Why NYC remains at the top

From the Atlantic:

The Feedback Loop That Will Make America’s Richest Cities Even Richer

This week, the Brookings Institution came out with a report on “job proximity”—that is, which cities have the largest and fastest-growing concentrations of jobs in their city centers. This is an important statistic, because people who live closer to work are more likely to be employed. It’s particularly important for poorer workers who cannot afford longer commutes.

The key finding of the study was that people and jobs moved to the suburbs in the 2000s, and the number of jobs near the typical resident fell by 7 percent. This is in keeping with Trulia data that has found that most moves—both within counties (two-thirds of all moves) and between counties—are toward lower density and cheaper housing.

Even in a decade when retail gasoline prices tripled, people and work didn’t move closer together. Americans are spacing out.

But another story emerges when you look at the cities with the highest job density and who is moving there. When Elizabeth Kneebone and Natalie Holmes used Census tracts to determine the places with the greatest job proximity, these cities topped the list:

(see link)

Anybody who spends their free time looking at ordinal lists of American cities will notice that this is a pretty familiar set. It’s almost exactly the list of the most populous U.S. metro areas (for methodological reasons, the Brookings study could not include Boston or any other cities in Massachusetts). It’s almost exactly the list of the large U.S. cities with the highest median incomes. And the highest density of college grads. And the highest share of foreign-born residents among young people.

And, perhaps most importantly for the immediate future, it’s almost exactly the list of cities where college grads have been moving since the recession began.

This is a tight feedback loop. The densest cities tend to be the most educated cities, which are also the richest cities, and often the biggest cities. They’re gobbling up a disproportionate share of college grads. And, as a result, they are becoming richer, denser, and more educated.

This feedback loop goes by many impressively multisyllabic names—geographic sorting, economic agglomeration, cumulative advantage. But they’re all fancy ways to describe something simple. Even as older and less educated Americans are moving to the suburbs, young people with college degrees are moving toward density, and their migratory patterns are encouraging future young people to follow in their steps.

But many cities that don’t already appear at the top of these degrees-and-density lists are fighting migratory currents that are pulling more of the most talented young people to the same small set of cities. “At the same time that American communities are desegregating, racially, they are becoming more segregated in terms of schooling and earnings,” Enrico Moretti wrote in his book The Geography of Jobs. In other words, today’s richest cities might not mimic the collapses suffered by the richest U.S. cities from the 1970s. “The knowledge economy has an inherent tendency toward geographical agglomeration,” he wrote. “Initial advantages matter, and the future depends heavily on the past.”

This entry was posted in Demographics, Economics, Employment, NYC. Bookmark the permalink.

84 Responses to Why NYC remains at the top

  1. grim says:

    From HousingWire:

    Black Knight: Home prices essentially flat in January

    Home prices ticked up 0.1% for the month and rose 4.6% on a year-over-year basis, according to the Data and Analytics division of Black Knight Financial Services and its latest Home Price Index report, based on January 2015 residential real estate transactions.

    In New York state, home prices were up 0.8% in January, hitting a new, post bubble/crisis high.

    On the other hand, prices in the NYC metro area – while also up 0.8% for the month – are still 9.4% off their July 2006 peak.

    Florida home prices saw a monthly decline at the state level, as did prices in all of the state’s major metro areas; many remain about 30% off their pre-crisis peaks.

    Connecticut home prices dropped 1.1% year-over-year, making it the only one of the 20 largest states to see a yearly decline.

  2. grim says:

    From NJ Newsroom:

    Check Out the Fastest-Growing Counties in NJ

    The U.S. Census Bureau recently reported on where the heaviest population growth in New Jersey was concentrated last year.

    The fastest-growing county in New Jersey between July 1, 2013, and July 1, 2014, was Hudson County, whose population rose 0.8 percent over the period.

    Hudson County was followed by Bergen County 0.7 percent, Middlesex County 0.7 percent, Union County 0.6 percent and Ocean County 0.5 percent.

