You can fix this fixer-upper up with a little bit of love!

From the WSJ (hat tip Chi):

Fixer Uppers: A Pot of Gold or a Money Pit?

Fixer-uppers are an increasingly popular option for home buyers looking to save a little money in exchange for a bit of elbow grease, says Leslie Piper, a real estate agent with San Francisco Bay Area real-estate firm Pacific Union.

But where are the best spots for buying such properties? Based on the percentage, as of December 2014, of home listings that included repair-related terms like “fixer,” “as-is” and “TLC,” the Realtor.com analysis identified both the markets with the most fixer-uppers available and the places where buying one offers the biggest potential price break.

In addition to Clarksville, towns like Omaha, Neb. (53%), Albany, N.Y. (50%) and Greensboro, N.C. (49%), offer significant savings, but, again, supplies are limited—these towns’ stocks of fixer-uppers number 10, 23 and 1, respectively.

On the other hand, buyers will likely find happier hunting, but smaller discounts, in spots like Atlanta (288 listings, 37% discount), Tampa, Fla. (223 listings, 32% discount) and Philadelphia (348 listings, 17% discount).

And then there are locales where buying a house in need of TLC will scarcely score any savings at all. In Portland, Ore. the median fixer-upper runs $354,928, just 6% lower than the $379,000 median price of a home in good condition. In Prescott, Ariz., the discount is a mere 2%. Lorinda Johnson, an associate broker at Prescott Realty, attributes this small spread to what she says is the town’s stable, retiree-heavy homeowner base.

Regardless of where they settle, buyers considering a fixer-upper should make sure to get estimates from qualified tradespeople to determine just how much they’ll have to sink into the property to bring it up to snuff, says Ms. Piper.

Some repairs, she notes, might be more trouble than expected. Issues like a bad roof or dry rot, for instance, “can be more costly than a buyer might recognize” she says, while problems like open subfloors and exposed wiring represent safety hazards that could make it difficult to get a mortgage.

This entry was posted in Housing Recovery, National Real Estate, New Development. Bookmark the permalink.

97 Responses to You can fix this fixer-upper up with a little bit of love!

  1. grim says:

    From HousingWire:

    TransUnion: Mortgage delinquency rate down to 3.29% in 4Q14

    The mortgage delinquency rate declined for the 12th straight quarter to 3.29% at the end of Q4 2014, according to TransUnion’s latest mortgage report.

    The mortgage delinquency rate declined more than 14% in the last year, down from 3.84% in Q4 2013.

    Average mortgage balances per consumer increased to $187,139 in Q4 2014, up from $185,496 in Q4 2013. It continues a recent trend of yearly growth, as this metric stood at $183,339 in Q4 2012. The greatest mortgage balance increases were seen in the super prime risk category, where balances rose approximately 3% in the last year.

    “The mortgage delinquency rate continues to be well controlled as it slowly recedes to pre-recession levels, driven primarily by the ongoing clearance of the foreclosure backlog. More recent vintages have been performing exceptionally well,” said Ezra Becker, vice president of research and consulting in TransUnion’s financial services business unit. “A bigger story this past quarter is the continued rise in mortgage balances. Much of this gain can be attributed to those consumers who took advantage of a low interest rate environment to purchase homes with jumbo mortgage loans. The share of these loans amongst all mortgage originations increased by 8% in Q3 2014 from 6.8% in Q3 2013 and 5.8% in Q3 2012.”

  2. grim says:

    From MarketWatch:

    3% down payments being used at lowest level in 10 years

    Fewer people bought a house with just a 3% down payment in 2014 than in any of the previous 10 years. That might sound like a positive thing because it means the purchaser owns more of the house and the bank owns less, but experts say it suggests that first-time buyers are not fueling the housing recovery.

    Only 25% of house purchasers taking out all residential house loans (conventional or Federal Housing Administration loans) put less than 3% down when purchasing a home, versus 27% in 2013, according to new analysis by real estate data firm RealtyTrac of nearly 20 million loans for single-family homes and condos nationwide over the last 10 years. That’s the lowest level in a decade. First-time buyers are among the most likely candidates for these loans. “It may seem like a lot but the average over the past 11 years has been 33%,” says Daren Blomquist, vice president at RealtyTrac.

