Is it really so easy to downsize?

From Forbes:

The Next Housing Crisis: Aging Americans’ Homes

There’s another potential housing crisis coming and this one won’t be a collapse in home values.

The nation is facing a lack of affordable, physically-accessible and well-located homes for America’s aging population — especially those with low incomes, according to a new, gloomy study released today by the Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies & AARP Foundation.

“You’ve got a scenario with the largest generation we’ve ever had moving into their senior years combined with the fact that longevity is increasing,” says Jonathan Smoke, chief economist at Realtor.com, the site of the National Association of Realtors. “And we’re fairly ill prepared to address the housing needs and challenges of them.”

Fortunately, there’s time to address this crisis — but not much. In 15 years, one in five Americans will be 65 or older. And by 2040, we’ll have 28 million who are 80+.

“If things don’t change, low-income older people will be compromising their well-being in many respects,” says Chris Herbert, acting managing director of the Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies. “It’s an issue that will affect us all.” Housing, says Vivian Vassallo, vice president of Housing for AARP Foundation “is a lynchpin for well-being.”

Many houses and apartments — which are often old themselves — lack basic accessibility features, preventing older adults with disabilities from living safely and comfortably in their homes, according to the report.

Only 1% of U.S. housing units have all five of what are called “universal design” features: no-step entry; single-floor living; extra-wide doorways and halls; accessible electrical controls and switches and lever-style door and faucet handles. Just 57% of homes have more than one of them.

And, the study notes, no-step entryways appear in homes of only 46% of households headed by someone at least 50 and which have a person with serious difficulty walking or climbing stairs.

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132 Responses to Is it really so easy to downsize?

  1. Mike says:

    Good Morning New Jersey

  2. grim says:

    Interesting article. I applaud her for the ingenuity, but suspect there is more to the back story.

    In many areas it is against the law to capture rainwater from your downspouts. That’s right, it’s an illegal diversion of a public resource, and don’t you dare touch it.

    In many areas solar panels are specifically prohibited by town codes. Well known case right over the border in NY state of a homeowner who lost his battle with the town for having put up solar panels. They were considered an eyesore and a detriment to the health and well being of the neighborhood. They were taken down.

    Also illegal to use gray water (not sewage) for other purposes, like watering your garden, etc. This is water from handwash and kitchen sinks, tubs and showers.

    In many areas most other alternatives are illegal. Another well known case in Wayne, from the record:

    Hard-fought energy-saving turbine finally installed at Wayne carwash

    The 49-foot wind turbine installed Monday at Wayne Auto Spa on Hamburg Turnpike won’t easily escape the notice of passing motorists, and that’s how Rob Burke, the carwash owner, wants it.

    If Burke had his way, the wind turbine would have been built more than twice as tall, and much sooner. But a lengthy and costly legal battle with the township delayed and changed the plans he drew up in 2006.

    “It’s been a long time,” Burke said. “I guess the wheels turn slowly.”

    Mayor Chris Vergano, who had opposed the project when it was introduced, said as he visited the carwash on Monday, “It’s been a bumpy road.”

    Burke initially planned to build a 120-foot turbine with a horizontal axis – so the blades would face sideways, like a fan — but the idea was met with protests from some neighbors over fears it would be too obtrusive and perhaps unsafe, by flinging ice in the winter.

    As Burke sought Planning Board approval, the township council voted to ban turbines within 1,640 feet of residential areas, schools and day-care centers, arguing they were protecting property values by keeping away a noise-making eyesore. The Planning Board denied Burke’s application.

    Burke took the fight to court. In 2010, Superior Court Judge Donald Volkert Jr. in Paterson found that the Planning Board had improperly denied Burke’s application and granted him approval.

    After the township appealed the decision, they reached a settlement in 2012 that awarded Burke $220,000. He decided to build a smaller turbine, which did not require a variance, and settled on a turbine whose axis points up and can be closer to the ground.

  3. grim says:

    And you know how they came up with the 1,640 feet number, don’t you? This is a cute little secret in municipal code. They aren’t banning it outright, so don’t get upset if you are a supporter. But if you are against it, realize that there is no single contiguous piece of property in town that is not 1,640 feet of a residential area, school, or day care center.

    So in their insane battle against this guy wanting to put up a wind turbine, paid for by his own money, to power his business, the town spent nearly half a million dollars. Which is f*cking insane, look at the things this guy has done:

    The turbine joins a list of eco-friendly, energy-saving measures Burke has implemented since buying the car wash in 2005: solar panels cover the roof of the building, waste oil from cars fuels furnaces, and the carwashes use biodegradable soap and well water, instead of treated municipal water.

    On the southern end of his property — where the wind turbine stands — are vegetable gardens and chickens that provide food for Eva’s Village in Paterson. Burke also plans to install a greenhouse there this fall that will double his production.

  4. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    [2] grim,

    You have scratched the surface. A deep gash, but a scratch nonetheless. The degree over which governments at all levels, “quasi governments” such as school boards and utility or water districts, private bodies like HOAs, and even trusts and covenants, have over the use of “our own” property is staggering. You ran up against more of this when you tried to site your distillery.

    In law school, you are taught that property is “a bundle of rights”. You’d be surprised at how few rights are actually left in that bundle.

  5. Looks like my dressing-down of shit-for-brains yesterday brought back the notorious troll and practitioner of straw man, gluteus.

  6. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    [4] redux,

    Owning property in any urban or suburban area in this country means adhering to the old Japanese saying that “the nail that sticks up gets hammered down.”

  7. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    [5] clot

    I was just thinking that last night. Although he wasn’t really trolling yesterday.

    BTW, for some reason, Fabian reminds me of Morrissey from the Smiths. I like listening to First Wave on XM but every time The Smiths come on, with that quaver of his and those vaguely psychotic lyrics, I think of Fabian. Then I change the channel.

  8. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    Speaking of solar, I am giving it serious thought. I was going to install a backup generator but that’s a lot of coin for something I may never use.

    Still have to look into it, but it seems to me to make more sense to install solar, get the current use of it paying me back, and I will still have some (not as much but some) electrical during power failures, assuming I have battery backup.

    My sister and BIL installed panels on their flat roof in a Boston suburb. I asked her how they are working. She said her electric bill last month was $6.

  9. “[A] crash is coming, and it may be terrific. …. The vicious circle will get in full swing and the result will be a serious business depression. There may be a stampede for selling which will exceed anything that the Stock Exchange has ever witnessed. Wise are those investors who now get out of debt.

    The above words could easily have been stated by me or another of the (very) few others who currently predict the coming of crashes in the markets.

    But they were not. The statements above were made by investor Roger Babson at a speech at the Annual Business Conference in Massachusetts on 5th September, 1929.

    Mr. Babson’s prediction was not a sudden one. In fact, he had been making the same prediction for the previous two years, although he, in September of 1929, felt the crash was much closer.

    News of his speech reached Wall Street by mid-afternoon, causing the market to retreat about 3%. The sudden decline was named the “Babson Break.”

