National foreclosures nearing 10 year low

From Marketwatch:

U.S. Foreclosure Activity Down 4 Percent in February to Lowest Level Since July 2006 Despite 9 Percent Rise in REOs

Realtytrac today released its U.S. Foreclosure Market Report(TM) for February 2015, which shows foreclosure filings — default notices, scheduled auctions and bank repossessions — were reported on 101,938 U.S. properties in February, a decrease of 4 percent from revised January numbers and down 9 percent from a year ago to the lowest level since July 2006. The report also shows a U.S. foreclosure rate of one in every 1,295 housing units with a foreclosure filing in February.

“Given that August 2006 was the peak of the housing bubble, this eight-and-a-half year low in foreclosure activity is a significant milestone and a sign that nationwide foreclosure activity is on track to return to historic norms this year — and is possibly even headed below historic norms given the skinny-jeans-tight lending standards over the past five years,” said Daren Blomquist, vice president at RealtyTrac. “In markets where foreclosures were processed more efficiently we are seeing foreclosure numbers now below pre-crisis levels in some cases. Conversely, the cleanup of deferred distress is continuing in markets where a logjam of in-limbo foreclosures is still lingering from the housing crisis — as evidenced by rebounding foreclosure activity in those markets.”

Despite the national decrease from a year ago, 24 states posted a year-over-year increase in overall foreclosure activity, including Massachusetts (up 53 percent; fifth consecutive month with an increase) and New York (up 19 percent; sixth consecutive month with an increase).

Despite the national decrease in foreclosure starts, 23 states posted year-over-year increases in foreclosure starts, including Nevada (up 153 percent; fourth consecutive month with an increase), Massachusetts (up 116 percent; 11th consecutive month with an increase), and Texas (up 5 percent; five out of last six months with increase).

25 states post annual increase in scheduled foreclosure auctions

Nationwide, 45,880 properties were scheduled for a future foreclosure auction in February, down 13 percent from revised January numbers and down 4 percent from a year ago to the lowest level since July 2006.

Despite the national decrease in scheduled foreclosure auctions — which can act as the foreclosure start in some states — 25 states posted a year-over-year increase in scheduled foreclosure auctions, including New York (up 146 percent; ninth consecutive month with an increase), Massachusetts (up 88 percent; third consecutive month with an increase), New Jersey (up 38 percent; 15th consecutive month with an increase), and Washington (up 17 percent; five out of last seven months with an increase).

Maryland, Nevada, Florida post highest state foreclosure rates

Other states with foreclosure rates among the top 10 highest nationwide in February were Indiana (one in every 871 housing units with a foreclosure filing), Idaho (one in every 877 housing units), New Jersey (one in every 895 housing units), Illinois (one in every 906 housing units), Delaware (one in every 957 housing units), Ohio (one in every 1,000 housing units), and North Carolina (one in every 1,088 housing units).

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71 Responses to National foreclosures nearing 10 year low

  1. anon (the good one) says:

    Mortgage rates up

  2. Toxic Crayons says:

    Uber: State lawmakers and taxi industry are trying to drive us out of N.J.

    http://www.nj.com/politics/index.ssf/2015/03/fighting_nj_taxi_industry_over_regulation_uber_tak.html#incart_river

    Private business using our lawmakers and legal system to preserve a monopoly…..hidden in plain sight.

  3. Toxic Crayons says:

    Locked in at 4.125%. I think that’s about the best I’m going to do on a 30 year fixed on my previously underwater mortgage…..

  4. grim says:

    2 – There have been some major success stories:

    Modified N.J. rules aid craft brewers

    If Governor Christie decides to run for president, he may want to display this feather in his small-business-development cap: Since signing legislation in September 2012 that eased sales restrictions on craft brewers — over opposition from the powerful restaurant, bar and liquor-store lobbies — the number of these breweries has nearly tripled, from eight to 23. And more are in the works.

    It took courage for Christie to sign that legislation, said Gregory J. Zaccardi, founder and president of High Point Brewing Co. in Butler, which has been making German-style wheat beer under the Ramstein brand since 1994.

    “It was a huge win for us,” he said. “One of the things you don’t touch in New Jersey is liquor laws.”