  3. grim says:

    From Bloomberg:

    Student Debt May Be Sabotaging Your Shot at Buying a Home

    Student debt continued its decade-long explosion last year, quietly undermining many young people’s chances of buying a home, according to data from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. A blog post published on Wednesday by the New York Fed presented data that elaborates on a report published earlier this week showing that student debt grew to nearly $1.2 trillion in 2014, the biggest-ever figure, as more people took out larger loans.

    The average balance for each borrower has grown by 74 percent in the last decade, mushrooming from $15,000 per person in 2004 to $27,000 in 2014, said the report, which was based on a nationally representative sample taken from anonymous Equifax credit data.

    Most borrowers have less than $27,000 in debt. The average is elevated by the 1.8 million people—a small proportion of all borrowers—who carry an extreme level of debt, pushing $100,000.

    Still, the economists said things are not looking up for a growing slice of borrowers who can’t keep up monthly payments toward their debt. The share of loans that were officially delinquent—payments were at least 90 days overdue—rose to 11.3 percent in the last three months of 2014, up from 11.1 percent the previous quarter.

  4. grim says:

    Catch 22 – Can’t afford a house without a degree, because you can’t get a job. Can’t afford a house with the degree, because the debt is too high. Who wins? Those who can graduate without debt, I suppose.

  5. grim says:

    I CAN NOT wait for the HBO series, this will be fantastic. Move over Sopranos, the Epstein’s are the new mob bosses. Those Orthodox really are an enterprising people. I’m not sure if I buy the argument that this is justified by religious law (that reaks of extremism), but I’m absolutely sure the Torah doesn’t approve of getting paid for it. Although anything doing well is worth… I hope they get Seth Rogan to play the Rabbi, that would be awesome.

    Lakewood rabbi trial underway for kidnap, torture of husbands

    A Lakewood rabbi accused of arranging the kidnapping and beating of Orthodox Jewish husbands until they agreed to give their wives divorces got underway this morning with prosecutors saying he orchestrated the torture – sometimes with stun guns – of three men who eventually complied.

    “They conspired to kidnap men, tie them up, blindfold them, and beat them – including at some time using stun guns – to force them to participate in a Jewish divorce ritual,” Assistant U.S. Attorney Joseph Gribko told the jury of eight men and eight women in his opening arguments.

    When arrangements were finally made to meet with the husband, who did not actually exist, on Oct. 9, 2013, Goldstein, Stimler and six others instead were arrested in a warehouse in Edison. Authorities contend the men, who were flexing and shadow boxing as they waited for their prey, planned to beat the husband – who did not actually exist – until he agreed to a divorce, known as a get.

    Gribko said the wives seeking divorces – or their families – were charged tens of thousands of dollars for the forced gets. He said a rabbinical court received $10,000 and the “tough guys” were paid a total of $50,000.

  6. ExPat in NJ says:

    re: yesterday’s thread – grim – I don’t think you are allowed to register as a Democrat if you have actual math skills. This is how far Democrat math goes: “The rich have plenty of money to pay for everything.”

  7. ExPat in NJ says:

    [4] Thinking outside the box, how about getting the degree without debt, then skip the home debt entirely rather than escaping one kind of debt just to take on a different kind?

    Catch 22 – Can’t afford a house without a degree, because you can’t get a job. Can’t afford a house with the degree, because the debt is too high. Who wins? Those who can graduate without debt, I suppose.

  8. anon (the good one) says:

    lenders. lenders always win. whichever loan you default on, my taxes will bailout the lender.

    grim says:
    February 19, 2015 at 6:08 am
    Catch 22 – Can’t afford a house without a degree, because you can’t get a job. Can’t afford a house with the degree, because the debt is too high.

    Who wins?

  9. Toxic Crayons says:

    Robert Van Winkle, AKA Vanilla Ice, Arrested in Residential Burglary: Police

    http://www.nbcmiami.com/news/local/Robert-Van-Winkle-AKA-Vanilla-Ice-Arrested-in-Residential-Burglary-Police-292442671.html

    According to police, the burglary happened at a home in the 100 block of N. Atlantic Drive. Numerous furniture items, a pool heater, bicycles and other items were taken, police said.

