Foreclosures down (but not here)

From HousingWire:

Foreclosure activity at lowest level since 2Q 2007

There were 117,485 foreclosure filings in March 2014, which is up 4% from February but still down 23% compared to March 2013, according to RealtyTrac’s “U.S. Foreclosure Market Report.”

RealtyTrac’s report on foreclosures — that includes default notices, scheduled auctions and bank repossessions — covers the month of March and the first quarter of 2014.

March was the 42nd consecutive month where U.S. foreclosure activity decreased from a year ago, helping to drop first quarter foreclosure activity to the lowest level since the second quarter of 2007.

“Now that the foreclosure deluge has dried up, banks are turning their attention back to properties that have been sitting in foreclosure limbo for some time,” said Daren Blomquist, vice president at RealtyTrac. “This is most evident in judicial foreclosure states that were more likely to have impediments in the foreclosure process, but there are also signs of this catch-up trend happening in some non-judicial states like California, where an increasing number of judicial foreclosure filings boosted foreclosure starts in the first quarter.”

The monthly increase in foreclosure activity was driven by a 7% month-over-month increase in foreclosure starts — the initial public notice starting the foreclosure process — and a 6% monthly increase in scheduled foreclosure auctions.

Homeowners saw lenders repossess 28,840 properties in March, down 5% from the previous month and down 34% year-over-year to the lowest level since July 2007 — an 80-month low.

About 341,670 properties had a foreclosure notice in the first quarter, down 3% from the previous quarter and down 23% from a year ago.

Despite the decrease in overall foreclosure activity in the first quarter, 29 states posted annual increases in scheduled foreclosure auctions, including Utah (up 226%), Oregon (up 177%), Connecticut (up 131%), New Jersey (up 79%), Delaware (up 49%), New York (up 47%), Maryland (up 46%), Massachusetts (up 37%), Nevada (up 21%) and Florida (up 21%).

Meanwhile foreclosure starts in the first quarter increased from a year ago in 19 states, including New Jersey (up 83%), Maryland (up 43%), Indiana (up 38%), Delaware (up 24%), Connecticut (up 13%), and California (up 10%).

This entry was posted in Economics, Foreclosures, New Jersey Real Estate. Bookmark the permalink.

192 Responses to Foreclosures down (but not here)

  1. grim says:

    From the Record:

    Standard & Poor’s drops N.J.’s credit rating over budget worries

    Standard & Poor’s downgraded New Jersey’s credit rating Wednesday, citing what it described as the state’s structurally unbalanced budget, overly optimistic revenue projections and reliance on one-time measures to help close the budget gap.

    The ratings agency reduced the state’s general obligation debt one step, to A+ from AA- and lowered ratings for other kinds of debt, an action that means the state stands to face higher borrowing costs. S&P also offered unsparing criticism of the state’s financial position a little more than two weeks after Governor Christie unveiled a $34.4 billion budget.

    “Almost five years after the official start of the economic recovery, New Jersey continues to struggle with structural imbalance and stands in stark difference to many of its peers who registered sizable budgetary surpluses in fiscal 2013,” the statement said.

    The downgrade puts New Jersey’s rating four levels below the top, lower than 47 other states along with California and Illinois, Bloomberg News reported.

    S&P added that the state is suffering from the effects of “bullish revenue assumption and overreliance on untested or uncertain revenues” in the past two budgets, citing, for example, the use of future revenues from the 1998 tobacco settlement to help balance the budget.

    S&P’s downgrade was the first New Jersey has suffered since 2011, when all three major ratings agencies — the others are Fitch and Moody’s — did so, citing factors including the state’s sluggish economic recovery and continuing failure to make full pension payments, long a concern of the ratings agencies.

    The downgrade, and S&P’s criticism of the state’s fiscal management, is bad news for Chris­tie, who has sought to portray his administration as having improved finances after years of Democratic mismanagement, and having boosted New Jersey’s economy — which nevertheless has trailed those of its neighbors in recovering from the recession.

  2. Street Justice says:

    BREAKING: Feds prep for Waco style raid of Bundy Ranch .

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wWhFm80Phqk

  3. anon (the good one) says:

    knife? c’mon! get the proper gear for mass murder. look up Adam Lanza, et al

  4. Street Justice says:

    Way to go. Politicize a tradgedy. Try and think independently for once in your life.

    3.anon (the good one) says:
    April 10, 2014 at 7:57 am
    knife? c’mon! get the proper gear for mass murder. look up Adam Lanza, et al

  5. anon (the good one) says:

    why is that a political statement?

  6. Street Justice says:

    What is “proper gear” and why would you bring it up?

  7. anon (the good one) says:

    what about this?

    Libturd in the City says:
    April 9, 2014 at 12:21 pm
    Obviously, what is needed in Pennsylvania are stricter knife laws. And more bike paths.

  8. Street Justice says:

    So because someone else did it first, it makes you less guilty? You could have left it in yesterday’s thread.

    7.anon (the good one) says:
    April 10, 2014 at 8:14 am
    what about this?

    Libturd in the City says:
    April 9, 2014 at 12:21 pm
    Obviously, what is needed in Pennsylvania are stricter knife laws. And more bike paths.

  9. Comrade Nom DePlume on the road says:

    [2] street

    More like an occupation. Feds are there already. This story is a week old.

    BTW, Clinton did the heavy-handed stuff like this all the time. Most of it was never reported because there was no standoff. Feds simply kicked in the front door, tossed everyone in the van, and were done. I recall a lengthy article years back about Feds evicting people from cabins on public land. The cabins were there forever, usually in families for generations. The Clintonistas wanted them gone so they opined that these structures weren’t grandfathered and ownership lapsed. They used SWAT teams to evict anyone they found in them.

    I went back to see if I could find the article. Interestingly, though I remember some of the accounts in the story, I can’t find it.

  10. chicagofinance says:

    Dedicated to Fast Eddie:
    Trailer Parks Lure Investors Pursuing Double-Wide Returns
    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-04-10/trailer-parks-lure-investors-pursuing-double-wide-returns.html

  11. Painhrtz - Disobey! says:

    I would have stolen daddy’s truck and rung the kids down as they off loaded at school more damage that way.

    Who needs a gun when you have 6000 pounds of force and energy. then again kids who do this don’t really seem to think this through other than the publicity angle

  12. Painhrtz - Disobey! says:

    chi fi they are the section 8 housing of the midwest and south. Guaranteed checks.

  13. grim says:

    Huge drop in the claims number this morning, geez, down to 300k – something like a 7 year low.

  14. Comrade Nom DePlume on the road says:

    We always knew this, but it’s official. The most interesting man in the world is John.

    http://www.businessinsider.com/jonathan-goldsmith-dos-equis-2014-3

    Listen to where he says “I’m not the most interesting man in the world but I get to play him.” He’s talking about our JJ!

  15. joyce says:

    Weapons of war have no place on our streets.
    http://imgur.com/9Te4rGX

  16. Painhrtz - Disobey! says:

    I may or may not have nailed you daughter but when I did it was with crushed velour. Stay disease free my friends.

  17. grim says:

    Stay disease free my friends.

    I thought the appropriate closing was “live royal”

  18. Ottoman says:

    Benghazi

    “Way to go. Politicize a tradgedy. Try and think independently for once in your life.”

  19. Street Justice says:

    What government employee or politician caused the stabbings in PA yesterday?

    19.Ottoman says:
    April 10, 2014 at 10:35 am
    Benghazi

    “Way to go. Politicize a tradgedy. Try and think independently for once in your life.”

  20. Libtard in Union says:

    About 80 years ago, I know a bunch of Europeans who wished they had had guns instead of knives. My grandmother is 93. It’s not that long ago.

  21. Street Justice says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FP-45_Liberator

    21.Libtard in Union says:
    April 10, 2014 at 10:49 am
    About 80 years ago, I know a bunch of Europeans who wished they had had guns instead of knives. My grandmother is 93. It’s not that long ago.

  22. Libtard in Union says:

    Very interesting Street.

  23. Painhrtz - Disobey! says:

    Lib think of it from this perspective since you and I are about the same age

    there is a good possibility you knew a WW1 vet
    had someone in your family that either served in WWII or was directly affected by it that was still alive
    Knew someone or more than a few who served in the Korean war
    Vietnam veterans were in their 30’s
    Hated Iran for no other reason than 400 hostages but were to young to understand why
    You knew where Grenada, Nicaragua, Libya, and Lebanon were and was not thanks to geography class
    Had friends who served in the first gulf war
    had kids of friends who served in the current morass in the middle east.

    When people ask me to describe the human condition one word always comes to mind war. It sucks, so when I hear that guns are unnecessary I think to the combined experience I have gained form exposure to the world through others eyes. There is only one conclusion, not only are they necessary but essential.

  24. grim says:

    Aside from self defense, which is an inarguable use case, I can pretty easily sum up why I am for gun ownership, and this is a large part of the reason I keep guns.

    There may come a day in the future, where I may need to defend my country and my brothers from our government.

    As crackpot as that sounds, I grew up with parents who knew WWII communist Europe well, I’ve walked through Auschwitz and Birkenau many times. I will not be so naive as to believe it can never happen again. Stu I think many Americans are so far removed, having only seen it in high school text books, that they can’t fully understand the gravity of what really happened.

  25. Comrade Nom DePlume on the road says:

    [19] ottoman,

    I’ll see your Benghazi and raise you a Sandy hook, Aurora, and Columbine.

  26. grim says:

    2014 will be the 70 year anniversary of the Warsaw Uprising.

  27. Comrade Nom DePlume on the road says:

    [16] Joyce

    Classic

  28. Libtard in Union says:

    I’m with both of you. Until the millennials meet a person with a number tattooed on their forearm, they just don’t get it. Worst of all, 95% of all gun crimes are committed with unregistered guns. Yet the laws keep punishing the law abiding.

    It’s actually kind of funny. Most gun crimes are committed by minorities. In NYC alone, 98% of gun crimes are committed by blacks and latinos. The vast majority of blacks and latinos vote Democrat. Perhaps they should only allow Republicans to have guns. Problem solved. You can thank me later Anon.

