How to improve the NJ economy? Remove building restrictions.

From HousingWire:

Housing in places like New York, San Francisco fail more than just the locals

Significant restrictions on housing polices in three American cities significantly curtailed the economic growth of this country in the last half-century.

That’s right, if New York City, San Francisco and San Jose opened local housing restrictions and let the markets go as they may, the combined boost to the gross domestic product of this country would have increased by trillions of dollars in the last 50 years, research now shows.

According to this white paper released last month, “We estimate that holding constant land availability, but lowering regulatory constraints in New York, San Francisco, and San Jose cities to the level of the median city would expand their work force and increase U.S. GDP by 9.5%,” write Chang-Tai Hsieh, researcher from the University of Chicago, and his counterpart, Enrico Moretti, of the University of California, Berkeley.

From the mid-’60s into the new millennium, these three cities in particular experienced phenomenal growth, but only contributed a “small fraction” to the growth of the nation, the authors write.

It’s this finding last month that underpins the need for a cohesive federal housing policy that can supersede some of the directions taken by local municipalities.

Therefore, the answer to fixing housing — and increasing GDP — is answering not how to stop people from leaving, but how to let more people in.

“Our results thus suggest that local land use regulations that restrict housing supply in dynamic labor markets have important externalities on the rest of the country,” the researchers conclude.

The conclusion to this is that housing reform needs to be far-reaching and national in scope. It’s obvious some policies are costing the nation some gains in wage growth and housing access.

This entry was posted in Economics, New Development, New Jersey Real Estate, NYC, Politics. Bookmark the permalink.

164 Responses to How to improve the NJ economy? Remove building restrictions.

  1. grim says:

    From Hsieh and Moretti at Chicago Booth:

    Why Do Cities Matter? Local Growth and Aggregate Growth

  2. grim says:

    From Bloomberg:

    Home Prices in 20 U.S. Cities Increased 5% in Year to March

    Home prices in 20 U.S. cities rose at a faster pace than projected in the year through March, reflecting a limited number of available properties on the market.

    The S&P/Case-Shiller index of property values increased 5 percent from March 2014 for a second month, the group said Tuesday in New York. The median estimate of 25 economists surveyed by Bloomberg called for a 4.6 percent year-over-year advance. Nationally, prices rose 4.1 percent from March 2014.

    Higher home prices along with lean inventory and limited income growth have tempered the recovery in residential real estate. More construction, particularly of cheaper properties, would help boost supply and bring purchases within reach of more Americans looking to take advantage of low borrowing costs.

    “There’s a reasonable pace of gains — it’s not particularly impressive or disappointing,” said David Sloan, a senior economist at 4Cast Inc. in New York, whose projection for a 5.05 percent rise was among the closest in the Bloomberg survey. “The economy’s improving. Mortgage rates are still low although they’re probably rising. Overall, the momentum will stay steady.”

  3. grim says:

    Case Shiller Tiered Home Price Index – March 2015

    Low Tier (Under $275248)
    YOY – Up 5.1%
    Two Year – Up 11.1%
    Three Year – Up 14.1%

    Mid Tier ($275248 – $439838)
    YOY – Up 2.4%
    Two Yier – Up 8.0%
    Three Year – Up 10.5%

    High Tier (Over $439838)
    YOY – Up 2.5%
    Two Year – Up 9.5%
    Three Year – Up 11.3%

    Aggregate (Overall Market)
    YOY – Up 2.7%
    Two Year – Up 9.3%
    Three Year – Up 11.3%

  4. Juice Box says:

    Our new AG is about to score her first goal. How about a few banksters instead of the soccer mafia in Switzerland?

  5. Comrade Nom Deplume, Future uber driver says:

    [4] juice,

    If it improves the horrid refereeing in soccer, I’m for it.

  6. anon (the good one) says:

    @AndrewDBlackman: Builders are knocking down old homes in U.S. suburbs and replacing them with $1m-plus mansions

    “Merion Homes bought two dozen rambler-style houses in Northern Virginia’s Pimmit Hills community for about $450,000 each, just to knock them down. Now it’s selling customized residences three times larger at prices topping $1 million.
    “The original homes don’t fit today’s market,” said Ryan Bensten, 35, a principal of Merion Homes, which he started with his father, Bill. “They don’t have enough bedrooms — they’re too small.”