    The reaction from business insiders was immediate. Rather than respond by saying, “Thanks for the warning—we’ll proceed cautiously,” Wall Street vilified him. The Chicago Tribune published numerous rebuffs from a host of economists and Wall Street leaders. Even Mr. Babson’s patriotism was taken into question for making so rash a projection. Noted economist Professor Irving Fisher stated emphatically, “There may be a recession in stock prices, but not anything in the nature of a crash.” He and many others repeatedly soothed investors, advising them that a resumption in the boom was imminent. Financier Bernard Baruch famously cabled Winston Churchill, “Financial storm definitely passed.” Even President Herbert Hoover assured Americans that the market was sound.

    But, 55 days after Mr. Babson’s speech, on 29th October, 1929, the market suddenly went into a free-fall, dropping 12% in its first day.”

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-09-15/babsons-warning

  10. plume (7)-

    Why? Because he’s a bat smoker (not that there’s anything wrong with that)?

    “BTW, for some reason, Fabian reminds me of Morrissey from the Smiths.”

  11. grim says:

    Do not install a system with a battery backup, you will pay a fortune, require significantly more batteries than you think you need, and realize that batteries are a consumable item, needing to be replaced fairly regularly at great expense and waste.

    Also, most every modern systems will not power your house should the power be disconnected from the grid or go out. They monitor your mains power to synchronize the power with it, and for safety reasons will immediately shut down the system should the power go out (to prevent back-feeding power to the grid where someone can be electrocuted). But also, you’ll likely be in a situation where every time a cloud passes, your electricity will go out, or sag, which will cause havoc for electronics and motors. There is a house around the block with both panels and a Kohler generator.

  12. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    [1-3] grim – I’m sure there were several Westview Rd residents that would have been about eye level with the 120 foot high turbine Burke wanted to initially construct, so I can get that (as you would too if you were paying $20K per year in taxes for one of those homes). In fact, just about any house on Westview that actually has a West view would be have the large turbine in their sightline. OTOH, I don’t disagree that shenanigans were in play by the town and the mayor and that’s why they had to ante up $220K to Burke, I guess.

  13. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    grim – I don’t like buying new UPS batteries either. And that’s just for a few home computers.

    Do not install a system with a battery backup, you will pay a fortune, require significantly more batteries than you think you need, and realize that batteries are a consumable item, needing to be replaced fairly regularly at great expense and waste.

  14. grim says:

    Sure, but didn’t you ever hear the phrase – “Don’t fall in love with the view unless you own it”? They willingly purchased property that is immediately adjacent to commercial and/or industrial property. The commercial property was in place long before those houses were constructed.

    The Westview road residents enjoyment of the view is predicated on Burke’s property rights. In addition to the $20k property taxes they pay, perhaps they should pay some of Burke’s too? What if Burke wanted to construct an office building on his property, which I believe would be a permitted use in this area. What then?

  15. grim says:

    Grid-tie is a vastly superior approach

  16. Ottoman says:

    Cool, so if I buy the house next to you, you’ll support my right to build a wind turbine on my property with my money. It’s hilarious how many of you doofuses directly benefit from regulations designed to keep your property values high and then complain about regulatory overreach.

    Time for a funny:

    Ayn Rand, Rand Paul, and Paul Ryan walk into a bar. The bartender serves them tainted alcohol because there are no regulations. They die.

  17. grim says:

    16.

    It’s your property, not mine.

    I would probably ask to see if we could get a discount on two turbines, and put one up myself. Maybe I’m just funny, but the best looking things in the whole of Atlantic City are the turbines on the drive in. How is anyone not awestruck by the elegance of those things?

    In most cases, uproar about “property values” is largely the bullshit excuse you use when you have no other grounds for argument.

    I’d wager a bet that horrendous DIY architecture by amateur builders, stupid paint colors, shitty old cars, rusty sheds, loud parties, obnoxious teenagers, rear yards filled with plastic toy houses, and neglected landscaping are all more detrimental to property values than a turbine.

  18. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    [14]grim – I never did hear that one, but I’ll remember it now. I’m fine with Burke enjoying all the property rights he is entitled to.

    BTW, if you have a small crack in your windshield don’t get the car washed at Burke’s place on 95 degree day. My ’84 CRX came out of that car wash looking like the windshield encountered a bird strike due to the thermal delta, I guess.

    Sure, but didn’t you ever hear the phrase – “Don’t fall in love with the view unless you own it”?

  19. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    [11] grim,

    Thanks, that’s helpful. These are all the things I need to educate myself on. Personally, I love the idea of doing both but if I am going to maintain the title of Sgt. Cheapo (with deference to the Captain), I have to think long and hard about best uses for this cash.

    I want a standby but a Kohler installed is a significant nut for something that may never get used, and the only reason I would even consider it is because I have a gas line running to my pool heater so that is one expense I wouldn’t have to incur. Just put the pad outside of the pool enclosure and branch off the gas line. Assuming it is sufficient, of course. Looks sufficient but I’m no expert.

  20. grim says:

    I like having electricity, but don’t you dare put up a power pole or transmission line.

    I like having gas to keep me warm and cook my food, but don’t you dare build a pipeline or mine for gas or oil.

    Sewage treatment, trash dump? Not in my back yard you don’t.

  21. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    Many years ago my wife (then gf) and I were looking for a home rental in NH. We looked at a Colonial farm house and while talking to the owner/landlord I asked him about the similar styled house that was painted purple with pink polka dots (and done very, very, well). The owner of the house I was looking at said, “Oh, that guy. He painted his house red on the front and white on the other three sides. The town told him that he was violating a local ordinance that said all sides of the house have to be finished in the same color and style. So he did that.”

    stupid paint colors

  22. anon (the good one) says:

    saw that the other day and was about to post here. good one

    Ottoman says:
    September 16, 2014 at 7:44 am

    Ayn Rand, Rand Paul, and Paul Ryan walk into a bar. The bartender serves them tainted alcohol because there are no regulations. They die.

  23. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    [10] clot,

    No real reason. He just does. I think its because if I didn’t know what Morrissey looked like, I’d picture Fabian. Or there is something about the songs and his voice. I cannot say why with any certainty.

    Can’t be about football. Morrissey’s a Manc.

  24. Fast Eddie says:

    Liberals are cute when they’re resentful and angry.

  25. grim says:

    If there isn’t yet a conspiracy theory about that trifecta, let me offer one up:

    Ayn Rand, Rand Paul, and Paul Ryan

    Ayn
    Rand
    Rand
    Paul
    Paul
    Ryan

    To complete the logic and make the relationship nearly circular, Ryan is an anagram of “Ayn R”. Coincidence? I think not.

    Which taken together as an anagram produces the following phrase: “A Lard, nary any pun”, wait, no, “Ad Annul Nary Pray”, or something perhaps starting with Anal Play… Pay a Lardy Nun Run? Or even “Lardy Nap Ran Yuan”, which I think is a fantastic thai dish. Was Rand Paul really named after Ayn Rand? Where the hell was I going with this anyway.