    With respect to numerical growth, Bergen County added 6,138 people over the period, more than any other county in the state. It was followed by Middlesex County, which grew by 5,482 people, Hudson County 5,209, Essex County 3,632 and Union County 3,216.

    Bergen County is the most populous county in New Jersey, with 933,572 residents, followed by Middlesex County and Essex County.

    This information is based on annual population estimates for each of the nation’s counties, county equivalents, metropolitan statistical areas, and micropolitan statistical areas since the 2010 Census and up to July 1, 2014.

  3. chicagofinance says:

    All Is Right In The World (clot Edition):
    Duke in the Final Four

  4. grim says:

    From the Jersey Journal:

    Hudson County fastest growing county in state, new U.S. Census data shows

    “This is really what we’d call a demographic long wave,” James Hughes, dean of the Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers University told NJ Advance Media. “It’s been going on for a long time and it will continue to go on. The result is a sustained increase in diversity and population.”

    “We’re going through the greatest age-structure transformation in history,” Hughes said.

    Hudson County, for example, has grown by more than 34,000 people since 2010 while Sussex County lost nearly 4,000. Fifty years ago, those trends were the polar opposite, as people longed for more space and the house with the white picket fence became cemented in the American psyche, NJ Advance Media reported.

  5. Essex says:

    Of course ChiFi is a dook fan.

  6. Essex says:

    I’m seeing some great homes in the B towns under $700k. Just sayin’

  7. anon (the good one) says:

    sad? that precisely is capitalism at its very best. ask ragnar

    Grim says:
    March 29, 2015 at 12:36 pm
    Sad country we live in where a medical issue puts you out of your house.

  8. anon (the good one) says:

    we all are above average middle class

    @WSJecon: How much you have to earn to be in the 1%:

    $506,000 in New York
    $438,000 in California
    $263,000 in Mississippi

  9. grim says:

    8 – So what you are saying is that federal income tax should have a geographic modifier to equalize incomes across areas? So someone earning $263k a year in Mississippi should be paying as much in income tax as someone earning $506k in NY. After all, those one percenters in Miss. are living like kings without paying their fair share. Paying only 33% when they should be paying 39.5%, disgusting tax cheats exploiting geographic loop holes. I’m with you man, too long has Mississippi been bogarting the government teat, with $2.34 returned by the feds for every dollar paid in.

  10. grim says:

    Personal incomes up 0.4% for the fourth consecutive month? Finally some concrete examples of increasing wages? Personal savings in at an amazing 5.8%.

  11. Toxic Crayons says:

    So true. We should switch to a fully socialized model where you just die.

    anon (the good one) says:

    March 30, 2015 at 8:25 am

    sad? that precisely is capitalism at its very best. ask ragnar

    Grim says:
    March 29, 2015 at 12:36 pm
    Sad country we live in where a medical issue puts you out of your house.

  12. grim says:

    Last time savings rate hovered at the 6% mark for an appreciable period of time, it was the early 1990s.

  13. grim says:

    11 – I don’t at all disagree, especially with regard to end of life care. Frankly, I’d rather die with some dignity than be dragged along with a nonexistent quality of life. Why assisted suicide isn’t a core part of socialized healthcare I just don’t understand. In addition, if we started to look at medicine as a risk-based service, and not as a miracle performed by a witch doctor, perhaps we can get away from the litigation that pushes the cost of services up to unaffordable levels. I would be fine with a two tier pricing system, one as today (you guys can pay the premium associated with having the ability to sue). I’ll take the second pricing option, which would include a lawsuit limitation.

  14. 1987 Condo says:

    Good, maybe 2015 = 1993 (22 years?) and I can be a lot smarter during this replay than apparently I was in the 90’s…so 1999 is 2021…

  15. chicagofinance says:

    I hate Duke….just tweaking clot….

    Essex says:
    March 30, 2015 at 7:50 am
    Of course ChiFi is a dook fan.