    Before the liberalizing of the brewery sales limits, Zaccardi could not sell his beer by the glass to visitors, and he could not sell more than two carry-out six-packs a day to a walk-in customer. All he could serve on-site was 4-ounce free samples. Now he can sell by the glass and walk-in customers can buy up to a keg, which is 15.5 gallons, at a time. As before, he still can sell only the beer that he brews and he cannot serve food.

    “It’s still limited, but the limits are much higher now,” he said.

    The change in the law is a big part of the reason that Zaccardi’s sales increased by about 25 percent in 2014. This year, he is doubling the size of the taproom he installed just three years ago. He now employs five people, including himself, which is two more than he had three years ago. Trouble is, brewery taproom sales sometimes come at a nearby bar owner’s expense, and some bar and restaurant owners fear that Zaccardi and other craft brewers are encroaching on their turf, which they paid large sums to acquire.

    “Licenses to sell beer and liquor in New Jersey are more scarce, and, therefore, more expensive than they are in most states, because they are based on population,” he explained. “In many municipalities they cost hundreds of thousands of dollars.”

    Although it can cost $1 million or more to establish a craft brewery, also known as a microbrewery, in New Jersey, the price of a license ranges from $1,250 to $7,500 a year, depending on the amount of beer produced — which remains capped by the state at 300,000 barrels a year, or 9.3 million gallons.

    The New Jersey Restaurant Association was among the groups that unsuccessfully fought against the changes approved by Christie, which are aimed at increasing tourism and creating jobs.

    The New Jersey Liquor Store Alliance also opposed the changes, at least at first. “At the end we were neutral on it,” said Paul Santelle, a director on the board of the New Jersey Liquor Store Alliance.

  5. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Shift To The Suburbs

    In the past Asians, like other immigrants, tended to cluster in “gateway cities” and often in the densest urban neighborhoods, like New York’s Chinatown. Now the center of gravity has shifted to the suburbs. Between 2000 and 2012, the Asian population in suburban areas of the nation’s 52 biggest metro areas grew 66.2% while those in the core cities expanded by 34.9%. In 2000 three large cities ranked among the 20 most heavily Asian cities with populations over 50,000: Honolulu, San Francisco and San Jose. In 2012, only the Hawaiian capital made the grade (Hawaii is the only state with an Asian majority).

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/joelkotkin/2015/03/18/the-evolving-geography-of-asian-america-suburbs-are-new-high-tech-chinatowns/

  6. grim says:

    From the APP:

    Christie signs law allowing Tesla sales in New Jersey

    Tesla Motors can once again sell its electric cars in New Jersey.

    Gov. Chris Christie signed a bill into law Wednesday sent to him just two days earlier by the Legislature that allows manufacturers of zero-emission vehicles to sell their cars directly to consumers at up to four locations in New Jersey. They’re also required to operate at least one service facility.

    Tesla Motors used to sell its vehicles in New Jersey but was blocked roughly a year ago by the state Motor Vehicle Commission because state law requires cars to be sold through franchised dealerships.

    “I said last year that if the Legislature changed the law, I would sign new legislation put on my desk and that is exactly what I’m doing today,” Christie said. “We’re pleased that manufacturers like Tesla will now have the opportunity to establish direct sales operations for consumers in a manner lawfully in New Jersey.”

  7. Toxic Crayons says:

    6 – The law should legalize ALL direct sales. Not just electric cars. Why show one manufacturer preferential treatment?

  8. grim says:

    The language in the law makes it apply to Tesla specifically. Not by naming them specifically, but by requiring certain time sensitive preconditions that they are the only ones to have met.

  9. anon (the good one) says:

    @njdotcom: The Christie-Exxon relationship may be toxic for the rest of us | Editorial

    “You wouldn’t know that from our governor’s presentation: He accepted three cents on the dollar to plug another budget hole and keep a big donor happy, but what played best on YouTube was his swanky command of an oil company to stay in its room and not come out until all its dirty laundry is picked up.

    Apparently, this is the kind of stuff that gets slack-jawed nods on the campaign trail.”

  10. Toxic Crayons says:

    9 – There is no limit to the amount of money exxon must pay to clean up the spill. They must clean it up to the state’s standards….who know how much that will cost. And that is in addition to any settlement money paid up front.

  11. JJ says:

    I am beginning to wonder if the summer rental business is dying for realtors.

    Second summer in row, realtor who sold me place offers to rent it out. Everytime she cant do it. Maybe it is because I dont want to rent entire summer, just for 4-6 weeks.