  29. Comrade Nom DePlume on the road says:

    [27] grim

    Anon and ottoman would be aghast that you would offer sympathy toward militia types who were attempting sedition and insurrection to overthrow the government. They should never have had guns. Shame on you!

  30. Painhrtz - Disobey! says:

    2018 50 year anniversary of the soviets rolling into Czechoslovakia, f*ck we are 25 years out from the Tienanmen square massacre I remember that like it was yesterday

    Grim my favorite misattributed quote goes to Admiral Yamamoto

    You cannot invade the mainland United States. There would be a rifle behind every blade of grass.

    Grim don’t worry about moderated comment forgot to self edit

    how far removed we have come from that sentiment

  31. grim says:

    At the start of the Warsaw Uprising – it is estimated that the polish underground army in warsaw, which was 40,000 strong, only had 2,500 weapons.

    The uprising was by most accounts, a failure, and resulted in Himmler ordering the murder of every man, woman, and child that remained in Warsaw. Hitler ordered the entire city razed to the ground. It’s estimated that 150,000 civilians were killed, more than 40,000 – including women and children, killed on one day alone. 90% of the buildings were reduced to rubble, an incalculable loss of history and culture. Pre-WW2 – Warsaw was one of the greatest cities in Europe.

    US and the Western Allies, fearing Russian response, provided almost no support, supplies or arms, despite the desperate pleas from the Polish government-in-exile for help. What did come at the end, was far too little and far too late.

    So don’t tell me I can’t own guns.

  32. Comrade Nom DePlume on the road says:

    [29] libtard,

    I guarantee you that if half of Clots vision ever comes to pass, anon will be filling out forms to get permission to own. I firmly believe that there are a sizable number of liberals who are calling for a halt to sales but would change their tune at bans or confisc@tion since they secretly own guns.

    Just like the earthy-crunchy lib in “The Milagro Beanfield War” who goes up to the counter and asks for .22 cal.

    Well, back to work.

  33. Dissident HEHEHE says:

    Not sure if this was shared – says a lot about our country:

    Ex-Countrywide Exec Co-Wrote Mortgage Reform Bill
    http://freebeacon.com/politics/banker-who-helped-crash-housing-market-helped-crafting-mortgage-reform/

  34. Painhrtz - Disobey! says:

    jeez Lech Wałęsa is 70, i remember him being younger than I am now and on the news every night. some people truly are courageous.

    Lib I indirectly knew 3 concentration camp survivors they were very powerful and purposeful people in life. I can’t imagine the horrors they saw even after being in Birkenau

  35. Libtard in Union says:

    Hey Anon? Is Guantanamo still open? Answer me!

  36. Theo says:

    Wife survived big pharma layoffs yesterday. Now I can get that poison ivy laden fence that has been lieing on my patient neighbor’s property since super storm Sandy replaced.

  37. Comrade Nom DePlume on the road says:

    [29] libtard

    “Perhaps they should only allow Republicans to have guns. Problem solved. You can thank me later Anon.”

    Ironically, more regulation would lead to precisely that result. In states where you rely on local law enforcement for approval, it is much more freely given in Republican areas than in Democratic ones.

    Pennsylvania is a good example of that. In Philadelphia, you have to jump through a ton of hoops to get a concealed carry permit. You have to make a personal visit to the police headquarters, and it always takes much longer than the period Prescribed by law. They look for any reason to deny you. I wasn’t denied but it took over 90 days to get something I was entitled to have after 30. In Bucks or Chester Counties, you complete the forms, you pay your fee, and leave with your card.

    So it isn’t a hard and fast rule, but more regulation leads to a greater percentage of legal guns in Republican hands.

    Interesting factoid of interest only to me:

    ChesCo is GOP country and there are LOTS of guns here (yet very little crime. Go figure). Last year, The Chester county sheriffs department raffled off a donated AR – 15 to raise funds for three police dogs. Raffle tickets were $20 each. They did not expect to sell a lot of them, however the mainstream media kicked up a fuss over it. The media attention brought in a considerable amount of money and the raffle tickets sold out quickly.

    This year, the sheriffs department is doing the raffle again and raffling off a Sig Sauer. In the announcement letter I received from the sheriffs department yesterday, they actually credited the media attention with making last years raffle a huge success. I’m hoping it doesn’t get so much attention this year as I don’t want all the tickets to sell out.

    Ok, Back to back to work.

  38. Painhrtz - Disobey! says:

    Theo Novartis or Forrest?

  39. Street Justice says:

    Why Are Liberal Cities Bad for Blacks?

    http://www.bloombergview.com/articles/2014-04-09/why-are-liberal-cities-bad-for-blacks

    The ultimate reasons may be hard to pin down, but a lot of liberal northern cities have truly lousy track records of fostering black-white economic equality, as well as integrated neighborhoods and schools. “We noticed the same thing,” said National Urban League President and Chief Executive Officer Marc Morial in a telephone interview. “That’s why we thought the national index might shock and irritate some folks.”

  40. Theo says:

    Novartis

  41. grim says:

    40 – No different from NJ’s most liberal towns, for example, Montclair and Maplewood – which are also the most segregated – both by race and income.

    Not surprisingly, the most integrated and unsegregated towns in NJ are the ones you never hear about.

  42. chicagofinance says:

    About 25 years ago I visited my grandfather’s cousin in Haifa….he had been living in Lithuania or eastern Poland or something and ended up in a camp. The guards had cut off his tongue and wrecked his throat……he basically spoke to me by belching…….his wife spent most of the time talking to us…..

    Painhrtz – Disobey! says:
    April 10, 2014 at 11:32 am
    jeez Lech Wałęsa is 70, i remember him being younger than I am now and on the news every night. some people truly are courageous.

    Lib I indirectly knew 3 concentration camp survivors they were very powerful and purposeful people in life. I can’t imagine the horrors they saw even after being in Birkenau

  43. Fast Eddie says:

    When I was in 8th grade, we had a guy come in that was a Holocaust survivor. He had a number tattooed on the inside of his forearm and he did talk about his experience but I remember him being so optimistic and encouraging. We realized what it was all about. But it really silenced all of us to listen to him tell us what it was like. I don’t remember exact details… I think he didn’t want to go into explicit details but I do remember you could hear a pin drop when he spoke.

  44. Libtard in Union says:

    Yeah. My grandfather on my stepdads side had the tattoo. It left quite an impression on me.

  45. Libtard in Union says:

    My stepfather, who is pretty reasonable politically (a Republican, but not a Foxnews hack), never lets me forget about WWII and the importance of being prepared for the next attack. He was really smart. He volunteered at a drafting center which lead to his not getting drafted to fight in the Korean war. He did have to do boot camp though. It’s just a shame how unaccountable our defense spending has become. Once again, it all comes back to the problem with the lobbyist model and campaign finance.

  46. Xolepa says:

    My grandfather fought against the Muscovites during the revolutionary war. Got thrown in jail by them twice, stabbed twice. Twice escaped. The second escape occured 1 world war apart.

    He had to flee the true hell of Stalin and wound up living in Azerbaijan for a while in order to survive. My father spoke Farsi at one time in his youth, learned along the way. My great grandfather went ‘along’ on the trip. He is buried in central Kazakhstan. Somewhat like being in the scene from Grapes of Wrath.

    My other grandfather lost his entire first family, wife and kids, due to mass starvation imposed by Stalin and his henchman. Grandpa was sitting in a jail in Siberia when it happened. Hated Moscow to the very end.

    Back to my father, he returned home, good old Soviet Union and wanted to sign up for Soviet Air force at age 17. they said he was too young. A year later, Germany invaded and the AF wanted him. Father told them to fu-off. He ran from both the Niemtzies and Commies for a couple years.

  47. Libtard in Union says:

    I bet Colbert has less longevity than either Sajak or Magic. Politics never work in that slot.

  48. Libtard in Union says:

    Looks like the market doesn’t like Letterman’s replacement.

  49. Painhrtz - Disobey! says:

    It really is an odd choice then again I have not watched late night TV in years so what do I know

  50. joyce says:

    I’m not saying I agree with the choice, but the article did say he won’t be bringing his character with him to the late show.

  51. Libtard in Union says:

    His shtick is really all he’s got and that got old about two years ago, unless you were a diehard libtard.

  52. yome says:

    Why Canadians lijes to retire innthe US
    It’s far from uncommon for Americans to retire abroad—the combination of exotic surroundings, lower rent and cheaper medical care can be irresistible for a retiree with wanderlust and an undernourished nest egg. But Yanks aren’t the only gray-haired migrants in North America: As Kathy Kristof reports this month for Financial Planning magazine, many Canadians are exploring the possibility of retiring in the U.S., drawn mostly by a tax code that treats them more gently than Canada’s.

    Nobody is certain exactly how many Canadians live in the U.S., though an estimated one million people hold dual Canada-U.S. citizenship. Canadians of all ages have certainly shown a preference for Florida’s beaches over, say, Newfoundland’s: According to an accounting firm cited by Toronto’s Globe and Mail newspaper, Canadian buyers have been involved in as many as 30% of Florida real estate purchases in the years since the housing crash.

    But the bigger draw for someone of retirement age is the way that withdrawals from a Canadian retirement account are treated when the assets are moved to the U.S. Unlike with an American citizen’s home-grown 401(k)s and IRAs, the Internal Revenue Service doesn’t tax withdrawals of principal from an imported Canadian retirement account. “If Uncle Sam didn’t give you a tax deduction for your contributions,” Kristof explains, “the U.S. government doesn’t expect you to pay tax on the principal.”

    Canadians would owe U.S. taxes on capital gains in their accounts. But Dale Walters, a financial planner who specializes in cross-border strategizing for Canadian expats, tells Kristof that Canadians can largely eliminate that liability by liquidating any stock holdings while their money is still under the maple-leaf flag. Walters says that his clients who move south typically lower their tax bills by anywhere from 25% to 50%; he also says that taxes at death are likely to be lower in the U.S. than they are in Canada.

    (Of course, there’s no shortage of other tax headaches that might accompany a cross-border move, including issues of proving residency; David Israelson of the Globe and Mail has more details in this recent piece.)