    Home teardowns are becoming common in U.S. suburbs such as Pimmit Hills, a 65-year-old neighborhood just beyond the borders of the growing Tysons Corner area near Washington. Builders, lured to locations where land is more valuable than the aging housing stock, are transforming communities outside of major employment hubs to take advantage of demand for real estate where schools are decent and commutes are short.”

  7. Grim says:

    America hates soccer, clearly the NFL is behind this.

    I second the above recommendation, why no banksters?

  8. Even if you have paid for your car to detect and avoid hitting pedestrians, Larsson says, “Volvo Cars strongly recommends to never perform tests towards real humans.”

    http://fusion.net/story/139703/self-parking-car-accident-no-pedestrian-detection/

  9. leftwing says:

    so i’m supposed to give some bumf*** in alabama a voice in my local zoning via the feds because of some theoretical optimal unexecuted growth strategy?

  10. [9] Maybe that was a pre-production version of the Suge Knight package?

  11. Liquor Luge says:

    Dammit. My FIFA rant moderated.

  12. phoenix says:

    3rd the motion.
    Why no banksters?

  13. phoenix says:

    8 Grim,
    They only want the money. No one will do jail time.
    The only ones who go to jail in the USA are those that cannot afford to stay out of it.

  14. D-FENS says:

    Steve Sweeney (Senate President) on pumping your own gas in NJ. (he refuses to allow the bill to have a vote)

    https://youtu.be/XJJNqPIUtAg

  15. Comrade Nom Deplume, the anon-tidote says:

    [15] D-FENS

    Sweeney still looking to try an unionize gas pumpers. (no, JJ, you’re thinking of PUMA)

  16. The Great Pumpkin says:

    At the helm of the scheme, David Nicoll led a lavish lifestyle fueled by the ill-gotten gains.

    He spent $5 million on high-end and collectible cars, including $580,000 for a Yenko Nova, (an extremely limited muscle-car edition of the Chevrolet Nova), $300,000 on a Ferrari and $291,000 for a Corvette, according to a court filing.

    His tab for frequent visits to a Manhattan gentlemen’s club exceeded $154,000. He also spent close to $400,000 on tickets to sporting events, upward of $600,000 on chartered private jets, and more than $700,000 on a Manhattan apartment for a “female companion,” the FBI said.

    Nicoll had a knack for enticing doctors.

    “Between cash, gifts and trips, as well as more than one bibulous dinner – literally wine, women and song, and not necessarily wives among those women – he took care of every animal need that these guys had,” said a lawyer for one of the defendants. “He spent a ton of money doing it and he made even more money.” The lawyer asked that his name not be used because his client has yet to be sentenced.

    http://www.northjersey.com/news/n-j-medical-bribe-scheme-reached-grand-scale-1.1342843

  17. The Great Pumpkin says:

    In the global race to remain competitive, the U.S. emerges as the strongest contender.

    Each year, the IMD World Competitiveness Center, a part of Lausanne-based business school IMD, considers the ability of countries around the world to “create and maintain an environment in which enterprises can compete.”

    To determine the countries around the world where competition is thriving, the center looks at data from organizations including the World Bank and IMF , private enterprises like PriceWaterhouseCoopers and Mercer HR Consulting, national data from partner organizations, and survey data collected from executives about circumstances in their country.

    Countries are evaluated against a host of criteria, including economic performance, government efficiency, business efficiency and infrastructure.

    At the top of the list for the second consecutive year is the United States, which earns its place at the the head of the line through robust business efficiency, a strong financial sector, innovation and efficient infrastructure.

    “The U.S. is a very resilient economy,” said Professor Arturo Bris, the center’s director. “It has an amazing financial sector, it provides capital to large, small and medium enterprises. On top of that, it ranks number one in infrastructure. It’s a big economy, and it’s very difficult to beat.”