    So she did a listing, but MLS only allows listings for one month or greater as “technically” less than one month leases are illegal. Than she wants me to pay the 10%. So she has to charge 10% more. Then the final hurdle I only do a cheap deal if I actually can meet or know renters. So since she is in middle and I know she just wants a commission I dont want to cut it cheap as who knows who I am getting.

    So she gets me a couple who balked at the price, wanted it for like 40% less for the month. Well right off the bat I got to pay 10%, which in turn I pass on to them. then MLS wont do leases less than one month, so I cant say how about three weeks. Then I never met these folks, if they really were a nice older couple quiet and just taking a beach vacation I might do it. But I risk they move in with a bunch of people, dogs, smokers etc and with an official MLS lease and a legal rental I am stuck.

    My realtor kinds does not like it as she likes to do cheap rentals, as folks on the low end she wants to put somewhere, as something is better than nothing and sometimes she converts them to a full rental and then buying their own place down the road.

    Every rental in my town under 10K is on AirBNB or VRBO. The low end value folks dont want to pay realtor fees (even if owner is paying), everyone knows it is baked into price and folks like me knows only the low end realtors, like my realtor who is a housewife will do deals for a 500 to 1,400 commission, the better realtors will list it and forget it.

    Soon I guess, small coops, small condos, tiny bungalows will face same issue as realtors wont really want listings. Redfin already requires a minimun selling amount to show you the house. They are spliting their half which means they are only getting 1/4 commission. So houses under 200K longer makes sense.

  12. grim says:

    If the State of NJ had won the case and taken the full amount, little to none of it would actually be used for clean up. Instead, it would have been appropriated, rebudgeted, shifted, or whatever else you want to call it, but I guarantee that 25 years from now, there would have been absolutely nothing done to clean anything up, and the money would be all gone. (Hello? Tobacco Settlement? Where have you gone? How much of the guaranteed $250 million a year is going to offset healthcare costs? Nothing? What? Wall Street is collecting you now? Huh? Democrat Jim McGreevy traded a guaranteed long-term revenue stream for some short-term crack to plug the budget hole?).

    Frankly, it simply makes more sense to hold Exxon accountable for the clean up. If they don’t clean it up to our standards, we take them to court again. But if what we want in the end is to have this pollution cleaned up, winning the massive settlement would not have given that to us. In fact the very thing we want (the cleanup), is likely to have never happened.

    Sorry, but NJ government, both democrats and republicans, simply can not be trusted. At this point in time, Exxon is more trustworthy.

  13. chicagofinance says:

    How can Jon Stewart do an epic rant then?

    grim says:
    March 19, 2015 at 8:39 am
    If the State of NJ had won the case and taken the full amount, little to none of it would actually be used for clean up. Instead, it would have been appropriated, rebudgeted, shifted, or whatever else you want to call it, but I guarantee that 25 years from now, there would have been absolutely nothing done to clean anything up, and the money would be all gone. (Hello? Tobacco Settlement? Where have you gone? How much of the guaranteed $250 million a year is going to offset healthcare costs? Nothing? What? Wall Street is collecting you now? Huh? Democrat Jim McGreevy traded a guaranteed long-term revenue stream for some short-term crack to plug the budget hole?).

    Frankly, it simply makes more sense to hold Exxon accountable for the clean up. If they don’t clean it up to our standards, we take them to court again. But if what we want in the end is to have this pollution cleaned up, winning the massive settlement would not have given that to us. In fact the very thing we want (the cleanup), is likely to have never happened.

    Sorry, but NJ government, both democrats and republicans, simply can not be trusted. At this point in time, Exxon is more trustworthy.

  14. 1987 Condo says:

    #12..McGreevy also traded 10 years of state Police traffic fine revenue for a 1 year fix.
    Your point is applicable to funding pensions as well. The money is often used. You end up being better off with pay as you go systems, like Social Security, anathema to us pension actuary types, but the reality is funded amounts are often diverted, in both private companies (through mergers) and in the public space.

  15. anon (the good one) says:

    “But here’s what he doesn’t tell you: Exxon has been obligated to clean the area since a consent order in 1991, but the real goal of the $8.9 billion lawsuit was the full-scale restoration of the 1,500 acres of wetlands contaminated by 4,000 tons of tar – which cannot be restored for decades, if at all.