    The home was in the process of foreclosure, and Van Winkle was renovating the residence next to the property, police said.
    During the investigation, police determined Van Winkle played a role. A search warrant turned up the stolen items at a residence under the care and control of Van Winkle, police said.

  10. Ottoman says:

    The 1% of the 1% and their government lackeys win. Debt fosters isolation, servitude, and compliance with the status quo. Congratulate the powers that be for crushing one of the most powerful forces for social, economic, and political change: student activism.

    lenders. lenders always win. whichever loan you default on, my taxes will bailout the lender.

    grim says:
    February 19, 2015 at 6:08 am
    Catch 22 – Can’t afford a house without a degree, because you can’t get a job. Can’t afford a house with the degree, because the debt is too high.

    Who wins?

  11. Ottoman says:

    Two words: trickle down

    BTW, explain how rich people get rich without tapping into the infrastructure, educated workforce, police and military protections, financial protections, etc that are paid for by taxpayers.

    ExPat in NJ says:
    February 19, 2015 at 6:56 am
    re: yesterday’s thread – grim – I don’t think you are allowed to register as a Democrat if you have actual math skills. This is how far Democrat math goes: “The rich have plenty of money to pay for everything.”

  12. Toxic Crayons says:

    Good idea…maybe even a conservative one if i may say. So, let’s get rid of Federal Student Loans.

    Sallie Mae has made debt slaves of a generation….

    Ottoman says:
    February 19, 2015 at 8:14 am
    The 1% of the 1% and their government lackeys win. Debt fosters isolation, servitude, and compliance with the status quo. Congratulate the powers that be for crushing one of the most powerful forces for social, economic, and political change: student activism.

    lenders. lenders always win. whichever loan you default on, my taxes will bailout the lender.

  13. grim says:

    11 – Probably through some combination of perseverance, commitment, financial risk, innovation, intelligence, and luck?

    If all that was required to “get rich” were the things you mentioned, we’d all be rich I guess.

    And who exactly pays the taxes you speak of?

  14. chicagofinance says:

    IT’S A HAT TIP MORNING!

  15. grim says:

    Let me just say something here, I have a newfound appreciation for the level of financial risk associated with starting and running a business. It’s astronomical. And this risk doesn’t even come with a remote guarantee, it’s a CHANCE, and most fail.

    Anyone who would pooh-pooh a wealthy small business owner as somehow being handed something, or stepping in shit, is an idiot.

    I think the other factor here is the misguided belief that once someone has “got rich”, it’s a permanent affliction. Sorry, in today’s economy, “rich” is at best a transient condition for most. Rich today, gone tomorrow. C’est la vie.

    But yea, we didn’t build that.

    We’re 6 figures in to our small business and we’re not even open yet, technically we still have no guarantee we’ll even be permitted to open without significantly more investment in compliance. That said, we haven’t even made a bottle’s worth of product yet. If it fails, it’s all vaporized. There are no grants, tax breaks, free lunches or otherwise, and any debt accrued is secured by personal assets.

    Every time the phone rings I have a heart attack that someone’s going to tell me I need to do something else.

    We also have nearly a thousand hours invested in the project, with zero pay, not even minimum wage, nothing. Every day money goes out the door, every month thousands of dollars go out the door.

    Didn’t build this though, not my story to tell.

  16. 1987 condo says:

    I think people confuse those rich people who used political power, lied, cheated and stole with those who actually risk it all and work hard.

  17. Ragnar says:

    Ottoman,
    Actually I don’t want one cent of my wealth to “trickle down” to you or anon. If anyone believes in “trickle down” Economics these days, it’s the Obama – chosen central planner at the Fed, who thinks dumping money on banks and bond markets are supposed to create real jobs.

  18. chicagofinance says:

    Welcome to the jungle……ask clot what he thinks……then all the warmed over crap from populists come into focus……..

    grim says:
    February 19, 2015 at 8:34 am
    Let me just say something here, I have a newfound appreciation for the level of financial risk associated with starting and running a business. It’s astronomical. And this risk doesn’t even come with a remote guarantee, it’s a CHANCE, and most fail.