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/kathryndill/2015/05/26/united-states-leads-ranking-of-the-most-competitive-countries-in-the-world/

  18. phoenix says:

    Give me a pair of 6×6’s, some 12″ spikes, 6 bags of quickrete, a 5 pound mallet, a shovel, a solar powered spotlight and a visible spot right off interstate 80 and we can take care of these types of problems easily….

  19. D-FENS says:

    17. Nom, you’re kidding right? If that were true it would be way too sterotypical….

  20. FKA 2010 Buyer says:

    The whole origination > pooling > securitization > selling to investors process was essentially like whipping your hands clean. Great minds think of ways to make money and if along the way you can transfer the risk, why not. Good sleeping material.

    Study Connects Credit Default Swaps to Mortgage Delinquencies

    Researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas recently published the first empirical investigation connecting credit default swaps to mortgage defaults that helped lead to the 2007-2008 financial crisis.

    The study, authored by finance and managerial economics professor Dr. Harold H. Zhang and associate professor Dr. Feng Zhao, was published in the April issue of The Journal of Finance.

    The researchers found that the presence of credit default swaps further stimulated the strong demand for mortgage-backed securities, which led to lax lending standards in the mortgage origination market and encouraged predatory lending and borrowing practices. Lenders increasingly offered subprime mortgages, which inevitably drove much higher mortgage default rates.

    “There are many media reports that to some extent link the financial crisis to the housing market crash, and subsequently, research has confirmed that,” Zhang said. “One of the issues that people have paid particular attention to is the role played by derivative securities, and in this case, credit default swaps.”

    A credit default swap (CDS), in essence, acts as an insurance policy, Zhang said. When investors buy mortgage-backed securities, a CDS provides protection to the investor in case the borrower defaults on the loan.

    The researchers found a direct effect between credit default swaps and higher loan default rates.

    Poor quality loans were originated by lenders, and then were repackaged, securitized and sold to investors. The loans were no longer on the lenders’ books, so they had less incentive to monitor the borrowers. The investors relied on their insurance policy — the CDS — and also neglected to monitor the borrowers.

    “That’s how the credit default swaps created more hazard issues and actually exacerbated the financial crisis, because it encouraged origination of poor quality loans,” Zhang said.

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jofi.12221/abstract

  21. Comrade Nom Deplume, Future uber driver says:

    [21] DFENS

    Yeah. Kidding. But how far fetched is it?

  22. FKA 2010 Buyer says:

    Can you at least show up in court looking presentable? Gordon Gekko had it wrong….greed is not good.

    N.J. medical bribe scheme reached grand scale

    By the numbers

    • 25 doctors and one physician’s assistant pleaded guilty to |accepting bribes.
    • 16 of the doctors live in New Jersey; seven in New York; and two in Connecticut. The physician’s assistant is also from New Jersey.
    • 12 other defendants who worked at Biodiagnostic Laboratory Services have pleaded guilty.
    • The amount of bribes pocketed by |individual doctors ranged from $10,500 to $1.8 million.
    • In return for bribes, the doctors referred over $100 million in blood tests to the lab.
    • So far, 12 doctors have been sentenced to terms ranging from one year of probation, for a cooperator, to more than three years in federal prison and fines of up to $75,000.
    • The government is seeking a combined forfeiture of more than $87 million from the 38 defendants, including $50 million from former BLS owner and president David Nicoll and $25 million from his brother, Scott Nicoll.

    http://www.northjersey.com/news/n-j-medical-bribe-scheme-reached-grand-scale-1.1342843

  23. Ragdian the Magnificent says:

    Sharpen up your spanish!

    Just saw this, 1st web RE broker in Havana.

    http://www.espaciocuba.com/

    So when is Goldman Sachs doing mortgage derivatives on them?

  24. 1987 Condo says:

    Like drug laws…there should be mandatory sentencing (10 years?) for health care fraud

  25. JJ says:

    White Chicks and Asians.

    So at the HS bus stops this morning on way to the train all I see is white chicks and asians. Not a single non asian male, no spanish, no blacks, no nothing. Each bus stop is like 2/3rds empty.