    That means the actual cleanup – which he crows was the deal-clincher – can come down to an agreement between Exxon and Christie based on cost and practicality. And given that the time it takes to restore such a hellscape is mostly a theory, Exxon may be permitted to simply cap the site and contain the contaminants and simply move on – rather than pay the $2.6 billion that the lawsuit sought for the disposal of the toxic material, as required by DEP standards.”

  16. anon (the good one) says:

    have to post this in pieces cause the full editorial gets blocked

    “Sure, they may do the perfunctory hot-spot cleanups, such as removing toxins from areas that might contaminate groundwater, and Exxon claims such remediation has been ongoing for years. Beyond that, however, it’s the governor’s call. And after 24 years of foot-dragging, his pals at Exxon have probably convinced him to rethink the standards of a thorough cleanup, as they’ve already received the Jersey Discount.”

  17. Toxic Crayons says:

    16 – You’re quoting the Star Ledger Editorial Board? Most of those pieces are written by Tom Moran who hates Christie’s guts and would write anything he could just to make him look stupid.

    I’m all for criticizing government and holding them accountable but his writings are completely biased.

  18. The Great Pumpkin says:

    16- Exxon is the govt. Plain and simple. Christie doesn’t tell them what to do, they tell him what to do.

  19. Toxic Crayons says:

    Haters gonna hate.

  20. The Great Pumpkin says:

    How am I hating? It’s the truth. Exxon is very powerful. They are above the law.

    Toxic Crayons says:
    March 19, 2015 at 9:44 am
    Haters gonna hate.

  21. joyce says:

    Libtard,
    Re: your comment yesterday about central america. Funny, I always thought you were kidding when you made similar comments previously. But yesterday I took it as you were definitely not kidding. Have you narrowed it down to a few countries/cities?

  22. jj says:

    Exxon is owned by every pension fund, 401K fund, Annuity and folks seeking conversative Dividend income. Putting it out of business just about screws everyone

  23. joyce says:

    Put individuals in jail (when warranted), fine them personally… leave the piece of paper known as the company alone… OK?

  24. JJ says:

    In that case no one will go to jail. Exxon is a great company and is Rated AAA
    joyce says:
    March 19, 2015 at 10:58 am
    Put individuals in jail (when warranted), fine them personally… leave the piece of paper known as the company alone… OK?

  25. joyce says:

    So the pollution just magically escaped… no individuals were involved in the process?

    and why limit the discussion to just exxon

  26. JJ says:

    26-year-old pregnant woman in Colorado, spotting a Craigslist ad for baby clothes, drove to the home of the woman who placed the ad. When the pregnant woman arrived on Wednesday, she was beaten and stabbed by the 34-year-old woman who lives there. The attacker then did something nearly unimaginable: She “removed” the fetus from her victim’s body, according to police in Longmont.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2015/03/19/a-pregnant-colorado-woman-was-stabbed-her-baby-removed-when-she-answered-a-craigslist-ad-for-baby-clothes/

  27. grim says:

    Y’all should have picked up a place in Punte del Este a few years back, you could have made a killing and would be retiring in real luxury.

    Say hi to remaining Gestapo while you are down there though.

  28. joyce says:

    Did that area have a huge real estate bubble? not familiar with the area

  29. grim says:

    26 – That’s a terrible story. I told my wife she’s banned from buying and selling on craigslist.

  30. grim says:

    I worked with a guy that picked up a major position in Punte Del Este and the surrounding area by the early 2000s. It was his retirement plan, and he’d been going there every year for almost 20 years. He pushed me to buy down there pretty much every day for two years straight. He showed me places outside of town that were incredibly low priced. Too good to be true was all I could think, as well the geopolitical risk.

    He’s doing well renting his places to millionaire jet setters now. His biggest problem in retirement is deciding where to go for lunch and dinner.

    I’m kicking myself for not listening.

  31. Fast Eddie says:

    JJ,

    You had to post that story? Geezus! sigh…

  32. Libturd in Union says:

    Joyce,

    I really haven’t settled on a locale yet. My plan is to move down there and rent while living minimally for a couple of years to find the lay of the land I prefer. I am leaning towards Costa Rica or Nicaragua, but stability will probably be what matters the most to me. Ideally, I would make the move in 16 years, when the “D” goes off to college or plumbing school. By then, we should have a couple million in the kitty not counting SS. Technically, one could live comfortably down there on about 40K of income per year. I would anticipate having > 200K of income per year without touching the principle. Plenty to fly the kids and grandkids down at their mercy. I also wouldn’t be opposed to coastal areas in Mexico such as on the outskirts of say Puerto Vallarta or on the Baja, but owning in Mexico is problematic. If I didn’t have that second kid, the move would only be 7 years away in my early 50s. Now I have to wait until I’m 60.