    Walters tells Kristof that some of his clients take their expatriate status one step further, setting up a work history in the U.S. so that they can qualify for Social Security and Medicare benefits. Non-citizens can qualify for such benefits as long as they pay taxes into the respective systems for a certain predetermined amount of time. To make that possible, Walters recommends that his “snowbird” clients pick up consulting gigs for U.S. companies while they’re in the country—or even, in some cases, that they buy U.S. businesses and pay themselves a salary.

    It’s far from uncommon for Americans to retire abroad—the combination of exotic surroundings, lower rent and cheaper medical care can be irresistible for a retiree with wanderlust and an undernourished nest egg. But Yanks aren’t the only gray-haired migrants in North America: As Kathy Kristof reports this month for Financial Planning magazine, many Canadians are exploring the possibility of retiring in the U.S., drawn mostly by a tax code that treats them more gently than Canada’s.

    Nobody is certain exactly how many Canadians live in the U.S., though an estimated one million people hold dual Canada-U.S. citizenship. Canadians of all ages have certainly shown a preference for Florida’s beaches over, say, Newfoundland’s: According to an accounting firm cited by Toronto’s Globe and Mail newspaper, Canadian buyers have been involved in as many as 30% of Florida real estate purchases in the years since the housing crash.

    But the bigger draw for someone of retirement age is the way that withdrawals from a Canadian retirement account are treated when the assets are moved to the U.S. Unlike with an American citizen’s home-grown 401(k)s and IRAs, the Internal Revenue Service doesn’t tax withdrawals of principal from an imported Canadian retirement account. “If Uncle Sam didn’t give you a tax deduction for your contributions,” Kristof explains, “the U.S. government doesn’t expect you to pay tax on the principal.”

    Canadians would owe U.S. taxes on capital gains in their accounts. But Dale Walters, a financial planner who specializes in cross-border strategizing for Canadian expats, tells Kristof that Canadians can largely eliminate that liability by liquidating any stock holdings while their money is still under the maple-leaf flag. Walters says that his clients who move south typically lower their tax bills by anywhere from 25% to 50%; he also says that taxes at death are likely to be lower in the U.S. than they are in Canada.

    (Of course, there’s no shortage of other tax headaches that might accompany a cross-border move, including issues of proving residency; David Israelson of the Globe and Mail has more details in this recent piece.)

    Walters tells Kristof that some of his clients take their expatriate status one step further, setting up a work history in the U.S. so that they can qualify for Social Security and Medicare benefits. Non-citizens can qualify for such benefits as long as they pay taxes into the respective systems for a certain predetermined amount of time. To make that possible, Walters recommends that his “snowbird” clients pick up consulting gigs for U.S. companies while they’re in the country—or even, in some cases, that they buy U.S. businesses and pay themselves a salary.

  53. Michael says:

    Well said!

    grim says:
    April 10, 2014 at 11:06 am
    Aside from self defense, which is an inarguable use case, I can pretty easily sum up why I am for gun ownership, and this is a large part of the reason I keep guns.

    There may come a day in the future, where I may need to defend my country and my brothers from our government.

    As crackpot as that sounds, I grew up with parents who knew WWII communist Europe well, I’ve walked through Auschwitz and Birkenau many times. I will not be so naive as to believe it can never happen again. Stu I think many Americans are so far removed, having only seen it in

  54. Michael says:

    Fu$king people suck. They always have to try and take advantage of a system. Always have to be a jerk-off and ruin it for the people that really need it.

    “Walters tells Kristof that some of his clients take their expatriate status one step further, setting up a work history in the U.S. so that they can qualify for Social Security and Medicare benefits. Non-citizens can qualify for such benefits as long as they pay taxes into the respective systems for a certain predetermined amount of time. To make that possible, Walters recommends that his “snowbird” clients pick up consulting gigs for U.S. companies while they’re in the country—or even, in some cases, that they buy U.S. businesses and pay themselves a salary.”

  55. Anon E. Moose says:

    JJ, how are your Puerto Rico Gen. Ob. Bonds holding up?

    There’s No Bailout for Puerto Rico

  56. Anon E. Moose says:

    Michael [57];

    So if I have your opinion straight, the problem isn’t flawed government systems, but that people look out for and act in their own self- interest? I guess overweaning leftist statism would be great if only we could get rid of all the people, huh? Don’t you know a few dictators tried just that — 100 million lives worth, in fact.

  57. anon (the good one) says:

    sorry Grim, but neither you nor anybody else here has ever joined even a small time street march in your lives and now you think that owning guns makes you capable to engage in civil war? you are jumping the shark

    “There may come a day in the future, where I may need to defend my country and my brothers from our government.”

  58. chicagofinance says:

    Speaking of crackpot……you tech geeks need to straighten me out……Microsoft stops supporting Windows XP on April 8th……next day the huge HEARTBLEED bug appears…..conspiracy?

    grim says:
    April 10, 2014 at 11:06 am
    As crackpot as that sounds, I grew up with parents who knew WWII communist Europe well, I’ve walked through Auschwitz and Birkenau many times. I will not be so naive as to believe it can never happen again. Stu I think many Americans are so far removed, having only seen it in

  59. anon (the good one) says:

    to this day chifi can’t even get to airport, but you think he will be fighting side by side with you?

  60. joyce says:

    I have protested on more than one occasion. Anything else you want to be wrong on today?

    anon (the good one) says:
    April 10, 2014 at 3:57 pm
    sorry Grim, but neither you nor anybody else here has ever joined even a small time street march in your lives and now you think that owning guns makes you capable to engage in civil war? you are jumping the shark

    “There may come a day in the future, where I may need to defend my country and my brothers from our government.”

  61. Libturd at home says:

    Anon.

    When people who can’t think for themselves (you know, your type) are easily manipulated into scapegoating their former neighbors and friends because their government has told them to do so, I’ll gladly line up behind the gun nuts. You can take your chances on the freight trains where everyone is headed to the showers.

  62. Bystander says:

    Lib,

    You have to have a schtick to survive in showbiz. Problem is that his act would go over the head of most current late night viewers. You have to keep it stupid like Leno did for 20 years. Colbert is one the sharpest satirists around. He should just stick with his target audience and not dilute his act to appeal to masses. It would be a straight capitalist move and capitaliats don’t live in Montclair. He is still there?

  63. grim says:

    I think he moved to a bigger house in town

  64. ccb223 says:

    On the one hand I take grim’s point, history does tend to repeat itself and maybe we have been spoiled, are being naive etc.

    But the notion of a bunch of regular guys with “guns” getting together and taking down the U.S. government just seems utterly preposterous. You guys do realize they have aircraft carriers, tanks, nuclear weapons, navy seals…etc.

    Talk about bringing a knife to a gun fight.

  65. joyce says:

    How was this country founded?

    ccb223 says:
    April 10, 2014 at 6:06 pm
    On the one hand I take grim’s point, history does tend to repeat itself and maybe we have been spoiled, are being naive etc.

    But the notion of a bunch of regular guys with “guns” getting together and taking down the U.S. government just seems utterly preposterous. You guys do realize they have aircraft carriers, tanks, nuclear weapons, navy seals…etc.

    Talk about bringing a knife to a gun fight.

  66. ccb223 says:

    Joyce – the Brits had “muskets” back then…good try though

  67. Comrade Nom DePlume on the road says:

    [69] ccb

    Wow, that’s a liberals wet dream but highly unlikely. First, there isn’t any intention to take down the US government; the intention would be to get an illegitimate government out? Second, The US government cannot use those carriers troops tanks etc. without invoking the Insurrection Act. And if memory serves, a governor has to request it. If the governor is sympathetic, and doesn’t request it, I don’t know that Posse Comitatus act allows the tanks to roll (legally anyway) But I am not an expert and that requires further study. Next consider that there are 100 million guns in the United States. I think that the military might be a tad outnumbered even if they have better training and equipment. Further, consider that many military won’t go along and may actually side with the right-wing militia you fear (which is why there are actual purges going on now in the officer ranks). That cuts down your response force even further assuming you can even use them. Next, Consider that guys with A.R. 15’s taking over government buildings or harassing government agents, make lousy targets for F-18s. Finally, nuclear weapons? Really? I guessing not.

  68. Comrade Nom DePlume on the road says:

    [72] ccb

    Muskets? Yes, and bayonets, which gave them a tactical advantage. In fact, the British army was one of the best equipped, best trained in the world, and the Americans usually lost to it in a head to head fight. Where the Americans did win battles was when they used tactics and terrain to their advantage, things that the British didn’t understand or failed to adapt to.

    Further, the Americans didn’t have a navy and the British ruled the seas. The French came in, not to make war on the British with the Americans, but to largely take the British fleet off the American shores. That was effective, and the popular image of the French laying siege to Yorktown is something of a myth. In fact the French fleet prevented the British fleet from coming to Yorktown, which is why Cornwallis surrendered.

    Finally, the reason that the British gave up and signed a peace treaty was because they couldn’t afford the war and public sentiment had turned against the war. Essentially, the Americans wore them down in a guerrilla war, the same way that the Vietnamese wore down the United States. In fact, the Revolutionary war nearly bankrupted the British Empire, and did bankrupt the French monarchy.

    I guess American history wasn’t a required course where you studied.

  69. joyce says:

    And the people were lawfully allowed to have the same arms as the military; it was common sense. But we can’t have that now, good try though

    ccb223 says:
    April 10, 2014 at 6:54 pm
    Joyce – the Brits had “muskets” back then…good try though

  70. Grim says:

    But the notion of a bunch of regular guys with “guns” getting together and taking down the U.S. government just seems utterly preposterous. You guys do realize they have aircraft carriers, tanks, nuclear weapons, navy seals…etc.

    Do I really need to point you towards Afghanistan or you to see the folly in that statement? A bunch of towel head jahadists in caves seem to be goin us a pretty good run for our money, no?

  71. Juice Box says:

    Funny you mention the Brits, the biggest threat until about 1935 was the Brits invading the US. I know plenty of people born before 1935 it wasn’t that long ago.

    Check out War Plan Red and learn about our Military and their preparedness. There is a reason why Britain, France and Russia are still today a threat which we have war plans for in the year 2014.

