Who to blame? Christie or the Survey?

From the Daily Record:

Why is the NJ unemployment rate rising while the state gains jobs?

Another increase in New Jersey’s unemployment rate — this time to 9.9 percent — prompted the Christie administration Thursday to wonder aloud if there was something wrong with the survey itself.

Charles Steindel, chief economist for the state Department of Treasury, said the jobless rate told a story that was 180-degrees different from another survey that showed the state added 5,300 jobs in August.

If the unemployment rate is accurate, “this would mean we were losing 600 jobs a day in August, including weekends,” Steindel said in a conference call with reporters. “It didn’t happen.”

Steindel’s comments came after the monthly jobs report showed New Jersey posted both an increase in jobs and an increase in the unemployment rate.

Casting blame on the survey takers is risky, analysts said. What happens next month, for example, if the same survey shows that the unemployment rate declined?

“It is curious that such concerns are raised only when someone objects to the data,” said Patrick J. O’Keefe, director of economic research for J.H. Cohn, a Roseland-based accounting firm.

From NJ Spotlight:

Unemployment Rate Rises for Fifth Straight Month

With New Jersey’s unemployment rate rising to a new 35-year high of 9.9 percent, the Christie administration yesterday took aim at the methodology used to determine the rate, saying there is clearly something awry with the nationwide household survey used to come up with the numbers.

New Jersey Still a Long Way from Recovery, Report Shows
Charles Steindel, the Treasury Department’s chief economist, said the increase in New Jersey’s jobless rate from 9.0 percent to 9.9 percent over the past five months is contradicted by employer surveys showing a gain of 50,000 jobs over the past year. Administration officials noted that New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Connecticut labor officials also have questioned the validity of the unemployment rate calculations.

Gov. Chris Christie and administration officials insisted that the state is enjoying healthy job growth, despite yesterday’s announcement that the jobless rate rose from 9.8 percent in July to 9.9 percent in August, while the national unemployment rate dropped from 8.2 percent to 8.1 percent

The Republican governor said that his administration has added 86,200 jobs since he took office in January 2010, making up one -hird of the jobs lost under his predecessor, Democratic Gov. Jon Corzine, during the 19-month recession that ended in June 2009.

“Keep the big picture in mind,” Christie spokesman Kevin Roberts urged. “New Jersey added 5,300 total jobs in August, giving New Jersey positive job growth in 10 of the last 12 months. “

Steindel said it’s “nuts” to believe that unemployment has been going up in New Jersey. “We’re not seeing unemployment claims shoot up like we did at the beginning of the recession,” he said in a conference call with reporters.

This entry was posted in Economics, New Jersey Real Estate. Bookmark the permalink.

166 Responses to Who to blame? Christie or the Survey?

  1. grim says:

    Sorry to ruin your weekend, from the Star Ledger:

    N.J.’s middle class shrinking under growing income gap, Census data shows

    New Jersey’s middle class has eroded in the last four years, further polarizing a state where the rich and the poor have long been miles apart on levels of income, if not on the map, new Census data shows.

    A Star-Ledger analysis of four years of data from the American Community Survey shows the percentage of households with an annual income between $35,000 and $150,000 has dipped by nearly 3 percent since 2008, while the percentage of those richer and poorer has increased.

    That accounts for about 79,000 people in the state leaving the middle class, according to New Jersey Policy Perspective, a left-leaning think tank.

    “I’m very concerned that last year was probably one of the worst years in half-a-century for the state,” said Ramon Castro, a senior policy analyst at NJPP. “It may well be that we’ve reached our peak but … my concern is that New Jersey is more vulnerable than other states.”

    New Jersey’s middle class is shrinking faster than that of the United States as a whole, and with more than 3.1 million housing units in the state, the nearly 3 percent dip accounts for tens of thousands of households leaving the $35,000 to $149,999 income bracket. Because additional housing was added to the market each year, it is difficult to put an exact number on figures.

    The data also reveals that while the free-fall of several economic and housing indicators appears to have ebbed somewhat, the recovery from the worst recession since World War II has been slow to materialize in New Jersey while the United States as a whole is showing signs of shaking off the rust.

  2. grim says:

    I pretty much always look for a Hughes quote on the employment data release, surprise this wasn’t picked up more broadly, from NJ Today:

    Bloustein School Dean Relieved by 9.9% Unemployment Rate

    The economic recovery is underway, but unemployment in New Jersey remains higher than the national average. Dean of the Edward Bloustein School at Rutgers University James Hughes told NJ Today Managing Editor Mike Schneider that the state is moving in the right direction and that he was relieved by the latest jobs numbers released.

    The picture was better today with the jobs numbers, which Hughes sees as positive. “Last month looked like it was a disaster. We had a huge loss in private sector jobs but it only lasted a month,” he said. “They were all revised.” Revisions to released numbers are important, according to Hughes, because the data has been erratic in the past several years.

    The trend is promising, Hughes said. He explained that 117,000 jobs were lost in 2009. In 2010, there was stability and modest growth of 10,000 jobs. In 2011, jobs grew by 33,000. Based on the first eight months of this year, Hughes said it’s likely there will be 45,000 to 50,000 additional jobs added in 2012. “So we’re moving in the right direction but we still have a deep hole to climb out of,” he said.

    The rise in the unemployment rate can’t be blamed on more people looking for work this time, according to Hughes. “When you look at the components it basically was a labor force that didn’t grow, unemployment went up, employment went down,” he said.

    Hughes pointed out that there is sometimes a disconnect between the unemployment rate and the number of created jobs. “That’s not just New Jersey,” he said. “Everybody knows New York City has been doing extraordinarily well in terms of payroll employment but their unemployment rate has jumped into the double digits and they can’t explain it.”

  3. Mike says:

    Good Morning New Jersey

  4. Mike says:

    It’s ashame we have to wait until the weekend to hear what Gary has to say.

  5. Brian says:

    I don’t know how widespread fraud in NJ is but I did know somebody who left their job, to move to Florida and retired. The great state of NJ sent their unemployment checks down to them in Florida. Would this be a “unemployment claim” in the state of NJ?

  6. All Hype says:

    “The rise in the unemployment rate can’t be blamed on more people looking for work this time, according to Hughes. “When you look at the components it basically was a labor force that didn’t grow, unemployment went up, employment went down”

    But we are in a recovery cause all the good paying jobs that were lost were offset by newly hired baristas and burger flippers.

  7. JJ's B.S says:

    Grim the middle class are moving to poor or rich based on decisions they made themselves.

    For instance editorial in WSJ today talked about a man who was middle aged in 2006 who had a very healthy balance sheet, tons of home equity and tons of appreciated stock. He was just a middle class guy who saved a lot. Planned to retire in a few years.

    Now he is moaning he could not stomach stock market losses and sold near low put 100% in short term treasuries, short term CDs, savings and money markets and last three years has been earning near zero on money due to fed policies, missed whole comback in stocks, lost value in RE and even though he has equity cant sell as he cant find qualified buyers.

    Who did this to him but himself. Heck all he had to do was nothing and he would be better off as stocks are 100% back and the dividends and cap gains reinvested from 2009 to 2012 would all be way up. He could have sold house at peak of Spring 2004 to Spring 2008 and captured that gain. Bottom line he had a boatload of money in Spring 2007 in risky assets that had greatly appreciated. He could have sold it all, bought 30 year treasuries, 30 year munis, 30 year investment grade, 30 year Fannie MBS, etc. And retired to Florida to a rental then bought a home a few years later dirt cheap and lived like a king next 30 years. A trader I knew once told me the easiest decision one can make is to buy something, stock, bond, house whatever, hardest decision is when to sell. Guy did not know when to sell. However, lots of people me included when we were taking body blows in stocks and bonds from summer 2008 to Summer 2012, held our nose and kept buying and guess what the folks who were middle class who did that are no longer middle class. They are now rich. Folks who paniced are not poor.

