July Case Shiller

From Bloomberg:

Home Prices in U.S. Cities Fell 4.1% in Year Ended July

Home prices in the U.S. declined less than forecast in July from a year earlier, a sign bank delays in processing foreclosures may have temporarily slowed the slump in real-estate values.

The S&P/Case-Shiller index of property values in 20 cities fell 4.1 percent from July 2010, after a revised 4.4 percent drop in the 12 months to June, the group said today in New York. The median forecast of 28 economists surveyed by Bloomberg News projected a 4.4 percent decline. Values were little changed in July from the prior month after adjusting for seasonal changes, the same as in June.

Estimates for the price change from July 2010 ranged from declines of 4 percent to 5.5 percent, according to the Bloomberg survey. The Case-Shiller measure is based on a three-month average, which means the July data were influenced by transactions in June and May. July’s year-to-year drop was the smallest since March.

Prices in the 20 cities rose 0.9 before adjusting for seasonal changes in July after climbing 1.2 percent in June.

“This is still a seasonal period of stronger demand for houses, so monthly price increases are expected,” David Blitzer, chairman of the S&P index committee, said in a statement. “We are still far from a sustained recovery.”

From the Record:

Home prices in region down 3.7 percent

Home prices in the New York metropolitan area, which includes North Jersey, dropped 3.7 percent in the year ended in July, the Standard & Poor’s/Case-Shiller index reported Tuesday. Nationally, prices slipped 4.1 percent in that period.

From June to July, however, prices ticked up, both nationally and in the region.

What it means: Home values nationally have returned to the levels of summer 2003, while in the area, prices have returned to the levels of April 2004. Values have dropped about 31 percent nationally and 22 percent regionally since their peaks in mid-2006.

In Bergen County, the median price of a single-family home was $460,000 in July, down 7.8 percent from a year earlier, while the number of sales rose 15 percent. In Passaic County, the median price dropped 7.2 percent to $280,275, while the number of sales rose 2.3 percent.

These numbers are from the New Jersey and Garden State multiple listing services and reflect the mix of homes sold during the month. Case-Shiller does not break down sales by county, but it is considered a more reliable barometer because it tracks the value of the same properties over time.

This entry was posted in Economics, National Real Estate, New Jersey Real Estate. Bookmark the permalink.

88 Responses to July Case Shiller

  1. Mike says:

    Good Morning New Jersey

  2. grim says:

    From HousingWire:

    Shadow inventory declines to five-month supply: CoreLogic

    The nation’s residential shadow inventory as of July declined slightly to 1.6 million units, representing a supply of five months, according to a report from CoreLogic.

    That’s down from 1.9 million units, a supply of six months, from a year ago, and follows a decline from April when shadow inventory stood at 1.7 million units.

    “The steady improvement in the shadow inventory is a positive development for the housing market,” said Mark Fleming, chief economist for CoreLogic. “However, continued price declines, high levels of negative equity and a sluggish labor market will keep the shadow supply elevated for an extended period of time.”

    CoreLogic said the decline is driven by a pace of new delinquencies that is slower than the pace of the disposition of distressed assets.

    The company estimates the current stock of properties in the shadow inventory, or pending supply, by calculating the number of distressed properties not listed on multiple listing services that are more than 90-days deliquent, in foreclosure and real estate owned by lenders.

    Of the 1.6 million properties currently in the shadow inventory, 770,000 units are seriously delinquent (2.2-months’ supply), 430,000 are in some stage of foreclosure (1.2-months’ supply) and 390,000 are already in REO (1.1-months’ supply).

  3. funnelcloud says:

    Top of the morning to ya Mike, early bird again!

  4. funnelcloud says:

    Hey Grim & the rest of New Jersey, I know this is a real estate blog but everything about housing sucks. We could really use some happy news, Any good fall festivals going on in North Jersey, Where can I get some great apple cider. Any recommendations as to the best farms to go apple picking in Morris, Sussex, Warren, Hunterdon Counties, Any recommended haunted houses to visit. I know there is a garlic festival in Lafayette village this weekend, any other recommendations????