  33. Juice Box says:

    re: # 30 – When I first started out in the 90s one of my older coworkers was investing heavily in building rental homes in the Smoky Mountains near Asheville North Carolina. I thought the guy was crazy, he did after all have 10 children. He retired there and has since passed on but left basically a whole entire town to his family. If they kept it in the family the rentals would be worth quite a bit now. The area Asheville is quite expensive now.

  34. The Great Pumpkin says:

    This story could be the end of craigslist. That’s a horror story. Terrible.

    JJ says:
    March 19, 2015 at 11:04 am
    26-year-old pregnant woman in Colorado, spotting a Craigslist ad for baby clothes, drove to the home of the woman who placed the ad. When the pregnant woman arrived on Wednesday, she was beaten and stabbed by the 34-year-old woman who lives there. The attacker then did something nearly unimaginable: She “removed” the fetus from her victim’s body, according to police in Longmont.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2015/03/19/a-pregnant-colorado-woman-was-stabbed-her-baby-removed-when-she-answered-a-craigslist-ad-for-baby-clothes/

  35. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Yes, that’s why they run this country.

    jj says:
    March 19, 2015 at 10:52 am
    Exxon is owned by every pension fund, 401K fund, Annuity and folks seeking conversative Dividend income. Putting it out of business just about screws everyone

  36. Anon E. Moose says:

    RE: Craigslist attack;

    I haven’t done a ton on Craigslist, actually nothing on CL per se, but I have sold a couple of things on a local FB board called the virtual yard sale. I’ve always met the buyer in a public place. I thought that was common knowledge precaution. Couldn’t doing that have avoided this?

  37. Bystander says:

    I just gave away a bunch of furniture free on CL and this was a big fear. Never know who you are inviting inside. It worked out that the woman was part of church who collects stuff for poor (most likely illegals) in Bridgeport. Still, never again after this story. Hard core JJ.

  38. nwnj says:

    Something like kids clothes should be left on a porch or curb. No reason to go inside for that, especially a single woman.

    Furniture can be a different story but that should go no further than a garage. They should tell you ahead of time if you have to remove the item from the inside of the house yourself.

    I think a lot of the craigslist victims are the same people who end up vulnerable and victimized in public. With that said, there are still outliers both in public and on craigslist, and a lot of the predators seem to have moved their venue to CL. The couple in GA who were shot looking for a classic car didn’t seem to make any obvious mistakes.

  39. Juice Box says:

    Without Craigslist the ladies of the night will have to start swinging a bag on the street again.

  40. NJT says:

    I’ve bought and sold vehicles, furniture, appliances and various other items on CL for over a decade now without any issues other than some things not being as good as advertised.

    Two rules:

    I ALWAYS bring another guy with me when picking something up and if I’m selling something it’s ALWAYS outside for pickup.

  41. Juice Box says:

    yeah but what if they have a porch like this?

    http://www.hotflick.net/pictures/010BOE_Mila_Kunis_012.html

  42. nwnj says:

    We live in a town where the water meters still have to be read manually. I told my wife to tell the guy to f- off when I’m not home.

    That happened about 6 months in a row and we were self reporting our usage during that time. The town called and suddenly had a spare wifi meter they wanted to put it, they came while I was home.

  43. nwnj says:

    With that domain name I’m going to go out on a limb and assume NS4W.

  44. Toxic Crayons says:

    Read somewhere else that the ethanol mandate costs drivers about 14 cents a gallon…..remove it and raise the state gas tax by that much….

    Ethanol mandate / The fuel of politics

    Posted: Thursday, March 19, 2015 12:01 am

    The federal government’s requirement that all gasoline contain at least 10 percent ethanol is causing widespread damage to boat motors and the small engines powering outdoor equipment.
    Shore repair shops say the corn-alcohol additive is the No. 1 cause of outboard engine problems. Marine businesses are backing bills in Congress that would exempt marine engines from its use, or at least from an anticipated increase to gasoline with 15 percent ethanol.

    Let’s go further. Government-mandated use of corn ethanol is destructive and costly on many levels and should be ended.