  8. Brian says:

    7.JJ’s B.S says:
    September 21, 2012 at 8:56 am
    Grim the middle class are moving to poor or rich based on decisions they made themselves.

    I haven’t gone anywhere. I’m still squarely in the middle. Some dumb decisions some smart ones. One thing’s for sure I won’t be doing any of the dumb stuff twice.

  9. JJ's B.S says:

    Tons of jobs however, the guy who worked assembly line at GM cant built Aps for Iphones or Samsung phones. Cant be a Java Programmer. Cant fill so called STEM jobs, cant be the RN at local hospital. Heck he cant even do the day laborer jobs of cutting grass all day or putting on new roofs cause at 55 with a bad back he is too old. Also they dont have the look. Trader Joes near me hired 5 people recently, 300 applied. Friends Daughter was hired, btw GREAT JOB, was told she has the Trader Joe look, Irish, blonde hair blue eyed 20 year old college student bubbly natural beauty with no make up helpful energetic. Guess what the grouchy old 50 year old guy with the poochy belly and bifocals aint who I want to see serving me free samples. Sad but true. Look I am an old fart, bottom line there are lots of good jobs I can no longer get. For instance Long Beach Long Island hires a lot of bartenders in summer. Pays a lot like $500 cash off the books a night. Hire a lot of teachers in their 20s who are single and good looking. But hey a laid off 52 year old indian IT guy no one wants him serving your drinks at the beach. Even a 52 year old female indian women does not want it. Plus as economy weakens harder to get job. I go to Pool Supply warehouse about twice a year, back in Spring 2005- 2008 you had crusty old guys, handicapped people, stoners working there. Now young pretty college students, assitant manager is a grad school accounting student. Guess what I not only closed pool I bought some stuff to open pool. They had a sale, a good looking girl explained I could buy the opening chemicals today 50% off so I bought more enjoyed it and left happy. In a few years economy will be strong the girl who helped me will be a broker at morgan stanley and the stoners will be back selling me chemicals

    All Hype says:
    September 21, 2012 at 8:51 am

    “The rise in the unemployment rate can’t be blamed on more people looking for work this time, according to Hughes. “When you look at the components it basically was a labor force that didn’t grow, unemployment went up, employment went down”

    But we are in a recovery cause all the good paying jobs that were lost were offset by newly hired baristas and burger flippers.

  10. All Hype says:

    JJ (9):
    You are a unique guy. Your post make no sense what so ever but you seem to love to write.

  11. Richard says:

    Its a problem the middle classes people have to be skilled part time traders. Ideally you’d find a reputable financial institution to take care of that for you, but that isn’t working either.

  12. Grim says:

    I think the point that JJ is trying to make is that you can’t cure long term structural unemployment through the expansion of new industries or businesses due to the fact that jobs are generally non fungible. In order to cure, you need to speed up the typical cyclical acceleration in the specific sectors that lost large volumes of jobs to rehire employees skilled for those positions.

  13. prtraders says:

    Once you get past the spelling and grammar, I find JJ’s comments sage. He takes the overlooked and adds color and importance. I was laughing the other day about the interview kid who showed up soaked from rain because JJ claimed he refused to buy an umbrella. I would have been feeling bad for the kid while JJ was crossing him off his list. But when you think about it, he is right! We have an employee here that I wanted to nix after the interview because she wore sandals. Boss liked her recommendations and her reason for the sandals was that she was coming straight from a funeral! Duh. Its not working out. Anyway thanks for years of ancedotes and insight JJ. Keep them coming. Not that you need any encouragement.

  14. JJ's B.S says:

    I think Dean Werner summed it up when he said fat, drunk and stupid is no way to go through life.

    prtrader, I will take you the wet kid for the girl with no shoes.

    Grim says:
    September 21, 2012 at 9:25 am

    I think the point that JJ is trying to make is that you can’t cure long term structural unemployment through the expansion of new industries or businesses due to the fact that jobs are generally non fungible. In order to cure, you need to speed up the typical cyclical acceleration in the specific sectors that lost large volumes of jobs to rehire employees skilled for those positions.

  15. Essex says:

    Jj is a sage. I wanna read his memoirs.

  16. Mike says:

    14 Meanwhile his wife was getting boinked

  17. grim says:

    14 – I thought the quote was, “I spent half my money on gambling, alcohol and wild women. The other half I wasted!”

  18. grim says:

    From HousingWire:

    Deutsche Bank claims housing correction complete

    Recent indicators showed housing has largely corrected back to pre-bubble levels and affordability, according to a note from Deutsche Bank analysts.

    Nationally, home prices dropped roughly 40% from the overheated peak in 2006 to a low in 2009. But the analyst said in a note Thursday that prices are still 30% higher than the millennium average. Incomes, while similarly dented by the financial crisis actually recovered more quickly than prices.

    With the affordability of mortgages heading in the other direction to a level not seen since 2000 – led by rates still falling to historic lows – prices look manageable once put into this perspective.

    “The correction phase can be regarded as largely completed, and the outlook is improving,” Deutsche analysts said.

  19. nwnj says:

    Hey sage #9, the term is structural unemployment.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Structural_unemployment

  20. Essex says:

    What is also interesting is how attitude is key in landing a job. Who wants to work with toxic losers??

  21. Fast Eddie says:

    Mike [4],

    I can’t tell you how busy I am and can’t post as often as I want. It’s the private sector – many hats to wear, many hours at the office and more at home for a 70% of 2005 wages. I sold my soul for the privilege of a job with benefits. If they say “strap on knee pads” I would have no choice. This is the new norm for full time employment and one better have some skills to bring.

  22. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    [5] Brian – There are few things in this life as trouble-free as an interstate unemployment claim.

    1. File the claim in the state where you lost your job.
    2. “Move” to a new state to “Look for work”. This is the lynch pin. You must say you are moving to search for work because you can’t find any jobs locally. This allows you to write off your moving expenses.
    3. In your new state, show up at their unemployment office and file an interstate claim telling them you moved their to look for work.

    Once your interstate claim is set up you will have no more troubles for the remainder of your claim and all extensions. You will also never get called into an unemployment office for any kind of future interview or training or counseling. Back in the old days (70’s, 80’s) you had to show up every two weeks on a particular day at a particular time based on the last 4 digits of your SS number to claim your check AND show your work search at the counter after waiting in line a long, long, time. If you moved across state lines your checks just showed up in the mail like clockwork. The only thing you had to do was mail in your claim for the next period at the right time, not early, not late. Interstate claims are the preferred way to collect unemployment.

    I don’t know how widespread fraud in NJ is but I did know somebody who left their job, to move to Florida and retired. The great state of NJ sent their unemployment checks down to them in Florida. Would this be a “unemployment claim” in the state of NJ?

  23. JJ's B.S says:

    DB should be more concerned with the housing bubble in Berlin

  24. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    If you live in NY and work in NJ or vice-versa you used to be able to choose whether to file a NY or NJ claim. An interstate claim was always the least hassle once it was set up. I collected NJ unemployment in NJ at least 3 times and also collected NJ unemployment while living in NY and NH. Both NY and NH unemployment offices were much nicer than any in NJ and they were actually helpful and efficient. Why wouldn’t they be? They’re helping you siphon NJ dollars into their state to be spent locally.

  25. Essex says:

    21. Hilarious.

  26. Anon E. Moose says:

    So since all us bubble sitters are happy homeowners now (or well into the throes of buying…)

    Anybody know a good window guy in Morris County? Any thoughts on whether it is worth the money saved to go with anything other than Anderson/Pella?

  27. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    Speaking of siphoning foreign dollars into your local economy, in Holmdel NJ they used to have this hyper-local free town newspaper. I think you just picked it up right outside the supermarket. In it would be printed the roads and hours in Holmdel where speed traps would be set up by the police. They wanted to pull new $$ into the town, not just transfer it from taxpayer to government.