    Anyone who would pooh-pooh a wealthy small business owner as somehow being handed something, or stepping in shit, is an idiot.

    I think the other factor here is the misguided belief that once someone has “got rich”, it’s a permanent affliction. Sorry, in today’s economy, “rich” is at best a transient condition for most. Rich today, gone tomorrow. C’est la vie.

    But yea, we didn’t build that.

    We’re 6 figures in to our small business and we’re not even open yet, technically we still have no guarantee we’ll even be permitted to open without significantly more investment in compliance. That said, we haven’t even made a bottle’s worth of product yet. If it fails, it’s all vaporized. There are no grants, tax breaks, free lunches or otherwise, and any debt accrued is secured by personal assets.

    Every time the phone rings I have a heart attack that someone’s going to tell me I need to do something else.

    We also have nearly a thousand hours invested in the project, with zero pay, not even minimum wage, nothing. Every day money goes out the door, every month thousands of dollars go out the door.

    Didn’t build this though, not my story to tell.

  19. grim says:

    explain how rich people get rich without tapping into the infrastructure

    Implicit in this statement is another misguided thought that somehow we’re not paying for using, and funding, this infrastructure.

    So let’s see here, we’ve paid nearly $20,000 into the Federal, State, and Municipal Bureaucracy so far (again, still nothing to show for it, not a dollar of revenue).

    This doesn’t even consider the fees we’ll pay for water (commercials pay a surcharge), Sewerage (significant user fees above and beyond standard municipal sewerage fees), surcharges to fund the local Hazmat programs, as well as Fire Department surcharges (this is above and beyond property taxes).

    Based on the money going out the door, I’m pretty sure we’re paying above and beyond what we’re actually using. Especially consider the $30,000+ a year property taxes the landlord is paying on the building.

    Not to mention the Federal and State excise taxes that we’ll be paying on alcohol sold.. $19 per proof gallon.

  20. grim says:

    I think people confuse those rich people who used political power, lied, cheated and stole

    Politicians?

  21. chicagofinance says:

    Do you want to know why extremists kill?…… OMG we are so fcuked….I can’t wait for January 2017…..

    “Obama’s op-ed was a more carefully crafted version of a message that State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf tried to deliver Tuesday, when she drew fire for saying on CNN that jobs were at the core of the global terror threat.

    “But we cannot win this war by killing [terrorists],” she said. “We cannot kill our way out of this war. We need in the medium to longer term to go after the root causes that leads people to join these groups, whether it’s a lack of opportunity for jobs or …,” she trailed off………”

  22. grim says:

    And plenty of discussion about raising the federal excise tax on alcohol manufacture to $16 a proof gallon, which when combined with the state, would raise our taxes to $21.50 a proof gallon. And yes, sales tax still applies as well, which adds another $10 a proof gallon. Of course, don’t forget about state and federal income tax too.

  23. ccb223 says:

    Well, looks like we’re f*cked, irrespective of what all the “scientists” on here have to say.

    http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2015/02/nyc-climate-report-flooding-heatwaves.html?mid=facebook_nymag

  24. anon (the good one) says:

    akin to Rand, Heinlein and L. Ron Hubbard.

    I’d had been interested in their opinion on politics if they had ever demonstrated any talent at all in their core competency of writing Science Fiction novels. In other words, never.

    Ragnar says:
    February 18, 2015 at 5:24 pm
    I’ll be interested in Rolling Stone’s opinion on science and politics some time after they demonstrate some expertise in their alleged core competency of music criticism. In other words, never.

  25. grim says:

    Sea levels in NYC have risen 1.1 foot since 1900.

    One foot? I would imagine that would mean the island is smaller… Have you seen the overlay map of Manhattan Island from 1600s to today?

    http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2013/06/15/article-0-1A567035000005DC-167_634x623.jpg

    I think it would be relatively easy to continue the build out and build levees relatively inexpensively.