  16. Essex says:

    MIAMI — In September, Susan Rodolfi celebrated an unusual anniversary: five years of missed mortgage payments.

    She is like a ghost of the housing market’s painful past, one of thousands of Americans who have skipped years of mortgage payments and are still living in their homes.

    Now a legal quirk could bring a surreal ending to her foreclosure case and many others around the country: They may get to keep their homes without ever having to pay another dime.

    Source: NYTIMES

  17. Essex says:

    16. I stand corrected

  18. grim says:

    From the NYT:

    Foreclosure to Home Free, as 5-Year Clock Expires

    “No one gets a free house,” Judge Michael B. Kaplan of the United States Bankruptcy Court in Trenton wrote in an opinion late last year, reflecting what he characterized as a longstanding “admonition” he and others made during the foreclosure crisis. But after effectively ending a New Jersey homeowner’s foreclosure case in November because the state’s six-year statute of limitations had expired, he wrote in his opinion, “With a proper measure of disquiet and chagrin, the court now must retreat from this position.”

  19. JJ says:

    There is a house near me going on six years where owner has never made a mortgage payment. Did a 3% down thing and missed first payment. No property taxes, no insurance no mortgage. And at one point he made it an illegal two family and collected rent. Guy is a landscaper and told neighbors when day comes I am retiring and leaving country. I guess living free for 6-8 years while working off the books with a tenant really helps someone out a lot

  20. Anon E. Moose says:

    Grim [10];

    Is 5.8% really savings, or just income – expenditures; meaning that individuals are plugging the debt holes in their personal balance sheet? I thought 5.8% savings was Mrs. Wantanabe territory, never to be seen in the US.

  21. Essex says:

    20. Amazing

  22. Toxic Crayons says:

    19 – Who’s laughing now? We could have bought houses in 2006 with the bank’s money, stopped paying the mortgage and just paid the tax bill. I guess real estate can be a good investment….we’ve all been looking at it wrong.

  23. Juice Box says:

    re # 19 – There is no free lunch here, isn’t there a lien on back property taxes owed?

  24. grim says:

    From MarketWatch:

    Pending home sales in February climb to 20-month high

    Pending home sales in February reached their highest level since June 2013, a trade group said Monday. The National Association of Realtors said its pending-home-sales index rose 3.1% to 106.9 after a downward revision to January’s numbers. The index is up 12% from February 2012 levels. A sale is listed as pending when the contract has been signed but the transaction has not closed. Total existing-homes sales in 2015 are forecast to be around 5.25 million, an increase of 6.4%, and the national median existing-home price is expected to increase around 5.6%.

  25. Liquor Luge says:

    Been saying it since 2007: only idiots pay their mortgages.

  26. Liquor Luge says:

    Dook can suck it, too.

  27. Liquor Luge says:

    Think either Michigan St or Kentucky (for sure) can give Dook a proper monkeyhammering.

  28. FKA 2010 Buyer says:

    Guess if you are a RE Agent, you should start making yourself more presentable.

    How to get real estate consumers to spend up to 90 percent more time on your website

    As real estate, mortgage and title company professionals we are seeing marketing shifting to video more and more. Why? Video is one the most powerful and fastest ways to convey a message to your target audience.

    In today’s world, consumers would rather see a video of a house or a real estate agent talking about relevant real estate topics versus still pictures or words. As I meet with real estate agents day to day they tell me that they don’t necessarily want to use video in real estate because they are afraid or because they have certain fears.

    Many agents agree that video is a powerful tool and a future necessity in their business, yet they still don’t want to be in front of the camera. I tell them that they need to overcome their fears and anxiety because using video will shorten their sales cycle and lead to new business.

    http://www.inman.com/2015/03/30/how-to-get-real-estate-consumers-to-spend-up-to-90-percent-more-time-on-your-website/

  29. grim says:

    Real estate agent website? Completely worthless. You’d need to be an idiot to burn the kind of cash necessary on some sort of enhanced web presence.