  28. Fast Eddie says:

    Went to see a house last night – colonial split, sort of a tri-level – great location, nice layout of home but it needed A LOT of work and it was septic and no central air. Asking price? $639,000. I feel like I’m f*cking doomed here. No job growth, stagnant wages for a decade yet this home will find a buyer probably for not much less than asking despite the fact that so many people are stuck in their homes because they’re underwater. There’s no stat to measure it; thus, I need to compete with the solitary greater fool who keeps hope alive for ugly Mary and fat Joe the seller.

  29. Ann says:

    Fast Eddie was that in Hillsdale, get out of Hillsdale. Did you see 1 West in Mahwah? Might be above your price range, but you could probably get them down. 1 acre lot, flat lot, new swimming pool, low taxes. Inside is totally livable, might need a few cosmetic upgrades. There are good deals out there, I wish I was house hunting now.

  30. grim says:

    Moose – I’d get someone out to look at the siding/flashing before just replacing the window. If I recall, the windows were somewhat recent. Generally, the window itself doesn’t leak, but the flashing or the j-channel around it. Could sometimes be as simple as needing drip cap, especially if it’s a situation where water sheets down the face of the siding (driving rain in just the right (err, wrong) direction).

  31. grim says:

    I’ve seen some silly shit before, like the contractor wanting to use up the last few scraps of J-Channel, and they split the J-Channel right over the center of the window. Perfect situation to collect all the water coming down the face of the siding right above the window and channeling it right into the flashing of the window. Nothing could withstand this kind of rain.

    I see the same kind of crap with the window replacement guys these days, you can always tell how good they are by how they wrap the old trim in aluminum. In the past, the old guys would bend that aluminum like origami, making sure that each bend and cut was done in such a way that no water would channel in. Today, they just bend and cut in the most efficient locations, and slap some caulk on. Inevitably, these are all going to leak.

  32. Fast Eddie says:

    Ann [29],

    It was in Wyckoff but we did see one in Mahwah last weekend that was nice, great taxes but the upstairs bath had a shower that had a slanted ceiling due to the roof line and the first level ceiling heights were like 7.5 feet. We felt like hobbits but I liked the house. Mahwah’s taxes are great but only the Fardale section will do for commuting/school purposes. I still have Hillsdale/Pascack on the radar as well.

  33. Essex says:

    28. Yes, But it’s the priiiivate sector !!!

  34. Ex Poster says:

    Increasing unemployment married to increased hiring? Easy – H1-B visas. Who said they were hiring Americans?

  35. Essex says:

    I put Pella Architectural series in the entire house. The installers are the key here.

  36. grim says:

    Just going through the activity in BC over the past week, I’m surprised to see strong activity continuing well into September.

    145 SFH went ARIP in the last week, 51 condos/townhouses/coops.

  37. grim says:

    35 – Nice windows, I went with Anderson Architectural. True divided lights with internal and external muntins. Can’t go wrong there, and agree, shitty install, leaky windows, or worse (torqued windows that won’t close properly).

  38. Fast Eddie says:

    grim [36],

    Decreasing inventory plus antsy buyers pulling the trigger. When the buffet table starts looking bare, hungry people start grabbing at anything. I’m not sure how to define the market at this point.

  39. JJ's B.S says:

    Does central air raises your taxes in NJ? Oddly in LI it does along with inground pools and wood decks. I often see 750K homes for sale with through the wall air conditioning, above ground pools and slate/concrete decks none of which raises taxes.

    My favorite is steel or wood sheds or any type shed on a concrete foundation is taxable. I have a rubbermaid shed that is 10 by 10 on non attached treated wooded. Which of course violates another code that a shed be anchored, but if I anchored it and it becomes a perm structure I get taxes.

    First time buyers often look at stuff and dont get it, they ask for central air but dont realize it sucks electricity and raises taxes. The sloped roof in shower thing, I have in master bath works cause my sky light is slanted so condensation and leaks are not an issue. Showers, get taxes less than baths for instance. Bay windows dont count as extensions etc. I even saw some houses with water heater and furnance up in unfinished attic. Why owner was finishing basement wanted more room and if he added square foot to house taxes would go up so just added space my moving furnance All type of stuff. Favorite is garage doors on houses with no garage as it is now a den, but if they take off fake door taxes go up. People hate these weird things people do if they are first time buyers but they dont understand why us old folks did it this way. My above ground pool, concrete deck, plastic shed and through the wall airconditioning saves me like 3k a year in taxes.

  40. gary says:

    “let’s be blunt…the biggest threat to the world’s biggest economy are the cranks and crazies that have taken over part of the republican party.”

    – Aussie Federal Treasurer Wayne Swan laying down the troof

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2012-09-21/swan-attacks-republican-cranks-and-crazies/4273300

  41. 3B Buying says:

    #29 Ann: What is wrong with Hillsdale, (away from the flooding concerns, and school funding battle)?

  42. Fast Eddie says:

    Gee, we all can’t figure out who’s using my name now, can we. f*cking duh.

  43. Anon E. Moose says:

    JJ [39];

    Does central air raises your taxes in NJ? Oddly in LI it does along with inground pools and wood decks.

    That’s funny because modern tech is through-the-wall, not central. Compressor noise is still outside, and you run the rooms you need — more efficient. Considering you lose closet and attic space for the ducts and registers, both in short supply in a typical LI post-war Levittown cape, why would anyone spend 5 figs. to put central in one of those houses? I hadn’t even considered a possible tax bump.

  44. Brian says:

    Strangely, replacing all of your windows increases your taxes in my town. They have a little flyer on their website that says so. I always wondered why the previous owner only did like half the windows. I know he could affor all of them. Now I know.

    Property tax laws are so stupid. They discourage investment/maintenance in your home.

    39.JJ’s B.S says:
    September 21, 2012 at 11:34 am
    Does central air raises your taxes in NJ? Oddly in LI it does along with inground pools and wood decks. I often see 750K homes for sale with through the wall air conditioning, above ground pools and slate/concrete decks none of which raises taxes.

  45. Anon E. Moose says:

    Grim [30];

    Thanks for that tip. I’ll have the siding & flashing looked at first.

    All the windows seemed in pretty good shape, but some (even many) were original – including the window that seemed to be the entry point for this water. Those that were replaced were Anderson, though.

  46. JJ's B.S says:

    Ok actual real estate question. Short sale I am in first stages of contract on, my lawyer is talking to her lawyer and we agreed on price is as follows.

    Owner bought Spring 2003, middle aged married couple. Title from my search just in husbands name. Couple listed home for sale in Spring 2009 for 245k more than they paid or it, by Spring 2012 down to 150k more than they paid. By summer 2012 down to 45k more than they paid and it was listed as a Short Sale not yet approved by bank. House was delisted for two weeks in summer as husband died. House went back on as a short sale late summer, I offered 40K below their Spring 2003 purchase price and they accepted 25k below spring price. Mind you house is 9 years old and no work at all done to house and repairs added up. But in a great neighborhood.

    Do you think husband dying and being only one on title is going to fast track it. I mean they must of had cashed out big time on house as women needed like 175K over purchase price to break even. They have not paid mortgage in two years.

    Technically bank could foreclose on them any moment. Only person on mortgage and title is dead. Women is living for free. Youngest kid graduates HS this year so they are in luck as can push last kid though school district. I will be lucky to close by spring.

    Do you think husband being dead will hurt or help this short sale. Odd that in the middle of a short sale only one on mortgage and title dies on a house where a wife and two kids still live there.

  47. Brian says:

    Common. My town also. If the shed is bigger than 100sqft, you are taxed higher. Look online and you see tons of plans for sheds that are 100sqft or less but like crazy tall.

    My favorite is steel or wood sheds or any type shed on a concrete foundation is taxable. I have a rubbermaid shed that is 10 by 10 on non attached treated wooded. Which of course violates another code that a shed be anchored, but if I anchored it and it becomes a perm structure I get taxes.