  5. grim says:

    Applefest in Warwick NY on Sunday!

    Stop at Pennings Farm on the way up to pick your own (you’ll need to bring a sack full of cash to exchange for the apples).

  6. funnelcloud says:

    Warwick NY
    Do they still have that medieval fest going on up there ???

  7. Don’t forget to pick up some Doc’s Draft Cider while you’re in Warwick.

  8. grim says:

    NY Food and Wine festival starts tomorrow as well

  9. Mike says:

    Flemington has an awesome haunted hay ride. Almost pooped me pants when the wagon stopped and a guy came through a hatch in the floor with a roaring chain saw. Not good for real little ones though.

  10. Haunted House at Clinton Mill also features chainsaws, raw meat, blood, etc. Tickets are $35 or so, and lines are long.

  11. scribe says:

    I’m still trying to catch up with JJ to find out how 30-year zeros are …

    up even more than 28%.

    ???

    JJ, where are you?

  12. gary says:

    In Bergen County, the median price of a single-family home was $460,000 in July, down 7.8 percent from a year earlier.

    Let me know if you’re having any trouble with the big words.

  13. chicagofinance says:

    by definition fixed income hyperbole…..potentially mathematically correct, but in context pedestrian…

    scribe says:
    September 28, 2011 at 8:44 am
    I’m still trying to catch up with JJ to find out how 30-year zeros are …
    up even more than 28%. ??? JJ, where are you?

  14. chicagofinance says:

    scribe…you got my e-mail?

  15. gary says:

    Does anyone know if the inter-continental railroad from New York to London is non-stop?

  16. JJ says:

    Chifi since 30 year treasury strips are synthtic instuments I can’t find pricing.
    Can you. I want to show how a 30 year Principal Only bond stripped of interest payments have performed yeat to date vs. a traditonal only 30 year bond that is up like 28%

    chicagofinance says:
    September 28, 2011 at 9:06 am
    by definition fixed income hyperbole…..potentially mathematically correct, but in context pedestrian…

    scribe says:
    September 28, 2011 at 8:44 am
    I’m still trying to catch up with JJ to find out how 30-year zeros are …
    up even more than 28%. ??? JJ, where are you?

  17. yo'me says:

    OK! What is the difference between the headline and S&P/Case Shiller Home Price Index? One shows a GAIN and the other a DROP
    yo’me says:
    September 27, 2011 at 11:09 am
    Home Prices Continue to Show Seasonal Strength
    According to the S&P/Case-Shiller Home Price Indices
    New York, September 27, 2011 – Data through July 2011, released today by S&P Indices for its
    S&P/Case-Shiller 1 Home Price Indices, the leading measure of U.S. home prices, showed a fourth
    consecutive month of increases for the 10- and 20-City Composites, with both up 0.9% in July over June.
    Seventeen of the 20 MSAs and both Composites posted positive monthly increases; Las Vegas and
    Phoenix were down over the month and Denver was unchanged. On an annual basis, Detroit and
    Washington DC were the two MSA that posted positive rates of change, up 1.2% and 0.3%, respectively.
    The remaining 18 MSAs and the 10- and 20- City Composites were down in July 2011 versus the same
    month last year. After three consecutive double-digit annual declines, Minneapolis improved marginally to
    a decline of 9.1%, which is still the worst of the 20 cities.

    http://www.standardandpoors.com/servlet/BlobServer?blobheadername3=MDT-

  18. 3B says:

    #12 gary:In Bergen County, the median price of a single-family home was $460,000 in July, down 7.8 percent from a year earlier. However prices did not decline in the Bergen Co. hamlet of River Edge, where prices were up 26% from a year earlier.

  19. 30 year realtor says:

    One of the interesting things I have noticed while doing research for other projects is the number of homes once listed for sale by individual sellers which have been rented in the last 12 months. Eventually these sellers will awaken from the fantasy that they can sell when prices recover. This should account for a steady stream of inventory as time goes on. Another aspect of the uncounted shadow inventory.

    Another strange phenomenon is the number of estate owned homes which have become expired listings and have not re-listed after listing expiration.