    The ethanol mandate started as blatant corporate welfare with a fig leaf of environmentalism – its supposed reduction in emissions. Even though the fig leaf is gone and the damage of ethanol is obvious, the mandate continues simply to channel about $9 billion in profits a year to Midwestern corn growers and the politicians they support.

    A 2008 study published in Science by Princeton University researchers found that the production and use of 15 percent corn ethanol increases carbon emissions 93 percent compared to plain gasoline. It is worse for climate change than fossil fuels.

    The National Research Council reported in 2011 that “air-quality modeling suggests that production and use of ethanol to displace gasoline is likely to increase air pollutants such as particulate matter, ozone and sulfur oxides.” A few years earlier, the National Academy of Sciences found it took 780 gallons of water to make one gallon of Nebraskan corn ethanol.

    Damaging engines and profiteering from forcing Americans to buy 14 billion gallons of corn ethanol a year isn’t even the biggest cost to consumers of this federal boondoggle.

    The World Bank reported that about three-quarters of the increase in food prices from 2002 to 2008 was due to biofuels and the effect of their mandates on commodities markets. Ethanol takes 40 percent of the U.S. corn crop, raising prices of beef and a host of other foods.

    Political parties don’t just harvest money from ethanol – they both also bow before Iowa, the top corn ethanol producer, where the first presidential primary is held. A win in Iowa is an indicator of corporate welfare support.

    Seldom does even a poorly thought out government mandate do such much damage at so much cost.

  45. JJ says:

    Maybe Joey from Full House was involved. He always did the “cut it out” skit

  46. nwnj says:

    Who said it was poorly thought out?

  47. The Great Pumpkin says:

    45- I can attest to the damage done by ethonal in the gas. Went through three carbs on my blower in 3 years. I could slap these bastards for putting this in the gas. Now they expect you to go to Home Depot and buy straight gas in a little container that costs like 10 bucks for a little bottle. Such bs!!! I refuse to do that. This is costing me an insane amount of money. Not cool having to buy and replace a carb every year. Hope those Iowa farmers are happy.

  48. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Have to buy a product called ethonal shield now to mix in my gas. Can’t keep gas for more than a month, because the ethonal attracts water, which lowers your octane and messes up your engine and carb.

    How is this legal? You are forcing me to buy a product that messes up my small engines. Total bs!!!

  49. grim says:

    Funny, I remember my dad fiddling with the lawn mower engine and having carb issues with every small engine he owned in the early 1980s. In fact, every piece of power equipment I’ve ever owned, even prior to ethanol, routinely had carb issues.

    Its ethanol that’s the problem? Maybe shitty foreign engines?

  50. Toxic Crayons says:

    The more important point is the added cost. However, I do find that cranberry juice (mostly water) mixes better with alcohol than gasoline.

  51. Toxic Crayons says:

    I will say though, I’ve had motorcycles, used lawn mowers, snow throwers, classic cars and every other small engine you can think of. I’ve never had to rebuild the carbs on any of them. What the hell are you doing michael?

  52. grim says:

    Leaving gas in them through the winter.

  53. NJT says:

    Yup. Let’em run dry on last use for the season.

    Wife: You know you left the lawnmower/blower ect. running in the backyard?
    Me: Yup.
    Wife: Are you going to shut it off?
    Me: Nope, it will when it runs out of gas… ’bout 15-20 minutes from now.
    Wife: The neighbors…
    Me: What’s the difference if I’m standing behind it or not? Noise ordinance is 7 to 7.

  54. Anon E. Moose says:

    Low Unemployment! Recovery! Not so much.

    Who you gonna believe, Obama or your own lying wallet?

    http://finance.yahoo.com/news/is-the-economy-getting-better–185638699.html

  55. ccb223 says:

    My wallet ain’t lying bud.

  56. ccb223 says:

    But hang your hat on the 4 guys they interviewed outside of time square. Who needs empirical evidence when it doesn’t suit your agenda? The sky is falling! The sky is falling! Yawn.

  57. joyce says:

    I guess those 4 people don’t work in an industry that got a bailout

  58. Juice Box says:

    My farmer relatives hate e10 and e15 gas. They drive diesel trucks instead. E10 has been used in the farm belt allot longer than in NJ. E10 used to only be a winter mix I believe. Now it’s year round. If I could get a 5 series diesel like they have in Europe I would.