    Disclaimer: I do not own guns but have fired plenty.

  72. Juice Box says:

    The end is neigh – Pork Edition

    Bacon prices rise after virus kills millions of baby pigs

    Bacon prices and other pork prices are climbing quickly due to a virus that has killed between 3 and 6 million piglets. Bacon prices in February were 13% higher than a year ago.

    http://www.csmonitor.com/Business/Latest-News-Wires/2014/0408/Bacon-prices-rise-after-virus-kills-millions-of-baby-pigs

    ww.csmonitor.com/Business/Latest-News-Wires/2014/0408/Bacon-prices-rise-after-virus-kills-millions-of-baby-pigs

  73. Comrade Nom Deplume, quite mobile says:

    Here’s a quote that will resonate with someone here.

    ” Most men appear never to have considered what a house is, and are actually though needlessly poor all their lives because they think that they must have such a one as their neighbors have.”

    Thoreau.

  74. Comrade Nom DePlume on the road says:

    Boy, when Carter is mocking your foreign policy chops, you must really suck!

    http://politicalticker.blogs.cnn.com/2014/04/10/jimmy-carter-knocks-hillary-clinton-president-obama-foreign-policy/?hpt=hp_t2

    FWIW, Carter, for all his feckless handling of the economy and Iran, accomplished more in foreign policy in one term than The Clintons and Obama have in four.

  75. Both my in-laws are Auschwitz survivors.

    Getting to know them fortified my commitment to owning firearms. Every gen0cidal despot in history has made disarming the citizenry one of his first goals.

  76. Michael says:

    Anon E. Moose says:
    I’m not saying to get rid of anyone. I’m just saying that it is inevitable that you will always have a portion of the population dedicating their lives to getting over on the system. It’s in their nature.

    They clearly lack a sense of forward thinking. They do not see the harm their actions will bring. Basically, these people suck.

    April 10, 2014 at 3:00 pm
    Michael [57];

    So if I have your opinion straight, the problem isn’t flawed government systems, but that people look out for and act in their own self- interest? I guess overweaning leftist statism would be great if only we could get rid of all the people, huh? Don’t you know a few dictators tried just that — 100 million lives worth, in fact.

  77. Michael says:

    I’m not saying to get rid of anyone. I’m just saying that it is inevitable that you will always have a portion of the population dedicating their lives to getting over on the system. It’s in their nature.

    They clearly lack a sense of forward thinking. They do not see the harm their actions will bring. Basically, these people suck.

    Anon E. Moose says:

    April 10, 2014 at 3:00 pm
    Michael [57];

    So if I have your opinion straight, the problem isn’t flawed government systems, but that people look out for and act in their own self- interest? I guess overweaning leftist statism would be great if only we could get rid of all the people, huh? Don’t you know a few dictators tried just that — 100 million lives worth, in fact.

  78. Vigoda > Sebelius’ job

  79. Essex says:

    41. RIP OTC

  80. Street Justice says:

    I define ‘arms’ as any weapon, that can be used in self defense, and can be directed in such a manner as not to harm an innocent. So, for example you can own an AR-15, but not a hand grenade. Fully automatic firearms I believe to fall into a “grey” area as they are more difficult to control. The idea that weapons have evolved is not relevant. Under the second amendment You are allowed to own weapons that are in “common use” at the time. The idea is that you would own weapons that are of similar type and use by those that would enforce law, in the case that the laws enforced are unjust. Use of these weapons, of course, is the last resort. All other peaceful non-violent means must be exhausted. There is a real and undeniable dark side to humankind that cannot be denied. While people and humanity are good overall, people can and do harm each other, it is the unpleasant reality of the human condition.

    The choice to own ‘arms’ is a personal one, and not one your government should make for you. At this time, I have chosen not to own ‘firearms’.

    ccb223 says:
    April 10, 2014 at 6:54 pm
    Joyce – the Brits had “muskets” back then…good try though

  81. anon (the good one) says:

    @SenSanders: What Happened to Fast-Food Workers When San Jose Raised the Minimum Wage? – @EricMorath, @WSJ: http://t.co/ppZwpL2U7F

    The pace of hiring at fast-food joints and other quick-service restaurants in the metro San Jose area slowed in December 2012 and January 2013. That was after San Jose voters approved the measure in November 2012 but before the increase took effect in March 2013.

    Fast-food hiring in the region accelerated once the higher wage was in place. By early this year, the pace of employment gains in the San Jose area beat the improvement in the entire state of California. Nearly half of all minimum-wage workers are employed in food service.

  82. Street Justice says:

    Be advised, if you do choose to be a gun owner in NJ, you live in a state that is openly hostile to gun owners:

    http://www.nj.com/salem/index.ssf/2014/04/pennsville_man_cleared_of_gun_charges_attorney_cautions_gun_owners.html

    This man should not have had to fight for his freedom and should never have been charged with a crime where he faced manditory minimum jail time.

  83. joyce says:

    87
    Police love to use their discretion, except in common sense situations. Or maybe they had to arrest him cause they both pissed their pants.

    I love how the article started, “It wasn’t intruders after all, it was the police.”. Like those are always mutually exclusive.

  84. Painhrtz - Disobey! says:

    disgusting

  85. Michael says:

    I don’t know what to think. I’m starting to think people are picking sides on this issue based on a lot of false info and based on personal beliefs. They say that it is going to cost jobs if you raise the minimum wage 2 dollars, but in this case, it certainly is not true. So what the hell do you believe? Some stupid reports pushing agenda or the facts that a two dollar raise does not cost jobs in this situation. Think about it, if you are already underpaying employees, how is it going to cost jobs if you are paying what you are supposed to be paying?

    anon (the good one) says:
    April 11, 2014 at 7:49 am
    @SenSanders: What Happened to Fast-Food Workers When San Jose Raised the Minimum Wage? – @EricMorath, @WSJ: http://t.co/ppZwpL2U7F

    The pace of hiring at fast-food joints and other quick-service restaurants in the metro

    San Jose area slowed in December 2012 and January 2013. That was after San Jose voters approved the measure in November 2012 but before the increase took effect in March 2013.

    Fast-food hiring in the region accelerated once the higher wage was in place. By early this year, the pace of employment gains in the San Jose area beat the improvement in the entire state of California. Nearly half of all minimum-wage workers are employed in food service.

  86. Street Justice says:

    Corelation does not imply causation.

    In order for your conclusion to be valid, you have to prove that the raise in minimum wage is the cause, or that it was not enough of a force to discourage hiring. All other factors influencing the hiring or lack thereof, must be considered.

    87.anon (the good one) says:
    April 11, 2014 at 7:49 am
    @SenSanders: What Happened to Fast-Food Workers When San Jose Raised the Minimum Wage? – @EricMorath, @WSJ: http://t.co/ppZwpL2U7F

    The pace of hiring at fast-food joints and other quick-service restaurants in the metro San Jose area slowed in December 2012 and January 2013. That was after San Jose voters approved the measure in November 2012 but before the increase took effect in March 2013.

    Fast-food hiring in the region accelerated once the higher wage was in place. By early this year, the pace of employment gains in the San Jose area beat the improvement in the entire state of California. Nearly half of all minimum-wage workers are employed in food service.

  87. Ragnar says:

    What I think is that the government is telling a guy whose labor is only worth $9/hour, and who is willing to work for $9/hr, that it’s now illegal to hire him be employed at that wage. It doesn’t take a statistical study to see that.
    It also doesn’t take much deep thought to understand that price controls distort economic transactions, leading to surpluses, shortages, and substitutions.

  88. Ragnar says:

    With the world crumbling on Oblamer’s head, the bootlicking media are so thankful that a Malaysian airplane full of Chinese people disappeared, followed by a congressman kissing someone. It would have been so inconvenient to report on the actual news going on.

  89. anon (the good one) says:

    yesterday ppl made gun ownership a Holocaust-prevention issue

    maybe minimum wage should also be made a Holocaust-prevention issue because on low minimum wage one can barely eat, but higher income offers disposable cash which for some ppl will use to buy guns and that would help to defend themselves against tyranny

    Michael says:
    April 11, 2014 at 9:21 am
    I don’t know what to think. I’m starting to think people are picking sides on this issue based on a lot of false info and based on personal beliefs. They say that it is going to cost jobs if you raise the minimum wage 2 dollars, but in this case, it certainly is not true. So what the hell do you believe? Some stupid reports pushing agenda or the facts that a two dollar raise does not cost jobs in this situation. Think about it, if you are already underpaying employees, how is it going to cost jobs if you are paying what you are supposed to be paying?

    anon (the good one) says:
    April 11, 2014 at 7:49 am
    @SenSanders: What Happened to Fast-Food Workers When San Jose Raised the Minimum Wage? – @EricMorath, @WSJ: http://t.co/ppZwpL2U7F

    The pace of hiring at fast-food joints and other quick-service restaurants in the metro

    San Jose area slowed in December 2012 and January 2013. That was after San Jose voters approved the measure in November 2012 but before the increase took effect in March 2013.

    Fast-food hiring in the region accelerated once the higher wage was in place. By early this year, the pace of employment gains in the San Jose area beat the improvement in the entire state of California. Nearly half of all minimum-wage workers are employed in food service.

  90. Theo says:

    “Corelation does not imply causation.”

    You can say that no matter what the numbers are.
    I think the pioint is the world didn’t come to a standstill.

  91. Juice Box says:

    #94- I hope Anon’s PAC gets investigated by the IRS. How about you respond to #65 you coward.

  92. Ragnar says:

    My suspicion is that anon works for the IRS.

  93. Comrade Nom DePlume on the road says:

    “#94- I hope Anon’s PAC gets investigated by the IRS.”

    Yeah, like that’s going to happen before 2017 at the earliest.

    Interestingly, with the whole IRS flap, it was revealed that only one group, a left-leaning group, did have its tax-exempt certification revoked by the IRS since the controversy started. For a while, the left was pointing to this as evidence that the right wasn’t being targeted. But the reason that the group had its certification revoked was because it patterned itself after a right wing group that also had its certification revoked. This point was made clear in the revocation letter. Not a good fact, which is why you haven’t heard about it in the media.