  20. gary says:

    So, if I make a broad estimation and extrapolate using my keen IT/engineering mind, another 7% to 8% drop in median from 2011 to 2012 will result in a sales increase of roughly 40% from 2010 levels. It’s an exponential relation. In other words, prices are still too high and the Case-Shiller index is dead nuts.

  21. gary says:

    30 year [20],

    Great analysis, as always!!

  22. Juice Box says:

    er # 20 – 30 year – REO list/relist

    Here is one kooky REO I was following. I liked the location, but not the fact you cannot add a dock and the taxes are totally insane. Even with a major reno it really should just be knocked down instead. This one was a $1.5 million dollar loss for the banks. This fixer upper went for $475k and comes with a 27k tax bill.

    07/27/2011 Sold $475,000 -5.0% $116 Public Record Flag transaction
    Close
    07/02/2011 Listing removed $499,900 — $123 RE/MAX at Barnegat Bay
    06/18/2011 Price change $499,900 -9.1% $123 RE/MAX at Barnegat Bay
    05/14/2011 Price change $549,900 -6.0% $135 RE/MAX at Barnegat Bay
    04/26/2011 Price change $584,900 -5.6% $143 RE/MAX at Barnegat Bay
    03/06/2011 Price change $619,900 -11.4% $152 RE/MAX at Barnegat Bay
    01/31/2011 Price change $699,900 -2.8% $172 C21/ Chas Smith Agency
    01/08/2011 Price change $719,900 -4.0% $177 C21/ Chas Smith Agency
    12/11/2010 Price change $749,900 -5.1% $184 C21/ Chas Smith Agency
    11/12/2010 Price change $789,900 -3.7% $194 C21/ Chas Smith Agency
    10/16/2010 Price change $819,900 -16.3% $201 C21/ Chas Smith Agency
    05/15/2010 Listed for sale $979,900 72.9% $241 C21/ Chas Smith Agency

    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1-Jaywood-Manor-Dr-Brick-NJ-08724/39567221_zpid/

  23. 3B says:

    #20 I am seeing more of this in River Edge; it used to be extremely rare there to have rental houses.

  24. yo'me says:

    #17 I see it now.one is MOM the other YOY

  25. Mike says:

    No. 20 30 Year They have become lifetime landlords

  26. Juice Box says:

    Not that Porkulus II has any chance of passing but they are at it again with the create or save jobs lingo again.

    President Barack Obama’s $447 billion jobs plan would help avoid a return to recession by maintaining growth and pushing down the unemployment rate next year, according to economists surveyed by Bloomberg News.

    The legislation, submitted to Congress this month, would increase gross domestic product by 0.6 percent next year and add or keep 275,000 workers on payrolls, the median estimates in the survey of 34 economists showed. The program would also lower the jobless rate by 0.2 percentage point in 2012, economists said.

  27. Happy Renter says:

    [23] Well Juice, I see room for optimism there: that house in Brick sold for only $24,900 less than the asking price, a mere ~5% haircut. Heck, it was practically a bidding war.

    This listing is special!

  28. scribe says:

    Chi,

    Yes

    Was out most of yesterday, haven’t read it yet.

  29. Happy Renter says:

    [18] That’s right, while house values in the rest of the country may be sinking, prices are up 26% YOY in The Little Community That Could! (TM), because “unicorns eat your nightmares” . . .

    The Joy of Unicorns
    http://www.slate.com/id/2304732/

    (the above Slate article explains it all, even the “unicorn kebabs”)

  30. Mattax says:

    I frequently see people referring links to zillow/trulia however many realtors i talk to downplay them as riddled with errors.. In my experience they are fairly accurate with what’s on public records such as the tax history. I know zestimate can be far off given that it doesn’t take into account such things as flood zones, high-transmission electric lines.. as well as the home upgrades. What do you guys think?

  31. Groucho says:

    Nom should have fun with this one:

    As a way to solve the national debt crisis, North Carolina Democratic Gov. Beverly Perdue recommends suspending congressional elections for the next couple of years.

