More millionaires than ever before in NJ

From the Star Ledger:

New Jersey has more millionaires than ever

Just before the start of the World Economic Forum in Switzerland in January, Oxfam International reported 85 individuals own 65 times as much wealth as the entire bottom half of the world’s population. That’s 85 rich people with 46 percent of the world’s wealth ($110 trillion) compared to three billion poor people controlling only seven percent of the world’s wealth ($1.7 trillion.) The rest of us are somewhere in between.

They also reported income inequality is growing in affluent countries. The US leads that inequality list with one percent of our richest neighbors having benefitted most from economic growth in the past five years.

The other 99 percent saw incomes shrink a little. Yes, only a little. Inequality didn’t deepen because the poor were getting significantly poorer, but because the rich were getting incredibly richer. The Oxfam report drew the attention of President Obama who commented that income inequality is one of America’s most urgent problems.

In New Jersey numbers didn’t change much in the past few years. As population grew, so did the number of wealthy households. Seven years ago when whispers of a millionaires’ tax began to be heard around Trenton, New Jersey had the second highest number of millionaire households in the country with 6.46 percent reporting annual incomes above a million. Only Hawaii had more.

The latest report by Phoenix Marketing International, which tracks wealth as part of its financial services program, showed New Jersey as number two again, with 7.49 percent earning more than a million bucks a year. This time Maryland beat us and Hawaii dropped to number four.

Numbers are solid but statistics can be interpreted many ways. The number of actual millionaire households in New Jersey did increase, and the increase seems proportionate to other states with high-income households, but could it have been better? How does your income compare to your income seven years ago? Could it be better? What can make it better?

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119 Responses to More millionaires than ever before in NJ

  1. grim says:

    From CNN Money:

    Borrowers paying mortgages over credit cards again

    As the housing market and hiring continue to recover, consumers are making their mortgage payments a priority again.

    A growing number of borrowers are paying off their home loans before their credit card debts, reversing a trend first seen in September 2008, according to a TransUnion study that examined the delinquency rates of borrowers with mortgages, auto loans and credit card debt.

    The delinquency rate for mortgages fell to 1.71% in December, down from 3.32% in September 2008. Meanwhile, the rate of credit card delinquencies was 1.83% in December, down from 3.29% in 2008.

    After the housing bubble burst, many borrowers owed more on their homes than they were worth and stopped making mortgage payments a priority.

    “As unemployment rose and home prices cratered, many borrowers chose to value their credit card relationships above their mortgages,” said Ezra Becker, vice president of research and consulting for TransUnion. “When people lose jobs they need credit cards as a source of liquidity.”

  2. See, gary…it’s different here. Move to Iowa.

  3. anon (the good one) says:

    millionaires should not have to pay taxes. cost of living in NJ is very high and we don’t want them to become non-millionaires and then we lose the status of having the most

  4. grim says:

    I may stop into the US Army Corps session in Fairfield today, or Pompton Lakes on Thursday to make my voice heard.

    http://www.nj.gov/dep/newsrel/2014/14_0014.htm

    I’ll come right out and say I’m pro-tunnel. Yes, it will be a boondoggle, yes it will be filled with pork (I think the Army should actually take lead on project, with NJ politicians playing as little a role as possible). It has zero to do with the fact I live in town, I’m not in flood, I don’t know anyone that lives in flood, I’m not even near enough to flood to be impacted. Though realize that this project will impact the entire passaic river basin, which stretches up to Rockland, Bergen, Saddle River, Passaic, Paterson, Essex, Morris, Bernards, Livingston, Rockaway, Pequannock, and everything in between, all 935 square miles of it.

    The fact that we can’t even imagine undertaking these large infrastructure projects is a disappointment. When Christie axed the tunnels into Manhattan, that was a major setback. Frankly, I question whether or not we’ve got the ability to even do it anymore. The GWB, Brooklyn Bridge, etc – I have a hard time these things could even be built in America anymore.

    The flood tunnel is a massive project, would require moving more rock than it took to build the Chunnel, to put it into perspective, a tunnel so large you could fit 4 lanes of traffic in it, and drive straight down to Newark bay, all 20 miles of it. That’s why I want to see it done, to change our perception on what America can do. The tunnel is not a crackpot idea, and more than $30 million dollars of study has been done, with the Army Corps still recommending it as a viable solution.

    http://www.nan.usace.army.mil/portals/37/siteimages/120921-D-CR197-003.jpg

    Once the tunnel machines are in Newark, we might as well let them keep digging all the way into Manhattan. We’ll have a tunneling team the envy of the world. Monmouth to Brooklyn? Why not?

  5. anon (the good one) says:

    ain’t cheap living among so many liberals

    Ascent of the Robots says:
    March 25, 2014 at 6:59 am
    See, gary…it’s different here. Move to Iowa.

  6. grim says:

    Someone needs to drive down there and punch that judge square in the nose.

    How is it that parenting now requires judicial input on a regular basis? Are we incapable of that too?

  7. anon (the good one) says:

    you assume that having children automatically makes you a good parent. i don’t think that’s necessarily the case. large pct of parents in the south, for example, are against their kids learning science. is that good parenting? courts get involved

    grim says:
    March 25, 2014 at 7:14 am
    Someone needs to drive down there and punch that judge square in the nose.

    How is it that parenting now requires judicial input on a regular basis? Are we incapable of that too?

  8. Street Justice says:

    I wanna be rich.

  9. grim says:

    8 – I said that? Where? My comment had to do with needing the judiciary to play mommy and daddy, because we’re not capable of it anymore.

    Nanny Statism at it’s finest. Can’t wait to see the first case where a 7 year old is “on trial” for bullying a classmate. Because we all know, real hardcore criminals are forged on the playground.

    Clearly, we’ve taken care of all the real crime we needed to, and can now move on to prosecuting children and deciding familial disputes in a public spectacle.

    It’s like someone has been watching Judge Judy and Judge Wapner and thinking that’s the way the courts really aught to operate.

    What kind of precedent are we setting for the children who will be raised in this environment? Do you think we’re adequately preparing them for the real world by doing this?

  10. Street Justice says:

    I’m sorry Grim, but it’s really been a chore reading the comments in your blog lately. I just can’t get past this gem:

    “large pct of parents in the south, for example, are against their kids learning science”

  11. grim says:

    11 – Well, see, you’ve got the right kind of ignorance, and the wrong kind of ignorance. Just like you’ve got the right kind of bigotry and stereotyping, and the wrong kind of bigotry and stereotyping.

    You must have missed the other day when we’ve established that it wasn’t discriminatory or bigotry to insult a gay republican, but it would absolutely be discriminatory to insult a gay democrat (a hate crime even). Or a few weeks back, when we established that it was OK to insult and demean someone based on their weight and appearance, but only if they didn’t share your political views. It is not at all hypocritical to maintain a holier-than-thou position while simultaneously stooping to petty insult and discrimination. Can’t you understand this?