  48. AG says:

    Get your horse drawn carriages and apple carts ready. We are going into the abyss.

  49. grim says:

    Technically bank could foreclose on them any moment. Only person on mortgage and title is dead. Women is living for free.

    Irrelevant, in all likelihood the wife has survivorship rights.

  50. Brian says:

    Does central air raises your taxes in NJ?

    Yes. It does. Clearly says so on my town’s website. I wonder if those “through the wall” systems like the mitsubishi ones count ( I think that’s what moose was talking about). If not, that would be the way to go.

  51. JJ's B.S says:

    That I understand. But why is wife continuing with short sale. If house is not in name why does she care if house goes to foreclosure. What is in it for her?

    grim says:
    September 21, 2012 at 12:05 pm

    Technically bank could foreclose on them any moment. Only person on mortgage and title is dead. Women is living for free.

    Irrelevant, in all likelihood the wife has survivorship rights.

  52. Painhrtz - Vote Obamney! says:

    47 Brian my shed resembles that remark have a 3′ peak over 8′ walls. could have probably put dormers in the thing. What I lack in floor storage I make up for in vertical. When we told the building permit folks it would be 8 x 12 they said that was too large. Pointed out I was giving up 4 square feet for ease of construction. this made no sense to the mouth breather behind the desk. Had to show her how to calculate area.

  53. Brian says:

    I wonder if a couple of these strategically placed, increases your taxes. It’s not central A/C, right?

    http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053&R=203013144&catEntryId=203013144

  54. grim says:

    File a permit for a mini-split? Pshaw.

  55. daddyo says:

    Chifi from yesterday –

    It’s actually illegal to ship alcohol to a NJ resident. Occasionally, you can find someone who will ship a “collector’s bottle – contents unknown”, but they are hard to find. Do you have a friend in NY you can ship it to?

    A shipment of 120min IPA landed in NJ about 6 weeks ago, you may be able to find some by calling around to the usual haunts. I actually just looked through all the big online craft beer shops and not a single one had 120min. Dogfish hasn’t been brewing it often lately, so it’s been almost impossible to find.

  56. daddyo says:

    Oh, there is a listing on ebay, $36 for one bottle.

  57. LL Cool J says:

    Unemployment Rate Rises for Fifth Straight Month

    “don’t call it a comeback…”

  58. Libtard in Union says:

    “Nationally, home prices dropped roughly 40% from the overheated peak in 2006 to a low in 2009.”

    Libtard wins!

  59. JJ's B.S says:

    LL Cool J is always working brother,

    LL Cool J says:
    September 21, 2012 at 12:35 pm

    Unemployment Rate Rises for Fifth Straight Month

    “don’t call it a comeback…”

  60. JJ's B.S says:

    Going to buy that if I get rental. Popular as not central air. Plus you dont waste attic space and closet space with stupid duct work. Central Air is for suckas

    Brian says:
    September 21, 2012 at 12:18 pm

    I wonder if a couple of these strategically placed, increases your taxes. It’s not central A/C, right?

    http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053&R=203013144&catEntryId=203013144

  61. Libtard in Union says:

    As to the AC question. Just put in Window boxes. The newer ones are much lighter, easier to install and quieter than the old ones. We cool our whole house down to a comfortable 70 degress for less than $200 per month this Summer. Throw in a couple of ceiling fans and hit the reverse switch and the air will even get to the opposite side of the house. We do the main floor with a 16K BTU. Figure it covers a little over 1,00o sq. feet. We have a 10K BTU in the master bedroom and a tiny 4K one in Gator Jr’s room. It takes me ten minutes to put them in or remove them twice per year. What are your central air bills like and how often do you need the system repaired?

  62. JJ's B.S says:

    From Spring 2007 from Govt Report giving detailed stats warning of upcoming housing crash. Amazing reading.

    http://www.nassaucountyny.gov/agencies/olbr/docs/pdf/consumer_finance_report.pdf

  63. Ernest Money says:

    All over, but for the crying.

    These are the death throes of the stupefied trilobites once referred to as “people”.

  64. Ernest Money says:

    Gold is money. Anyone who tells you different is someone who is about to declare war on your ass.

  65. grim says:

    I’ve always thought that good tree cover/shade was key to energy efficient living. Good tree cover in the summers can save you a fortune in air conditioning costs, likewise, once the leaves fall in the winter, if you’ve got dark shingles you can create a sort of passive-solar heating system out of your attic (or at least significantly reduce heat loss).

    I’m hesitant to cut down the two remaining (very) large trees that are close to the house (uncomfortably), because of the shade they produce. The difference that shade makes is more than perceptible, they kitchen is always cooler than the master bedroom when the AC is off, mainly because the master gets hit with the full-late day sun, with no shade at all. Easily a 5-10 degree differential across the house because of it.

  66. JJ's B.S says:

    Not even Indians think that, it is a yellow rock.

    Ernest Money says:
    September 21, 2012 at 12:58 pm

    Gold is money. Anyone who tells you different is someone who is about to declare war on your ass.

  67. grim says:

    If the trees do come down, I’ll throw up a couple of solar hot water panels and a few PVs.

  68. Anon E. Moose says:

    Grim [66];

    tree cover

    All that plus: UV rays are harsh. We have plenty of tree cover and even considering the leaf canopy is down in the winter, it blocks the most direct of sunlight in the summer. The original mid 80’s build asphalt shingle roof hardly looks like it has nearly 30 years on it.

  69. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    [62] JJ – good read. She had it pretty much nailed until the last couple lines:

    “However, even with the dampening effects of the
    previously listed variables, as long as interest rates do not rise rapidly, it seems that there are ample home equity and credit lines available for residents.”

  70. JJ's B.S says:

    Yep she blew that. But considering the time she wrote that many people looked at her like a kook. But she had cold hard stats.
    http://www.nassaucountyny.gov/agencies/olbr/docs/pdf/consumer_finance_report.pdf

    The Original NJ ExPat says:
    September 21, 2012 at 1:24 pm

    [62] JJ – good read. She had it pretty much nailed until the last couple lines:

    “However, even with the dampening effects of the
    previously listed variables, as long as interest rates do not rise rapidly, it seems that there are ample home equity and credit lines available for residents.”

  71. 1993 House Buyer says:

    Wash DC CFO Report on tax Burdens,

    I have been reviewing these every 2 year reports for that last decade. You can spot some erros, particularly in the property tax assumptions, but interesting reading.

    http://www.cfo.dc.gov/cfo/frames.asp?doc=/cfo/lib/cfo/10study.pdf

  72. Essex says:

    I’ll never forget when Pella delivered the windows. Four of them were 10′ across which is quite large and very expensive. I was standing behind the truck watching the unload when the imbecile in the truck skidded one across a turnbuckle in the truck floor and essentially took a chunk out of the bottom of the structure. I was shocked and immediately called him out on his stupid unloading trick. He said, “You wanna return it??”

    I said “NO” the installers were there and the whole thing needed to be done. It was November and the install needed to occur ASAP. It was truly disheartening. Pretty typical for this area. Knucklheads.

  73. Brian says:

    Anyone ever tell you that you sound like Harold Camping? You know, the apocalyptic pastor that ripped people off and predicted the end of the world a few times? 5/21/2011 came and went.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harold_Camping

    65.Ernest Money says:
    September 21, 2012 at 12:58 pm
    Gold is money. Anyone who tells you different is someone who is about to declare war on your ass.

  74. Phoenix says:

    Associate in Science (A.S.) Degree in Homeland Security from Passaic County Community College. What exactly do you do with this degree?
    http://www.pccc.edu/prospective/academics/academic-programs/associate-in-science-a.s.-degree-in-homeland-security

  75. 1993 House Buyer says:

    #75 Probabably a $200k job as county Sherrif?