    I find out that Regents are next week. Math and English etc. Any student below a certain average had Mandatory early help this week at 7am before school. Apparently in the year 2015 only white girls and Asians study. None of them had to go to mandatory extra help

  26. Libturd in Union says:

    “Our new AG is about to score her first goal. How about a few banksters instead of the soccer mafia in Switzerland?”

    Perhaps the NCAA and FIFA should merge? They both work quite similarly.

    As for the banksters? They’ve paid handsomely for their protection.

    “The new dirt on Mozilo looked promising. According to a Congressional investigative report, he created a “Friends of Angelo” unit, which doled out discount loans to members of Congress who had the power to rein in his risky business.

    The report is the outcome of a four-year investigation prompted by Wall Street Journal and Portfolio magazine stories in 2008 that exposed Countrywide VIP loans to several Democratic members of Congress. Republican Congressman Darrell Issa, Chair of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, jumped on the case. He subpoenaed Bank of America, which had taken over the failed subprime lender, for all loan documents related to members of Congress and other officials.

    What did he find? The report alleges that Angelo Mozilo intervened personally to set special discount terms on loans for several members and staff of the key committees with jurisdiction over the mortgage industry — the Senate Committee on Banking and the House Committee on Financial Services.

    Among those who allegedly took advantage of the discounts are former Senator Chris Dodd (D-Conn.), Senator Kent Conrad (D-N.D.), Rep. Howard P. “Buck” McKeon (R-Calif.), Rep. Elton Gallegly (R-Calif.) and Rep. Edolphus Towns (D-N.Y.).

    So what did these VIPs get? The perks typically included a half-point discount on interest rates and a waiver of junk fees. While the report doesn’t attempt to estimate the value of the discounts, simple math indicates they could easily have run into the tens of thousands of dollars. This would certainly be more than the value of a round of golf, an example the House Ethics gift rules cite as a big no-no.

    The report also alleges that Mozilo guaranteed loan terms and approvals for VIP clients before they even filled out applications. With regard to Rep. Towns, they claim that Countrywide “ignored Towns’ low credit score in order to process his loan quickly.” When Senator Conrad, the current Chair of the Senate Committee on Banking, applied for a $1.16 million loan in 2002, documents show that Mozilo instructed an employee to “take off 1 point, no extra fees and approve the loan — if any problem, advise Angelo asap.”

  27. Libturd in Union says:

    “Apparently in the year 2015 only white girls and Asians study. None of them had to go to mandatory extra help”

    Same as it ever was.

  28. Boston Latin Enrollment
    Male 44.7%
    Female 55.3%

    Total Enrollment 2379
    African American/Black 9.5%
    Hispanic 10.6%
    White 47.7%
    Asian 29.0%
    Native American 0.0%
    Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander 0.1%
    Multi-Race, Non-Hispanic 3.1%

  29. 1987 Condo says:

    With exception of engineering schools, most colleges seem to be 55%-45% or greater women to men enrollment

  30. Juice Box says:

    re# 29 – “Same as it ever was.”

    For the the vast majority of human existence men did the hard manual labor 7 days a week.

    What makes anyone think women will ever pick up that role?

  31. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Trust is a complicated emotion. Walmart has presumed for several years that selling organic products for a slightly lower price would drive defections from companies like Whole Foods Market WFM -0.07%, or even Costco. There’s one problem however. The Whole Foods and Costco customer trusts Walmart even less than she trusts Big Food. By now, most people know that those price reductions come at a cost, and there’s a real concern that in this case, the cost will be food quality.

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/paularosenblum/2015/05/26/big-food-tainting-its-organic-subsidiaries-with-trust-problems/

  32. Growth Hiccups Vex Fed Yet Again
    Latest weak data show how sluggish economy remains prone to shocks
    http://www.wsj.com/articles/why-the-economyand-the-fedkeeps-getting-knocked-off-track-1431716782

    (Comments Section)
    Alan Sewell
    The U.S. economy may never return to the “golden age” of 1945-1990 when career employment was the norm. In those days people expected to keep their jobs until they retired. They could plan long-term purchases like cars and houses because they knew they could count on steady paycheck income.