  30. grim says:

    I now realize that I’ve just insulted myself, and probably rightfully so. The time invested in the blog would best be categorized as entertainment, since the ROI is worse than minimum wage. So yes, spending cash on building out some kind of social or web presence will not see payback.

  31. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Can I go puke now? WTF kind of world do we live in? You made your bed, now sleep in it.

    Essex says:
    March 30, 2015 at 9:15 am
    MIAMI — In September, Susan Rodolfi celebrated an unusual anniversary: five years of missed mortgage payments.

    She is like a ghost of the housing market’s painful past, one of thousands of Americans who have skipped years of mortgage payments and are still living in their homes.

    Now a legal quirk could bring a surreal ending to her foreclosure case and many others around the country: They may get to keep their homes without ever having to pay another dime.

    Source: NYTIMES

  32. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Watch it, starting to sound like me. 2020 will be good times for real estate.

    1987 Condo says:
    March 30, 2015 at 9:07 am
    Good, maybe 2015 = 1993 (22 years?) and I can be a lot smarter during this replay than apparently I was in the 90′s…so 1999 is 2021…

  33. The Great Pumpkin says:

    It’s coming!!!

    grim says:
    March 30, 2015 at 8:56 am
    Personal incomes up 0.4% for the fourth consecutive month? Finally some concrete examples of increasing wages? Personal savings in at an amazing 5.8%.

  34. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “The public workers pay into the pension system for 25 years at 7%. The politicians use that money to plug State budget holes and fail to make the State’s mandatory contributions. All the while the political elite get 2, 3, or 4 no show jobs while working full time as attorneys in private practice earning huge salaries that allow them to rack up nice fat 401K’s for retirement. When pension time rolls around they get appointed to yet another no show job or commission at over $100,000 a year for just enough time to bump their pension to over $100,000 a year. Meanwhile the State worker who did contribute for 25 years is lucky to get a pension for $15 or $20 thousand a year and has to defend his or her right to get what they were promised. That’s what is wrong with the pension system. Dig and find out how Codey’s brother went from an $80,000 a year job with the AGs office to a no show job for his last couple of years at well over $100,000 a year to let him retire with a pension worth $50,000 more than he would have gotten otherwise. That’s what’s wrong with the pension system. ”

    http://www.nj.com/politics/index.ssf/2015/03/christie_pension_fix_not_a_new_idea_but_ups_ante.html#incart_most-read_jjournal-news_article

  35. Libturd in Union says:

    I’ll let you know when I get a raise that covers my property tax increase. I know my local government workers all got their 3% or more. Well, the ones that remain as revenues are not what they used to be. Of course the union that represents them didn’t care about those laid off to pay the increases.

  36. joyce says:

    14
    grim,
    Malpractice insurance is not causing high healthcase costs.
    http://truecostofhealthcare.org/malpractice

  37. Essex says:

    I love this blog, Grim. There’s more intellectual property / insights here than if you spent a decade learning how an RE Agent will “aggressively market your property”.

  38. Anon E. Moose says:

    Pumpkin [35];

    Yeah, ‘borrowing’ money from pension contributions is stupid long term, same as an individual skipping 401k contributions (plus a match) to go on vacation.

    But the problem you’re describing is fixed by making pension payouts reflect contributions, instead of arbitrarily making it the average of last three years’ earnings. Imagine that, you get out what you put in. Public unions would never stand for it — they bought their politicians with real money and expect them to stay bought.

    Sick pay is sick, too. Why is a sick day that someone foregone 30 years ago at 1/4 their current salary paid out at their last (and highest) hourly rate? Not to mention that public sector vacation policy is so generous that most senior people would rather take a personal day to go to the doctor or ride out a bug than a sick day — vacation time is use-or-lose, sick time not so.

    Lastly you’re getting a little excited about an inference of wage inflation from 0.4% growth there.