  76. Grim says:

    TSA or Customs agent at the airport or port. It’s not exactly a high pay job but the work ain’t bad I suppose.

  77. Brian says:

    Guy across the street from me got a job as an air marshall. Seems like a pretty good gig.

  78. Ann says:

    32 Fasteddie, Not surprised, Wyckoff has the worst housing stock ever, so overpriced. Actually, Ramsey might win that title, but Wyckoff is up there.

  79. Ann says:

    41 3b Oh nothing wrong with Hillsdale, lovely town. Just very expensive and rough for Fast Eddie’s price range.

  80. Ann says:

    Re trees….trees definitely help cool, but they can be a pain if they are too big or too close to your house. They are a way for animals to get in. We had a tree so big and so close that we were getting mold and fungus all over our sidewalk and porch. Also, if they are too close, you’re in danger of it falling on your house especially if it’s old or during those freak storms like we had last October. So we took it down. I agree AC costs go up a bit, but I like the extra sunshine coming in so it’s a tradeoff.

  81. grim says:

    I hear you, the freak storm last October was a nail-biter. That’s why I’m considering cutting the two closest trees down.

  82. 3B Buying says:

    #81 : Ann: Was going to put a bid in on one in Hillsdale, until I saw the stream in the back yard.

  83. Statler Waldorf says:

    If the trees have been there 40+ years, odds are in your favor they’re not going anywhere.

    What’s the hypothetical damage if one hits the house, $10K? The energy savings are not hypothetical, you’ll enjoy the energy saving dollars every year, guaranteed.

    Homes with trees look nicer, too.

    Large trees are an acceptable risk, to me. If they fall, they fall, just maintain them (regular pruning, check for diseases, carpenter ants, proper soil drainage, etc) and they’ll do fine.

  84. Hughesrep says:

    55 / chifi

    DFH 120 not too far from Colts Neck.

    Buyrite on Mantaloking Rd in Brick has had it as of late.

    Wine World on 88 in Pt Pleasant (may also be Brick, it’s on the border) has it if they will sell it to you. They keep it behind the counter for regulars. I picked up two today. They also have a killer Belgian selection. Picked up a limited edition Chimay there today.

  85. grim says:

    If the trees have been there 40+ years, odds are in your favor they’re not going anywhere.

    My gutter, fascia and grill will argue that’s not the case, but for the most part yes, I agree.

    Problem is that the trees were not maintained properly. I know this sounds like an odd statement to make, what the hell do you do to maintain a tree, right, the thing just “is”? But, it’s the case. The trees were pruned by rookies, likely after a storm brought down limbs, so they were excessively thinned and are now extremely tippy/tip heavy, and the limbs are all extremely long, which increases the risk of breaking, especially under snow load before the leaves drop (see my grill comment above). Likewise, many of the trees were crowded, so they didn’t quite grow straight and true, but crooked, in an attempt to reach sun. Looking at those leaners doesn’t give me much confidence. Lastly, the crowding caused many trees to lose pretty much everything but the top growth (every sapling allowed to grow to maturity), so you’ve got 70 or 80 foot catapults. Again, just not healthy.

    Dropping 26 or 28 trees wasn’t something I wanted to do, but the total neglect of caring for them over the prior 50 years didn’t quite constitute stewardship. So we cut the crap, and start fresh. I’ll be planting many new trees come spring.

    I’m sure they’ll look beautiful, in 20 years. :)

  86. Brian says:

    Huh, I didn’t know “blue ribbon” was an actual thing.

    Rev. Brown School earns national honor
    Posted: Sep 20, 2012 11:18 PM EDT
    Updated: Sep 21, 2012 12:24 AM EDT

    Photo by Daniel Freel/New Jersey Herald The Rev. George A. Brown Memorial School in Sparta, seen here on Thursday, has been named a 2012 National Blue Ribbon School, one of only 50 non-public schools selected this year.By JESSICA MASULLI REYES

    jmasulli@njherald.com

    SPARTA — Rev. George A. Brown Memorial School has been named a 2012 National Blue Ribbon School, an honor that has not been awarded to a Sussex County public or private school in more than 10 years.

    The Catholic school in Sparta was chosen by the Department of Education as one of 50 non-public schools in the nation for its excellence in academics. This honor was also awarded to 219 public schools this year.

    “We are very, very excited about it,” Co-Principal Susan Santore said.

    Co-Principal Catherine Duncan said this was only possible because of the strong roots of the school.

    “It is really a tribute to the teachers, the parents and certainly the students here,” Duncan said. “As Father (Kieran) McHugh often says, ‘We stand on the shoulders of other people.’ Our success is really shared with the people who came before us.”

    The state nominates public schools and the Council for American Private Education (CAPE) nominates private schools that it thinks should be considered for the National Blue Ribbon School honor each year. Rev. Brown was asked to apply because of its high ranking test scores, which had to be in the top 5 percent to qualify for the honor, Duncan said.

    In the involved application process, Rev. Brown focused on a range of things that the school offers, including its fine arts program.

    “That is the thing that we highlighted,” Duncan said. “It has really grown in recent years.”

    The Department of Education then chose 269 public and private elementary, middle and high schools to receive the honor based on two categories — exemplary high performing and exemplary improving. Rev. Brown was awarded under the exemplary high performing category, which is for schools that are the highest performing in the state based on test scores. The exemplary improving category focuses on schools that serve disadvantaged students, but are continuing to show improvement in test scores.

    Rev. Brown is the only school in Sussex County to be named this year. The last National Blue Ribbon School was Fredon Township School in 2000-2001, according to the Department of Education’s website. High Point Regional High School and Kittatinny Regional High School were blue ribbon schools in 1997-1998.

    The award has been given to nearly 7,000 schools in the United States over its 30-year history.

    “Our nation has no greater responsibility than helping all children realize their full potential,” U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said in a statement. “Schools honored with the National Blue Ribbon Schools award are committed to accelerating student achievement and preparing students for success in college and careers. Their work reflects the conviction that every child has promise and that education is the surest pathway to a strong, secure future.”

    Santore said she believes the school was chosen because of strong support from the community, teachers and administrators.

    “Our community here is so supportive of the students and teachers,” Santore said. “You can’t do it without a supportive community. Also, we have great teachers here. We just couldn’t be more proud of our staff for their dedication to what they do.”

    Santore said that being part of the Catholic Academy of Sussex County for the last five years has also created an environment that has benefitted Rev. Brown.

    “Being part of Sussex County Academy of Catholic Schools provides a very collaborative atmosphere for the teachers,” Santore said. “I think that is a big contributing factor, as well.”

    Santore said Rev. Brown focuses on the whole student by also having several extracurricular activities, like academic bowl, track and a new robotics team. But, she said that this hasn’t taken away from the main focus of math and reading skills, which are highlighted in high test scores.

    “Our math and reading scores have been very good,” Santore said. “That was a huge reason we were even asked to apply. It was an honor to even be asked.”

    She said the students are the ones who also deserve the award.

    “The students are great too,” Santore said. “They work very hard, and we are proud of how much effort they put into everything. They have to be dedicated to this also.”

    Rev. Brown and all the other National Blue Ribbon Schools will be recognized at a ceremony on Nov. 12-13 in Washington, D.C. Duncan and Santore plan to attend the ceremony.

    “We are looking forward to accepting the award,” Duncan said.

    “We both feel it is quite an honor, but we can’t take credit for this on our own,” Santore said, again thanking the community, staff and students.

  87. Anon E. Moose says:

    Phoenix [75];

    Associate in Science (A.S.) Degree in Homeland Security from Passaic County Community College. What exactly do you do with this degree?

    Seriously? Let me guess, is Golan Cipel head of the department?

    It’s the TSA’s equivalent of those teaching certificiates or other credentials. Completely useless letters that give cover to the government bumping the salary of a useless salary of a useless worker performing a useless job, uselessly. More degrees == more pay! Do they use the degree in the position? Nope. but they’ve got the most credentialed workforce around – that’s worth more money, right?