    Around the mid 1980’s the mania about how every job was a temporary job became prominent. Companies began using their people as “just in time” employees, hired only to work during times of peak demand and then to be laid off and sent home without pay. In the 1990s and 2000’s the deliberate destruction of fulltime employment became our national policy.

    So now we have the lean-and-mean, hyper-efficient economy that doesn’t employ the same number of people as the “old” economy did. In conditions such as this, when people can’t plan to make long-term purchases due to employment uncertainty, the economy can’t experience stable growth. It will grow in fits and spurts, with lots of dead time in between.

  33. Libturd in Union says:

    Speaking of trust. We eat a bit of the MorningStar Farms vege alternatives. Always knew it was Kelloggs. Over the past few years, besides seeing their packaging shrink from 14 oz. to 12 oz. and now in many cases down to 9 oz. Their prices have gone up to over $7 a package at ShopRite. The same product sells for under $4 at Target. When vege burgers cost more than salmon at Whole Paycheck, I ain’t buying it. Gator actually emailed ShopRite to see what gives? We’ll see if they have an excuse.

  34. Libturd in Union says:

    I just looked online vege bacon at Shoprite goes for $23 a pound. That’s just crazy.

  35. Comrade Nom Deplume, who needs to stop screwing around and get back to work says:

    [27] JJ

    “So at the HS bus stops this morning on way to the train all I see is …”

    Does one of those Js stand for “jailbait”?

  36. leftwing says:

    Does not mean elected officials didn’t run afoul of Ethics Rules but it is no different than any private banking client.

    “While the report doesn’t attempt to estimate the value of the discounts, simple math indicates they could easily have run into the tens of thousands of dollars….take off 1 point, no extra fees and approve the loan — if any problem, advise….. “

  37. joyce says:

    38
    But what if the special programs were intended specifically for quid pro quo? Would that not rise to the level of a bribe?

  38. leftwing says:

    “I just looked online vege bacon at Shoprite goes for $23 a pound. That’s just crazy.”

    I’ve noticed the analogy to “buying a monthly payment’ when purchasing a house in the food sector. Seems many premium products are priced and sized around $7-9 per package. Look at your spices, which must have a ridiculously low cost of production. Prices there have been steadily rising, some products are at $50+ per pound.

    A premium protein snack (better than jerky jerky) is $6 per 3oz, $30 per pound. I can get fresh, real in-house smoked salmon at $23 per pound ($18 if I take a whole filet) at our local meat shop.

    We’ve been cold smoking our own salmon for a while now.

  39. Libturd in Union says:

    “We’ve been cold smoking our own salmon for a while now.”

    If I ever saw a euphemism…

  40. leftwing says:

    39. Presumably joyce. I doubt that actually happened and even if it did they wouldn’t be stupid enough to put the quid pro quo in an email.

    More a ‘professional courtesy’. Cop lets a judge walk away from a DWI; a Senator is flagged for best rates in the house. Both cases no quid pro quo, just a general “I did you a favor and we work together” thing.

  41. Bystander says:

    Lib,

    TJs veggie sausage patties are awesome. Think you get 6 for $3. Amazing taste.

  42. leftwing says:

    Really keen secular macro observation by way of expat in 34:

    “In the 1990s and 2000′s the deliberate destruction of fulltime employment….So now we have the lean-and-mean, hyper-efficient economy that doesn’t employ the same number of people as the “old” economy did. In conditions such as this, when people can’t plan to make long-term purchases due to employment uncertainty, the economy can’t experience stable growth. It will grow in fits and spurts, with lots of dead time in between.”

  43. Libturd in Union says:

    leftwing,

    One can save a ton on spices buying them in ethnic markets (or in Clifton). The problem is having to go to so many different places to shop.

    We do:
    Frozen prepared – Trader Joes
    Dry goods/Seafood/Cold cuts – ShopRite
    Produce – Route 46 Farmer’s market
    Meat and what’s on sale – Costco
    Splurge – Whole Foods

    Wish we had a Wegmans.