  39. grim says:

    For example, the premium rate for a neurosurgeon practicing in Long Island is $331,295

    This is a problem. If you need neurosurgery, and someone is going to be cutting your skull open and f*cking around in your brain, you should enter into that transaction with the understanding that the best case outcome is you survive the surgery with significant cognitive impairment.

    I know a few neurosurgeons, and they are bright guys, but honestly – neurosurgery isn’t all that more advanced than when they just cut holes in your skull to let demons out. We’re not talking about a 2 year guarantee on a transmission replacement here.

    Instead, there should perhaps be some gratitude that the surgeon is even willing to try – which is what this is really all about. Try.

  40. Walking Bye says:

    @37 Malpractice in NJ for OB’s is $75k a year with $125k tail should you decide that its not worth your troubles to practice anymore. I think your website is skewing the data. Also Mr Belk works in the lovely state of California, which caps its malpractice payouts.

  41. The Great Pumpkin says:

    You haven’t been given a raise of 3% or more the past couple of years? I recommend looking for a new job. People I know have been avg between 4-5%.

    Libturd in Union says:
    March 30, 2015 at 10:40 am
    I’ll let you know when I get a raise that covers my property tax increase. I know my local government workers all got their 3% or more. Well, the ones that remain as revenues are not what they used to be. Of course the union that represents them didn’t care about those laid off to pay the increases.

  42. Juice Box says:

    re # 30 – There is realtor by me who takes out a large billboard advertisement on Rt 35, no idea if that works at all. My realtor simply sends out a monthly newsletter via regular mail of his listings and closings. He was been working my neighborhood for 25 years quite effectively, and I don’t see to much competition when it comes to listings.

  43. phoenix says:

    41. Grim, neurosurgery also includes spinal stabilization, tumor resection, etc.
    I also know a few neurosurgeons and they are bright guys. Bright guys that have to deal with issues from patients and families. Bright guys who are available at all hours when something goes wrong. Bright guys who gave up many years of youth to get a license to “cut holes in your skull to let demons out.” Veterinarians make more than this with much less drama and liability to deal with. 331k does not seem outrageous to me.
    However, a man with a bat who hits a little white ball on a grassy field is worth millions?
    Have that guy drill a hole in your skull to remove demons, or fix your broken back after you fall from a ladder. After all, this is America.
    You get what you pay for, right?
    In America, we have no problem paying for what we like–5k for a vacation, 600/mo payment for a car, 700k for a big house, etc.
    But doctors, hey, they took an oath. They should fix me for free, so I can spend more money on ICrap.

  44. JJ says:

    Most Doctors who do neurosurgery on Long Island who graduated in last decade are Indians and Asians who do it as they have no other choice. They dont have skill set to work in a Bank, Broker dealer, Insurer or any Financial Services company as an SVP or Managing Director level. Which is what they have to do to make that salary.

    They mumble, are shorter, have accents, have visas, limp handshakes you name it. If they were good looking, six foot three inch, had a great personality, firm handshake I am sure they would do other easier jobs that require less education and pay more.

    Orthodox Jews are also big now in Medical services.

  45. Walking Bye says:

    @45 I think he states the insurance costs $331k a year, due to the potential multi million dollar lawsuits that would wipe the guy out. You find that states that have created caps on medical lawsuits have seen drops in malpractice costs. Florida being the most recent. There are many who will deny this effect. But its just like your auto insurance you can opt out of limited right to sue in which case you cap your injuries, and premium would be lower.

  46. Libturd in Union says:

    No I have not Sir Blumpkin. But I have something much more valuable. A great quality of life in that I can pretty much work whenever I want including weekends. I manage three shifts of workers in two departments and have more work than can be performed in the typical 8 hour day, so really, I can work whenever. I can work from home too. I’d much rather take what I’ve got over an extra $2,000 a year. After you work for a while, you will understand this. This may also be why I don’t get the big raises, but I’ve made peace with this. I’ve made my job very secure by taking on responsibilities that no else can and have embedded myself in as many single points of potential failure as possible. Redundancy? That’s for suckers looking to be replaced.