  26. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    I was looking through local ads for a contractor to do some gutter work and I came across an ad for this store, not that far from me.

    http://www.starquestshooterssurvivalsupply.com/

    It starts. And in my last Costco circular, I see they are now offering water treatment and storage systems in addition to the years-supply-of-freeze-dried-food. I suspect the new Cabelas near me is probably getting in on this though I don’t know. My next purchase from them is going to be a fishing rod.

    Prepping is going mainstream. I am hoping that they are only looking to ride a wave here.

  27. Ragnar says:

    Sounds like a government run bar with government liquor. Hard to make money serving poisoned liquor, which grim would know.

  28. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    [24] eddie

    Saw a sticker a week ago that said “Liberalism: Arrogance and Envy Disguised as Compassion.”

  29. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    Ragnar, you mentioned Still Looking the other day when we spoke. I got a linkedin request from her this weekend. So she is still around.

  30. anon (the good one) says:

    GM makes lots of money with defective cars

    Ragnar says:
    September 16, 2014 at 8:30 am
    Hard to make money serving poisoned liquor,

  31. jj says:

    Walk In Closets.

    Isn’t that term illegal according to the ADA, why do realtors use it?

  32. grim says:

    Ayn Rand, Rand Paul, and Paul Ryan walk into a bar. The bartender serves them tainted alcohol because there are no regulations. They die.

    I’ll say it again, Skateboarding Business is not a Crime.

    Inherent in this joke is clearly a deeply seated resentment against business. What business is going to stay in business poisoning their customers? What bartender isn’t going to get lynched when half his bar keels over dead? Why are you so certain that it’s the goal of every business to lie, cheat, steal, and kill? Why is being in business the same as being a criminal to you?

    Asinine.

    And how again exactly do you make a living without lying, cheating, stealing, and killing? Or do you just live off the public dime?

    Funny, because only those enterprises that operate under the sanction of government, can usually get away with killing their patrons.

  33. grim says:

    Legislating prosperity is as effective as trying to outlaw crime.

    God, if only we had just one more law, just one more regulation, everything would just be perfect.

  34. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    I saw a Prius with a bumper sticker that said:

    You are entitled to your own opinion but you are not entitled to your own facts!

    I didn’t think conservatives drove Priuses.

  35. jj says:

    A lot of the recent GM recalls were for older cars and orphan cars. The recall was regardless of Milage or whether you were original owner.

    I have a used beat up Pontiac, Saturn, Oldsmobile with in excess of 100K miles I go to dealer for the “free recall” and while I am there I am told if I turn in car to dealer instead of dealer paying for recall I will get a credit worth sometimes double to triple of value of car.

    I can buy a low end Chevy for like 16K take my 4K credit on my junk Saturn and drive off with a nothing down five year loan at zero percent on 12k. I would be nuts to keep Saturn. The Saturn has maybe 1-3 years left and will need repairs and this one time deal is gone. The new Chevy I got a brand new car. Also in the case of my wifes car recall, she never had an issue with car. The car ran fine.

    Some of these recalls over the Key issue or SeatBelt Harness issue were serious issues but only were a problem in a high speed crash. So I bought a Saturn brand new nad beat the poop out of it till 150K miles and get a double recall why would I not take a new car. GM increased sales greatly as a result of recalls.

    anon (the good one) says:

    September 16, 2014 at 8:34 am

    GM makes lots of money with defective cars

    Ragnar says:
    September 16, 2014 at 8:30 am
    Hard to make money serving poisoned liquor,

  36. gary (24)-

    No, that’s when they’re at their most dangerous. It means they’re about to try and dictate other people’s behavior.

    “Liberals are cute when they’re resentful and angry.”

  37. I’m no Michael Savage fan, but he nailed it with liberalism…it is a mental disorder.

  38. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    [30] HeWhoMustNotBeAcknowledged

    “GM makes lots of money with defective cars”

    Brought to you by http://www.whitehouse.gov/the_press_office/Fact-Sheet-on-Obama-Administration-Auto-Restructuring-Initiative-for-General-Motors

  39. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    [32] grim,

    It’s your blog but shouldn’t you know better than to try to reason with a troll?

    They should be belittled and, if we ever find ourselves WROL, killed.

  40. chicagofinance says:

    I claim credit for MTR…….Stu went there after my vehement endorsement and exclaimed with a full throated “meh”……he said some hipster sh!tpile in the neighborhood had bartenders with better beards and tats……he claimed the food at MTR was leftover maggot-meal…..go look it up….

    Anthrax for snob says:
    September 15, 2014 at 9:23 pm
    Grim (95)-

    Memphis Tap Room. Great beer & great food. Everything on the menu sounds weird and awful, but it’s all terrific.

  41. Anon E. Moose says:

    Re: [16];

    Statists joke about killing people who harbor “non-conforming” thoughts, just like how Obama joked about auditing his enemies back in 2009

  42. joyce says:

    I guess the story last year of all those restaurants serving crap liquor and rubbing alcohol was just made up… there’s no way that could have happened cause there was regulations in place.

    Ottoman says:
    September 16, 2014 at 7:44 am
    Cool, so if I buy the house next to you, you’ll support my right to build a wind turbine on my property with my money. It’s hilarious how many of you doofuses directly benefit from regulations designed to keep your property values high and then complain about regulatory overreach.

    Time for a funny:

    Ayn Rand, Rand Paul, and Paul Ryan walk into a bar. The bartender serves them tainted alcohol because there are no regulations. They die.

  43. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    [42] moose

    Joke? I seem to recall many statists in history who have done exactly that, and on massive scales.

  44. NJGator says:

    Chifi 40 – I thought the MTR was great. But that’s because I was smart enough to order the smoked coconut club. My BIL loves the hot dog truck. Even when we go someplace else in town, we always seem to wind up there to visit the truck.

  45. Ben says:

    Ayn Rand, Rand Paul, and Paul Ryan walk into a bar. The bartender serves them tainted alcohol because there are no regulations. They die.

    Maybe you didn’t read the news lately in NJ. An owner of a handful of TGIFriday was serving rubbing alcohol in place of vodka in the most heavily regulated state for alcohol. I wonder if people realize that the liquor business was 100% illegal in the 1920s yet still managed to function smoothly without regulation.

  46. Phoenix says:

    The APC switch is a real gem.

  47. Fabius Maximus says:

    #5 clot

    I keep forgetting that if someone doesn’t sign up for your circle jerk, they are automatically labeled a troll.

    What’s on Zero Hedge today?

  48. Fabius Maximus says:

    #32 grim

    Thank you for smoking.

  49. joyce says:

    Never realized people were forced to smoke.

    Fabius Maximus says:
    September 16, 2014 at 10:40 am
    #32 grim

    Thank you for smoking.