  59. chi in MSG for LJ Bobblehead Night says:

    Knicks suck. My lord.

  60. chi in MSG for LJ Bobblehead Night says:

    Bargnani getting double teamed in the post. Nuff said

  61. The Great Pumpkin says:

    My father-in-law says the same thing. He can’t understand it. When it was under warranty, I took it to the dealer and that’s how I found out about the ethanol issue. I don’t know if it’s on newer models or I just have bad luck. I have a 15 year old blower that runs regularly on stale gas. She just keeps on chugging. New stuff is making me crazy. It’s a commercial grade blower too. Do a quick google search and you will see a ton of people having problems with ethonal. It’s pretty crazy.

    Toxic Crayons says:
    March 19, 2015 at 6:36 pm
    I will say though, I’ve had motorcycles, used lawn mowers, snow throwers, classic cars and every other small engine you can think of. I’ve never had to rebuild the carbs on any of them. What the hell are you doing michael?

  62. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Guidelines for using E10 gasoline in STIHL power equipment:
    If the proper precautions are taken, gasoline containing a 10% quantity of ethanol can safely be used in your STIHL products.

    Use a minimum of 89 octane gasoline and always use fresh fuel. Only buy enough gasoline that you can easily use up within a two-month period or use a specially formulated fuel mixture like STIHL MotoMix® Premixed Fuel. STIHL MotoMix® is a high-grade, high-octane, ethanol-free premixed fuel containing STIHL HP Ultra synthetic oil. It is a pure and stable fuel mixture that can be stored for up to two years in the original container and is ideal for machines that are used infrequently.
    For air-cooled, two-cycle engines, use a quality mix oil that meets the engine manufacturer’s recommendations. All STIHL oils are designed to readily mix with gasoline containing 10% ethanol.
    Properly store your equipment. If your equipment is not going to be used for a couple of months, the remaining gasoline in the machine should be drained from the tank and disposed of properly. To ensure that any remaining ethanol is removed from your equipment, STIHL recommends adding a small amount of STIHL MotoMix® Premixed Fuel to the tank and running the engine for a few minutes to circulate the fuel through the carburetor.
    Equipment should be serviced regularly by your STIHL Dealer. Items such as fuel filters, fuel lines, carburetor diaphragms and spark plugs should be checked and replaced if necessary as part of a normal engine tune-up.

    http://www.stihlusa.com/information/articles/gasoline-guidelines-outdoor-power-equipment/

  63. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Power Equipment Ethanol Problems
    ECHO handheld power equipment is designed to tolerate up to 10% ethanol blended fuel and cannot compensate for higher concentrations of ethanol like your car. Hand held power equipment is not used as often, so fuel is often stored much longer than two weeks. Therefore, engine and carburetor problems can still occur when running your equipment on the approved 10% or less ethanol content depending on how your fuel is stored and when the fuel that you are using becomes older than 30 days.
    WATER – Ethanol in blended fuel attracts moisture as soon as it’s exposed to air. High humidity and fuel containers with poor sealing or missing spout covers or vents accelerate the problem. Ethanol will absorb a small amount of moisture and stay in suspension within the gasoline for awhile. However, the ethanol will only absorb up to 3⁄4 of an ounce of water in a gallon of gas before it reaches its saturation point.
    Once the ethanol has absorbed enough moisture to reach its saturation point, phase separation occurs. Phase separation means the ethanol and absorbed water drop to the bottom of the fuel container because it is heavier than the gas and oil. Floating on top now is the gasoline and oil mixture. Most operators never notice water in the container when they refuel their equipment. The end result is most often ruined carburetors with rust and corrosion. These expensive repairs can cost over $75.00 and are not typically covered by warranty.

    http://www.echo-usa.com/tomwin41/Fuel/Ethanol%20Fuel%20Tips.pdf

  64. NJT says:

    I’m sick of Pumpkin. Halloween ended almost five months ago. I wish Lucy would kick your ass (OR he was one of my tenants).

    *Note – ‘kick your ass’ is being used as a figurative term and the local Sheriff’s dept.
    handles ridiculous tenants for me.

  65. McDullard says:

    Does anyone here know of a good garage door installation company? We are looking to replace the garage doors and openers. I don’t trust my sense of style, but am inclined to go with one with windows.

    Thanks in advance. All tips from here have been really great — right from financing to buying a van.

    S

  66. Andria says:

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