    I am going on my 17th year here. How long have you been at your current employ?

  47. Juice Box says:

    re # 48- re: “embedded myself in as many single points of potential failure as possible”

    I hear what you are saying.

    There is nothing like a nice engineered crisis to keep management keenly aware that you aren’t easily replaceable.

  48. Fast Eddie says:

    Libturd,

    I am going on my 17th year here. How long have you been at your current employ?

    I suspect the fraud was just figuring out the difference between boys and girls when you started your current role.

  49. Libturd in Union says:

    I’m not following you Gary?

  50. grim says:

    I’m not saying that the guy ain’t worth it, what I’m saying is I shouldn’t be charged more for service because I’m not going to sue if I get wheeled out of a tumor resection as a vegetable.

  51. Pete says:

    #47,

    Sure caps lower premiums, but those savings pretty much end up in the physician’s or hospital’s pocket. How much ends up in the consumers pockets in lower healthcare costs. Not much.

  52. JJ says:

    Well considering the STAR rebate which provides middle class school tax relief for folks earning under 500K is a good indicator of how high salaries are in NY.

    499K is middle class.

    anon (the good one) says:
    March 30, 2015 at 8:27 am
    we all are above average middle class

    @WSJecon: How much you have to earn to be in the 1%:

    $506,000 in New York
    $438,000 in California
    $263,000 in Mississippi

  53. JJ says:

    How could we tell?

    grim says:
    March 30, 2015 at 12:34 pm
    I’m not saying that the guy ain’t worth it, what I’m saying is I shouldn’t be charged more for service because I’m not going to sue if I get wheeled out of a tumor resection as a vegetable

  54. joyce says:

    A court case so secret, US Govt says it can’t go on
    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=11424037

  55. Bystander says:

    Lib,

    Just go tell your boss that the Great Blumpkin has predicted wage inflation and demand 5% immediately. This is industry standard apparently. If not tell him that numbers show .04% wage inflation for 4 months.

    Wage inflation only comes from testing the market and I test it every week when recruiters pester me. I tell them I work FT and provide my current base. I will let you know when one comes back offering more..or even states they have flexibility in their highest number. That will tell me things are getting better, not some troll’s posts about how great everything is in his imaginary world.

  56. Libturd in Union says:

    Yup!

    Still haven’t rented out my upstairs unit in my multi. I stop getting rent from former tenant on the 20th of April. This is the first time a unit has sat empty. Both of my former tenants just decided it was smarter to pay the mortgage than my exorbitant rent. Lowered the price by $275 on Saturday. Still no takers. Next weekend is Easter, so that’s a busted weekend. Me thinks the rental market in NYC burbs might finally be peaking. Though, would not be surprised if purchase price continues to drift upwards on limited supply as everyone I know who formerly rented is now buying.

  57. Libturd in Union says:

    Maybe I ought to just offer my boss a blumpkin? Then he couldn’t possibly “stiff” me.

  58. Fast Eddie says:

    Stu,

    My point was that he/she is a fraud, a troll, someone posting to stir sh1t.

  59. Juice Box says:

    re # 57- Cumon Lib put your thinking cap on and engineer a crisis or two a few days before your annual review.

  60. Libturd in Union says:

    My last review kind of sucked (for me). We do a self evaluation prior to receiving a review and I was pretty honest. My boss said that I was incredibly self aware. He also said that it was refreshing to see someone not completely bullsh1t the self exam. I told him to wait until next year when I kick ass, which I have been since January. Maybe I’ll get 3%.

  61. JJ says:

    So this is interesting, a condo near me built in 1985 that does have an outdoor pool and tennis court and dog rune but no other amenities and they want to improve resale values. Since weather stinks nine months a year the pool and tennis is not much of an amenity

    Unlike my condo they have a big reserve fund. They have realtors and experts in there as they want to create amenities that will raise values. Supposedly condo values fell from 500K to around 350k in last ten years.

    They already are finishing up new roofs and more modern siding and cleaning up grounds. Remaining budget is two million.