  50. A Home Buyer says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prohibition_in_the_United_States


    Furthermore, stronger liquor surged in popularity because its potency made it more profitable to smuggle. To prevent bootleggers from using industrial ethyl alcohol to produce illegal beverages, the federal government ordered the poisoning of industrial alcohols. In response, bootleggers hired chemists who successfully renatured the alcohol to make it drinkable. As a response, the Treasury Department required manufacturers to add more deadly poisons, including the particularly deadly methyl alcohol. New York City medical examiners prominently opposed these policies because of the danger to human life. As many as 10,000 people died from drinking denatured alcohol before Prohibition ended.[87] New York City medical examiner Charles Norris believed the government took responsibility for murder when they knew the poison was not deterring people and they continued to poison industrial alcohol (which would be used in drinking alcohol) anyway. Norris remarked: “The government knows it is not stopping drinking by putting poison in alcohol… [Y]et it continues its poisoning processes, heedless of the fact that people determined to drink are daily absorbing that poison. Knowing this to be true, the United States government must be charged with the moral responsibility for the deaths that poisoned liquor causes, although it cannot be held legally responsible.”[87]

  51. anon (the good one) says:

    clot is a Bot, that’s why i ignore it. it is programmed to eternally repeat

    1) Burn the MFer down
    2) They’ll be rioting in the streets
    3) What’s on Zero Hedge

    Fabius Maximus says:
    September 16, 2014 at 10:39 am
    #5 clot

    I keep forgetting that if someone doesn’t sign up for your circle jerk, they are automatically labeled a troll.

    What’s on Zero Hedge today?

  52. FKA 2010 Buyer says:

    I absolutely nothing on solar panels (or generators) but would it make sense to run certain rooms (like the kitchen, master bedroom, and master bath) all the time if it could support it. That way if the power went out is would be bau for those rooms. And maybe if you have more than one A/C units you put one of those on that grid.

  53. Anon E. Moose says:

    Fabu [51];

    Welcome home!

    Getting to your point, its funny that you should choose that particular phrase. It was coined to illustrate that the government (which is “protecting” us from tobacco) makes more from a pack of cigarettes than anyone else in the supply chain — including the ‘greedy’ businessmen. Tobacco settlement revenues for the next 50 years have already been bonded out and sold by governments, pulling that revenue forward to cover pork spending and public sector union obligations. Its now to the point that government is big-tobacco’s enforcer against new entrants into the field (remember that the “charge” was false advertising – as to a new brand, no one can say the risks of tobacco smoking are unknown or understated).

    “Thank You” indeed – for illustrating the nanny state hypocrisy.

  54. A Home Buyer says:

    55 – FKA 2010

    You start getting into other more complicated issues then.

    For instance, you need 2 Service Disconnects (Fire Dept needs to be able to kill all power inside in-case of fire), 2 power panels, entirely separate wiring for the house, etc on top of the new photo-voltaic system.

    And as they are separate systems, the PV system wont be lighting anything at night requiring a generator / battery system for those areas (assuming you actually have a sunny day and these backups aren’t running then).

    You need to “Go Big or Go Home” with alternate energy solutions (except solar hot water, that you can play with).

  55. grim says:

    53 – Post of the day

  56. FKA 2010 Buyer says:

    @ 57 Homeowner

    Sounds like implementing these alternatives is not that scable just yet. I think you should be able to (under) utilize the power of solar by completely taking some things off the grid while keeping a backup battery source charged.

    Why not have your alarm system / and kitchen be the only items powered by it?

    Most developments have retention ponds. If you had solar panels there (especially if it could be done in a way that makes it look better), they could power just the street lights in the development. And since I pulling crap out no where, on those light posts you have outlets that could be used in an emergency.

  57. Toxic Crayons says:

    53 – The same could be said of Marijuana. We can thank Reagan and the drug war for really strong weed..

  58. grim says:

    We should just poison the heroin, makes more sense than giving the police reversal agents.

  59. Toxic Crayons says:

    Funny, now that everybody’s prepared with home generators and off grid solar, there haven’t been any hurricanes in the northeast.

  60. Toxic Crayons says:

    Alcohol is a poison…technically.

  61. Anon E. Moose says:

    TC [60];

    Reagan started the drug war? I never knew…

    1979: Illegal drug use in the U.S. peaks when 25 million of Americans used an illegal drug within the 30 days prior to the annual survey.[17]

    1988: Near the end of the Reagan administration, the Office of National Drug Control Policy was created for central coordination of drug-related legislative, security, diplomatic, research and health policy throughout the government. In recognition of his central role, the director of ONDCP is commonly known as the Drug Czar. The position was raised to cabinet-level status by Bill Clinton in 1993.

    1992 Illegal drug use in the U.S. fell to 12 million people.[17]

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_United_States_drug_prohibition

    Is Reagan responsible for the 1970 CSA, too? I’m not saying US drug policy is great, just that pinning it on Reagan seems a little unhinged.

  62. Toxic Crayons says:

    I think this is essentially how some transfer switches work. You just power the circuits you need.

    FKA 2010 Buyer says:
    September 16, 2014 at 11:29 am
    I absolutely nothing on solar panels (or generators) but would it make sense to run certain rooms (like the kitchen, master bedroom, and master bath) all the time if it could support it. That way if the power went out is would be bau for those rooms. And maybe if you have more than one A/C units you put one of those on that grid.

  63. Toxic Crayons says:

    The part of the drug war that criminalized marijuana and imposed mandatory minimum sentences was signed into law by Reagan in 1986.

    Jesus man, your knee jerk defense of Reagan is so transparent.

    1986

    Anti-Drug Abuse Act – Mandatory Sentences

    President Reagan signed the Anti-Drug Abuse Act, instituting mandatory sentences for drug-related crimes. In conjunction with the Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984, the new law raised federal penalties for marijuana possession and dealing, basing the penalties on the amount of the drug involved. Possession of 100 marijuana plants received the same penalty as possession of 100 grams of heroin. A later amendment to the Anti-Drug Abuse Act established a “three strikes and you’re out” policy, requiring life sentences for repeat drug offenders, and providing for the death penalty for “drug kingpins.”

    Anon E. Moose says:
    September 16, 2014 at 12:04 pm
    TC [60];

    Reagan started the drug war? I never knew…

    1979: Illegal drug use in the U.S. peaks when 25 million of Americans used an illegal drug within the 30 days prior to the annual survey.[17]

    1988: Near the end of the Reagan administration, the Office of National Drug Control Policy was created for central coordination of drug-related legislative, security, diplomatic, research and health policy throughout the government. In recognition of his central role, the director of ONDCP is commonly known as the Drug Czar. The position was raised to cabinet-level status by Bill Clinton in 1993.

    1992 Illegal drug use in the U.S. fell to 12 million people.[17]

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_United_States_drug_prohibition

    Is Reagan responsible for the 1970 CSA, too? I’m not saying US drug policy is great, just that pinning it on Reagan seems a little unhinged.