  26. chi says:

    Just saw College BBALL scores. Guess clot is going to have a big Knob Creek morning

  27. NJCoast says:

    Grim,
    I feel your pain. My daughter and SIL just closed on the property for their brewery in NY. Luckily the town is thrilled with their plans and are very accommodative. And lucky for the kids that they have no college loans. Hopefully the beer will be flowing soon!
    http://www.suarezfamilybrewery.com

  28. jcer says:

    NYC would likely get a tide barrier, similar to Venice. They’d block the entrance to NYC harbor around Staten Island at high tide and during storms. As for starting a business, yes most businesses fail and our government makes it so, large corporations get all of the handouts and help, they can best manipulate a Byzantine tax code. There is one thing that stands true and that is that the government doesn’t want you to get rich, they penalize individual success and yes as you were saying for most small business owners there is a lot of variability in revenues, sales, and profit. That doesn’t stop Obama from calling you rich and taxing the life out of you…meanwhile hedge fund managers are still using the carried interest loophole(why any fee should be considered a capital gain is beyond me)?

  29. Anon E. Moose says:

    Grim [5];

    Its a function of the religious law, and how much power it vests in the husband to grant (or refuse) a religious divorce. I would not be surprised to learn equally shocking stories among Catholics looking to secure an annulment.

  30. Anon E. Moose says:

    Tool [8];

    whichever loan you default on, my taxes will bailout the lender.

    And your solution to this, naturally, is MORE COWBELL GOVERNMENT!!!

  31. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Doesn’t the customer pay this? Aren’t these costs just passed down to the customer aka the tax payer? This is not meant as an attack. I love small business owners. Unfortunately, they are getting killed by big business, which are the “rich” that everyone hates. Why? They cut corners and did a bunch of shady moves to get where they are. No one has a problem with people getting rich the honest way, through hard work. Too bad that type is few and far between these days.

    grim says:
    February 19, 2015 at 8:53 am
    And plenty of discussion about raising the federal excise tax on alcohol manufacture to $16 a proof gallon, which when combined with the state, would raise our taxes to $21.50 a proof gallon. And yes, sales tax still applies as well, which adds another $10 a proof gallon. Of course, don’t forget about state and federal income tax too.

  32. grim says:

    28 – That’s awesome, they aren’t that far up either. We’d love to do a small-batch co-branded product! Also, if they are interested in doing any Bourbon or Rum barrel aged products, we’ll have barrels!

  33. grim says:

    33 – No, I pay it prior to distribution. The second we take a case out of bond the excise tax is due to the federal government in less than two weeks, regardless of whether or not someone buys it. Unlike other taxes, Federal excise is paid every two weeks.

    We had to post $50,000 in bond for Federal and State excise tax liabilities, secured by our personal assets.

  34. grim says:

    Not surprisingly, small batch producers don’t have the ability to pass through 100% of the excise taxes to the distributor and the consumer. Unlike big manufacturers that have enough scale to bring their costs down, we don’t. So to be on a shelf with a competitive price point, it means we shoulder a significantly larger component of the tax burden ourselves.

  35. walking bye says:

    Does anyone see a future downside to Upper Saddle River? We have been looking at homes in the area. Talking to locals the parks are unusable due to neighboring communities flooding in and leaving it trashed not a big deal for me. The other concern is the low income housing being proposed on the former apple ridge estate. Any truth to this?

  36. grim says:

    In addition, while small breweries and wineries get a break on excise tax, small distilleries do not. We pay the same taxes that Jack Daniels pays. There is some activity on creating excise tax parity for distillers, but appears to be going nowhere.

    http://www.americancraftspirits.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/background-federal_excise_tax_parity.pdf

  37. grim says:

    37 – I am a land use rookie, but I believe Upper Saddle River has met it’s current affordable housing obligations, and has zero requirement to add any additional at this point. I believe the town also previously acquired land specifically for any future requirements, a 4 acre tract behind Porcelanosa on 17.

  38. Libturd in Union says:

    Grim,

    Listening to all of the headaches involved in opening your small business, I hope you have enough booze left over to sell to customers after you treat your own personal pain with your product.

  39. Juice Box says:

    Apple Ridge? That will be million dollar townhouses no? I would be more worried about traffic it will generate.

  40. grim says:

    Happy New Year!

  41. Juice Box says:

    Pumpkin’s year?