  94. Comrade Nom DePlume on the road says:

    [98] Ragnar,

    In years past, I would say that you are incorrect because federal workers never took two social media to express their political views. This was considered anathema, and even risked violations of the Hatch act. Indeed, I had many friends who went on to federal service and you never saw them updating their linked in pages were Facebook pages if they maintained any at all.

    However, I noticed a sea change in the last few years. People I know at the department of justice and other federal agencies are now taking to social media in ways I have never seen before. A Justice Department attorney I know is openly advocating the LGBT agenda. A Commerce Department employee I know is constantly on Facebook, mocking and deriding conservatives.

    They are always careful never to mention a party or candidate, but I find it interesting that so many government workers at the federal level are taking to social media in ways that they never did prior to this administration. Further, I know plenty of people at the federal level who are conservative but don’t take to the airwaves to push their views. Their silence, especially in light of the vocal nature of the other side of the aisle, is telling.

    Correlation does not equal causation, but how do you account for the fact that federal employees never seemed to take to social media with their views prior to this administration, and suddenly they are out there. Further, the only ones out there are on the left. I find it hard to believe that this is simply a spontaneous, uncorrelated event.

    So, it is entirely possible that anon works for the IRS.

  95. Comrade Nom DePlume on the road says:

    [92] street,

    Another factor to consider is whether these employees actually saw an increase in their wage as a result of the law. San Jose is a ridiculously expensive place. I find it hard to believe that fast food workers in that area would accept the federal minimum wage because welfare probably pays more, and it is possibly not worth it to work for the minimum wage in such a pricey area.

    But I have to agree that correlation does not equal causation in this instance. All things being equal, cost inputs mean that either employment should take down slightly, or margins should be compressed. If there was an actual climb in minimum-wage hiring after the law, it is much more likely because business picked up in the area generally and employees were needed, even at the higher cost.

    A better question to ask is whether more employees would have been hired if the minimum wage had not been increased. Anon’s argument is similar to the now discredited argument that the Clinton tax hikes improved the economy. The economy improved in spite of the tax hikes, not because of them, and this was proven by Clinton’s very own economist, Christine Romer. The increased revenues were not reflected by increased federal spending so that could not have been directly stimulative under any economic model. The question that should have been asked was whether the Clinton tax hikes proved be a drag on economic growth and, if so, how much of a drag?

    Hey, if an increase in the minimum wage allows these people to buy guns, then I am all for it.

  96. Michael says:

    Exactly. The pundits claimed the minimum wage hike in san jose would cost jobs. They even provided the # of jobs that would be lost. WELL HOW COME THE JOB LOSSES NEVER CAME?

    Theo says:
    April 11, 2014 at 9:57 am
    “Corelation does not imply causation.”

    You can say that no matter what the numbers are.
    I think the pioint is the world didn’t come to a standstill.

  97. Fast Eddie says:

    WELL HOW COME THE JOB LOSSES NEVER CAME?

    You’ll pay for it when you make a purchase. They’ll raise the prices.

  98. Ragnar says:

    Comrade, reminds me of the 1990s when I used to participate in discussion boards on Chinese economics and politics. The Chinese government used their propagandists to troll those boards. I almost felt sorry for them, they probably knew they were lying and evading, but it was their job, and would probably get in trouble if they didnt. But American propagandists have no such excuse.

  99. Michael says:

    102- How many employees does a mcd’s location have? If you pay a worker that avgs 30 hours a week 2 dollars more, how much more can you raise prices to cover that cost. Just do the math based on how much they sell. If they raise all their products by .25 cents, I guarantee it more than covers the cost.

    Fast eddie, are the mcd’s owners still going to make a ton of money if they give their workers a 2 dollars raise without raising their prices or laying off workers? You know they will. Why can’t they ever take a hit on their profits. Why do all corporations search for never ending growth in the profit department? It’s bonkers to base your business on a model of infinite growth on a planet with finite resources. People are crazy. They need to lighten up. They shouldn’t take life so serious, you are never going to make it out alive. —True story.

  100. Comrade Nom DePlume says:

    Over the past few years I have been reading many of the classics that I never read before due to lack of time and a lack of interest in television. When we were younger, we all used to the Cliff Notes to learn what we needed to learn from any given tome but I always regretted never exposing myself to rich text that I get to experience now. We all know that there is much that isn’t reflected in a given movie, but it’s interesting to read some of the classic pieces of literature and see how they have influenced their contemporaries. And the best part is that many of the classics are now free on Google play or the iStore.

    Lately, I have been reading Walden. And I have come away with is the firm conviction that Thoreau was a nut job, or at least some sort of crank or curmudgeon. Were he alive today, we would have marginalized him to the far left or far right, which side I have yet to determine. And Thoreau sets the standard for superfluous writing; he clearly takes the position that there is no point in using five words when 500 will do. I am so glad that I never bothered to read it back in college.

  101. Fast Eddie says:

    Michael,

    Why do all corporations search for never ending growth in the profit department?

    Because that’s the way it has been since the beginning of time.

  102. Street Justice says:

    Raising the cost of the minimum wage, whether you are for or against it, increases the cost of labor for businesses. It is not a force that would, by itself, cause increased hiring. Other, stronger economic forces could be at work in that localized area.

    I am not a hypocrite, and agree with your below statement about the “causation” statement. I don’t parrot the gun ownership argument where the murder and crime rates are quoted to prove that more gun ownership causes a decrease in crime. I contend, that there was a large increase in crime becuase of the crack epidemic of the late 80’s and 90’s, and that that crime wave has subsided. I believe gun ownership, or lack thereof, did not have as big an impact. That said, it is still an individual right.

    Theo says:
    April 11, 2014 at 9:57 am
    “Corelation does not imply causation.”

    You can say that no matter what the numbers are.
    I think the pioint is the world didn’t come to a standstill.

  103. Comrade Nom DePlume says:

    [103] Ragnar

    “But American propagandists have no such excuse.”

    That is an assumption that I am not going to make. There may well be some propagandists, few to be sure and likely in government, who may be feeling some pressure to propagandize.

  104. Fast Eddie says:

    Nom,

    Over the past few years I have been reading many of the classics that I never read before due to lack of time and a lack of interest in television.

    What a coincidence. I was just talking about this last night. I intend to visit Barnes and Noble tonight.

  105. Comrade Nom DePlume says:

    [107] street,

    Those on the left that are arguing for a minimum wage increase our making the argument that these dollars generate further economic activity that will offset the costs to business. I regard that is merely one input into an economic equation. It ignores the substitution effect, increases or decreases in the general economy at large, and the fact that government takes its share of rent.

    Until you acknowledge the foregoing, merely arguing the first point to the exclusion of the others is a sham argument. When Sanders and anon make that argument to people, they are assuming that the reader or hearer has no knowledge of economics and lacks the capacity for critical thinking. They are probably correct.

    That’s enough fun for me. Back to the salt mine.

  106. Street Justice says:

    Nom, regarding my last statement w/gun ownership and the crack epidemic….

    The crack epidemic of the late 80’s and 90’s overlapped with the assault weapons ban from 1994 to 2004. You could certainly say that banning civilian ownership during that time was not a remedy that decreased criminal gun violence.

  107. Street Justice says:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tfOVg5R4ngA&feature=player_embedded

    Radio Host Pete Santilli of Guerrilla Media Network, is standing by on the scene where the Militia has arrived to support the Bundy Family.

    Rusty Hill a former Land Broker who worked in that area for nearly 20 years issued this to our news room,

    “It is not about turtles it is about water. There are developers working for military contractors that want that land and water for mining weapons grade minerals for industry… they want to sell the land by the highway for real estate development because it’s close to I-15 and the Bundy’s have been refusing to sell what they actually own directly for over 20 years. Many buyers sent me out there with crazy offers for that land for many years. It is prime real estate not worthless desert. There is a natural gas pipeline going through there and lots of water under ground too. Somebody connected to a military corporation is using political power and the BLM to muscle those people out.”

    Santilli said the protesters want to know if the BLM is killing and burying the cattle.

  108. Libturd in the City says:

    Those on the left that are arguing for a minimum wage increase…

    Are doing it to placate their base.

    Those who think otherwise, like because they think these liberals are actually compassionate, are fools.

    Baaaaaaaaaaa!

  109. jcer says:

    The minimum wage debate is silly. I was in support of raising it in NJ, maybe on a federal level it should be indexed to inflation. But the truth is in certain parts of the country we need to maintain low wages in order to keep businesses running and costs down. In San Jose or NYC or NJ people have money and goods and services are consumed at higher prices to make up for higher wages, that is not the case in poor parts of america and will drive businesses out. Here the minimum wage was really 7.25 back in 1998 because almost no one is paid minimum wage.

  110. Michael says:

    I’m not a lefty and I support the minimum wage increase. Yes, I’m doing it out of compassion. You see, I don’t want anyone to have to work for a wage that pretty much makes them a slave. I think business owners that hire people, knowing damn well that the wage they pay can’t put a roof on their head, are pretty malicious. You are basically saying, this person is a piece of crap. It’s like a person who decides to get a dog, and then goes on to treat the poor creature like crap. Why did you want him in the first place? Same thing with a worker, if you are going to treat them like a “free slave” aka crap, why even hire them in the first place. Put them out of their misery, instead of continuing the abuse.

    I was talking to my wife yesterday. She was talking about the former ceo of vornado, her company. He was the third highest paid ceo in 2012. She was having a discussion with a co-worker who is a vp. He said that he stopped counting how much the ceo has made in his life. He said it’s insane. She asked why does he continue to work if he has so much money. He said it’s not about the money, it’s about the power. If it was only about the money, he would have stopped a long time ago.

    Libturd in the City says:
    April 11, 2014 at 12:06 pm
    Those on the left that are arguing for a minimum wage increase…

    Are doing it to placate their base.

    Those who think otherwise, like because they think these liberals are actually compassionate, are fools.

    Baaaaaaaaaaa!

  111. Painhrtz - Disobey! says:

    Street wouldn’t it be interesting if they all started shooting at eat other. i have always wondered how Waco would have been reported if the media did not control the message at the time. Now with everyone a roving reporter it is really hard to contain the facts.