  64. Toxic Crayons says:

    Anti-Drug Abuse Act = Smaller amounts of Marijuana that are far more potent

  65. Libturd in Union says:

    IMO whole house generators are a nice to have luxury, but an absolute horrible return on investment. It would be much cheaper booking a room at the Four Seasons an ordering in from Le Cirque while staying there, than it is to pay for the install and maintenance on a whole house generator that will most likely operate for less than a two weeks over the next decade.

    If you are worried about your perishables spoiling, buy a $300 gas powered generator and a decent extension cord. Heck, with my 3,000 watt Champion, I can power the fridge, the tv, the internet, the Xb0x a couple of lights and one air conditioner.

  66. NJGator says:

    Getting tired of trying to beat the spam filter.

    Will Portland Always Be a Retirement Community for the Young?

    Like many residents of Northwest Portland, Matthew Hale doesn’t own a car. Instead, he prefers to walk or ride the bus to the city’s innumerable coffee shops and breweries and live-music spots. On weekends, he and his wife have no problem h*tching rides to the Pacific Coast or the Cascade mountain range. Everywhere he looks, Hale told me, there are people just like him — bearded, on skateboards, brewing kombucha. “It’s really chill,” he says.

    Portland has taken hold of the cultural imagination as, to borrow the tag line from “Portlandia,” the place where young people go to retire. And for good reason: The city has nearly all the perks that economists suggest lead to a high quality of life — coastlines, mountains, mild winters and summers, restaurants, cultural institutions and clean air. (Fortunately, college-educated people don’t value sunshine as much as they used to.) Portland also has qualities that are less tangible but still likely to attract young people these days, like a politically open culture that supports g*y rights and the legalization of m*rijuana — in addition to the right of way for unicyclists or the ability to marry in a 24/7 doughnut shop. “It’s really captured the zeitgeist of the age in a way that no other small city in America ever has,” said Aaron Renn, an urban-affairs analyst who writes the Urbanophile blog. According to professors from Portland State University, the city has been able to attract and retain young college-educated people at the second-highest rate in the nation. (Louisville, Ky., is No. 1.)

    City dwelling is generally considered a good thing for the overall economy. Proximity and serendipity offer employers a better chance to hire the perfect person for a job as opposed to someone whose skills just sort of match, according to the work of Enrico Moretti, an economist at the University of California, Berkeley. Chance encounters in dense cities, Moretti has argued, lead to innovation, which subsequently leads to income. And as the baby boomers retire, the pressure is on the young and highly educated to spur urban economies. As a result, many American cities are remaking themselves to lure human capital, offering various perks, like cheap housing and tax breaks, in the hope that smart young people can attract others like them. The Greater Houston area has added more than a million residents since 2000, in large part through generous tax breaks and the growth of the energy sector. Las Vegas is in the middle of a privately funded $350 million project to transform its d*relict downtown into a tech incubator. Parts of Detroit have more or less been turned over to the online-mortgage billionaire Dan Gilbert. Other cities like Austin, Tex.; Boulder, Colo.; Raleigh, N.C.; and Nashville have tried, in some way or other, to spark their own little Silicon Valleys.

    Portland, meanwhile, has the opposite problem. It has more highly educated people than it knows what to do with. Portland is not a corporate town, as its neighbors Seattle and San Francisco have become. While there are employment opportunities in the outdoor-apparel business (N*ke, Ad*das and Columbia Sportswear are all nearby) or the semiconductor industry (Intel has a large presence in Hillsboro), most workers have far fewer opportunities. According to Renn, personal income per capita in the city grew by a mere 31 percent between 2000 and 2012, slower than 42 other cities, including Grand Rapids, Mich., and Rochester. And yet people still keep showing up. “People move to New York to be in media or finance; they move to L.A. to be in show business,” Renn said. “People move to Portland to move to Portland.” Matthew Hale may have all the kombucha he can drink, but he doesn’t have a job.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/21/magazine/will-portland-always-be-a-retirement-community-for-the-young.html?

  67. Libturd in Union says:

    As for MTR ChiFi, I found many things on the menu pretty lame. I ordered the pork belly salad and it was almost inedible. Though, that coconut club is really an amazing invention. Never complained of the beer list either. Though, the way to eat there really is the hot dog truck out in the patio. Much cheaper and those are really good. Plus, you never have to fight for a seat.

  68. NJGator says:

    Lib 68 – But what you forget is that when TSHTF, you won’t be able to get a room at the Four Seasons. It will all be booked.

    I don’t need a whole house generator. I just want the friggin switch that will let me plug in yours and not require me to gh*tto rig our heat if your’re not around.

  69. Libturd in Union says:

    Gh*tto rig is so PC.

  70. chicagofinance says:

    KNOCK …. KNOCK….
    Who’s there?
    FLABMAX
    Flabmax who?
    ANTI-SEMITIC CLOSE-MINDED ASSH0LE WITH BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER

    Prepare MSNBC talking points….

    Fabius Maximus says:
    September 16, 2014 at 10:39 am
    #5 clot I keep forgetting that if someone doesn’t sign up for your circle jerk, they are automatically labeled a troll. What’s on Zero Hedge today?

    Landmark fracking study finds no water pollution

    Federal study of Pennsylvania well site finds fracking didn’t ruin nearby water supplies
    Associated Press
    By Kevin Begos, Associated Press
    PITTSBURGH (AP) — The final report from a landmark federal study on hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, found no evidence that chemicals or brine water from the gas drilling process moved upward to contaminate drinking water at a site in western Pennsylvania.

    The Department of Energy report, released Monday, was the first time an energy company allowed independent monitoring of a drilling site during the fracking process and for 18 months afterward. After those months of monitoring, researchers found that the chemical-laced fluids used to free gas stayed about 5,000 feet below drinking water supplies.

    Scientists used tracer fluids, seismic monitoring, and other tests to look for problems, and created the most detailed public report to date about how fracking affects adjacent rock structures.

    The fracking process uses millions of gallons of high-pressure water mixed with sand and chemicals to break apart rocks rich in oil and gas. That has led to a national boom in production, but also concerns about possible groundwater contamination.

    A separate study published this week by different researchers examined drilling sites in Pennsylvania and Texas using other methods. It found that faulty well construction can cause pollution, but not fracking itself.

    Avner Vengosh, a Duke University scientist involved with that study, just published in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, said in an email that it appears the Energy Department report on the Pennsylvania site is consistent with their findings.

    The Energy Department report did yield some surprises. It found that the fractures created to free oil or gas can extend up to 1,900 feet from the base of the well. That’s much farther than the usual estimates of a few hundred feet. The Energy Department researchers believe that the long fractures may have followed existing fault lines in the Marcellus Shale or other formations above it.

    The Energy Department study monitored six wells at one site. Oil or gas drilling at other locations around the nation could show different results because of variations in geology or drilling practices.

  71. Xolepa says:

    I, too , decided not to get a whole house generator because it involved getting the ‘Man’ involved. Instead, I bought a portable 12.5kw nominal/15kw peak. I then bought a natural gas conversion kit and re-piped inside and out in order to let the juices flow. I need the extra power as I have 2 fridges, 1 freezer and a 1 hp well pump that needs a big kick start. Of course, plenty of extra left to power most of the house, including heat. Requires more work only when the electricity goes out: I have to roll it on to a point near the deck – weighs about 400 lbs. The natural gas and 50amp hookups for the house are hidden underneath the deck.