  12. Street Justice says:

    It’s like being called an ignorant and intolerant tool, by someone who is an ignorant and intolerant tool. Truly maddening. Like….Alice in Wonderland crazy…WTF is going on….

  13. I hate everyone equally.

  14. No, I hate anon even more.

  15. Michael says:

    Jesus, this makes me want to cry. How can you guys defend this. 85 individuals own 65 times as much wealth as the bottom half of the world’s population?!?! That’s straight up bonkers. Taking money from the rich in a normal system to help the rest of the population is not good, but guess what, this is not normal. Taking from 85 individuals, who have 65 times as much wealth as the bottom of the world’s population, and spreading it out, to where they only have 1 or 2 times as much as the bottom half of the world’s population should get the economy running in a more efficient manner. If you don’t agree, please explain to me how having 85 individuals own 65 times as much wealth as the bottom half of the world’s population is good for the economy. That’s 85 people having 65 times more wealth than over 3 billion people. Nothing wrong with that at all. You must support this, if you are not an idiot (sarcasm).

    “Oxfam International reported 85 individuals own 65 times as much wealth as the entire bottom half of the world’s population. That’s 85 rich people with 46 percent of the world’s wealth ($110 trillion) compared to three billion poor people controlling only seven percent of the world’s wealth ($1.7 trillion.) The rest of us are somewhere in between.”

  16. anon (the good one) says:

    what, no carjackings in newark to keep you excited?

    Street Justice says:
    March 25, 2014 at 7:33 am
    I’m sorry Grim, but it’s really been a chore reading the comments in your blog lately.

  17. Painhrtz - Disobey! says:

    Anon you truly are a mendacious fool.

  18. Painhrtz - Disobey! says:

    Grim regarding the flood tunnel, why not go with the cheapest, option of buyouts and mitigation.

    I agree the tunnel is cool, but it seems like using a jackhammer to drive a nail.

  19. grim says:

    How can you guys defend this. 85 individuals own 65 times as much wealth as the bottom half of the world’s population?!?! That’s straight up bonkers.

    Do you know anything about the individuals that make up the bottom half of the world’s population? What about the top?

    Haiti – 77% of it’s 10 million population living in poverty
    Congo – 71% of it’s 67 million population living in poverty
    Zimbabwe – 72% of it’s 13 million population living in poverty
    Madagascar – 69% of it’s 21 million population living in poverty

    Now how about the big ones..

    India – According to the world bank, 456 million Indians are living in poverty. That’s a person living in poverty in India for every man, woman, and child in the US, and then add another hundred million more for good measure.

    How about China? According to the world bank, 948 million people live on less than $5 a day. That’s almost 3 times the population of the United States, all living on less money than it costs to buy a Grande No-Whip Vanilla Frappucino.

    How do you figure we solve the world’s poverty crisis, Africa, Asia, South America, United States, etc?

  20. Painhrtz - Disobey! says:

    this is for you anon

    Maybe you’ll learn something

    http://reason.com/archives/2014/03/25/hey-politico-apparently-public-schools-d

  21. Michael says:

    I guess when you look at it like that, you accept it, but it is still messed up that 85 people have 65 times as much as 3 billion people. I can’t even makes sense of that.

    “India – According to the world bank, 456 million Indians are living in poverty. That’s a person living in poverty in India for every man, woman, and child in the US, and then add another hundred million more for good measure.

    How about China? According to the world bank, 948 million people live on less than $5 a day. That’s almost 3 times the population of the United States, all living on less money than it costs to buy a Grande No-Whip Vanilla Frappucino.”

  22. anon (the good one) says:

    this is for you PD

    Upward redistribution

    “Consider, as Exhibit A, the Bush tax cuts. Bush did cut the top tax rate on earned income from 39.6 to 35 percent, a 12 percent reduction. But he cut the rate on capital gains from 21 to 15, a 28 percent reduction; he cut the rate on dividends from 39.6 (because dividends were previously taxed as ordinary income) to 15, a reduction of more than 60 percent. And he put the estate tax on a path toward zero — a 100 percent reduction.

    And the efforts go on. I know that Paul Ryan likes to lecture the poor about the dignity of work; but his famous initial “roadmap” called for the complete elimination of taxes on interest, capital gains, and dividends, plus elimination of the estate tax. In other words, he proposed eliminating all taxes on income derived from wealth.

    Now, Ryan casts this as policy that favors saving. But the truth is that it would mainly favor people born on third base or beyond. Even now, 6 of the 10 wealthiest Americans are heirs rather than self-made entrepreneurs — the Koch brothers plus a bunch of Waltons. There’s every reason to believe that the role of inheritance will only grow over time.”

  23. Painhrtz - Disobey! says:

    really tax cuts helped me and I was decidedly not born on third base hell i wasn’t even born in the dugout. Plus how do the bush tax cuts help those impoverished around the globe.

    Plus more for you to digest

    http://blogs.wsj.com/economics/2013/08/19/work-or-welfare-what-pays-more/

    but I’ll also present the other side of the argument

    http://scientopia.org/blogs/authority/2013/08/21/no-cato-welfare-doesnt-pay-more-than-minimum-wage/

    the main difference is that your liberal friends don’t accept medicaid as a benefit when it most assuredly is

  24. Richard says:

    Surely the definition of millionaires is wrong in the article. I’d be really surprised if 7.5% of the households have incomes >$1m a year. Surely that is total wealth of $1m or non-housing assets.

  25. Anon E. Moose says:

    Grim [4];

    I share your cynicism about our inability to carry out major infrastructure projects. The “Big Dig” is now the model – years late; orders of magnitude over budget; any and every leftist grievance group that heard the dishes shake during the digging has their hand out for a payoff — and gets it. Oh, and the tiles fall off the ceiling anyway.

  26. grim says:

    Grim regarding the flood tunnel, why not go with the cheapest, option of buyouts and mitigation.

    I agree the tunnel is cool, but it seems like using a jackhammer to drive a nail.

    Army Corps indicated that of the 150 alternatives studied, the tunnel was the most effective approach.

    There is no buyout only option, I believe the studies had indicated marginal cost-benefit to a buyout only approach.

    The buyout+mitigation option that makes most sense is called “14A” – the estimated cost of which is $3.1 billion, which is only $1.6 billion less than the tunnel.

    This plan involves massive levees, ponds, pumping stations, etc. In some cases the levees constructed will be 17 feet high. This plan also involves “flood proofing” the vast majority of homes in the flood plain, not tearing them down.

  27. anon (the good one) says:

    coke just allocated 40 or so billion (yes billion) in compensation to their senior people. and they are not even a bank

    Richard says:
    March 25, 2014 at 9:20 am
    Surely the definition of millionaires is wrong in the article. I’d be really surprised if 7.5% of the households have incomes >$1m a year. Surely that is total wealth of $1m or non-housing assets.