    Still farmers and ranchers are usually just rich welfare queens.

  112. Libturd in the City says:

    When I was 14, I was paid minimum wage at Burger King which was $3.35 per hour. I left two years later making $3.75. I would work full time over the Summer and not net $100. That’s why I went to richer pastures…The automotive department at K-mart.

  113. jcer says:

    The other effect of higher minimum wages is that it forces workers off the books, so to speak. If the dems suceeded with all of their plans we’d a have a black cash economy lik e greece.

  114. Bystander says:

    Michael,

    Slavery is a state of mind, not a number. While I support wage increase, $9 hr is not changing anyones lives. A educated guy making 90k with two kids and stay at home wife with 3k PITI is pretty much a slave as well. There are millions who are making less than 6 years ago and going on years without pay raise. No money is no money, just neighborhood looks better.

  115. Painhrtz - Disobey! says:

    Lib best job i ever had was as an off the books pump jockey while I was away at school. 200 bucks a week cash in 94, plus tips from AC gamblers and girls headed to the beach in bikinis. We also got to keep half of the cash for any tires we fixed. I would roll in 300 bucks a week sometimes. not bad for a full time college student back in the day.

  116. Libturd in the City says:

    I actually used to drive forklifts for the various pharmaceutical distribution centers in Central Jersey (on the books, I might add). I did it through a temp agency and the pay was over $10 per hour. Worst job ever was unloading trucks for Wakefern/Shoprite in Raritan Center. Best job ever was probably Burger King. I really had a lot of fun there.

  117. anon (the good one) says:

    @BarackObama: “I urge Congress to follow Minnesota’s lead, raise the federal minimum wage, and lift wages for 28 million Americans.” —President Obama

  118. Libturd in the City says:

    I urge Congress to follow Minnesota’s lead…

    http://tinyurl.com/copy-minnesota

  119. Juice Box says:

    Best PT job I had as a kid was parking cars. I however quickly learned to call ahead to the hotel and ask for the names of the wedding parties before I would even show up for an assignment. I always worked the Mafia weddings, minimum tip was at least a fiver per car and usually the old man would come out and hand out $100 bills like a scene out of Good Fellas. I cleared about $500 one night parking cars for a bunch of garbage men, imagine that! I also worked when the NY Giants stayed overnight for home games at the Hilton. This was back when LT was playing, lots of good tippers on the team except for that cheap f*c*k Parcells who drove an Oldsmobile and parked it himself. I only parked cars for a Hasidic wedding once. Mainly because they would rather run over the orange safety cones and the valet parking sign than have to valet park the car. Lots of jingle in your pockets for all of that running back n forth, imaging getting a quarter for your hard work as a tip, those guys give the rest of the clan a bad name that is for sure.

  120. anon (the good one) says:

    @tim_cook: “We shall overcome”. Reflecting on the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act. Much done but much left to do. http://t.co/hk1IdRHZjU

  121. Libturd in the City says:

    You’d get a better tip from the Hasid’s if you were Hasidic. That’s how they roll.

  122. Libturd in the City says:

    Reflecting on the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act.

    http://tinyurl.com/anon-civil-rights

  123. McDullard says:

    Grim #42… about segregation in liberal towns… Race- and class-based divide is growing quite a lot.

    The race part reminds me of a joke: What’s the difference between a northern/liberal racist and a southern/conservative racist.

    The southern one doesn’t mind “not real americans” living near him as long as they don’t get uppity. The northern one doesn’t mind them getting uppity as long as they don’t live near him.

  124. Painhrtz - Disobey! says:

    Lib the way Hasids drive he is lucky he is still here forget the tips.

    50 years since the keeping blacks on the reservation act.

    Anyone See Adam corolla ripping huff post, not that it is hard

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A2Ve1wVuBGo

    http://dailycaller.com/2013/03/09/adam-carolla-rips-the-huffington-post-media-you-guys-all-have-blood-on-your-hands/

  125. Painhrtz - Disobey! says:

    Hey anon how o you square this one when your all licking each others backsides at all the right parties

    civil rights act Vote totals

    Totals are in “Yea–Nay” format:

    The original House version: 290–130 (69–31%).
    Cloture in the Senate: 71–29 (71–29%).
    The Senate version: 73–27 (73–27%).
    The Senate version, as voted on by the House: 289–126 (70–30%).

    By party and region

    Note: “Southern”, as used in this section, refers to members of Congress from the eleven states that made up the Confederate States of America in the American Civil War. “Northern” refers to members from the other 39 states, regardless of the geographic location of those states.

    The original House version:

    Southern Democrats: 7–87 (7–93%)
    Southern Republicans: 0–10 (0–100%)

    Northern Democrats: 145–9 (94–6%)
    Northern Republicans: 138–24 (85–15%)

    The Senate version:

    Southern Democrats: 1–20 (5–95%) (only Ralph Yarborough of Texas voted in favor)
    Southern Republicans: 0–1 (0–100%) (John Tower of Texas)
    Northern Democrats: 45–1 (98–2%) (only Robert Byrd of West Virginia voted against)
    Northern Republicans: 27–5 (84–16%)

  126. Juice Box says:

    Tim Cook, Set my iPhone FREE! Enough already with TSS and allow us to do as we please with our Devices!

  127. chicagofinance says:

    You are ignorant though….who gives a sh!t about your politics….

    Michael says:
    April 11, 2014 at 1:25 pm
    I’m not a lefty and I support the minimum wage increase.

  128. chicagofinance says:

    Mikey…..to be clear……this is the fcuking Wiki page…..OK?
    So the basic theory says that raising the minimum wage helps workers whose wages are raised, and hurts people who are not hired (or lose their jobs) because companies cut back on employment. But proponents of the minimum wage hold that the situation is much more complicated than the basic theory can account for. One complicating factor is possible monopsony in the labor market, whereby the individual employer has some market power in determining wages paid. Thus it is at least theoretically possible that the minimum wage may boost employment. Though single employer market power is unlikely to exist in most labor markets in the sense of the traditional ‘company town,’ asymmetric information, imperfect mobility, and the personal element of the labor transaction give some degree of wage-setting power to most firms.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minimum_wage

  129. chicagofinance says:

    Here is basic economic theory……ECON 101
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Wage_labour.svg

  130. chicagofinance says:

    also, do you see the word “equilibrium”? The triangle below the letter equili that is bounded by the center dot, the left boundary of unemployment, and the yellow diagonal supply of labor is called “dead-weight loss”.

  131. Ben says:

    I don’t know why the left is so hellbent on minimum wage raises. All that will happen is that their landlords will raise their rent $100 bucks a month.

  132. anon (the good one) says:

    @MotherJones: The Surprising Link Between Homicide Rates and…Belief in Free Will http://t.co/VQNa4hzFEM

  133. Juice Box says:

    Cumon Ben it is an election year. A six seats loss in the Senate and Obama will need to start worrying about how he will spend his remaining time trying to not rank worse than Jimmy Carter.

  134. Ragnar says:

    Here’s one real simple reason why employment could go up if the minimum wage rise under certain experimental conditions. The government always has programs that pays people for not working.
    Welfare, disability, food stamps, unemployment, etc.
    Working and welfare can be seen as substitute possibilities.
    That does not mean that either are good policies, separately or together.

    My solution to this conundrum is to abolish both.
    Because I have limited compassion for pick-pockets, and abhor price controls.

  135. Ragnar says:

    anon, 139,
    Wow, the left is willing to return to the totalitarian-loving behavioralism of B.F. Skinner, intimating to people that they don’t have free will? They truly are on the march.
    Keep pushing that, I think that even as dumbed down as the American populace is now, they still have a spark of self-worth left that will reject some lefty psychologist telling them that free will is an illusion and that submission to the benevolent guiders of society is their behaviorally determined choice.

    Here’s Ayn Rand on BF Skinner, Behavioralism, and his book “Beyond Freedom and Dignity”.
    http://www.sntp.net/behaviorism/ayn_rand_skinner.htm

  136. anon (the good one) says:

    @BillMoyersHQ: “Real patriotism is about combating the evils and injustices,” historian @harveyjkaye tells Bill. http://t.co/AzySElEFeS

  137. Michael says:

    135- Chi, from that wiki page. This quote from that wiki page sums up how screwed up the minimum wage debate really is. Problem is both sides are pushing bs. They are finding #s to fix their story. That’s what my college professor taught me about human beings and statistics. He said to be careful trusting graphs and statistics. People will mold the #s to whatever story they want to tell. The workers cheer minimum wage because it improves their situation. Stock holders and businessmen hate the minimum wage because it takes money out of their hands. So basically it’s one big pissing contest with each side trying to push their advantage aka self interest with bs #s to fit their argument.

    I’m going to side with the worker every time. I studied the labor movement and saw the horrors these individuals went through to get working rights. You are talking about people dying at the hands of the United States military. That’s right, our govt took the sides of big business and attacked workers, killing some, to protect the business owners interests. This is as anti-patriotic as you could get. Go look up the pinkertons and the use of national guard, and you will see why you must be wary of rich powerful men. This is history, and unfortunately people have forgotten how hard these American citizens fought to give us the rights we enjoy today (unfortunately they are being rolled back). People gave up their lives to provide humane rights in the work place. That’s right, they gave up their life fighting for this important cause. Fu!k the rich business man, he only cares about himself. On the Simpsons, mr. Burns is portrayed the way he is for a reason…..it’s the truth.

    “Supporters of the minimum wage say it increases the standard of living of workers, reduces poverty, reduces inequality, boosts morale and forces businesses to be more efficient.[1] In contrast, opponents of the minimum wage say it increases poverty, increases unemployment (particularly among low productivity workers) and is damaging to businesses.[2][3][4]”

  138. Michael says:

    144- Just to prove my point about the mr. Burns comment. If someone is worth 1 billion dollars, it shouldn’t be a fight to get them to help people. It just shows your true colors when they make comments like “I earned it” . That just says greedy all over it. Instead of realizing how lucky they are to be in a position to help people, they only help themselves. They lobby for laws that help them and hurts everybody else. What’s the big deal of paying taxes when you are worth that much money, why do they try so hard to avoid it. It’s insane to have the wealthiest people paying the lowest % of taxes in an economic system. How does that even make sense? In a logical based system, shouldn’t the biggest earners pay the highest taxes, not because you are picking on them, but because they make the most money. If you are a billionaire you should be paying a higher % than 15% if regular workers are paying over 30%. Just because it’s capital gains doesn’t make it alright to not pay taxes.