  72. Toxic Crayons says:

    Just call the electrician and ask him to install an interlock kit and input plug. It’s the cheapest way to go that meets building code.

    71.NJGator says:
    September 16, 2014 at 12:41 pm
    Lib 68 – But what you forget is that when TSHTF, you won’t be able to get a room at the Four Seasons. It will all be booked.

    I don’t need a whole house generator. I just want the friggin switch that will let me plug in yours and not require me to gh*tto rig our heat if your’re not around.

  73. Juice Box says:

    Neighbor just installed a 20 Kw Generac. I can just run an extension cord over to his house. The damm thing however has a bright green LED light on it that shines very brightly at night onto my property. I may have to take care of that light one of these days.

  74. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    [61] grim – It would be bad marketing for the cops’ favorite drug. Have you noticed how you don’t hear too much about crack anymore? About 20 years ago Police forces realized that crack addicts have to steal or “make” several hundred dollars a day to feed their habit, often via violent crime. OTOH, I think about $20 worth of heroin does a junkie up for the day. Beginning in Newark, I think, they started coming down like Thor’s hammer on crack while making it known that when it came to horse cops would start looking the other way.

    We should just poison the heroin, makes more sense than giving the police reversal agents.

  75. Juice Box says:

    re: Wind Power

    I don’t believe any larger scale project has ever been approved in the entire country for an offshore wind farm.

    The offshore one for Atlantic City which was just 5 turbines was also recently rejected. The costs were out of control, something like 188 million to build and deploy just 5 turbines courtesy of the taxpayer of-course, that broken down cost $19,000 a house hold..

  76. Juice Box says:

    re # 78 – Aren’t there a few inner city methadone clinics owned and operated by shell companies owned by cops?

  77. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    [72] LOL – I actually read right through Gator’s phrase, completely forgetting about the etymology from whence it came until I read your comment.

    Gh*tto rig is so PC.

  78. anon (the good one) says:

    @PIMCO: Gross: Yellen will be careful tomorrow. Japanese “lost decades” argue for accepting risk of higher inflation here in the US.

  79. Michael says:

    Nice, talking about my neck of the woods. One of the homes on westview that back up to the commercial properties on hamburg tpk is owned by a cousin of mine.

    The Original NJ ExPat says:
    September 16, 2014 at 7:25 am
    [1-3] grim – I’m sure there were several Westview Rd residents that would have been about eye level with the 120 foot high turbine Burke wanted to initially construct, so I can get that (as you would too if you were paying $20K per year in taxes for one of those homes). In fact, just about any house on Westview that actually has a West view would be have the large turbine in their sightline. OTOH, I don’t disagree that shenanigans were in play by the town and the mayor and that’s why they had to ante up $220K to Burke, I guess.

  80. NJGator says:

    Toxic Crayons 75 – That’s exactly what I want to do. Captain Cheapo doesn’t want to pony up the dollars to the electrician.

    How is his kid supposed to play the XB*x if he’s away for the next power outage?

  81. Libturd in Union says:

    ExPat: Glad somebody is listening. :P I can be cryptic at times.

  82. Juice Box says:

    Back in the olden days we would just Plonk twitter bot into the Killfile.

    How about it Grim? Ignore Button?

  83. Anon E. Moose says:

    Hey Nom, weren’t you just talking about your days servicing the Welesley campus? Any chance you bother to ask their major?

    First of all, if you’re still in college, stay away from math and the sciences. A survey taken at Wellesley College found that 72% of biology majors and 83% of biochemistry and math majors were virgins.

    What major maximizes the chance you will finally do the deed? Studio art. Yes, it turns out the same Wellesley survey uncovered the fact that none of the studio art majors who responded were virgins. It could be that all those hours spent studying naked studio models have some effect.

  84. A Home Buyer says:

    59 – FKA

    You ignored Grim’s earlier post about battery systems which is 100% accurate. Batteries are expensive, do need replacement (granted they last for 5-10 years), and are environmentally messy.

    Technologies are improving rapidly, but not there yet and probably not main stream for a few decades. Look at the Lithium Ion batteries. They were perfect, until they caused Boeing Dream Liner to catch fire thanks to a previously unnoticed battery thermal runaway condition which apparently never happens except when actually flying the planes…

    Alt. Energies are great systems, but they do have real world consequences that no-one will be able to predict until your utility energy usage is 5 times smaller (thanks to everyone using solar) but actually costs you 10 times more because of the green movement does not understand utility power baseline generation.

  85. Anon E. Moose says:

    New Jersey High School Teacher Charged With Having Sex With Student

    Once again, its easier to indict a public employee than to fire one.

  86. Libturd in Union says:

    My kid is banned from the Xb0x…Until Saturday. Our little soccer/hockey star leaves so much out on the ice and pitch that he’s too lazy to tie his shoes at home. At breakfast yesterday he shows me a huge gash on his hands that he received running home from our block party the day before. It had plenty of road rash in it. I looked down at his shoes, and the left shoe I asked him to tie when leaving the block party the day before is still untied. He tripped over his untied shoe and should have told me about it the night before. He waits until just before we have to leave for school and work to tell me. Man was I pissed.

  87. Juice Box says:

    re # 89 – whuppin room?

  88. nwnj says:

    It’s great to see Ottoman and anon’s attempt at wit blow up in their faces again. These two are dumber than a bag of hammers.

  89. Libturd in Union says:

    Moose,

    When I was in college, among the various positions I held in residence life and in student activities, I was also the c0ach of our College Bowl team. This particular year, the big tournament was down at Penn and was hosted by Alex Trebek. Pretty much every Northeast college was represented there so there must have been nearly 500 kids in attendance if not more. Alex Trebek just finishes reading the rules of the competition to all of the participants in the auditorium when he asks if there are any questions. One of the members of my team, stands up and asks, “Alex…do you think this is the largest assembly of virgins on a college campus ever?” Our entire team was rolling on the floor laughing. Sadly, few else in attendance thought it was funny.

    Another gem from the experience included being dumbfounded when the assembly of nerds booed when Trebek mentioned sports as one of the question categories.

    As all of the teams returned to the hotel where we were staying overnight prior to the competition the following morning…we headed down to frat row. We found a pretty big party at some house and probably partied till about 3am. The dumbest thing though, was that the only vodka they had was Penn Vodka, and back then, I was a straight Vodka drinker. Man was that stuff gross. On the way back to the hotel, the same guy who made the virgin comment at the tournament intro calls a bomb scare into the hotel. If he was going to wake up tired, so was everyone else.

    We ended up beating FIT, NYU and Penn. We pretty much lost to everyone else. Though our strategy was to throw the other teams off of their game. It worked against some teams. We would claim they were cheating, would yell out wrong answers that were funny, etc. Oh to be back in college.