    I heard condo President say he wants building to be set for 2030 and beyond. They also have a windfall coming as another condo is being built nearby and owner is writting a 500K check to this condo to get their blessing as it blocks some of their view. I think they also are worried when new condo nextdoor goes up in 2016 or 2017 there condo will be dates.

    What the heck type of amenities do condo owners want? I am treasurer my condo and always assumed folks want absolutely nothing, meaning low maint trumps pools, gyms etc.

  62. Essex says:

    46. Econ one oh one JJ style.

  63. Essex says:

    …and now let’s hear from the place where men are men and sheep are scared….The crash in oil prices is hammering the Texas economy.

    The latest manufacturing outlook index from the Dallas Fed plunged again in March, to -17.4 from -11.2 in February, indicating deteriorating business conditions in the state.

    Expectations were for the index to show a reading of -9.

    But the most important part of this report is the commentary from Texas business leaders, who have given an on-the-ground picture of how the decline in oil prices is affecting one of the country’s economies most driven by oil. In March the tune didn’t change, as it sounds as if things are still tough in Texas.

  64. JJ says:

    no more black gold in texas, all that is left is steers and queers

  65. FKA 2010 Buyer says:

    You have to pay attention to legislators these days.

    Developers force condo owners out of homes

    WINTER SPRINGS — Shirley Lofgren, 85, is being forced to sell the sun-filled, waterfront condo she and her husband bought nine years ago for less than a third of the $217,000 they paid for it.

    The sale is allowed under a “condominium termination” law passed by the Legislature in 2007.

    “Nobody can believe this is legal — that they can just take your home and they’ll give you what they want to give you,” said the former Chicago resident, whose husband now lives in a nearby Alzheimer’s treatment center.

    Rep. Chris Sprowls, R-Clearwater, said Lofgren and condo owners across Florida are being “divested” of their own homes.

    Under the law, developers must get an appraisal to determine the value of a home. But Sprowls said owners are left with little negotiating leverage.

    “In this situation, these people are not being permitted to stay in their homes, and that’s just wrong,” said Sprowls, who has proposed a reform bill that would pay relocation fees and above-market value for condo owners who live in their units.

    The law, passed in order to reinvigorate stalled condo projects, lets developers take title to condos when only 20 percent of the units are in the hands of individual owners.

    Up until 2007, all the owners in a condominium project had to agree to terminate their ownership. In 2007, legislators changed the laws so that only 80 percent of owners had to agree to end their ownership.

    The law became the “Distressed Condominium Relief Act” in 2010, and it helped restore Florida’s bottomed-out condominium market by encouraging lenders and developers to take over the condo projects with “fractured” ownership, said Fort Lauderdale attorney Mark Grant, who helped author that legislation.

    http://www.capitalgazette.com/topic/os-condo-termination-20150224,0,2312118.story

  66. JJ says:

    If you buy up enough units you can terminate condo. In small condos you get as little as 2-3 buyers can take out whole complex.

    The remaining owners are forced to take what they get and become renters in their own complex.

    Happens a lot in small condos. Take a really dumpy ten unit walk up condo 89 and 1st. If you can slowly buy up the really junky units then wait of a big recession or 9/11 thing and buy up you are set. As you acquire more units you vote down every budget to get building even dumpier, fire cpa, fire managing agent they when you control building buy out remaining folk. Then they renovate whole place brandnew and fill it full of tenants.

  67. Libturd in Union says:

    UnitedHealth to buy Catamaran for $12.8 billion in cash.

    This ACA is working great! For the insurance companies that is and those who invest in them.

  68. Libturd in Union says:

    Though, in full disclosure, I sold all of my UNH last month at 115. This gift horse had an average P/E of 12 and a current P/E of 21. It was enough.

  69. FKA 2010 Buyer says:

    [68] JJ

    Nice….be a slum lord before becoming a land lord.