  28. Fast Eddie says:

    Special interests and the warped, narrow-minded objectives fueled by the muppet media have so distorted common sense in this country that nothing less than a catastrophic event will reverse it. I cry and laugh at the same time. Who has the energy to even muster the anger any longer? Just take a look at the lump we call a president? How do you not feel entirely defeated even at the site of him?

  29. Libturd in the City says:

    “large pct of parents in the south, for example, are against their kids learning science.”

    Oy Vey.

  30. Painhrtz - Disobey! says:

    thanks grim knowing this state the buyout option would only be an opportunity for graft and corruption anyway.

    i also share the cynicism regarding large public works projects

  31. Michael says:

    Percentage of profits American corporations paid in taxes in 1961: 40.6%

    Percentage of profits American corporations paid in taxes today: 10.5%

    ———Institute for Policy Studies

    Income inequality is more severe in the U.S. than it is in nearly all of West Africa, North Africa, Europe and Asia.—–

    The Atlantic, Sept. 11, 2011.

    “This is a complex problem and I know too many educated young adults working for low wages or cannot find work at all. Easy to say get more education now, but do you think borrowing $100,000 for a masters, $200,000 and up for law or medicine is going to pay off? What degree? From where? Not everyone is an accountant, finance or computer science major. 10 years ago a strong work ethic and a BA got them a shot at an entry level corporate job. Now it seems limited to those majors.”

    “Again, it’s the same BS. You have any idea how many American tech workers can not find jobs because of collusion by big tech companies to keep wages low and by H-1B visa abuse?”

    “The demonization of rich people is what galls me. Face it folks, we need rich people who invest and take risks so that there are enough jobs to go around; when was the last time a poor person gave you a job?!”

    “When they were able to start a successful business and hired… It’s the rich monopolizing and controlling the labor market that’s killing us.”

    “Actually, “poor people” do create jobs. Our economy is consumer driven – when consumers don’t have money to spend, the economy stalls.” <—— this one is the point people seem to not understand

  32. Michael says:

    I’m sure a few of you can agree with this

    ““Again, it’s the same BS. You have any idea how many American tech workers can not find jobs because of collusion by big tech companies to keep wages low and by H-1B visa abuse?””

  33. Richard says:

    Yeah I found the source, a “Millionaire” is someone with $1MM+ Investable Assets, the article is wrong.

    http://w3.phoenixmi.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/Phoenix-GWM-U.S.-Ranking-States-By-Millioinaires-Per-Capita-2006-13.pdf

  34. Michael says:

    “Thanks Christie, the record $2.1 BILLION dollars you gave out to corporations in tax gifts since 2010 didn’t result in any NJ jobs!”

    “You know what you’re problem is Internet Genius..? You’re stupid “ideas” don’t work, and all you have is bile and hate for those that get up and strap on their working shoes every day.. Yea, “soak the rich”… 60 years of it and look where it’s gotten us..”

    “CaptainWillard, for someone who doesn’t have anything backing up his statement, I’d call you an internet genius as well. I’m an accountant and I’ve seen first hand how the rich have been getting quite the opposite of being “soaked” for the last 60 years. Just look at historical tax brackets to blow your hypothesis out of the water.
    1980: Highest tax bracket on a single income earner: 70% on income greater than $108,300 (that’s about $301,760 in inflation adjusted dollars)
    2014: Highest tax bracket on a single income earner: 39.6% on income greater than $391,890

    So, please, tell me again how we’ve been soaking the rich, when in reality their taxes have dropped astronomically over the past 30+ years all the while bringing in incomes never before seen. Yes, those poor poor rich people.”

    “And if you’re too lazy to find out where I got my information from, it’s from the tax foundation organization:
    http://taxfoundation.org/article/us-federal-indivi...

    U.S. Federal Individual Income Tax Rates History, 1862-2013 (Nominal and Inflation-Adjusted Brackets)
    http://taxfoundation.org/article/us-federal-indivi...
    To zoom in, print, select text or search the following document, please use the grey toolbar below. A PDF and Excel sheet are available for download above. U.S. Federal Individual Income Tax Rates History, 1862-2013 (Nominal Dollars):”

  35. Libturd in the City says:

    Hey Anon…What do you think of this tweet? Does it blow your mind?

    @AmSpec: Big Green CEOs Earn More Than Climate ‘Deniers’

  36. Street Justice says:

    Coca Cola is for Republicans and Pepsi is for Democrats. Tax Coke. Those evil bastards.

    28.anon (the good one) says:
    March 25, 2014 at 9:43 am
    coke just allocated 40 or so billion (yes billion) in compensation to their senior people. and they are not even a bank

  37. Street Justice says:

    BTW, anon, that is outrageous because much of that money should have gone to the shareholders. I’m sure that’s what you were thinking right?

    28.anon (the good one) says:
    March 25, 2014 at 9:43 am
    coke just allocated 40 or so billion (yes billion) in compensation to their senior people. and they are not even a bank

  38. Street Justice says:

    Wintergreen Advisers, LLC Expresses Disappointment with Coca-Cola’s Proposed 2014 Equity Plan

    http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20140321005785/en/Wintergreen-Advisers-LLC-Expresses-Disappointment-Coca-Cola%E2%80%99s-Proposed

  39. ottoman says:

    “How do you figure we solve the world’s poverty crisis, Africa, Asia, South America, United States, etc?”

    Global warming

  40. ottoman says:

    “The fact that we can’t even imagine undertaking these large infrastructure projects is a disappointment. When Christie axed the tunnels into Manhattan, that was a major setback. Frankly, I question whether or not we’ve got the ability to even do it anymore. The GWB, Brooklyn Bridge, etc – I have a hard time these things could even be built in America anymore.”

    The mental patients on the American right have a vested interest in making it seem like government can’t do big projects. Big Dig was in pinko commie Massachusetts.

  41. ottoman says:

    Its not an insult to point out the hypocrisy of a fat fvck that uses the Bible to deny gay people equal rights but ignores what it says about his gunt. Its a public service. You let us all know when lefties start denying people the right to vote and get married and then we can talk about bigotry on the left.

    “You must have missed the other day when we’ve established that it wasn’t discriminatory or bigotry to insult a gay republican, but it would absolutely be discriminatory to insult a gay democrat (a hate crime even). Or a few weeks back, when we established that it was OK to insult and demean someone based on their weight and appearance, but only if they didn’t share your political views. It is not at all hypocritical to maintain a holier-than-thou position while simultaneously stooping to petty insult and discrimination. Can’t you understand this?”

  42. JJ says:

    One million plus income is extremely rare and usually for most rich folk are years with large stock gains or bonus or sale of a vacation home at a big profit etc. Even folks who earn over one million it is rare to have over a one million base so to imagine 7% of folks earning over one million is crazy.

    25.Richard says:
    March 25, 2014 at 9:20 am
    Surely the definition of millionaires is wrong in the article. I’d be really surprised if 7.5% of the households have incomes >$1m a year. Surely that is total wealth of $1m or non-housing assets.