  90. Libturd in Union says:

    Don’t believe in physical punishment. Not with the dog nor the kid. Lot’s of timeouts though. Baby Gator got a time out last night and was crying horribly. Glad to see he finally gets it.

  91. Gator (45)-

    If you ever find yourself in Ithaca, go eat at Clown Truck. Best show in town.

  92. Gluteus is kinda like his team’s star, Ozil: disappears when the temperature nears the boil and it’s all on the line.

  93. In addition to plain weave fabric,0851999. with toothpaste (try to use green transparent gel-like, do the old process of silver jewelry, this gift from the value perspective, Several parents decided to send her daughter with pride that this is a gift. Each piece of jewelry has become their personality, has been recognized by the community. only the surface of this color reaction with toothpaste or eliminate drugs.2. Cheng Yu Tung and his family have a strong small private business groups.t25t25t

  94. Michael says:

    Lmao…love the comment on the article.

    “balls 51 minutes ago
    I love how she says it was a tough decision to sell her beach house. The reality is that this house and all the other sh!t they have was never theirs anyway. It was all purchased with stolen money. I hate these people. They were never rich to begin with. They would probably be living in a 2 bedroom rented apartment if they hadn’t commited fraud. It’s a joke how they actually think they earned these houses and somehow there being taken away from them. Boo hoo, these two deserve whatever they have coming to them. I hope they both have to do time. It’s a slap in the face to all of us who work for our belongings if they don’t go to jail.”

    http://www.nj.com/entertainment/celebrities/index.ssf/2014/09/teresa_giudice_beach_house_for_sale_real_housewives_of_new_jersey.html#incart_river

  95. Anon E. Moose says:

    Lib [92];

    Oh, to be broke and shopping for hard liquor. Ever drink Wolfschmidt Vodka? There wasn’t enough orange juice in all of Florida to overcome the turpentine essence.

  96. Hughesrep says:

    98

    110, “it’s the proof that counts”.

    Also works as paint stripper.

  97. Juice Box says:

    Wolfschmidt Vodka that is the good stuff. When I bartended Fleischmann’s was the real crap. However pass it through a Brita filter a few times and it becomes tolerable. Polish Luksusowa is the real deal potato vodka try that and you may never go back to grain vodka gain.

    http://www.luksusowavodka.com/

    Disclaimer I gave up vodka a long time ago.

  98. Juice Box says:

    re # 97 – Mikie – He is from your neck of the woods right, and back in the day he ran quite a few scams, no surprise he got nicked. It is also a bay house not a beach house….

  99. NJT says:

    Apparent Popov vodka (for the price) is good for mixed drinks. Wife and her friend used to like Baybreezes made with Grey Goose.

    Years ago one weekend she was away visiting relatives and a frend of mine decided to stay over after helping with some masonary work. Neither of us felt like driving to the liquor store afterwards so we drank her vodka.

    Before she retunred while buying some Bourbon (Bookers) I thought “I should replace the Grey Goose”. Bookers is expensive and Popov is, well, cheap. Poured it into the empty Goose bottle and put it away.

    Months later wife and her friend are hanging out having a drink. I aksed: “Nothin’ like the good stuff, huh?”. Oh yeah her friend said, “I KNOW good vodka”. Heh, heh. NEVER told them.

  100. pete says:

    Majorska was the go to at Rutgers 10 years ago. Could get a 1.75 for around $7.

  101. Libturd in Union says:

    Drank plenty of Wolfschmidt and Fleischmans back in my day. Back then, there wasn’t really much of a designer Vodka market yet. The good stuff was Absolute. Stoli was pretty mediocre and my preferred brand was Smirnoff. Still is. Though I prefer it mixed as a kamikaze in a tall glass with lots of lime. My other girlie drink is Captain and diet coke, also with a lot of lime. That 100 proof Captain’s is some dangerous stuff. I drank so much of it a Jets game tailgate that I couldn’t even focus enough to read the scoreboards. Funny story that night. It was freezing out, rainy, but I was jonesing for something sweet. In my drunken state, I asked Gator to get me an ice cream. When she came back with the ice cream, I told her she was crazy for getting me ice cream since it was so cold. I was so far gone, I forgot what I had asked her for. I think I argued with her for quite a while about it. I am some prize. :P

  102. grim says:

    Few months ago I was in a spirits judging training session with about 60 others, we did a double blind tasting of 16 vodkas.

    Best and Second best were nearly unanimous.

    Smirnoff was #1, something like 58 of 60 votes as the best vodka.

    Number 2 was a very cheap plastic bottled 1.75l. I won’t name names, I’ll keep you guessing. It may even have been named above, prompting me to post this.

    Position three is where there started to be wide variance, my #3 was Svedka.

    Most of the most notable top shelf vodkas were ranked near the bottom.

  103. grim says:

    Funny, when we did the session, the session facilitator had cardboard covers over the top shelf labels, since he’d run this session numerous times and had nearly identical results. He was worried about the chatter if he was showing the bottom ranked brands as prominently as he showed the bottom shelf winners.

  104. pete says:

    Been filling up a bottle of grey goose with smirnoff for every party we have with wifes family for past 5 years since they only will drink grey goose. Never once heard a complaint. Hundreds of dollars saved.

  105. grim says:

    Grey Goose was near the bottom, you were doing them a favor.

  106. grim says:

    Potato vodkas were generally more widely preferred than grain vodkas, especially rye vodkas which carried significantly more distinctive flavor. I’m not pimping the polish roots here, there are some excellent American potato vodkas.

  107. pete says:

    Ha of course. Or kettle one was fine for them. marketing is a powerful tool

  108. Michael says:

    You lost me here. I didn’t write that comment. That comment was copy and pasted from the article. Also….my neck of the woods? I’m from wayne.

    Juice Box says:
    September 16, 2014 at 7:34 pm
    re # 97 – Mikie – He is from your neck of the woods right, and back in the day he ran quite a few scams, no surprise he got nicked. It is also a bay house not a beach house….

  109. Michael says:

    I drink high end vodka to avoid the hangover.

  110. Michael says:

    112- maybe it’s all in my head, but cheap vodka makes me want to put a gun to my head the next day.

  111. Juice Box says:

    I vaguely remember a Y2K party in a SOHO loft with hookers and a giant bottle of Grey Goose on ice. Worse hangover I have ever had, and NO I did not partake in the party favors only the Grey Goose.

  112. Juice Box says:

    Re: #111 – “I am from Wayne.”

    Grim might tutor you about the bent nose crowd (your neighbors) if you stick around.