  139. Comrade Nom DePlume says:

    [133] street

    I found something similar that I came back here to share. Ordinarily I would not give this site much credence because of the obvious slant. However, if you look at the pure facts represented, and assume that they are accurate as reported, there is an issue here, one that leapt out at me from my time working on Clean Water Act and “takings” cases in NH and DC. It’s a bit esoteric but it is an accurate representation of how the mitigation process works.

    http://www.infowars.com/breaking-sen-harry-reid-behind-blm-land-grab-of-bundy-ranch/

    The story I found doesn’t, in my view, confirm unlawful treatment, just the heavy hand of government and the coincidental involvement of Reid. However, Your story has some additional facts; if these hold up then it’s starting to smell in Nevada.

  140. Comrade Nom DePlume says:

    [145] Michael

    “In a logical based system, shouldn’t the biggest earners pay the highest taxes, not because you are picking on them, but because they make the most money.”

    We pick on Michael but he has summed up in one sentence precisely why our progressive tax system works in the way it does. The “logic” is that, like Willie Sutton, you tax the wealthy more because that’s where the money is.

    It isn’t about “fairness”; I’ve never found anyone who can tell me why it’s “fair”. In fact, no one has ever tried. Fairness is a fig leaf, a shibboleth used to justify an action that is logical: We take from you because you have it to be taken. Who else is there?

    We may say it’s unfair to tax the successful more heavily but Michael has eviscerated those arguments by pointing out that it isn’t about fairness–it’s about logic.

  141. Michael says:

    147-

    I’ll bite. Fair is paying at least the same % as everyone else, not less. Plain and simple.

    Why do you defend a system in which the lowest earners pay the highest % of taxes when you factor in things like the sales tax. God forbid the wealthy pay an honest percentage of their earnings in taxes. You only have good guys like buffet complaining about it. He’s a smart man, he is trying to get billionaires to give back a little more.

    Sometimes “who says it” is just as important as “what they say.” So it is with Warren Buffett’s op-ed about taxes and fiscal reality in today’s New York Times. This is the “Oracle of Omaha,” acknowledged the best investor of the past 50 years, the wise man of finance, a man outside the political and ideological battles of Washington. What Buffett says is straightforward and obvious:

    1. Raising the marginal tax rate to Clinton-era levels will not have any impact on investment decisions. Indeed economic growth was robust during periods of much higher marginal rates—benefiting both the wealthy and the middle class. Recall that this was the same conclusion that the Congressional Research Service reached in a report Republicans recently tried to suppress.

    2. Cuts in tax rates have given, as Buffett puts it, “a huge tail wind” to the super rich. These folks paid an average tax of 26.4 percent in 1992, but only 19.9 percent in 2009, on average income of $202 million. As Buffet says, this is an “outrage.”

    3. There should be, according to Buffett, an absolute minimum tax of 30 percent on income between $1 million and $10 million, and 35 percent above that. No loopholes, no hidden games, keep it simple.

    4. The most important point. Over the long haul, government should set its goals at spending 21 percent of GDP, and raising 18.5 percent in revenue, leaving a gap—an annual deficit—of about 2.5 percent of GDP. That is manageable with a growing economy. And these figures are close to our historical norms. The crisis of the past few years has been that revenue fell to 15.5 percent of GDP while spending crept up to 22.4 percent.

    An annual deficit of 7 percent of GDP is not manageable. But notice, the most significant deviation has been the revenue decline, not the spending increase! We should spend about 21 percent of GDP, but are spending 22.4 percent. We should collect 18.5 percent in revenue, but are collecting only 15.5 percent.

    So listen to the wisest investor in America: Raise marginal rates, run a consistent but manageable deficit, and stop worrying about those at the top of the income spectrum.

    It sounds very simple and reasonable, especially coming from Warren Buffet.

  142. chicagofinance says:

    OPINION

    Hike the Minimum Wage? Show Me How
    An increase to $10.10 will lead to cutbacks in my nonprofit’s services to people with disabilities.

    By ROBERT STACK

    The debate over increasing the minimum wage might seem inconsequential to many Americans. After all, no one would dispute that those employees currently earning the minimum wage constitute less than 2.9% of the total U.S. workforce. One side of the argument talks about fair pay; the other focuses on the potential damage to employment and the economy.

    As the head of a national nonprofit organization celebrating 25 years of supporting thousands of people who have severe developmental disabilities, I thoroughly endorse raising the minimum wage to the proposed $10.10 per hour for our thousands of employees who provide this care—with an important caveat. Show me where to find the money.

    The majority of my 2,045 direct caregivers make around $8 per hour. Add to this amount fringe benefits such as health-care insurance, overtime and other insurance, and you’ve got $9.80 per hour. Our national budget is close to $100 million. The majority of our revenue is derived from Medicaid billable hours for the people with severe disabilities that we help. Over the past quarter of a century, our organization has essentially broken even—which is the point of a nonprofit. There are many times when we run into a deficit; this is why we fundraise. If we ever have excess income, it is used to develop additional facilities to meet some of the needs of the national waiting list for housing for people with disabilities. There are more than 500,000 people on the list.

    If President Obama’s advocacy for increasing the minimum wage succeeds, without a calibrated increase in Medicaid rates, we would be forced to shut down in most of the states where we pay $8 an hour. Why? Because the increase would add $3.1 million to our costs. Monday-morning managers who suggest that I cut executive staff are off base. Even if my executive staff works for free, that would still not cover the cost. We’d have to pull out of states like Texas, Kentucky, Tennessee, New Mexico and South Carolina, and we’d never open in Mississippi, where we know that our organization’s services are much needed. Other states in which we operate, such as New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania, will see services compromised, as there are caregivers we now employ who will gravitate toward other industries, like food and hotels, where the pay will be higher.

    This is not some political argument. This is the reality of our situation and that of many other nonprofits. We are highly regulated to provide documented care. We aim to do a great job, but that will be difficult to accomplish if we have to compensate the majority of our workforce with a 25% increase.

    We serve people, not burgers. If the minimum wage is increased, we cannot pass the added cost onto our customers. Paradoxically, our customers are for the most part indigent. The federal and state government picks up their tab. Government sets the rates, not the nonprofit, and if we can barely make it now, I don’t know how anyone expects us to do this without a rate adjustment. Yet Medicaid spending is already an enormous part of the federal budget, and an increase to address this problem seems unlikely. What should I tell the families and the people with disabilities in our care?

    Mr. Stack is president and CEO of Community Options.

  143. Michael says:

    Now is Buffet attacking billionaires too, because he is jealous? I hate when I hear that stupid sh!t about being jealous.

    Just realize you are not a billionaire, next ask yourself why do you like coddling billionaires and insist on the most severe punishment (elimination of welfare) for our most vulnerable citizens. Keep defending people making millions in a year while only paying a small % of that income in taxes, and keep up the fight against our weakest citizens.

  144. Michael says:

    149- ok, since a non-profit can’t make ends meet, thousands of people should continue to endure slave wages? If we keep this law based on this non-profit, I think we should shut it down, since it’s doing more harm than good. But realistically, this guy is just defending himself. Huh? Yes, this is a self-preservation move disguised as something else. Non-profits are a rip-off, and I don’t trust a damn word that comes out of someone’s mouth that is both president and CEO of a non-profit.

  145. Has Michael finished taking his dump here?

  146. Street Justice says:

    The Bundy Ranch will be the real life test to see if Rand Paul, Ted Cruz, and Mike Lee are the real deal or corrupt garbage like the rest of them. Let’s see if they do anything..,

  147. street (153)-

    You already know the answer to your question.

    Bow down to your masters, drone!

  148. anon (the good one) says:

    @SenSanders: The Koch Brothers Are Winning: http://t.co/5dxae5xo0f

  149. anon (the good one) says:

    @WSJ: Only 13% of Twitter accounts have written at least 100 tweets. 30% have sent 1-10 tweets, and 44% haven’t sent any. http://t.co/Qyj24vIr8n

  150. anon (the good one) says:

    @SenSanders: The top 25 hedge-fund managers made more than $24 billion last year, enough to pay the salaries of more than 425,000 public school teachers.

  151. anon (the good one) says:

    THE DIVIDE
    American Injustice in the
    Age of the Wealth Gap

    By Matt Taibbi

  152. joyce says:

    Street,

    http://www.market-ticker.org/akcs-www?post=228930
    Here’s your answer on Rubio (I know he wasn’t among the three names you mentioned, but the heck)

  153. Michael says:

    (NEWSER) – Could ethanol someday essentially be produced out of thin air? A group of scientists has published research in Nature detailing a new method of making ethanol out of carbon monoxide gas, instead of corn or sugarcane, Reuters reports. Researchers saturated water with the gas, then zapped it with a novel device featuring two electrodes, one made of what they’re calling “oxide-derived copper,” to convert it into fuel. “I emphasize that these are just laboratory experiments today,” lead researcher Matthew Kanan says. He expects to have a prototype device ready in two to three years.

    http://www.newser.com/story/185109/scientists-we-can-make-ethanol-without-corn.html

  154. Comrade Nom Deplume, Guardian of the Realm says:

    [148] michael

    You start out by saying that fairness dictates everyone should pay the same percentage but then you devolve into a defense of a minimum tax on the wealthy.

    Which is it? And if you advocate for the Buffett 30 percent minimum, which you appear to do, is that across the board? On everyone?

    At a minimum, your post screams out for clarification.

  155. Michael says:

    161- that’s what we call a game changer

  156. Michael says:

    162- yes, across the board. I don’t want our wealthiest citizens paying the lowest %. I don’t think it’s right, because that now means everyone else, who makes substantially less income, must now pick up the tab.