  43. Street Justice says:

    We can certainly talk about their bigotry with regard to civil rights of minorities.

    “You let us all know when lefties start denying people the right to vote and get married and then we can talk about bigotry on the left.”

    African Americans and the 15th Amendment

    Following the Civil War, Radical Republicans in Congress introduced a series of laws and constitutional amendments to try to secure civil and political rights for black people. This wing of the Republican Party was called “radical” because of its strong stance on these and other issues. The right that provoked the greatest controversy, especially in the North, concerned black male suffrage: the right of the black man to vote.

    In 1867, Congress passed a law requiring the former Confederate states to include black male suffrage in their new state constitutions. Ironically, even though African American men began voting in the South after 1867, the majority of Northern states continued to deny them this basic right.

    In the North, the Republican’s once-huge voter majority over the Democratic Party was declining. Radical Republican leaders feared that they might lose control of Congress to the Democrats.

    One solution to this problem called for including the black man’s vote in all Northern states.
    Republicans assumed the new black voters would vote Republican just as their brothers were doing in the South. By increasing its voters in the North and South, the Republican Party could then maintain its stronghold in Congress.

    The Republicans, however, faced an incredible dilemma. The idea of blacks voting was not popular in the North. In fact, several Northern states had recently voted against black male suffrage.

    In May 1868, the Republicans held their presidential nominating convention in Chicago and chose Ulysses S. Grant as their candidate. The Republicans agreed that African-American male suffrage continued to be a requirement for the Southern states, but decided that the Northern states should settle this issue for themselves.

    Grant was victorious in the election of 1868, but this popular general won by a surprisingly slim margin. It was clear to Republican leaders that if they were to remain in power, their party needed the votes of black men in the North

    http://www.crf-usa.org/black-history-month/african-americans-and-the-15th-amendment

  44. joyc says:

    42
    [Is this good Ottoman?]

    New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez was a regular customer of Santa Fe hair stylist Antonio Darden. About two years ago, Darden decided that he would no longer accept the Governor as a client because of her public support for the conventional definition of marriage as a monogamous, heterosexual arrangement. This was a perfectly legitimate exercise of Daren’s absolute property right as the owner of his business.

    Six years earlier, New Mexico resident Elaine Huguenin, who runs a photography business, declined a request to photograph a commitment ceremony between two women. In doing so, Mrs. Huguenin broke no contract, violated no promise, and didn’t defraud anybody.

    Like Darden, Mrs. Huguenin exercised her absolute property right as a business owner, which includes the unqualified freedom to accept or reject clients at her sole discretion. Darden was publicly praised for his decision. Huguenin was prosecuted.

    Rather than simply finding another photographer willing to take their business, the aggrieved women who had contacted Huguenin filed a complaint with a bureaucratic body calling itself the Human Rights Commission, which is more accurately described as the state’s Social Relations Soviet. The agency ruled that Huguenin had committed an act of “sexual orientation discrimination” and imposed a fine of nearly $7,000. Part of that sum went to the plaintiffs. By then they had who found another photographer willing to make a record of their ceremony, which was performed by a female cleric in Taos.

    The material outcome of that ruling – which was upheld by the New Mexico State Supreme Court – was not only to punish Mrs. Huguenin for peacefully exercising exactly the same right that Mr. Darden had invoked, but to force her to pay for a ceremony that embodied a religious view she does not share.
    http://freedominourtime.blogspot.com/2014/03/ending-property-rights-what-add-words.html

  45. Libturd in the City says:

    You know Street, your latest Coke/Pepsi comment got me thinking about my involvement in investment clubs. I am the president of a local one and probably going to be the president of a national club where all activities are performed online with people you will never meet. The purpose of these clubs are mainly educational, with a side effect of making money. Rather than expending my energy retweeting statements made by whore addicts and Oxycontin abusers interested in nothing more than gaining notoriety and expanding their own personal wealth, I choose to use my knowledge and experience to teach my peers how to not get taken advantage of by a system designed (some would say rigged) to maintain the wealth of the rich.

    The entitlement complex is strong within many of the recent posters here. One can choose to attack those who made it on their own or who were lucky enough to inherit it from some patriarch who also made it on their own. They can try to steal it from those who earned it by rounding up all of the other lazy suckers and demand they turn some of it over to them on the basis that life’s not fair.

    Or one can learn how to play by the same rules that these wealthy bastards set up to keep more of what they’ve sown. I know what choice I’ve made and I try to share it and educate as many of my friends that are willing to listen.

    Anon, Michael and Yome have made up their minds and that’s fine. It’s just a shame that they choose to continue to fight their battles against an enemy that can’t be beat. Enjoy the crumbs fools. It’s all you’ll be getting in your lifetime.

    And to some extent, I do agree that some executive pay is getting a little out of control. But then again, so are public sector benefits. Good luck changing either of them.

  46. Libturd in the City says:

    Oh. I left something out. Baa.

  47. Financialization vs Industrialization says:

    A bit wonkish, but worth it.

    http://youtu.be/E4VdOgL24hA

    After you see it, the question is now what?

  48. anon (the good one) says:

    your club is just about to burst

    @GiovannyMoreano: 52-Wk Highs:

    • Microsoft $MSFT
    • JPMorgan $JPM
    • $JNJ
    • Caterpillar $CAT
    • Schlumberger $SLB
    • $DOW Chemical
    • Corning $GLW
    • $CSX
    • $CVS

  49. Libturd in the City says:

    Firstly, it’s clubs. Secondly, you are so clueless that it’s simply painful to watch.

    Is it a bad thing that those gargantuan employers are doing well? Secondly, there’s a lot more to investing than mega caps. But you wouldn’t know as you spend all of your discretionary dollars on Mother Jones subscriptions and making campaign contributions to your crumb providers.

  50. joyc says:

    Not that I always follow my own advice, but let’s just stop responding. From the inane comments (like the nazi – oscars comment to all the rest), this person is just looking for a rise out of most here. The most obvious example is their hating of every corporation, but Apple… cause they know several people are here are not iFans.

    Just ignore

  51. joyc says:

    And this is for Brian. I wish it showed more of the event, but you’ll get the jist.

    RI STATE SENATOR MILLER TO 2nd AMENDMENT QUESTION
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zo98fDcFbtc&feature=youtu.be

  52. joyce says:

    test

  53. Fast Eddie says:

    Reagan closed the door on the Soviet Empire and Oblammy opened it up.