    TSA agents steal more contraband than they catch. They are, on the whole, minimum wage fast food job rejects. They are the perfect symbol of American decline. TSA delenda est.

  88. joyce says:

    I could make the case the all letters next to someone’s name are useless. A lot of people have gotten advanced degrees, certifications, and licenses and are stupid.

    You might hire someone who can survive an interview only to figure out they never had the skills the degree claims they have

  89. Millard says:

    Can somebody help me out?

    A few weeks ago I said that anybody who pays more on their taxes then they are required to is NOT qualified to be president…and today I released my 2011 taxes *blushing* and I paid more than I was required to so I could be at a 14% tax rate. Being as I am now “disqualified,” what should I do?

    And don’t be mean or Ann will get angry with you!

  90. Millard says:

    than

  91. grim says:

    90 – Quoting another sage … don’t hate the player, hate the game.

    I agree, I’d be much better off paying a 14% tax rate. Then again, the guy did pay $1.9 million in taxes, I’m sure he’d love to pay what I do in terms of dollars.

  92. chicagofinance says:

    thx

    Hughesrep says:

    September 21, 2012 at 2:54 pm

    55 / chifi

    DFH 120 not too far from Colts Neck.

    Buyrite on Mantaloking Rd in Brick has had it as of late.

    Wine World on 88 in Pt Pleasant (may also be Brick, it’s on the border) has it if they will sell it to you. They keep it behind the counter for regulars. I picked up two today. They also have a killer Belgian selection. Picked up a limited edition Chimay there today

  93. Grim says:

    Hughes – can you comment in solar hot water?

  94. Grim says:

    One more for you if you check back, point of use hot water. My kitchen is like 45 feet from my utilities, needless to say new faucets don’t belch enough water to warm things up for occasional spurts of use. Recirc seems wasteful, thoughts?

  95. chicagofinance says:

    girly man…..
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SZxEBBYg6kU

    JJ’s B.S says:
    September 21, 2012 at 12:59 pm
    Not even Indians think that, it is a yellow rock.

    Ernest Money says:
    September 21, 2012 at 12:58 pm
    Gold is money. Anyone who tells you different is someone who is about to declare war on your ass.

  96. chicagofinance says:

    is that still true?

    daddyo says:
    September 21, 2012 at 12:26 pm
    Chifi from yesterday –

    It’s actually illegal to ship alcohol to a NJ resident. Occasionally, you can find someone who will ship a “collector’s bottle – contents unknown”, but they are hard to find.\

  97. chicagofinance says:

    wiki….

    Alcohol distribution

    Historically, New Jersey law restricted the number of wineries to one per million people in the state. In 1981, the New Jersey Farm Winery Act exempted low-volume family-owned wineries from the population restrictions, and allowed wineries to create outlet stores.[17] Likewise, New Jersey has a limited brewery license for microbreweries and a restricted brewery license for brewpubs.[18] Legislation has been proposed to allow for craft distilleries to be established in New Jersey.[19]

    New Jersey prohibits breweries and distilleries from directly shipping beer or spirits to customers.[20] Until 2004, New Jersey permitted in-state wine shipments, but this was declared unconstitutional by the United States Supreme Court because it violated the interstate commerce clause.[21] In January 2012, the New Jersey Legislature passed a bill allowing wineries that produce less than 250,000 gallons of wine per year (includes all New Jersey wineries) to ship wine and sell wine at up to 15 outlet stores. The new law also allows out-of-state wineries that have an annual volume of less than 250,000 gallons to purchase an out-of-state wine license to ship wine and open outlet stores in New Jersey.[22][23] Although uncommon, it is legal for a liquor store to deliver alcoholic beverages to a person’s home.[24]

  98. chicagofinance says:

    I know that in 2008, the Wine Library shipped a bottle of wine to a NJ address……hmmm?

  99. hughesrep says:

    Grim-

    I don’t know much about solar water heaters, I rep a line that has them but don’t sell any. My concern woul be cloudy days in the winter. I’d want a standard gas back up.

    They all work basically the same way, glycol solution is heated via the panels and transfers that heat via a coil in the storage tank holding the domestic water.

    Point of use can be OK in very limited applications, I rep a line of them as well. They are ridiculously efficient in terms of creating hot water for a single appliance.

    The 110V versions are a waste. You may get half a gallon per minute at 45 degree temp rise. I base my calculations on 50 degree incoming water temps in the winter, so you may get 95 degree water at a flow rate of .5 gpm.

    240V will typically create enough water to be functional, but they will require massive amps. For example, this is not my line but they work the same way.

    http://www.gotankless.com/stiebel-eltron-tempra-20-plus.html

    When looking at them pay close attention to the tables they use to show how much water they produce. The column you should be looking for is how much water they produce (GPM) at a 70 degree temperature rise, you most likely want to get to 120 out of the faucet for a kitchen. Some companies like to produce a table based on 105 outlet temperature. Also pay attention to at what GPM they activate. If you have a low flo aerator in a lav for example, so do not activate at less tha .5 gpm.

    http://www.gotankless.com/stiebel-eltron-mini-tankless.html

  100. Grim says:

    http://us.grundfos.com/products/find-product/comfort-pumps-up-10.html

    Otherwise this looks interesting, my furthest fixture is actually the slop sink in the laundry, making the install pretty darn easy.

  101. Hughesrep says:

    101

    Recirc works well. Other pump manufacturers like B&G and Taco make similar products as well.

  102. Ernest Money says:

    Brian (74)-

    Go back over the last five years or so of my posts, and tell me which big calls I was wrong on (PS: plenty of others here made the same calls).

    I’m especially proud of the QE to infinity call.

  103. Ernest Money says:

    Camping wasn’t wrong on his end-of-world call. He shouldn’t have tried to nail the exact date, though.

  104. Ernest Money says:

    chi (97)-

    Law in NJ just changed. It’s now ok to ship wine into NJ from other states.

  105. Ernest Money says:

    I also have 120 Minute, but it would cost as much to ship the bottle as the bottle price itself.

  106. Ernest Money says:

    When the endtimes come, I’m going to chug 120 Minute until I pass out.

  107. Essex says:

    Old Harold’s ok. He’s just mass communicatin’.

  108. Brian says:

    I concede the point. You were right.

    http://njrereport.com/index.php/2006/12/21/is-a-lawyer-really-necessary/#comment-62650

    Ernest Money says:
    September 21, 2012 at 5:19 pm
    Brian (74)-

    Go back over the last five years or so of my posts, and tell me which big calls I was wrong on (PS: plenty of others here made the same calls).

  109. Hughesrep says:

    107

    I figure four?

  110. AG says:

    Grim,

    I can comment on PV but not solar water. I have a 2.2 kw system.

    1. Peak production on a monthly basis has been around 150. South facing roof with some tree shade in the morning. I suspect this month Ill be around 180. Lots of sunshine.

    2. Its affordable. 7500 out of pocket if you pay cash and count the 30% fed tax credit. This is key. If you are desperate for deductions, a deleveraging state of mind, and plan on sticking around for 10 years the numbers work.

    Heres the downside.

    1. The more panels the better. My roof cant hold the amount of panels that I want. I wanted around a 4kw system.

    2. South facing matters more than most think but plenty of people use east and west facing roofs.

    3. SREC’s are falling fast and the industry will die without legislation requiring utility companies to purchase more SRECS. This will postpone your pay back period. The upside is you can hold onto your SREC’s without selling for a few years I believe. My target sell per credit is around $400 tax free. You get 1 SCREC per kw produced per annum. Word on the street is that legislation is coming through that will boost SREC prices. Speculation in my opinion.

    Conclusion: If you are a tangible type of guy its worth it. If you a paper tard buy municipal bonds. I recommend Irvington.