    “Year of the Sheep”

  42. FKA 2010 Buyer says:

    Grim

    Good luck with your business venture. What is the “hook” that will distinguish and market your product from the others?

  43. Juice Box says:

    the “hook”

    Shinemobile?

  44. FKA 2010 Buyer says:

    #11, #14 and #20 are my favorites.

    The 25 people you should avoid on Wall Street

    http://www.businessinsider.com/25-people-to-avoid-on-wall-street-2015-2

  45. FKA 2010 Buyer says:

    Yes the hook, niche, the “I have to have this product” factor…..the marketing strategy.

  46. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Seems about right. Big business using govt to take out its competition (small biz). If govt regulation doesn’t take out the small business through unfair tax law, they buy out their competition as soon as they realize it’s a threat.

    I applaud you for starting a small business. You are everything America used to stand for. The middle class is small business. Unfortunately, they are getting killed in their competition with big business. No wonder the middle class is dying.

    grim says:
    February 19, 2015 at 10:19 am
    Not surprisingly, small batch producers don’t have the ability to pass through 100% of the excise taxes to the distributor and the consumer. Unlike big manufacturers that have enough scale to bring their costs down, we don’t. So to be on a shelf with a competitive price point, it means we shoulder a significantly larger component of the tax burden ourselves

  47. Libturd in Union says:

    I suggest Grim add vitamins to it. Some Jersey guy did that with water and made nearly 4 billion.

  48. Juice Box says:

    If Grim has 50 grand laying around for a bond he must have too small of a house.

  49. Juice Box says:

    Quick call the trademark office “Vitamin Hooch”

  50. FKA 2010 Buyer says:

    College kids would be all over that.

  51. Comrade Nom Deplume, who needs to stop screwing around and get back to work says:

    I put this right up there with the WH refusal to say “Islamic” or “Muslim” in the same sentence as extremism or terrorism.

    “At a briefing for reporters, the White House advisers acknowledged that some long-term trends remain only dimly understood. One is the gradual long-term decline of labor-force participation by men. In part, they said, it may reflect positive trends such as health improvements that allow more men to reach their retirement years. But it’s also in part a measure of technological changes that have left some low-skilled male workers behind.”

    http://www.cnbc.com/id/102438557

    Dimly understood? That’s Newspeak for “we can’t discuss the 800 lb gorilla in the room because its our gorilla.”

  52. grim says:

    Going to put cinnamon and gold flakes into whiskey, and make Sriracha flavored vodka. Also experimenting with booze infused self-serve frozen yogurt.

  53. I realized Rolling Stone was a rag when they were pushing REM as a better alternative band than Husker Du. Politics aside REM wrote some OK songs but most of it was just Stipe whining.

  54. grim says:

    And we’re going to one up Courvoisier by infusing brandy with pearl and diamond dust, it’s going to be called Jimmy Walker.

  55. Grim thank you for reminding me why I traded risk for minor security. The crap you have to go through is why my business ideas are on constant pause.

    Put me in for a bottle of your finest when released or the bankruptcy auction those were some fine distlers you posted many moons ago :)

  56. Libturd in Union says:

    Research shows that drinking coffee can lower your risk of getting liver disease. So I would infuse some free-trade coffee beans into the booze and make the claim that it helps reverse the negative affects of imbibing alcohol. Call it “Jim Bean.” You won’t need to do any marketing as people will accidentally buy it. Just make sure the label looks a lot like Jim Beam’s.

    Here’s another idea. I’m not sure how adding hops would help the flavor, but you could call it Hopscotch if you did.

    You distill in Clifton right? How about Urban Bourbon? The gangbangers would be all over that sh1t. Or just call it Boss. But be prepared to change the name in about three more months because I heard some white kid use that term in Glen Ridge the other day.

  57. grim says:

    We are across the street from Rutts Hut, you can take that in so many different directions.

  58. FKA 2010 Buyer says:

    College kids would also love the “Grim Reaper”. Liquor to die for.

  59. McDullard says:

    Grim,

    Important tidbit — call your company a bank and start getting unlimited amount of interest-free money.