  54. Street Justice says:

    Good point Ottoman…

    http://www.stanford.edu/~moore/Boon_To_Man.html

    What is well known is that climate changes. The world has shifted from periods that were considerably warmer — during the Mesozoic era when the dinosaurs thrived the earth appears to have been about 18deg. Fahrenheit warmer than now — to spells that were substantially colder, such as the Ice Ages when huge glaciers submerged much of the Northern Hemisphere.[6] One paleoclimatologist estimated that, during the Precambrian period, the polar regions were about 36deg.F colder than they are in the contemporary world.[7] During the last interglacial, about 130,000 years ago or about when modern man was first exploring the globe, the average temperature in Europe was at least 2deg. to 5deg.F warmer than at present.[8] Hippopotamuses, lions, rhinoceroses and elephants roamed the English countryside. Areas watered today by the monsoons in Africa and east Asia enjoyed even more rainfall then. Indeed during the last 12,000 years, that is since the end of the last glacial period, the globe has alternated between times substantially warmer and epochs that were noticeably cooler.

    An examination of the record of the last twelve millennia reveals that mankind prospered during the warm periods and suffered during the cold ones. Transitions from a warm to a cold period or vice-versa were difficult for people who lived in climates that were adversely affected yet benefited others who inhabited regions in which the weather improved. On average, however, humans gained during the centuries in which the earth enjoyed higher temperatures. In writing about the effect of climate change on human development, Senator and now Vice-President Al Gore admits:

    The archaeological and anthropological records indicate that each time the ice retreated [during the ice ages], the primitive peoples of the Eurasian landmass grew more populous and their culture more advanced. … Then, 40,000 years ago, the so-called cultural explosion of tools and jewelry may have coincided with an unusually warm millennium in Europe

    40.ottoman says:
    March 25, 2014 at 10:42 am
    “How do you figure we solve the world’s poverty crisis, Africa, Asia, South America, United States, etc?”

    Global warming

  55. Michael says:

    Nice write-up. I agree with most of what you said, but I just try to do my part to enlighten the world to stop attacking workers. This is what people do, they attack people who can’t find a job (can’t find a job due to not enough jobs, not choice or being lazy) or attack a public workers who have a better pension than you. Why doesn’t anyone attack the people in control of the monopolies? The people responsible for deciding who is poor and who is not? That’s the part I can’t figure out, attack a worker/public worker, but ok with the billionaires, because they provide part-time jobs that make them even richer. No problem supporting someone totally taking advantage of someone with low wages, but mad that a govt worker has a fulltime job with a pension. Makes no sense. (Scratching my head)

    As you know, I’m doing well. I’m not in the billionaires club, but I enjoy a better life. I take advantage of tax laws (mortgage and property taxes), but I don’t take advantage to a point where I’m making all this money and paying almost nothing, leaving everyone else to pay for it. I pay 28,000 in property taxes, that’s more than billionaires like Johnson pay on their 300 acres of Jersey property. What they pay, 500 a year, because they are a fake farm. I pay 28,000 on two properties that add up to a huge 1.1 acres. The system is so unfair. Keep protecting these thieves, I won’t. (btw, my property in clifton is .10 of an acre and I pay 11,000 on that)

    “The entitlement complex is strong within many of the recent posters here. One can choose to attack those who made it on their own or who were lucky enough to inherit it from some patriarch who also made it on their own. They can try to steal it from those who earned it by rounding up all of the other lazy suckers and demand they turn some of it over to them on the basis that life’s not fair.

    Or one can learn how to play by the same rules that these wealthy bastards set up to keep more of what they’ve sown. I know what choice I’ve made and I try to share it and educate as many of my friends that are willing to listen.

    Anon, Michael and Yome have made up their minds and that’s fine. It’s just a shame that they choose to continue to fight their battles against an enemy that can’t be beat. Enjoy the crumbs fools. It’s all you’ll be getting in your lifetime.”

  56. joyce says:

    “A 9-year-old Colorado girl was kept out of school on Monday after shaving her head to support a friend battling cancer.

    KDVR.com reports that officials at Caprock Academy in Grand Junction told the student, Kamryn, she couldn’t come back to class without a wig or until her natural hair grew back because her shaved head violates the school’s dress code.”

    So I guess kids that are actually sick aren’t welcome in that school either.

  57. joyce says:

    A new study finds that the price you pay for medical care can vary greatly depending on the hospital where you’re treated.

    The charge sheets from more than 3,000 hospitals around the nation reveal a seemingly random variation in prices for 100 of the most common in patient procedures.

    For hip and knee replacements the charges range from $5,300 at a hospital in Ada, Oklahoma to $223,000 in Monterey Park, California.

    The disparity exists even for hospitals just miles apart.

    In the nation’s capitol, George Washington University billed patients on a ventilator $115,000,
    while Providence Hospital charged just under $53,000.

    “The data doesn’t show that there’s any quality care as the prices go up,” notes Robert Zirkelbach of America’s Health Insurance Plans.

    http://www.mynews3.com/content/news/story/Survey-finds-discrepancy-in-hospital-charges/3UrlQu-GSEaLw83BI-IU8A.cspx

  58. joyce says:

    “So much of the public policy debate is focused solely on health insurance premiums and has largely ignored the prices that are being charged for services that drive those premium increases,” Zirkelbach points out.

    Now the debate shifts to what hospitals are charging, and why.

    John Blum runs the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services at the Department of Health and Human Services.

    He can’t find a logical explanation.

    “We don’t see any and we haven’t heard one that makes sense to us,” he says.

    The Obama administration released the data hoping to drive down the cost of health care.

    “When you make quality cost transparent, that added level makes better results for consumers,” says White House Chief Technology Officer Todd Park.

    Patient advocates say the data proves one thing: Health care costs are out of control.

    ——————-

    Remove state/federal monopolistic protections, among other things, and poof goes the cost.

  59. grim says:

    Hospital Billing Software Version 15.7b

    Start
    For each line item in invoice:
    Line Item(x).Price = Rnd*100000
    Next

    Submit Invoice
    End

  60. Libtard in Union says:

    I got you destroyed Michael. I pay $29,300 for .448 acres in total. My tenants pay a large part of that, to be more precise. But it’s well worth it.

    You can’t take advantage of the tax breaks since your political campaign contributions are simply to small to have an impact.

    For example, Sean Spiller, a very progressive member of the progressive town council in Montclair received a small contribution from another bluewave member in town. Tthree years later, this campaign contributor just received a $60,000 contract for his one man business to consult with Montclair to make the government more “transparent.” It happens at every level and through both parties. I throw up a little every time Nom and Eddie cheer for their guys or when Yome and Anon cheer for theirs. THEY ARE ALL THE SAME. Enjoy the crumbs. Baa.

  61. Street Justice says:

    The pension issue in NJ is so politicized, it clouds the real core issue. The funds will be insolvent in a matter of years if something is not done. Of course, if you speak of this issue, you must be “attacking” the public worker.

    A new Common Sense Institute of New Jersey pension study finds the state is doing a better job of making payments into the pension system, but those will have to increased by billions of dollars over the next few years to prevent the system from falling into further debt, and no one knows where that money will come from.