  111. AG says:

    78,

    I have a family member that is an air marshall. He can fire accurate rounds out of 9mm faster than I can click a mouse.

  112. AG says:

    103,

    I wouldn’t bet against Clot’s predictions. He has been on fire. This board has been on fire for years now.

    With the QE to infinity now proven as fact I will place my flag on the following prediction.

    The G_v is coming for your private retirement accounts. IRA’s and 401k’s. 2 trillion worth. They will be stuffed full of treasuries. Historical evidence in Hungary 2 years ago and a S. American country that eludes me at this time. I also know that the legislation is bouncing around DC. Just need the right opportunity to pass it.

    Timing unknown but its coming.

  113. Fabius Maximus says:

    #103 Clot

    Wrong calls? Toon in the CL!

  114. Fabius Maximus says:

    #107 Clot

    Can I put a order in for a half dozen DF120 and two mini kegs of Sports Direct Brown Ale, or do I get to join Snookie with a “No Fabius” sign in the window?

  115. Ragnar says:

    I like reading the 2006 Clot posts better than the 2012 version.

  116. Ernest Money says:

    F*ck it all. Western civilization is going down in flames, and Toon will be in CL next year. And I’d rather drink old Newcastle Brown than the tepid, watered-down tea that the zombies at the Emirates queue up for.

    If we don’t sell the Dembas, that is.

  117. All Hype says:

    Doom (117):
    This QEternity is really the end of the line for the USA. It will be a quick ride from 40 billion/month to 80-100 billion/month once Uncle Ben buys EU bank and sovereign debt (after the election of course).

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/europe-finally-comes-out-us-election-determines-entire-european-bailout-calendar

  118. All Hype says:

    Al Gore (113):

    The new IRA will be call the “Automatic IRA”. It will be an annuity that will invest in treasuries.

  119. chicagofinance says:

    SREC & Fed Tax Credit (expired?) are proof positive that solar is an untenable waste of time. Setting aside the FTC, the SREC is actually a bigger boondoggle on the back of everyone in NJ. We actually pay higher rates for electricity, because the SREC subsidy is buried in our power bills. So you are being given a license to place garish PV cells on the landscape and simultaneously pick our pockets.

    AG says:
    September 21, 2012 at 7:18 pm
    Grim,

    I can comment on PV but not solar water. I have a 2.2 kw system.

    1. Peak production on a monthly basis has been around 150. South facing roof with some tree shade in the morning. I suspect this month Ill be around 180. Lots of sunshine.

    2. Its affordable. 7500 out of pocket if you pay cash and count the 30% fed tax credit. This is key. If you are desperate for deductions, a deleveraging state of mind, and plan on sticking around for 10 years the numbers work.

    3. SREC’s are falling fast and the industry will die without legislation requiring utility companies to purchase more SRECS. This will postpone your pay back period. The upside is you can hold onto your SREC’s without selling for a few years I believe. My target sell per credit is around $400 tax free. You get 1 SCREC per kw produced per annum. Word on the street is that legislation is coming through that will boost SREC prices. Speculation in my opinion.

  120. chicagofinance says:

    Found the DFH IPA 120 around the corner from me at Spirits Unlimted in Red Bank…….$9.49 for the bottle…..in a separate note, the dead animal in the chimney has returned in plague-like fashion…..we now have maggots….

    Fabius Maximus says:
    September 21, 2012 at 9:00 pm
    #107 Clot

    Can I put a order in for a half dozen DF120 and two mini kegs of Sports Direct Brown Ale, or do I get to join Snookie with a “No Fabius” sign in the window?

  121. grim says:

    in a separate note, the dead animal in the chimney has returned in plague-like fashion…..we now have maggots….

    That’s what you get for listening to me. At least the kids had fun for an hour or so? I’ll let them know you actually lit up Santa, who was out doing a few practice runs in the pre-season, and that they ruined it for the rest of the kids.

    Pictures of the carcass are pretty much a requirement at this point.

  122. Fast Eddie says:

    We know what happen to Tony Montana when he started using his product; now you know where the U.S. is headed for with QE Infinity. For years, this blog has been creating the economic headlines at least two years in advance. Not that anyone had any doubt, it’s simply a reaffirmation.

  123. Essex Neanderthal says:

    “Creating the Economic Headlines” Is that like “Fair and Balanced” ??

  124. Fast Eddie says:

    Speaking of economics, I read that Chicago teachers average pay is $76,000 with full benefits and they wanted more? omg! And 85% of 4th graders can’t read and write in the district? And I’m looking at houses with 16K plus taxes on them just picturing some assistant administrator making a 6 digit salary. That gravy train is slowly coming to an end.

  125. Fast Eddie says:

    Mayor Rahm Emanuel is offering Chicago teachers a 17 percent raise over the next four years.

    Holy f*cking sh1t!! It’s like two different worlds; the private sector looking to make a profit and the politboro extorting those trying to generate profit. Its like the more you make, the more they want to take. It’s just a matter of time before the business of education becomes a private entity… the wheels are already in motion.

  126. Fast Eddie says:

    The primary disagreement appears to be teacher job security in the wake of a new program that evaluates teachers based on students’ standardized test scores. Chicago Teachers Union board member Jay Rehak called the idea “data-driven madness.” As many as 6,000 teachers could lose their jobs under the evaluation system.

    In private industry, you’re evaluated twice a year, so what’s the problem? If you don’t do your job, you get fired.

  127. Essex Neanderthal says:

    Chicago is a cesspool by a lake. Bad weather. Nice people. Ancient infrastructure.

  128. Fast Eddie says:

    On September 9, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan recognized 269 schools across our nation as 2012 National Blue Ribbon Schools. Among those recognized were 17 New Jersey schools.

    By the way, half of those were Catholic Schools, who educate better at half the price tag of the dead, bloated pubic schools.

  129. All Hype says:

    Gary (127): Don’t worry, Illinois will get a bailout. There is no further need for fiscal restraint.

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/piigs-america-illinois-preparing-request-federal-bailout

    This will go into the 80-100 billion/month Fed purchases. Throw California in the bailout pool too!

  130. chicagofinance says:

    The carcass is up the chimney somewhere, probably sitting on the back side of the flue. Here is the issue for discussion. Big fire on Sunday; no smell. Then suddenly on Wednesday smell returns, and maggots begin to appear Thursday……those guys can seriously motor……..the bad part is that you know their origin……

    grim says:
    September 22, 2012 at 6:09 am
    That’s what you get for listening to me. At least the kids had fun for an hour or so? I’ll let them know you actually lit up Santa, who was out doing a few practice runs in the pre-season, and that they ruined it for the rest of the kids.

    Pictures of the carcass are pretty much a requirement at this point.

  131. Phoenix says:

    [131]chifi

    You need to cook them thoroughly. At least 160 degrees thru the thickest part. Serving them raw is a no-no. Did you use a meat thermometer?

  132. Phoenix says:

    How is it that Calpers only generates a 1% return, but JJ always gets over 9%?? Time to send JJ’s resume to Calpers to help bail them out.

    [130] All Hype
    Gary (127): Don’t worry, Illinois will get a bailout. There is no further need for fiscal restraint.

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/piigs-america-illinois-preparing-request-federal-bailout

    This will go into the 80-100 billion/month Fed purchases. Throw California in the bailout pool too!

  133. All Hype says:

    “How is it that Calpers only generates a 1% return, but JJ always gets over 9%?? Time to send JJ’s resume to Calpers to help bail them out.”

    Totally agree. JJ also gets to hang out and sleep with a better looking pool of young female college graduates out in California. He can switch from onions to oranges.

  134. grim says:

    I really figured it was just a bird, or maybe a squirrel, but something thick like a racoon would have really been a long-shot (racoons don’t usually hang out on the roof, unless they’ve already made the attic home.