    “I think we ought to suspend, perhaps, elections for Congress for two years and just tell them we won’t hold it against them, whatever decisions they make, to just let them help this country recover,” Perdue said at a rotary club event in Cary, North Carolina, according to the Raleigh News & Observer. “I really hope that someone can agree with me on that.”

    https://bpb.opendns.com/a/nation.foxnews.com/north-carolina/2011/09/27/nc-governor-recommends-suspending-democracy-focus-jobs

  32. Groucho says:

    Another one for nom

    Too Much of a Good Thing
    Why we need less democracy.

    Peter Orszag
    September 14, 2011 | 9:46 pm

    In an 1814 letter to John Taylor, John Adams wrote that “there never was a democracy yet that did not commit suicide.” That may read today like an overstatement, but it is certainly true that our democracy finds itself facing a deep challenge: During my recent stint in the Obama administration as director of the Office of Management and Budget, it was clear to me that the country’s political polarization was growing worse—harming Washington’s ability to do the basic, necessary work of governing. If you need confirmation of this, look no further than the recent debt-limit debacle, which clearly showed that we are becoming two nations governed by a single Congress—and that paralyzing gridlock is the result.

    So what to do? To solve the serious problems facing our country, we need to minimize the harm from legislative inertia by relying more on automatic policies and depoliticized commissions for certain policy decisions. In other words, radical as it sounds, we need to counter the gridlock of our political institutions by making them a bit less democratic.

  33. yo says:

    #31 Mattax
    I tend to dis agree with Zillow.They base their Zestimate on property tax paid.I won a reevaluation on my property.The same house on this same block,same layout from the same builder and the same upgrades.My house that was contested and lowered in property tax, Zestimate is $35,000 less than the same house that was not contested.

  34. Westjester says:

    Re #27
    great! Only 1.6 mil per job.

  35. Anon E. Moose says:

    30-yr [20];

    Another strange phenomenon is the number of estate owned homes which have become expired listings and have not re-listed after listing expiration.

    Ran into this myself. Estate sale on the market 18 mos, lingering after dropping $100k off OLP – their idea of a counter offer was a $1,000 discount. I predict two generations of the family will die owning the same house (and not by design).

  36. Anon E. Moose says:

    Groucho [32];

    You sure that wasn’t Senator/Chancelor/Emperor Palpatine?

  37. gary says:

    Moose [36],

    Isn’t it cute how the plebians chase the market down? It’s like a dog chasing its tail.

  38. Anon E. Moose says:

    Gary [38];

    I can’t be too coc/<y, as it did show as under contract last I knew; but I'll believe it when I see the deed recorded, because to the best of my knowledge one of the owner's kids was homeless (after selling his own house in the same town at a loss). If it does sell to a third party I'll be very keen to strike up a conversation with the buyer about how much his realtor convinced him outbid the "other bidder " (i.e., me) by. I'll give you a hint – if the delusional kids accepted the offer, he outbid me by a country mile – we were told that there were no bids to be had in the 18 mos before I showed up.

  39. gary says:

    Moose [39],

    A meteor could be racing towards earth and f*cking miraculously, another “bid” just came in!

  40. JJ says:

    Another mystery is home path homes. I have one near my house right by a very busy street. But would make a good rental as right next to diner/wild by nature and great restaurant. When I called I was told there is a 3.5% rebate at closing if it is owner occupied and the person takes a mortgage. I then say how much for cash? Do I get a discount. Told Homepath not looking for cash buyers and no discount. Meanwhile house is sitting empty now for 10 months. Days of RTC no financing they just sold them quick. House is so cheap I could sell a few stocks and pay for it. Don’t even care much about inspection etc. Houses can’t sell quick cause of short sales and banks dragging it out.

  41. Confused in NJ says:

    New Forecast: Sun’s ‘Superstorms’ Could Doom Satellites
    By Charles Q. Choi, SPACE.com Contributor

    Magnetic storms set off by the sun could pose a bigger threat than thought to weather, communication, military and other satellites close to Earth, with a potentially devastating economic impact, scientists suggest.

    In the new study, researchers found that solar radiation can energize a belt of high-energy particles that surrounds Earth more dramatically than previously believed.