    Steve Malanga discusses the Common Sense Institute of NJ Pension Study. (Photo by David Matthau, Townsquare Media)
    In his State of the State message a few weeks ago, Gov. Chris Christie suggested the state needs to rethink its pension payment plan and lower payments, so we can hire more police officers and increase aid to education.

    One of the authors of the report, Manhattan Institute senior fellow Steve Malanga, said during a Trenton news conference that the New Jersey Legislature has had a long history of intervening improperly in pension matters – first of all artificially lowering pension payment rates, and secondly skipping payments altogether – and that has caused projected income growth to fall lower and lower over time.

    “In New Jersey, when we put in nothing some years,” he said. “We got nothing out of that nothing – eight percent of nothing is nothing.”

    He added that we not only have missed our investment targets because they were too aggressive, but at the same time by not putting money into the fund, we have forgone the investment gains from that money.

    Malanga also pointed out investment ratings services like Moodys have now added pension debt to their rating formula, and that will cause additional problems for New Jersey in the future.

    Business consultant Rick Dreyfuss, a co-author of the report, said right now New Jersey is on the hook for about $129 billion in pension payouts, but when you examine our assets they don’t quite match up.

    “We have what’s called the market value of assets of $56 billion,” he said, “so we have a shortfall of $72 billion.”

    He was quick to add that New Jersey is going to have to hit the reset button sometime soon in order to get Jersey’s pension system to be sustainable.

    “Because right now the track that we’re on, it’s not a question of will these plans become insolvent, it’s a matter of when.”

    Read More: NJ Pension Woes Persist [AUDIO] | http://nj1015.com/nj-pension-woes-persist-audio/?trackback=tsmclip

    56.Michael says:
    March 25, 2014 at 1:06 pm
    Nice write-up. I agree with most of what you said, but I just try to do my part to enlighten the world to stop attacking workers. This is what people do, they attack people who can’t find a job (can’t find a job due to not enough jobs, not choice or being lazy) or attack a public workers who have a better pension than you. Why doesn’t anyone attack the people in control of the monopolies? The people responsible for deciding who is poor and who is not? That’s the part I can’t figure out, attack a worker/public worker, but ok with the billionaires, because they provide part-time jobs that make them even richer. No problem supporting someone totally taking advantage of someone with low wages, but mad that a govt worker has a fulltime job with a pension. Makes no sense. (Scratching my head)

  62. Street Justice says:

    “One of the authors of the report, Manhattan Institute senior fellow Steve Malanga, said during a Trenton news conference that the [DEMOCRATICALLY CONTROLLED] New Jersey Legislature has had a long history of intervening improperly in pension matters – first of all artificially lowering pension payment rates, and secondly skipping payments altogether – and that has caused projected income growth to fall lower and lower over time”

  63. Michael says:

    Nice street and Ottoman…..good stuff

    “Street Justice says:
    March 25, 2014 at 12:27 pm
    Good point Ottoman…

    http://www.stanford.edu/~moore/Boon_To_Man.html

  64. joyce says:

    ” In his State of the State message a few weeks ago, Gov. Chris Christie suggested the state needs to rethink its pension payment plan and lower payments, so we can hire more police officers and increase aid to education. ”

    What a total clown, how much more money to you want to throw into the abyss of those two “programs”?

  65. Michael says:

    You are my hero!!! Great post!! This is the part that no one gets, instead they just fight each other and totally miss where their anger should be directed.

    “For example, Sean Spiller, a very progressive member of the progressive town council in Montclair received a small contribution from another bluewave member in town. Tthree years later, this campaign contributor just received a $60,000 contract for his one man business to consult with Montclair to make the government more “transparent.” It happens at every level and through both parties. I throw up a little every time Nom and Eddie cheer for their guys or when Yome and Anon cheer for theirs. THEY ARE ALL THE SAME. Enjoy the crumbs. Baa.”

  66. Street Justice says:

    Conclusion
    To achieve financial sustainability, NJ first needs annually updated long-term forecasts
    of employer pension contributions and unfunded liabilities by plan. This should be illustrated under
    various scenarios. For a plan to achieve comprehensive and sustainable reforms there must be a series
    of plan design actions which should include but not be limited to increasing employee contributions,
    modifying normal and early retirement ages and otherwise reducing future benefits. This action needs
    to be accompanied by the equally important funding reforms beginning with contributing 100 percent
    of the ARC based upon realistic funding assumptions and methods using demographically-driven
    amortization periods. Funding reforms and plan design reforms should not be decoupled. The 2010
    and 2011 changes addressed some plan design reforms but were mitigated by a (re)deferral and
    continued underfunding, albeit an improvement over certain failed policies of the past. However, these
    incremental measures will not prove to be sufficient to alleviate the shortcomings of the past and will
    prove to be of little solace to future taxpayers.
    18
    Absent these additional reforms these pension plans will remain unsustainable with the only
    question being by how much and when insolvency will occur.
    Properly funding pension plans is not a matter of convenience as this requires a prioritization of
    expenditures and/or new revenues. Failed strategies such as pension obligation bonds (using borrowed
    funds to reduce pension deficits) have also played out in New Jersey as well in other states.
    The reality is these plans must be better funded now which will quickly invite a political debate
    involving what taxes will be raised and/or which favored program(s) will be trimmed – all in an
    election year. The reality is proper funding a pension plan has a low political rate-of-return.

  67. Libtard in Union says:

    Street. Don’t forget that Corzine invested 100 million of it (I think that’s the number) into saving Lehman the day before it collapsed.

    But it’s the Big bad Republicans who are at fault.

    I have huge issues with both parties, but it was the assembly (D) in NJ that wrecked any chance of getting property taxes under control in NJ when they turned Christie’s 2.5% no exception property tax increase cap into a 2% thimble with exceptions for get this (exemptions to cover bond payments, higher health insurance or pension costs and natural disasters). So why not just bond to the moon. Pay tomorrow for what you can have today. That’s Krugman speaking.

  68. grim says:

    68 – We shouldn’t even attempt to fix these, as we’re incapable, and frankly, it’s simply too politically charged. It makes more sense to just let these pensions go insolvent and hand them over to bankrupcy court or the federal government to sort out when the time comes. We should no longer attempt to prevent politicians from raiding these funds, let’s get to the inevitable as quickly as possible.

    We have bigger things to worry about, like bullies.

    God help you if you are depending on those pension dollars to fund your retirement, they won’t be there.

    And I’m the bad guy?

  69. Michael says:

    Exactly, get rid of it. Too bad they won’t. If the politicians can’t blame the workers and their pension system, who are they going to blame to direct people’s attention away from the fact that they are robbing you blind.

    “” In his State of the State message a few weeks ago, Gov. Chris Christie suggested the state needs to rethink its pension payment plan and lower payments, so we can hire more police officers and increase aid to education. ”

    What a total clown, how much more money to you want to throw into the abyss of those two “programs”?”

  70. Libtard in Union says:

    And it was 180 millions that Corzine threw out.