    What your case highlights is that the not-rich (you in this case, starting a small company) face hurdles, and once the money starts flowing in, there are tonnes of tax loopholes to take advantage of (employ yourself and spouse; get about 110k stashed in retirement right off the bat), and once you get a smart accountant, the sky is the limit. So, it is really like the Hunger Games, with the winners getting a windfall, and losers perishing. Some industries are tougher than others — food industry is probably very tough; writing apps/games/software/writing may need no capital investment (only loss is the opportunity cost).

    The balance should tilt a bit to the other side, where the startup costs aren’t prohibitive (it won’t be as low as the case with software or indie-game development), and get more from the established. Of course, the other extreme is useless too — where everyone gets to take risks and there are no rewards or risks.

    Some reasonable point between Hunger Games and “Every Snowflake gets an A+”? Or everybody starts making Angry Birds type games?

  60. grim says:

    Pretty sure that doing anything that targets college kids will get us sued.

  61. I hear four loko may be available

  62. Comrade Nom Deplume, who needs to stop screwing around and get back to work says:
  63. Comrade Nom Deplume, who needs to stop screwing around and get back to work says:

    [58] lib,

    “Research shows that drinking coffee can lower your risk of getting liver disease.”

    So all that coffee I’m drinking will offset all that booze I drink?

  64. FKA 2010 Buyer says:

    Yea I know, but that still is a catchy name and if the bottle was a skulls head, even better. You would probably get the biker, and wannabe tough guys with that.

    Either way, good luck.

    I like how the moonshiners used Mason Jar type bottles to market their product. I’ve tried Apple Pie a few times, its ok.

  65. Libturd in Union says:

    Here’s an untapped market.

    Call it B0ndage Bourbon. Instead of a twist cap, use a Grolsch style cap that resembles a ball gag. Thank me later when you make Mark Zuckerberg look like Milli Vanilli.

  66. Libturd in Union says:

    “So all that coffee I’m drinking will offset all that booze I drink?”

    Of course not, but Tamiflu hasn’t been proven to heal the flu nor does Redbull really give you wings.

  67. Comrade Nom Deplume, who needs to stop screwing around and get back to work says:
  68. Libturd in Union says:

    Boy it’s hard to keep that Dow 18,000 hat on this year. Can’t wait to bust through.

  69. grim says:

    67 – E.L. James liked our Facebook page.

    We may be one step ahead of you bud.

  70. Ragnar says:

    Grim, I hope that all your hard work pays off and makes you rich. Profiting from multitudes of mutually beneficial transactions.

  71. Libturd in Union says:

    Who needs money when you’ve got anonymous blog friends like us?

  72. 50 shades of grim get the mommy pron crowd then? See if you can get in the next movie with product placement

  73. grim says:

    Nah, our target market is a little bit different.

  74. anon (the good one) says:

    AWESOME!

    @guardian: Walmart joins Ikea, Aetna, Gap in raising wages for lowest-paid workers

  75. yeah your clients may have class and a brain. Well brains anyway

  76. Anon E. Moose says:

    Grim [56];

    And we’re going to one up Courvoisier by infusing brandy with pearl and diamond dust, it’s going to be called Jimmy Walker.

    DY-NO-MITE!!!

  77. Libturd in Union says:

    “@guardian: Walmart joins Ikea, Aetna, Gap in raising wages for lowest-paid workers”

    Yay!

  78. Libturd in Union says:

    Anon’s getting a raise!

  79. anon (the good one) says:

    Libturd in Union says:
    February 19, 2015 at 2:27 pm
    “@guardian: Walmart joins Ikea, Aetna, Gap in raising wages for lowest-paid workers”

    @ReutersUS: Majority of U.S. public school students poor enough for lunch help

    “(Reuters) – The share of public school students who qualify for free or reduced lunch in the United States has grown to 51 percent, in an indication of growing poverty, according to a report released on Friday.

    The problem is most acute in Mississippi where 71 percent of students were in that category, according to the report from the Southern Education Foundation.

    The group identified the share of students from low-income families by analyzing 2013 federal data on children who qualify for free or reduced lunch at school, which is offered to those from families at or below 185 percent of the federal poverty level. For a family of four, the poverty level is less than $24,000 a year and 185 percent of that figure is about $44,000.