    The study focused on the possible effects of a particularly strong magnetic storm on the Van Allen radiation belts, the dangerous rings of high-energy particles that girdle the Earth. The belts are split into two distinct zones. The outer belt, which is made up of electrons, reaches from about 15,800 to 31,600 miles (25,500 to 51,000 kilometers) above the surface, while the inner belt, which consists of a mix of electrons and protons, reaches from about 4,000 to 8,000 miles (6,400 to 12,800 km) above.

    Scientists had known the outer belt could become far more intense during geomagnetic storms caused by high-energy particles spewed by the sun, such as the storm that supercharged Earth’s northern lights display Monday night (Sept. 26). However, they have long thought such storms do not affect the inner belt.

    Now computer simulations suggest that during a “superstorm” — which has occurred in the past and is likely to recur in the future ? the electrons in the inner belt, too, could become energized. Near-Earth radiation could then remain dramatically more intense for several years afterward.

    “The increase in radiation in the inner zone may last for up to a decade and continue damaging satellites for years after a very strong storm,” study lead author Yuri Shprits, a space physicist at the University of California, Los Angeles, told SPACE.com.

    This radiation would damage satellites in that zone and potentially cut their lifetimes by five-sixths or more. [Related: Space Radiation to Rise for Astronauts, Airline Passengers]

    “It would not destroy all satellites at once,” Shprits said. “However, at least according to our calculations, a very strong storm can increase the radiation dose in the inner zone by a factor of 10, and within a few years we may lose a significant portion of the satellites that traverse the inner zone.”

    In terms of new strategies that might be needed to protect satellite systems, “it’s hard to say,” Shprits said. “First of all, we need to estimate risks and estimate cost. If cost is too high, we may want to accept the risks and start getting ready to replenish the fleet in the case of such event.”

    “There are a number of rather expensive strategies that can be used to mitigate the risk, including redundancy in electronics and increased shielding,” he added. “Zero risk means infinite cost.”

    Two missions to study the radiation belts are planned for 2012, Shprits noted: NASA’s Radiation Belt Storm Probe will observe radiation belts in the equatorial plane, while Moscow State University’s LOMONOSOV mission, with UCLA-built instruments on board, will observe radiation belts at low altitudes.

    The scientists detailed their findings online in the Aug. 25 issue of the journal Space Weather.

  42. Juice Box says:

    re: # 42- One of my predictions here for 2011 was that we would perhaps see auroras in NJ. We came close yesterday, where they were seen in Upstate NY.

    The massive sunspot 1302 which you can see with the naked eye first came around the Sun’s edge last week and is now almost directly facing us. If it burps and lets out an X-class Solar flare in the next few days we could lose allot of satellites, and have power outages all over. It should be gone around the right edge of the Sun in another week.

    If you can see the Sunset tonight take a look for the spot in the middle.

  43. Anon E. Moose says:

    JJ [41];

    right next to diner/wild by nature and great restaurant.

    The comfort food place closed. I liked it, spouse didn’t. Is the Italian place any good? I haven’t been in there. I think the diner is OK, but overpriced. Like the Greek and the Chinese; didn’t like the sushi place. We should grab a smoke up the road some time – I’ll buy.

    How about the interior paint job on that house? Think they were running an illegal day care? That price is what ALL of the middle class, 60 year old capes in Nassau should be selling for if they were in livable condition, not just the repo’d fixers. And I think that they will be, soon enough.

  44. jamil says:

    15 gary “Does anyone know if the inter-continental railroad from New York to London is non-stop?”

    Given that it was “built by Lincoln”, I think it goes directly to London. Perhaps one stop in Colorado.

    This intercontitental railroad has been touted 5 times by the smartest president/greatest orator in history. But hey, maybe they didn’t teach the difference between inter and trans in Accidental college so can’t blame him.

  45. Confused in NJ says:

    “O” is confusing “Inter” with “Intra”. Imagine riding a subway from NY to London, through a tunnel, & not getting a seat. That would really make you a strap hanger.