  70. chicagofinance says:

    I had owned a ton of CTRX back from when SXC bought out Catalyst…..however, I threw in the towel on CTRX awhile ago…..the buyout just brings it back to where it was about 9 months ago……

    Libturd in Union says:
    March 30, 2015 at 3:46 pm
    UnitedHealth to buy Catamaran for $12.8 billion in cash.

    This ACA is working great! For the insurance companies that is and those who invest in them.

  71. Comrade Nom Deplume, who needs to stop screwing around and get back to work says:

    [11] toxic,

    “So true. We should switch to a fully socialized model where you just die.”

    Haven’t we already started that process?

  72. Comrade Nom Deplume, who needs to stop screwing around and get back to work says:

    [73] redux,

    Ironically, under a single payer model, I could easily see the democratic party’s most loyal constituencies turn on it like rabid badgers. I wonder what ATLA has to say about single payer? Gonna have to google.

  73. chicagofinance says:

    It is Pat…..and I know so, because she never addresses me…..

    Fast Eddie says:
    March 30, 2015 at 1:57 pm
    Stu, My point was that he/she is a fraud, a troll, someone posting to stir sh1t.

  74. Fast Eddie says:

    ChiFi [75],

    A.K.A Re investor and who knows how many other handles. I think you mentioned it before and then I just totally forgot. I don’t recall if I ever met Pat at any of the GTGs.

  75. NJT says:

    #58

    How to you advertise an available rental? As is said “It’s all in the marketing”. I’ll have
    an empty unit in a few months and already have potential tenants to choose from…in Warren county! No, the place isn’t some flop house in Phillipsburg. 2 brd. 2nd foor unit with off street parking and balcony in a quiet small town that’s close to major highways. I’m raising the price by $100 (only because I’m being selective).

  76. NJT says:

    #62

    ” We do a self evaluation prior to receiving a review…”.

    My former employer and the LAST Fortune 500 I’ll ever work for (by choice) used to do that and a ‘peer review’ by at least five others. I only worked with one other person and for my direct manager. His boss was adamant. FIVE ‘peer’ reviews!

    Besides a co-worker I didn’t have any PROFESSIONAL peers, there. Had to send requests to review me to people I didn’t know and never worked with and they were chosen by my Boss’ Boss (Total Sociopath…I”ll stop now before the post doesn’t make it to the forum). Do I have to say I received my first bad review EVER. It was good though as it forced me get a move on (though I would have preferred to ‘bust a move’ on that creature’s face).

    The goal of the review process at Fortune 500 companies is to keep your wages flat and find a reason to bring in H1Bs to replace you for pennies on the dollar. Beat the system for decade then left it two years ago, for good.

  77. NJT says:

    I had a pet Parrot once. He was orange in color. Always squawked “Wage inflation, wage inflation”. When I said “Pumpkin want a cracker?” he stopped…for a while.

  78. Comrade Nom Deplume, the loan snark says:

    [4] grim

    ““This is really what we’d call a demographic long wave,” James Hughes, dean of the Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers University told NJ Advance Media. “It’s been going on for a long time and it will continue to go on. The result is a sustained increase in diversity and population.”

    Of course it’s the fastest growing: no one ever dies there, they just leave our view and vote democratic for all eternity.

  79. Mose says:

    I used to be recommended this website via my cousin. I’m not certain whether or not this submit is written via him as nobody else realize such designated about my difficulty. You are incredible! Thanks!

  80. Charlene says:

    I’ve been browsing on-line greater than three hours as of late, yet I never discovered any interesting article like yours. It is beautiful value enough for me. In my opinion, if all webmasters and bloggers made just right content as you did, the net shall be much more helpful than ever before.

  81. Lourdes says:

    Greetings from Florida! I’m bored at work so I decided to check out your website on my iphone during lunch break. I love the knowledge you present here and can’t wait to take a look when I get home. I’m amazed at how fast your blog loaded on my mobile .. I’m not even using WIFI, just 3G .. Anyhow, fantastic site!

Comments are closed.