  44. joyce says:

    42
    Agreed.
    And I would say it’s possible they were dumb enough to put somethings in writing. Remember the emails from GS employees referenced in the show hearings before congress?
    I think a motivated prosecutor/AG could make many cases; however, since they’re all “in on it” at some level… nothign will happen.

  45. leftwing says:

    Thanks Lib. I remember Wegmans from upstate NY. Nice stores, selections, fair prices. Their version of Kings without the prices.

  46. Libturd in Union says:

    Wegmans is great for dry and frozen goods. Prepared is pricey. Produce is priced like Shoprite but quality of Whole Foods. Unfortunately, as they grow, their produce will worsen, as was/is the case with Fairway.

  47. chicagofinance says:

    Try 365 store branded stuff from Whole Foods versus branded at Shop Rite…..also, Stop & Shop may have lower prices on that type of stuff. Also, if you haven’t heard, new CEO of Target is going to hollow out the old generation packaged goods and insert more higher margin food that will appeal to younger and more upscale shoppers…….so look for MORE stuff there in the future when Costco doesn’t stock it….
    http://www.wsj.com/articles/target-puts-some-food-suppliers-on-the-back-burner-1431897130

    Libturd in Union says:
    May 27, 2015 at 11:54 am
    Speaking of trust. We eat a bit of the MorningStar Farms vege alternatives. Always knew it was Kelloggs. Over the past few years, besides seeing their packaging shrink from 14 oz. to 12 oz. and now in many cases down to 9 oz. Their prices have gone up to over $7 a package at ShopRite. The same product sells for under $4 at Target. When vege burgers cost more than salmon at Whole Paycheck, I ain’t buying it. Gator actually emailed ShopRite to see what gives? We’ll see if they have an excuse.

  48. chicagofinance says:

    Also Applegate Farms just bought by Hormel…..

  49. Libturd in Union says:

    Also Applegate Farms just bought by Hormel…..

    Wow…that sounds backwards

  50. Comrade Nom Deplume, who needs to stop screwing around and get back to work says:

    libturd,

    Wegmans going in down the road from me. Not more than a half mile from each of (and in btwn) a Whole Foods and a Fresh Mkt.

  51. phoenix says:

    Anyone who thinks a privatized business (without competition) is any good has never dealt with Comcast.

  52. Fast Eddie says:

    “We’ve been cold smoking our own salmon for a while now.”

    And somtimes I allow another to cold smoke my salmon! :o

  53. Libturd in Union says:

    I sympathize with you and Comcast. Before Fios, Montclair was Comcast only. The only thing good was that I never had to pay for their internet as it was down at least one evening per month, to which I would call their customer service and tell them I wasn’t paying for that month. They would always oblige.

    Had the best FIOS experience last week. For the second time in a month, our ONT’s video portion fried so we had no cable. Keep in mind, we brought our original ONT over from Montclair so it must be 8 years old. The first repair guy replaced the video portion and we were good for about three weeks. When it went bad the second time, last Friday, my wife called and the service person came out same day. Not only did he give us a brand new ONT, but I asked him nicely and he replaced our 8-year old router too. We went from 20up/20down to 30/30. I’m grandfathered in on a pretty good fourplay deal, so I’m not willing to pay the $10 for quantam which would kill our cheap cable/phone/internet/cell package. We have so many discounts (bundling/onebill/20% corporate discount) that our bill has more credits than charges on it.

  54. Libturd in Union says:

    With that said, does anyone know of an HDMI switch that’s 4 to 1 that maintains 1080P from the input to the output. When I buried my wires to the big screen, I figured 2 HDMIs would be enough. Who was I kidding?

  55. Libturd in Union says:

    It would also need an IR remote so I can program it to my Harmony remote.

  56. D-FENS says:

    This is what happens when a Marine meets a gang member…in New Jersey

    http://allenbwest.com/2015/05/will-chris-christie-let-this-retired-marine-rot-in-jail-just-because-he-owns-a-gun/

    (Spoiler: the Marine goes to jail for 3 years.)

    Happy Memorial Day.