  46. 250k says:

    So has anyone who purchased a home in the past 12 months already refinanced from a 4 handle to a 3 handle? Grim….?

  47. Shore Guy says:

    When I first opened this link and started reading, I thought it was Onion satire. As it turns out, it was real. All I can say is, oy!

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/26/us/san-francisco-nudity-restrictions-provoke-the-nakedly-ambitious.html

  48. grim says:

    Grim….?

    Need to finish all the reno work before I can do anything that involves an appraisal.

  49. Shore Guy says:

    Nom,

    Did you have any involvement with the FFB whilst you were at treasury?

    “Sitting at the center of the Solyndra scandal is an off-balance-sheet bank at the Treasury Department that dates back to 1973.

    This little-known government bank, the Federal Financing Bank [FFB], had a zero balance in 2008 for green energy projects, but now, with little Congressional oversight, it is giving out billions of dollars in loans to White House pet projects often at dirt-cheap interest rates below 1%.

    In July alone, the government bank, which had $61 billion in assets, lent nearly three quarters of a billion dollars in taxpayer funds with no Congressional checks and balances.

    Plus the bank is funding the insolvent U.S. Post Office; the White House’s expensive green car projects at Ford Motor, Nissan and Tesla Motors; a $485 million loan to an expensive solar project that’s lost $160 million over the last three years that’s backed by Google, BP and Chevron; plus the FFB is funding the teetering HOPE housing bailout program, which gives delinquent mortgage borrowers breaks on their loans.

    And according to KPMG’s audit report of the bank, the FFB is losing billions of dollars in taxpayer money because it is forgoing collecting interest costs on already inexpensive loans that are financing projects at agencies like the Agriculture Dept.

    What’s scary for taxpayers is this: The FFB can borrow unlimited amounts of taxpayer money from the Treasury for these kinds of political pet projects. Under the 1973 “FFB Act, the bank may, with the approval of the Secretary, borrow without limit from the Treasury,” says the bank’s audited statements from KPMG.

    snip

    http://www.foxbusiness.com/markets/2011/09/28/government-bank-financing-more-solyndras/#ixzz1ZHC3RPWO

  50. JJ says:

    The italian place on Thursday nights by road to school has Porches, Mercedes, Ferrais and Rolls lined up. Tons of gold digging 30 something women in short short skirts and high heels at bar. You would like. Funny part food is extremely good.

    Anon E. Moose says:
    September 28, 2011 at 1:59 pm
    JJ [41];

    right next to diner/wild by nature and great restaurant.

    The comfort food place closed. I liked it, spouse didn’t. Is the Italian place any good? I haven’t been in there. I think the diner is OK, but overpriced. Like the Greek and the Chinese; didn’t like the sushi place. We should grab a smoke up the road some time – I’ll buy.

  51. Shore Guy says:

    “features chainsaws, raw meat, blood, etc.”

    Sounds like the meeting from which I just emerged.

  52. jamil says:

    Uh..

    Government Gives $737 Million to Solar Firm Linked to the Pelosi Clan to create 45 jobs

    http://thehill.com/blogs/e2-wire/677-e2-wire/184331-energy-department-approves-737-million-loan-guarantee-for-solar-project

  53. gary says:

    jamil [46],

    I think the Annointed One is just tired from fixing the economy… ya know?

  54. jamil says:

    “Coca-Cola CEO Says China Now More “Business Friendly” than the United States.”

    I knew we fell behind Canada, but communist China?

  55. Juice Box says:

    O is really reaching here with the railroad as a reason for his jobs bill.

    The biggest scandal of the Gilded Age was the Union Pacific bankruptcy and the Credit Mobilier fraud. This scandal was the Enron of their time. PBS did a nice story on it a few years back. There is also the fact that many of the workers were chinese “coolies” and coolieism is a form of human slavery.

  56. gary says:

    “Coca-Cola CEO Says China Now More “Business Friendly” than the United States.”

    I think Oblama should appoint a chairperson to research the correct measures required to form a committee that can appropriate funds to lobby congress to secure a grant that can formulate a hypothesis eventually leading to a solution that will enable the U.S. to be as business friendly as China.