  71. Libtard in Union says:

    “God help you if you are depending on those pension dollars to fund your retirement, they won’t be there.”

    I have said this to teacher after teacher that I know, not as an attack but as a warning for them to save. If I were a teacher, I’d be in Trenton every single weekend and all week during the Summer with all of my other teaching buddies fighting for what was promised to them, even if the math doesn’t work. Obviously, teachers really aren’t that bright.

  72. Street Justice says:

    Looks like it was $180 million, 10 days before Lehman went belly up.

    http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2008/06/nj_state_pension_funds_invest.html

  73. grim says:

    I really wonder what kind of back room dealings took place before that Lehman deal.

    Sorry, but Corzine isn’t an idiot, he knew that money was going to go down the shitter.

    Where did that $180 million go? Into which pockets?

    And people call bridgegate a scandal? The whole thing reeked of a old boys club back room deal.

  74. grim says:

    Oh an had anyone heard what came of the lawsuit asking for $118 million to be returned?

    Lots of talk about it in 2009, and it subsequently disappeared after that.

  75. Street Justice says:

    From savejersey.com

    March 2008: Moody’s Investor Service lowers their outlook for Lehman Brothers. (“Moody’s affirms Lehman’s ‘A1′ rating on senior long-term debt, but lowers outlook to stable,” The Associated Press, 3/17/08)

    March 2008: Standard and Poor’s moves Lehman’s credit rating outlook to “negative.” (“US stocks advance as JP Morgan ups bid for Bear Stearns,” The Herald, 3/25/08)

    March 2008: Lehman announces 1st Quarter profits are down 57% over previous quarter. (“Goldman, Lehman profits halved, but market’s worst fears fail to materialize,” EuroWeek, 3/20/08)

    March 2008: Forbes comments on rating agency action noting, “The slashed outlook may be especially difficult for Lehman Brothers to stomach. The financial services firm, whose business mix most closely resembles that of virtually collapsed Bear Stearns.” (Melinda Peer, “Not So Good Friday for Goldman and Lehman,” Forbes.com, 03/21/08)

    April 1, 2008: New York Times reports that Lehman Brothers has been “whipsawed by rumors that it might stumble.” (Jenny Anderson, “Trying to quell rumors of trouble, Lehman raises $4 billion,” The New York Times, 04/01/08)

    April 1, 2008: NJ Division of Investment buys $2 million of Lehman Brothers preferred stock. (Kathy Shwiff, “New Jersey Sues Lehman Officials,” Wall Street Journal, 3/18/09)

    June 5-6: NJ Division of Investment learns in a direct conversation with Lehman CFO Callan that the company will report a 2nd Quarter loss of $2.8 billion. (NJ v. Fuld et al, p 4 http://www.nj.gov/oag/newsreleases09/031709-nj-v-fuld.pdf, Accessed: 09/14/09)

    June 9, 2008: NJ DOI buys $60 million of Lehman Brothers preferred stock at $1000 per share and $120 million of common stock at $28 per share. (Dustin McNichol, “NJ state pension funds invest $180 million in Lehman Brothers,” Star Ledger, 6/9/08)

    September 14, 2008: Lehman Brothers fails

  76. Ragnar says:

    On the KO equity plan, it does seem a bit generous. The big benefit of private sector compensation plans like this is that it’s public, it’s debated and discussed by shareholders, it’s voted on by the owners of the company, and sometimes the shareholders can change things. Much more transparent than NJ public worker contracts and retirement plans. Looks like KO will essentially be granting the equivalent of 2.5% to 3% of the company stock each year to the top 6,000 people, for the next 4 years. But some of those will be options, which is not the same as getting stock for free, but rather the increase in value versus today’s price. KO is already spending 36% of revenues on SG&A, and already had about 11% of shares outstanding reserved for awards, so this doesn’t seem like a big deviation from past history of generous management payouts.

    Of course, with some high profile democrats running the KO board, it’s not so surprising to see them spending big. Corrupt Democratic Mayor Richard Daley, Big Spending Democractic senator Sam Nunn, limo liberal Barry Diller, the Buffett heir, the Greenberg college dropout hippy heir. They also have some token Diverse Women promoting Diversity on the board – how can they afford stock and shatter the glass ceiling if it isn’t given to them?

  77. joyce says:

    Your second question being the one we’re not allowed to ask in public. Whether it’s that Lehman “deal” or his latter “dealings” with MF Global or any of the other frauds… it’s always stated in the media the money is gone. No it most certainly did not vanish. Someone ELSE has it.

    75.grim says:
    March 25, 2014 at 1:54 pm

    Where did that $180 million go? Into which pockets?

  78. Ragnar says:

    Libtard, 46
    Good luck with your investment club ascension. Local schools should be begging you to come speak to the high school kids about real life, savings, and investment. No doubt the home ec and econ/investments teachers could benefit from your experience and advice. I wish I had some of your gumption when I was a teen.

    People do generally reap what they sow, despite what the envious haters say. On that note, a quote from my favorite author:
    “Do not envy a worthless heir; his wealth is not yours and you would have done no better with it. Do not think that it should have been distributed among you; loading the world with fifty parasites instead of one would not bring back the dead virtue which was the fortune. Money is a living power that dies without its root.”

  79. Michael says:

    81- I know insurance is really to blame, but if doctors didn’t play along, none of this could take place.

  80. Michael says:

    That’s it…plain and simple. This pension plan was used by politicians to fund their own party, where only their friends were invited. They double dipped, used it to offset spending for other programs created to give their friend’s more money, and last but not least, used the pension fund as a means to fund their friend’s investments. The workers never had a say in where that money was invested. The govt worker was the sad casualty in this, not the problem.

    “The reality is proper funding of a pension plan has a low political rate-of-return.”

  81. Michael says:

    Give politicians access to the governemnt workers’s retirement fund….this might end well! What a joke.

  82. Michael says:

    Best part, the politicians, mainly guys like Christie, got the public to blame the govt worker in 2010 as the cause for their own pension getting robbed. You gotta feel for the worker. Totally played= the citizens and the workers

  83. Anon E. Moose says:

    Lib [61];

    I throw up a little every time Nom and Eddie cheer for their guys or when Yome and Anon cheer for theirs. THEY ARE ALL THE SAME. Enjoy the crumbs. Baa.

    They both spill crumbs, but I’m still pulling the lever for the party baking the smaller loaf.

  84. joyce says:

    And you define the small loaf… how?

  85. Painhrtz - Disobey! says:

    I have a plan to fix the pension system but no one in law enforcement is going to like it.

    Legalize marijuana all tax proceeds go into the pension system.

    Cuts costs by reducing incarceration rate for pot related crimes and increases the coffers of the pension system

  86. Anon E. Moose says:

    Joyce [86];

    For the first 6 years of the GWB’s presidency, I was appalled that he couldn’t find his veto pen nor exercise any spending discipline on his own party in power. I chalked that up to “compassionate conservatism”; and was happy that we got Alito and Roberts on the Bench, and avoided Harriet Meyers in the process, among a few other minor rightward victories.