  157. Comrade Nom Deplume, Guardian of the Realm says:

    [148] redux

    And you say that Buffett calls for an increase in marginal rates.

    Have you considered how much more tax Buffett would pay? Let me help you out with that: Zero.

    Buffett has a “salary” that is a tiny portion of his income. Nearly all is capital gain or qual. div. income, and a sizeable portion of that is tax exempt.

    You don’t get to correct the kink in the progessivity of the top tier unless you raise, and by a dramatic amount, the tax rate on unearned income. Of course, that brings with it its own collateral damage but I doubt you are much concerned with that.

    If you are going to post on tax policy, do all of us a favor and read up on it first.

  158. joyce says:

    Why isn’t a flat amount (rather than a percentage) considered fair?

  159. joyce says:

    Actually, disregard my question. I don’t really care about tax rates; my concern is the FED/Fedgov being responsible for certain individuals’, companies’, industries’ existence… let alone incomes.

  160. Comrade Nom Deplume, Guardian of the Realm says:

    [164] michael

    You do realize that you are advocating a flat tax? To be tax neutral, you have to raise taxes on unearned income AND, more importantly, raise taxes dramatically on the bottom 50-70% of taxpayers if your measure is to be revenue neutral.

    Right now, the vast majority of all income tax revenues come from the top tier of taxpayers. You would be asking cashiers and burger flippers to pay the same percentage as billionaires. Naturally, the billionaire pays more, a freakload more, but the burden on the lower classes will go up while the burden on the top 2-5% would go down.

    Nice try, points for altruism, but I see that as a complete nonstarter with the left. They want to go in the other direction, a direction that will be a failure of epic proportions as that giant sucking sound Ross Perot talked about won’t be jobs, it will be capital flight.

  161. joyce says:

    Comrade,
    (Your last post)

    What about the tax treatment for the various kinds of trusts and foundations? I dont know most of the rules, but my guess is that comes into play. I love when morons bring up Buffet as the shining beacon of what is right… Do three seconds of homework to find the truth. Did or didn’t he love the bailout of AIG which paid Goldman back at 100cents which he had a size able position in?

  162. Comrade Nom Deplume, Guardian of the Realm says:

    [167] joyce,

    I consider a flat tax to be “fair” on a philosophical level. It is, however, not “logical” as Michael pointed out. It is also something that won’t be seen in our lifetimes unless there is a revolution of epic proportions, one that will shake the world to its very foundations.

    Consider this: Putting aside whether it would be allowed, if Texas had a referendum and voted to secede from the Union, the economic fallout would be catastrophic. Markets worldwide would experience the worst crashes in the history of finance. The resulting economic collapse would be nothing short of a depression that makes the Great Depression look like 2008.

  163. anon (the good one) says:

    @SenSanders: The #FreedomSummit means freedom to pollute, freedom to work for $3 p/hr and if you’re old without insurance you have the freedom to die.

  164. joyce says:

    I’m sorry I do not understand the analogy between the fallout of adopting a flat tax vs that of Texas seceding.

  165. Comrade Nom Deplume, Guardian of the Realm says:

    [173] joyce

    Yeah, noticed that after posting. It was an example of the sort of revolutionary activity that could promote a flat tax regime but would crash markets in the process.

  166. yome says:

    Lower tax rates with a graduated flat tax and eliminate all deductions, Corporate and Individual. Obamas paid 25% on $425,000 income.$146,000 is the max on a 25% bracket. That means they deducted most of their income to bring it downt to AGI of $146,000

  167. Comrade Nom Deplume, Guardian of the Realm says:

    [170] joyce,

    If you look at all that Buffett supports, it invariably is good for his business ventures and his own bottom line, and would be a net increase to his wealth.

    He did not propose any tax changes that would actually cost him much of anything, and his support for other things inures to the benefit of various BH holdings. So he is talking his own book.

    Consider Soros–IMHO, he is doing the same thing. He advances the far left agenda but has made his money betting against the dollar and betting on gold (which is essentially the same thing, but done at different times). If someone were shorting the United States, you would expect them to take positions that make the short profitable.

  168. Ragnar says:

    Hey lefties,
    I am a one per center and I’m paying 36% in federal taxes for 2013. Another 7% or so in state taxes. Can you please do my taxes according to your imagined fantasy land where I am paying less taxes than you? My accountant apparently isn’t reading the daily kos or mother jones and so missed all these secret rules that let rich people pay so little.

    You know where the taxes hurt the most? It’s taking the cash flow that I would otherwise be reinvesting in my business. And thinking of the undeserving poor who will spend it while spitting at me that I don’t pay enough taxes, while I pay more in taxes in one year than they will in a lifetime.

  169. yome says:

    #177
    fire your accountant. Not even Buffett pays 36%

  170. yome says:

    President Barack Obama and Michelle Obama paid $98,169 in taxes on $481,098 in adjusted income last year, tax returns the White House released Friday show. They paid an effective federal income tax rate of 20.4 percent and donated significantly less to charity than they did the year before.

    The 42-page document, which included the couple’s Illinois state income tax return, shows the Obamas reported donating $59,251 to 32 charities, which helped lower their overall tax bill. The nearly $60,000 in donations represents 12.3 percent of their adjusted gross income.

    But their charitable giving was down sharply from 2012, when the president and first lady reported giving away $150,034.

    Their largest charitable gift last year, $8,751, went to the Fisher House Foundation, which supports military families. The Obamas gave the foundation $103,871 in 2012.

    The joint tax returns, which the Obamas signed Tuesday, were posted on the White House website on Friday, four days before the April 15 income tax filing deadline.

    Income from the sale of Obama’s best-selling books also declined significantly since 2012.

    Obama received $31,139 from Random House and $85,041 from Dystel & Goderich Literary Management, for a total of $116,180 in book sales. That combined total compares with $273,739 in similar payments he received in 2012. There was a big drop in the amount from Random House, which paid Obama $162,789 in 2012.

    Overall, the Obamas had total tax payments of $117,277. They were entitled to a refund of $19,108, but applied it toward their 2014 tax bill instead of pocketing the money.

    They also paid an extra $9,513 in alternative minimum tax.

    Obama’s annual salary as president is $400,000, which was the main source of the family’s income last year.

    Itemized deductions totaling $147,769 helped reduce the Obamas’ taxable income. Along with their charitable contributions, the Obamas deducted $42,383 in mortgage interest on the home they own in Chicago.

    Among the Obamas’ other notable charitable contributions were $5,000 to the Sidwell Friends School, the exclusive private school where daughters Malia and Sasha are enrolled, $4,000 to the American Red Cross and $2,000 to One Fund Boston, which was created last year to aid victims of the Boston Marathon bombings.

    The Obamas also redeemed a $295,000 short-term U.S. Treasury note they acquired in April 2012, selling off the security in January 2013. The proceeds were the same as the original price of the note, so the Obamas incurred neither a profit nor a loss on the sale.

    They also sold three other long-term Treasury notes worth $1.2 million and posted a capital loss of $112,515. The White House did not say why the Obamas sold the notes.

    For tax purposes, the Obamas reported only a $3,000 capital loss from the sales. Taxpayers are allowed to carry over capital losses to the next year if the loss is more than $3,000. Under the carry-over provision, taxpayers can list just $3,000 as their total capital loss for the year.

    The White House said the year-to-year difference in Obama’s charitable giving was largely due to declining proceeds from sales of his children’s book, “Of The I Sing: A Letter to My Daughters.” Obama in 2011 designated those proceeds to Fisher House. Proceeds have declined every year since.

  171. McDullard says:

    Ragnar #177… I second yome’s recommendation.

    There are so many tax-deferred and tax-deductible options that if you are paying 36% rate on your income, you are either arithmetically challenged, or you are simply minting so much money that you should go IPO…

  172. joyce says:

    http://money.cnn.com/gallery/pf/taxes/2014/03/14/tax-audit/9.html

    I love the way the its phrased at the end, “after providing [evidence] he was let off the hook [of an IRS audit].” I thought we were innocent until proven guilty?

  173. joyce says:

    Where does the prez, the gov, or any other elected official report as income all the expenses he doesn’t have to inur? Such as lodging et al

  174. yome says:

    Obama’s actually just paid $98,169 on an income of $481,098. 20% of income

    “Overall, the Obamas had total tax payments of $117,277. They were entitled to a refund of $19,108, but applied it toward their 2014 tax bill instead of pocketing the money.”

  175. anon (the good one) says:

    here you go from the WSJ. but you fukcers again and again and again and again argue that our taxes go to welfare

    1. Army
    2. Social Security
    3. Socialized medicine for the elderly

    @WSJmarkets: As April 15 tax day nears, here’s a question: Where do your tax dollars go? http://t.co/f6aaVaMATP http://t.co/2dmg4DlKkG

  176. anon (the good one) says:

    @CMYKjunkie: Don’t blame poor people! Blame tanks/planes/bombs “@WSJmarkets: Where do your tax dollars go? http://t.co/LMbjzElBjr http://t.co/LKdBh1jbBJ”

  177. anon (the good one) says:

    @Wootenomics: @WSJmarkets @WSJ it would be interesting to compare these totals with what taxpayers think their share of taxes goes to.

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  179. Street Justice says:

    @RepGosar: Thousands of cars on I-15. Going about 10 MPH to #bundyranch #bundybattle http://t.co/D2tkLp0ewj

  180. Street Justice says:

    The Feds have under estimated the rage building at injustices from IRS to NSA to Benghazi to F&F to the #BundyRanch pic.twitter.com/eNxTS3aqfH

  181. plume (166)-

    You’re making a big stretch in assuming that Michael can read. I have seen no evidence here that he’s anything other than a pie-faced troll of a mook who bleeds with the need to be heard above all else.

    “You don’t get to correct the kink in the progessivity of the top tier unless you raise, and by a dramatic amount, the tax rate on unearned income. Of course, that brings with it its own collateral damage but I doubt you are much concerned with that.

    If you are going to post on tax policy, do all of us a favor and read up on it first.”

  182. I’m ready for an uptick in the trend of lone madmen crashing truck bombs into IRS facilities.

  183. What’s this Bundy thing? Are they doing a remake of Married With Children?

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