  57. Kitty Litter says:

    56. Hard to compete with slave labor and totalitarian regimes you dunce.

  58. Kitty Litter says:

    But good to know the soft drink industry can expand somewhere else.

  59. gary says:

    Hard to compete with slave labor and totalitarian regimes.

    Oblammy’s vision for the USSA?

  60. Juice Box says:

    re # 59 – “you dunce” flattery for Jamil? You might give him an inflated ego and he might run for congress or something.

  61. Libtard in Union says:

    Jamil’s agenda…

    2000-2007: Deny all Bush culpability on as many multimedia platforms as possible

    2008-2011: Assign all culpability to any non-Republican on as many multimedia platforms as possible

    2012-2015: Waiting for the border collie to determine what he needs to do next

  62. hughesrep says:

    63

    You forgot campaign for Rick Perry.

    http://tinyurl.com/62j5t55

  63. jamil says:

    63, letarded.

    Yeah, those awful Bush years. We had 4.5% unemployment during GOP rule (2002-2006) and Pelosi/Reid/Obama promised to change that. 2007, Pelosi Congress started to pass all those great things about jobs.

    Well, they did change that, I’ll admit that.

    You must be so proud how things are going.

  64. jamil says:

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/federal-eye/post/census-workers-caught-sleeping-on-the-job/2011/09/28/gIQAmELm4K_blog.html

    “Workers are sleeping on the job at the U.S. Census Bureau and the agency is asking employees to stop napping in public areas of its Maryland headquarters. A memo sent Tuesday said officials are fielding an increased number of complaints about colleagues “sleeping in public areas.” “

  65. Confused in NJ says:

    Seton Hall University is planning to reduce its annual tuition by $21,000 for some incoming freshmen next fall. Incoming freshmen with high SAT scores and are in the top 10 percent of their graduating high school class would be eligible for the reduction. The university will match Rutgers University’s undergraduate tuition — which is currently $10,104 for in-state students — if freshmen score at least 1,200 on their SAT tests, have a composite ACT score of 27 or above and graduate in the top 10 percent of their high school class. Other students will continue to pay Seton Hall’s regular tuition rate, which is currently $31,440 annually before room, board and other costs are added.

  66. JJ says:

    Guess the fee for taking the SAT are going to rise.

    Confused in NJ says:
    September 28, 2011 at 5:17 pm
    Seton Hall University is planning to reduce its annual tuition by $21,000 for some incoming freshmen next fall. Incoming freshmen with high SAT scores and are in the top 10 percent of their graduating high school class would be eligible for the reduction. The university will match Rutgers University’s undergraduate tuition — which is currently $10,104 for in-state students — if freshmen score at least 1,200 on their SAT tests, have a composite ACT score of 27 or above and graduate in the top 10 percent of their high school class. Other students will continue to pay Seton Hall’s regular tuition rate, which is currently $31,440 annually before room, board and other costs are added.

  67. jamil says:

    67, better to switch to some online high school or some accidental HS on senior year in order to get into the top 10% and eligibility to the reduction.

  68. Kitty Litter says:

    Jamil is my hero. He defines the adage Ignorance Is Bliss.

  69. Confused in NJ says:

    68.JJ says:
    September 28, 2011 at 5:23 pm
    Guess the fee for taking the SAT are going to rise.

    Confused in NJ says:
    September 28, 2011 at 5:17 pm
    Seton Hall University is planning to reduce its annual tuition by $21,000 for some incoming freshmen next fall. Incoming freshmen with high SAT scores and are in the top 10 percent of their graduating high school class would be eligible for the reduction. The university will match Rutgers University’s undergraduate tuition — which is currently $10,104 for in-state students — if freshmen score at least 1,200 on their SAT tests, have a composite ACT score of 27 or above and graduate in the top 10 percent of their high school class. Other students will continue to pay Seton Hall’s regular tuition rate, which is currently $31,440 annually before room, board and other costs are added.

    Just glad my boy graduated S.H. in 1989. Wouldn’t want to pay $31K+.

  70. chicagofinance says:

    Source?