    Still, under GWB the federal debt expanded by far more than Clinton before him, and this troubled me.

    Then began the reign of His O-ness, whose profligate spending put drunken sailors to shame, and moved me from troubled to disturbed…

  87. Libturd in the City says:

    It’s not over Michael. The fireworks should start to fly in the latter years of this decade. It will be fun to see if the taxpayers (the middle class) will have their public workers backs? I think they will not. Except in the liberal bastions.

  88. joyce says:

    Seen vs unseen. What evidence do we have that another person in that job would have been better? or worse for that matter?

    88.Anon E. Moose says:
    March 25, 2014 at 3:30 pm
    Joyce [86];

    For the first 6 years of the GWB’s presidency, I was appalled that he couldn’t find his veto pen nor exercise any spending discipline on his own party in power. I chalked that up to “compassionate conservatism”; and was happy that we got Alito and Roberts on the Bench, and avoided Harriet Meyers in the process, among a few other minor rightward victories.

    Still, under GWB the federal debt expanded by far more than Clinton before him, and this troubled me.

    Then began the reign of His O-ness, whose profligate spending put drunken sailors to shame, and moved me from troubled to disturbed…

  89. Libturd at home says:

    I stopped attributing the increases in the federal debt to a party. When the economy is good, the spending increases. When the economy is bad, the spending increases more. This occurs regardless of whose butt graces the white house porcelain throne. Likewise, if the market improves under the current party, the throne is maintained by the same party. If the the market declines, the other party gets the presidential vote. At least, that’s the way it has worked since I was born. Same holds true for the governorship of NJ unless the current guber is a total derelict and even then, they have to be really, really bad.

  90. Anon E. Moose says:

    Lib [91];

    That doesn’t work as neatly if you measure spending as a percentage of GDP — which is essentially what you’re saying. Click my ‘drunken sailor’ link to illustrate (it’s safe, wikipedia graph).

  91. Libturd at home says:

    Yeah…I know Moose. Obama spent like crazy. That’s from the playbook. Dem’s believe you create nonsense jobs to get out of recession. Repub’s believe you create wars and beef up the defense catalog. Same old. Same old. Both parties blame the prior guy and then essentially do the same thing while acting like they are supporting their base. Meanwhile, Guantanamo remains open.

  92. Michael says:

    Stop it, you are making too much sense! It’s much better to keep paying the massive amounts of money it takes to keep this super dangerous substance off the streets. That leads us to the next point, the defenders claim that we must continue to support this massive spending to keep it off the street, but they miss the point, it’s every where. Just because it’s illegal doesn’t mean it won’t be available on the streets. What a complete waste of money and time. Feel bad for anyone that had to waste this precious thing we call life in a jail for smoking weed.

    Painhrtz – Disobey! says:
    “March 25, 2014 at 3:10 pm
    I have a plan to fix the pension system but no one in law enforcement is going to like it.

    Legalize marijuana all tax proceeds go into the pension system.

    Cuts costs by reducing incarceration rate for pot related crimes and increases the coffers of the pension system”

  93. Michael says:

    95- if you make it legal, your kids will smoke it….guess what, they are going to do it whether it’s legal or illegal. Anyway, it’s weed. You can’t call weed a drug, it’s so weak. Try doing coke or eat a shroom, then you will know what a real drug is. What a joke our society is that we have weed categorized as a more harmful substance than coke. It really is commical, and shows how out of touch our law system really is with reality.

  94. Michael says:

    Libtard, you seriously are my hero today. Great posts!!!

    Now, if we can get the majority of the population to get their heads out of their a$$, and stop fighting on party lines, maybe we can start to see things improve.

    Libturd at home says:
    March 25, 2014 at 4:21 pm
    I stopped attributing the increases in the federal debt to a party. When the economy is good, the spending increases. When the economy is bad, the spending increases more. This occurs regardless of whose butt graces the white house porcelain throne. Likewise, if the market improves under the current party, the throne is maintained by the same party. If the the market declines, the other party gets the presidential vote. At least, that’s the way it has worked since I was born. Same holds true for the governorship of NJ unless the current guber is a total derelict and even then, they have to be really, really bad.

  95. Michael says:

    I agree, they will not. This is why I don’t jump on board when people start bashing regular govt workers and teachers. These people are the victims, made out to be the villains. You can only see this if you haven’t fell for the ploy. If you are attacking these people, you have been duped, you just don’t realize it. Divide and conquer, it’s a beautiful thing.

    Just like in Iraq, the news called it a civil war, the U.S. generals called it divide and conquer.

    “Libturd in the City says:
    March 25, 2014 at 3:30 pm
    It’s not over Michael. The fireworks should start to fly in the latter years of this decade. It will be fun to see if the taxpayers (the middle class) will have their public workers backs? I think they will not. Except in the liberal bastions.”

  96. Street Justice says:

    that this budget contains a record pension payment by the state: $1.675 billion for Fiscal Year 2014, the largest pension contribution ever made by the state of New Jersey

    http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ygb7j3cQg7k

  97. chicagofinance says:

    The End Is Nigh (Craft Brew Edition):
    Would you like some brains in your beer?

    Philadelphia’s Dock Street Brewing Company will release a zombie-friendly brew in honor of AMC’s “The Walking Dead.”

    The American Pale Stout, which has been dubbed Dock Street Walker, is made with malted wheat, oats, flaked barley, cranberry and an extra-special ingredient — smoked goat brains.

    “The pre-sparge-brain-addition provides this beer with intriguing, subtle smoke notes,” the brewery says in a press release. “In true walker fashion, don’t be surprised if its head doesn’t hang around forever.”

  98. chicagofinance says:

    Interesting video…..not sure whether you need a subscription to see…..

    comment: part of the increasing segregation in the U.S. is due to people being more desirous of marrying their equals versus “mixing”….

    http://live.wsj.com/video/opinion-college-women-wont-marry-himbos/83AA6181-2E9A-4560-BE72-3998F9DE3811.html?mod=WSJ_article_outbrain&obref=obnetwork#!83AA6181-2E9A-4560-BE72-3998F9DE3811

  99. anon (the good one) says:

    chifi, this may help your friend

    @BloombergNews: Marijuana benefits MS patients as other remedies fail: http://t.co/z64Oll2kXD

  100. I ain’t drinking no beer with smoked goat brains in the brew.

    Politics? Simple answers:

    - running for political office is a sign of mental illness, rethug or dumbocrat
    - anyone who works at any type of gubmental job should be imprisoned and/or shot

    That is all.

  101. Perhaps we can make exceptions for dog catchers and the guys who unclog storm sewers.

  102. joyce says:

    “Perhaps we can make exceptions for dog catchers and the guys who unclog storm sewers.”

    Nope, outsource ‘em or go with your first instinct.

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