  113. Fabius Maximus says:

    #56 Moose

    “Thank you for smoking” is a classic movie, much better than that Atlas Shagged Pt 3 garbage you just sat through. That is the Death March part of that book a few hundreds pages of meandering with out much purpose. You are so far into the book at that point, you are almost guiled to finish.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iBELC_vxqhI

  114. Fabius Maximus says:

    #73 moe

    So we’ve had Curley and Larry and now its Moe’s turn.
    Where to start with this one. It’s like a headline from The Onion ” Frackers get one site right!”
    Let’s try this, focus on the sentences in the following article and then you can answer the question.
    Point One: “the drilling company might have been unusually meticulous” ,
    Point Two: “depth of the well”
    Point three: “instead allowed state officials – many of whom are drilling advocates – to take over the study”.
    Question: When the puppy mill graduated you, did they give you a piece of Vellum, or did they just print your degree on the back of a Pets.com Stock Cert?

    “Rob Jackson, a scientist at Duke University, warned that a single study should not serve as evidence that fracking is safe, especially since the geology and fracking practices vary across the US. He told the AP that the drilling company might have been unusually meticulous at their research site, knowing that the procedure was being closely monitored.
    Jackson also explained that other aspects of the drilling process can contaminate groundwater, including poor well construction, accidental surface spills of chemicals and chemical-laced fluids, and wastewater.
    The depth of the well might also have an impact on the potential effect on groundwater. Drilling at the well in western Pennsylvania occurred at 8,000 feet below ground, with groundwater in the Marcellus Shale usually found at a depth of 300 feet.
    Drilling at a fracking site in Pavilion, Wyoming, on the other hand, occurs at a depth of 1,200 feet. Groundwater in that region is acquired from depths of 800 feet, which means that the fracking site is in close proximity to drinking water. The Environmental Protection Agency in 2011 released a report concluding that chemical-laced fracking fluids contaminated the groundwater in Pavilion. But last month, the EPA dropped its plans to further investigate the preliminary findings, and instead allowed state officials – many of whom are drilling advocates – to take over the study. “

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  117. Michael says:

    As I was reading soho, hookers, giant bottle of the goose, and worst hangover ever…first thought that went through my head was the party favors….funny that you made it a point to say it was not lol

    Juice Box says:
    September 16, 2014 at 10:38 pm
    I vaguely remember a Y2K party in a SOHO loft with hookers and a giant bottle of Grey Goose on ice. Worse hangover I have ever had, and NO I did not partake in the party favors only the Grey Goose.

  118. Fabius Maximus says:

    #95 Clot

    I put it back to you with your carToons, nailed to the bottom of the table, and not really relevant. Still living off the dream off a perceived glory that fell short, 20 years in the past.

    Your only saving grace is that Mikey is looking to buy Rangers so he will have to sell. Another set of gullible fans he can sell shirts to.

  119. chi in People's Republic of Ithaca says:

    oh wait…..do you mean that this impact could have been prevented if the Obama administration had acted responsibly instead of stonewalled? Oh sorry….my mistake….wait does this imply that the above post by anti-sem!te-max is horsebleep?….sorry…..

    BUSINESS

    Fracking Report Cites Bad Wells for Tainted Water

    Federally Funded Study Blames Poor Construction for Gas Contamination

    By RUSSELL GOLD CONNECT
    Sept. 15, 2014 6:34 p.m. ET

    A new report said poorly built and cemented gas wells caused contamination at seven sites in northeastern Pennsylvania.

    Natural gas is contaminating some aquifers not from hydraulic fracturing but from faulty well preparation, according to a new paper.

    Poorly built and cemented gas wells, rather than fracking itself, have allowed contaminants to flow into shallow drinking-water sources, according to a report published in the Proceedings of the Natural Academy of Sciences.

  120. chi in People's Republic of Ithaca says:

    Evidence of guest appearance by FabMax in Brooklyn……

    With a name like Uber and strong-arm tactics like these, it was bound to happen eventually, Godwin’s Law or not: The NYPD is investigating a possible bias incident after flyers were distributed in Brooklyn pairing the taxi-killing app with swastikas to unsettling effect. “Uber is not involved with this disgusting act of hatred and we call on the NYPD Hate Crimes Task Force to aggressively investigate this despicable crime,” the start-up said in a statement.

    While it’s possible the handouts are are just a tone-deaf transportation protest, given the state of things, instead of an anti-Semitic gesture — even the Anti-Defamation League says the “swastika has morphed into a universal symbol of hate” — the misguided propagandist definitely should not have distributed the flyers in Hasidic Williamsburg.

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  122. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    [100] juice,

    “I gave up vodka a long time ago”

    Me too, back in college actually. Damn near killed myself binge drinking on a few occasions during freshman year. I am truly lucky I survived it. After that, I decided that the hard stuff wasn’t worth the problems it caused and I didn’t down another shot until nearer to graduation.

    And this just occurred to me: when I stopped drinking vodka, I stopped thinking like Fabian and anon. Hmmmm.

  123. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    [121] fabian

    Still living vicariously through the exploits of others, I see. So when Gooners start sucking, to whom will you shift your allegiance?

  124. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    Smirnoff fans: I occasionally buy the 50ml nips of flavored Smirnoff for $1 at the checkout, it’s cheaper by volume than the 750ml bottles. I just happened down the Vodka aisle the other day just to make sure the pricing inefficiency still held true and I found a mail in offer. Buy two 1.75 liter bottles and get $11 back (flavored and straight). This is in MA, so YMMV.

  125. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    [125] Early in my freshman year at Rutgers, just barely 17-1/2 years old, I was a bar tender at a dorm party. I was feeling quite the BMOC as I slung 7&7’s, Rum and Cokes, Whiskey Sours etc across the bar ping pong table. I was feeling so superior and grown up that I felt it was my duty to have at least one of every type of drink I was serving. The aftermath of that September night pretty much dissuaded me from hard liquor for most of my college days.

    “I gave up vodka a long time ago”

    Me too, back in college actually. Damn near killed myself binge drinking on a few occasions during freshman year. I am truly lucky I survived it. After that, I decided that the hard stuff wasn’t worth the problems it caused and I didn’t down another shot until nearer to graduation.

    And this just occurred to me: when I stopped drinking vodka, I stopped thinking like Fabian and anon. Hmmmm.

  126. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    Nom – My accountant mistakenly emailed me someone else’s tax return. The guy and his wife live in (at least file from) Chester County, PA. Couple of married Yale undergrads with last names so pedigreed that she kept her maiden name (my accountant is in CT, btw). Wife has a PhD, Husband works for Merrill Lynch, they’re both under 40 and pulling down $600K together. The address they file from is lakefront in Landenberg.

  127. Fabius Maximus says:

    #122 Moe

    Wow that is some post. Apart from your hate of the O Man, you just confirmed the point I have been making for years. The argument not so much that the technology is unsafe (which it is), it is more the fact that up and down the profit chain there is the attitude of “F*Ck the environment, there is money to be made”.

    So its the O Mans fault that these companies are drilling unsafe wells and poisoning water supplies. What’s your answer here, more regulation?

  128. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    People fault Obama all the time on the environment, but he does his best. At least he put all of the BP oil spill back on the bottom of the ocean where it belongs.

    So its the O Mans fault that these companies are drilling unsafe wells and poisoning water supplies. What’s your answer here, more regulation?

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