    Confused in NJ says:
    September 28, 2011 at 5:17 pm
    Seton Hall University is planning to reduce its annual tuition by $21,000 for some incoming freshmen next fall. Incoming freshmen with high SAT scores and are in the top 10 percent of their graduating high school class would be eligible for the reduction. The university will match Rutgers University’s undergraduate tuition — which is currently $10,104 for in-state students — if freshmen score at least 1,200 on their SAT tests, have a composite ACT score of 27 or above and graduate in the top 10 percent of their high school class. Other students will continue to pay Seton Hall’s regular tuition rate, which is currently $31,440 annually before room, board and other costs are added

  71. Happy Renter says:

    [72] Link wasn’t working, but found the story here:

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/the-hot-button/hallmark-introduces-job-loss-sympathy-cards/article2182592/

    Now I’m just waiting for Hallmark to take up my idea for the “Embrace the Oblivion” line of cards.

  72. Groucho (33)-

    IMO, we need a lot less Peter Orszag than a little less freedom.

    Let him come after my freedom (what shred of an illusion of it still remains). I wouldn’t hesitate to put a bean right between his eyes.

  73. Happy (75)-

    Say it best with Everclear and dead flowers (apologies to Mick & Keith).

  74. Confused in NJ says:

    74.chicagofinance says:
    September 28, 2011 at 6:35 pm

    Source?
    Seton Hall will lower tuition rate by $21K to match Rutgers for some incoming freshmen
    By Kelly Heyboer/ The Star-Ledger The Star-Ledger
    September 28, 2011, 6:09PM

  75. jamil says:

    bloomberg:

    “It wasn’t just any factory. When it was completed at an estimated cost of $733 million, including proceeds from a $535 million U.S. loan guarantee, it covered 300,000 square feet, the equivalent of five football fields. It had robots that whistled Disney tunes, spa-like showers with liquid-crystal displays of the water temperature, and glass-walled conference rooms.

    “The new building is like the Taj Mahal,” John Pierce, 54, a San Jose resident who worked as a facilities manager at Solyndra, said in an interview.”

  76. NJGator says:

    250K (48): “So has anyone who purchased a home in the past 12 months already refinanced from a 4 handle to a 3 handle? Grim….?”

    We close on our refinance tomorrow. Going from a 4.75 30-year purchase mortgage which we closed on in January, to a 3.875 20-year no-cost refi and some extra cash back to boot. We close tomorrow at 9am. Thank you Obama!

  77. Libtard at home says:

    That was me. Gator stole the laptop again.

  78. 250k says:

    Libtard, NO cost? What bank…..they paid appraisal fees, title, etc?

  79. Libtard at home says:

    Yes they did. Mortgage Masters. Carl Nielson.

    http://www.mortgagemasterinc.com/LoanOfficers-detail.cfm?ID=864&alpha=

    Any good broker should be willing to do it if you have excellent credit, a lot of assets and a history with them. They just don’t want to be stiffed if you deceive them about your financial situation. This is our 4th mortgage with them in the past 7 years. They know that Gator and I are an easy sell to the bank who will acquire the mortgage. Like I said about a month ago, for the first time since the financial crisis started in late 2007, I have finally been rewarded for my ethical behavior. Sure it’s nothing compared to what the government does for you if you buy a home you can’t afford, but it’s nice to finally get something in return for playing by the rules. If the government stopped moving the goal posts every damn week, the economy might even be able to come back. Nah, that would make too much sense. Keep bailing out the idiots who fukc up, frequently with intent. That is the obvious solution.

  80. Libtard at home says:

    They paid for every single cost. Even the lawyer too. They are still making plenty of money. Trust me.

  81. Comrade Nom Deplume says:

    [51] shore,

    I was never at Treasury. I just know people there.

  82. Comrade Nom Deplume says:

    [32] Groucho

    Actually, Meat may have much more to say on that topic.

    [33] Groucho,

    Orzag channeling Tytler? Nice idea, but you wouldn’t even get agreement on that.

  83. debtobey says:

    O2ceqb xzqtjkbo cmqltppa bvsruqlg

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