    The foundation said the share of poor students in the nation’s schools has been growing for decades.

    It called the fact that a majority of U.S. students are now from low-income families a “defining moment in America’s public education.” The group argues poor students have greater needs and should receive more support than has been offered to them.”

  80. anon (the good one) says:

    Mississippi is as conservative and republican as it gets. it ain’t working too good for 71% of the kids there

  81. Anon E. Moose says:

    Tool [81];

    The share of public school students who qualify for free or reduced lunch in the United States has grown to 51 percent, in an indication of growing poverty, according to a report released on Friday.

    Weren’t you just crowing recently about the robust Obama recovery? Which is it?

  82. Libturd in Union says:

    And I thought there was no such thing as a free lunch!

  83. joyce says:

    “In 2013, Mike Knight was billed $112,000 over sales tax for a business he used to own. Less than half of the bill was for taxes he already paid in 2004. The rest was for government interest and Linebarger’s collection fees. But his bank no longer had his proof of payment, so it took months and $800 in legal fees to convince Linebarger he had paid his taxes. “I was guilty until proven innocent … I didn’t know if I would go to jail [or] if they would take my house,” he said. “I think I’ll have [the papers with proof of payment] buried with me.” The Oklahoma Tax Commission wouldn’t comment about Knight’s specific case, but it said it has improved its system to make it easier for taxpayers to dispute bills.”

    How about not making the mistake in the first place? Nah, that would be too efficient. Just send out the bills and late notices and let the chips fall where they may.

  84. NJT says:

    Back when I used to file my income tax via mail someone in the IRS mailroom stapled a bunch of rental properties that didn’t belong to me onto my return. Took months and not an insignificant amount of money to straighten it out! What a nightmare!

    Despite the properties having absolutely NO connection to me and NOT on my return I was judged guilty until proving it was a mixup, on THEIR part!

  85. POS cape says:

    [59]

    I think a glass of small batch Bourbon would go well with a ripper and onion rings, or mix it into a Marvis. Years ago across from Rutt’s Hut was Bertlins, which was like a lower grade Rutt’s. I know that doesn’t sound possible. Then it was the Jade Fountain, a Chinese restaurant. Amazing that Rutt’s is still there and looks exactly the same, and with the same menu as 50 years ago.

  86. POS cape says:

    Spelled “Mavis” actually.

  87. Thomas says:

    82. Anon

    Detroit is as liberal as you can get, it ain’t working too good there either.

  88. leftwing says:

    28. Suarez. Very cool. Good luck to them.

    Grim, you too. Sounds like you embarked on something similar.

    It’s all risky, but there is nothing better than actually getting paid for something you love to do. Makes it worth it, beyond the monetary sense.

  89. Ben says:

    Right across from Rutt’s Hutt? I’d stop by just for a Frenchy gravy.

  90. leftwing says:

    30.

    $47k profit over six months ($94k annualized comp) with $300k capital needed and risk that a 10% deviation in selling price moves you from profit to loss?

    Sounds more messy than tidy profit to me…….

  91. joyce says:

    86
    NJT,

    Yeah, I had one each at the Federal and State level… not fun. Due process…? HA!

  92. Liquor Luge says:

    Suarez Family should brew a beer for Luis Suarez. El Vampiro!!!

  93. grim says:

    87 – That’s exactly where we are

  94. Toxic Crayons says:

    Southern tier NY towns looking to secede to PA

    Over taxes and Fracking.

    http://www.wbng.com/news/local/Southern-Tier-towns-looking-to-cut-NY-ties–292486411.html

  95. NJT says:

    #96

    It will NEVER happen.

    This is…contradictory;

    “From my standpoint, owning a liquor store, if we were a part of Pennsylvania it would be hard,” said Francis Larkin, owner of Spirits of Conklin.

    Larkin said he isn’t sure if he would be able to even own his shop anymore, considering Pennsylvania privatizes all liquor sales.

    I guess he means Nationalizes/Publicizes (sorry don’t recall the word if a state takes over a business).

    BTW – There’s a big push (for the second time in five years) in PA to have privately owned liquor stores.

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