  135. Neanderthal Economist says:

    Fast Eddie, the problem is that you’re looking for prices to collapse during the lowest interest rate environment in history. Ain’t gonna happen buddy. I don’t care if unemployment goes to 30%. All the flippers and sub prime are out of the market. Prices are bottoming if anything. Jump in. The waters warm.

  136. Brian says:

    Chifi doesn’t have a cat does he? Imagine if he just roasted a neighbor’s cat. The neighborhood bagholders will really think those renters are weird if he just roasted fluffy.

  137. Anon E. Moose says:

    NE [136];

    Much as I hate to admit it, for me it was just time to give up the logic and — much like JJ’s bailout bond picks (betting with the companies that were ‘too big to fail’) — to get on board the “Gov’t gonna save us” train with regard to buying a house. Fed inflation + Fannie/Freddie ready mortgage availability will keep most people above water if they put a real downpayment, don’t buy too much house or do anything stupid with their money.

  138. Essex Neanderthal says:

    129. That’s great. For Catholics. For the rest of us, Meh.

  139. Fast Eddie says:

    140,

    It has nothing to do with being Catholic. It’s the fact that those kids are getting a better education at half the cost. Most private and/or charter schools deliver at a higher level. When the beauracracy claims “it’s for the children,” they’re just making themselves the subject of laughter. Public education is a monopoly of nonsense and waste funded by an endless stream of taxpayer dollars through legalized extortion.

  140. Pete says:

    Do you have a citation for that assertion? All data I’ve ever seen shows cost per pupil in catholic and public schools are almost identical.

  141. Fast Eddie says:

    Pete,

    A little over $4000 per year in tuition from pre-K through 8th for my kid and all my family went to Catholic schools including myself. Forget it. I’ve been down this road a hundred times on this blog. Unless it’s an affluent town, the public school systems are a f*cking zoo run by 6 digit salary administrators who don’t give a sh!t. How do I know? I also have family and friends that are adminstrators and I when I utter the phrase, “for the children”, they chuckle and tell me the word “children” never comes up. For a 6 digit salary and an endless stream of money, I’d chuckle, too.

  142. Fast Eddie says:

    In 2011, New Jersey spent $17,800 per student. What a f*cking joke. In Newark, it’s $25,000 per student and you need a side arm to protect yourself.

  143. Essex Neanderthal says:

    Go ahead and do the Catholic thing brother. I’m with ya man. Yeah Baby.

  144. Essex Neanderthal says:

    Remember: There is always someone willing to take your money.

  145. Ann says:

    Think how much money everyone could save in taxes if we gave even $4,000 vouchers to everyone who wanted to go to Catholic school (or any private school).

  146. Ben says:

    Just got out of shop rite and was stuck behind a young couple in their early 20s buying baby food with government checks. Took forever with the poor cashier in training. They were texting away with their iphones while the poor kid was trying to figure out how to enter in the checks. Meanwhile, I’m sitting there wondering three things.

    1. What business did they have having a kid at such a young age?
    2. How much baby food would each of those iphones buy?
    3. How can I get the government to pay for my kids food?

  147. Ernest Money says:

    daddyo (55)-

    I have 120 Minute right now, I virtually never don’t have it, and I will ship it anywhere in NJ. Legally.

  148. Ernest Money says:

    daddyo (56)-

    I sell it every day for about 1/3 that price.

  149. grim says:

    Need Pappy…

  150. Essex says:

    147. $4k would barely cover 1/4 of the tuition at a competitive private school.
    The really good private schools may take 1 or 2 “voucher kids” and the rest will go toward every type of academy with space for Jr.

  151. grim says:

    You ever try any interesting Aglianico? The Terredora has been a recent favorite, but there have got to be better examples.

  152. relo says:

    Gary,

    $4k in BC ain’t gonna cut it for HS unless kiddo is a baller.

  153. Fast Eddie says:

    relo,

    My kid is already in HS, in Bergen County and not in a public school. I know all about private school tuitions, believe me.

  154. Fast Eddie says:

    152,

    Wrong. But I won’t even try to explain because it’s tough getting through to someone with Syd Barrett syndrome.

  155. leftwing says:

    There are three choices. The Black Horse with a live band playing (of all things) Space Cowboy by Steve Miller (guys are actually pretty good).. Or Caribbean, barefoot. Or wage and benefit slave.

    Your call. JJ, you da man.
    Leftwing (hockey, not politics)

  156. cobbler says:

    Oratory Prep (arguably, the best catholic HS in NJ) charges $ 17K in tuition which is about $4k more than the per-student costs of Summit public schools – Oratory happens to be located about half-mile from Summit HS. They give discounts to about 30% of students, almost exclusively from the endowment.
    Most Catholic schools with really low (4K) tuition either have good subsidy from the diocese, or still have some nuns around. Also, I think the public school costs will drop by a third or more if they are allowed to get rid of 5% of the class (private and parochial schools don’t have the problem, they were not having these 5% from the beginning).

  157. AG says:

    148,

    Ben,

    If you ever wonder why I am the way I am consider the following. When I was in college I was almost thrown in jail for throwing parties. My parties were so big I would negotiatie with bars on which night to throw them on. I had friends on the police force to give me early warning, shuttles for the drunks, girlfriends with even hotter friends, and friends with beer distributors. I would get 75 cases of Beast lite for 2 bucks a case then charge 4 at the door. My roomates and I would clear $300 a piece every other weekend. Until we got busted. We were so dam good it took them 3 years to build a case against us. One of my roomates decided to blow up the garage with a pipe bomb as a town councilman turned the ignition to his car. That pretty much did us in. The police report was 10 pages long. The courtroom laughed their ass off when they read the whole thing out loud.

    I was so poor in college I would have 5 bucks for the entire week. Figure 8 packs of Ramen noodles, a gallon of gas, and a 6 pack of something cheap. I weighed 140 lbs. My mother begged to helped me but I refused. My first experience with a f_ckin food stamp loser was at the local convenience store when I saw a 250lber ordering a hot meal with a debit card. I didnt know debit cards existed at the time. All i knew was poverty. None of my roomates or myself would ever accept a f_ckin debit card from the g_v.

    Live free or die motherf_cker!

  158. AG says:

    158,

    Cobbler,

    I am happy to pay for my kids parochial school tuition. Sending your kids to public schools is a death sentence. I would rather live my life in pverty than to know I saved my fiat trash only to have my kids brainwashed by the Rockefeller foundation.

    I’m just a conspiracy theorist. I know nothing trust me.

  159. AG says:

    158,

    Cobbler,

    I costs 24,000 a year to educate a gangbanger from Newark or Camden, They will amount to nothing. No amount of money will save that trash. Just arm yourself. The battleground is being set. Muzzies and multiculturalism vs Europeans etc. The time is coming where the white guys won’t be pushed around anymore.

  160. AG says:

    152,

    Essex,

    Your family and cocks_ckers like you hurt my kids. Why? Because my tax dollars go to pay you morons to teach my kids.

    How about we hand out 5k for each kid in the state and the parents get to choose the school. That wouldn’t work for you because that would interfere with you sitting on your fat ass while your wife sucks the tit of the taxpayer. Prove me wrong.

  161. Kattie says:

    Hello my loved one! I want to say that this post is awesome, nice written and come with approximately all significant infos. I would like to peer more posts like this.

  162. wow gold says:

    I purchased THESE buy wow gold possessing banned! THEY Have been AS A RESULT Adorable AND JUST HAD To fund THEM. THEY Have been pleasant AND FITTED IDEAL.

  163. Site says:

    Thanks for the auspicious writeup. It actually was once a enjoyment account it. Glance complicated to more delivered agreeable from you! By the way, how can we communicate?

  164. read more says:

    Hey very nice site!! Guy .. Excellent .. Superb .. I’ll bookmark your website and take the feeds also?I’m glad to seek out a lot of useful information here within the put up, we want work out more techniques in this regard, thanks for sharing. . . . . .

Comments are closed.