  57. [44] Leftwing – some of the comments in that article were as good or better than the article itself. Here’s another:

    “Because interest rates are already near zero—in part because of the slow growth rate—the Fed doesn’t have room to cut them in response to a downturn if one actually does occur.”
    This is another way of saying that when the next recession occurs, the resulting fall will continue until it stops on its own as the Fed stands by unable to do anything about it except make it worse by taking steps that could produce a hyperinflation.
    One thing you are not reading is that the current flat economy is at least stable. It may be but no one knows which is clear because with every new disappointment our best and brightest economists express “surprise”.
    And since stability is only a special condition of a more common instability, having spent all our means of countering economic collapse earlier during the apparently ongoing Great Recession we are now powerless to deal with the next wave of instability which, if the past is prologue here, is not too far down the road.
    Solution? Don’t waste this Summer, who knows how long we have before things turn ugly again.

  58. JJ says:

    How do you know where food comes from I thought you were married?

    Chicagofinance says:
    May 27, 2015 at 1:12 pm
    Try 365 store branded stuff from Whole Foods versus branded at Shop Rite…..also, Stop & Shop may have lower prices on that type of stuff. Also, if you haven’t heard, new CEO of Target is going to hollow out the old generation packaged goods and insert more higher margin food that will appeal to younger and more upscale shoppers…….so look for MORE stuff there in the future when Costco doesn’t stock

  59. phoenix says:

    Spent a little time with the BPU over Comcast.
    Nice as can be, basically explained to me that they are powerless to deal with them.
    Maximum fine to Comcast would be 10k. And that would be with “smoking gun” evidence of something egregious.
    This is what happens when private business goes unchecked.

  60. chicagofinance says:

    you are correct…my bad

    Libturd in Union says:
    May 27, 2015 at 1:25 pm
    Also Applegate Farms just bought by Hormel…..

    Wow…that sounds backwards

  61. joyce says:

    “This is what happens when private business goes unchecked.”

    I think there is a distinction and a difference between that and a govt granted monopoly.

  62. 1987 Condo says:

    Am I missing something? Hormel bought Applegate farms to get into organic marketplace

  63. Libturd in Union says:

    Hormel and Applegate are on the opposite ends of the spectrum. It’s like Hummer buying Smartcar. Well there goes Applegate, unless they keep them separate, as is the case with Bud and Goose Island.

  64. Liquor Luge says:

    jj (27)-

    …a bunch of teenage girls laughing at you, because your clown suit doesn’t really attract 16 year-olds.

    “So at the HS bus stops this morning on way to the train all I see is …”

  65. Liquor Luge says:

    Hey folks, there’s NO GROWTH IN THE NECRONOMY. There’s only planted stories and rigged statistics.

    Dead man walking. 50-100 years in the wilderness. Much gnashing of teeth. Prepare for the endtimes.

  66. FKA 2010 Buyer says:

    [67] Luge

    I get a chuckle every time you write about going into the wilderness.

    It reminds me of an old Dilbert cartoon where he’s describing to a female colleague about all of the prep work he has done stocking up on food, liquids, etc for the pending end of times. And then he asked her, what has she done? Her reply is that she’s done nothing and that she’s already staked out his [Dilbert’s] place and noticed he has an extremely weak security set-up and can easily break into it.

  67. chicagofinance says:

    Here is part of the WSJ article so you can understand what is happening in the market…….

    Several top suppliers summoned to Target Corp.’s headquarters early this year left digesting some difficult news: Their brands were no longer special.

    Representatives from Campbell Soup Co., General Mills Inc., Kellogg Co. and others were told that the retailer doesn’t want to put as much money and effort into promoting some of their products as it did in the past, people familiar with the matter said.

    Bottom line: Target said it wants to do less with Cinnamon Toast Crunch and Corn Flakes and more with granola and yogurt. Canned soup, a category facing a long decline, will be de-emphasized. The processed foods sold by Kraft Foods Group Inc. and others will move down the totem pole, while fancy sauces and oils will move up, the people said.

    Shoppers have long been shifting to fresh and healthy-sounding foods at the expense of canned and bagged goods in the aging center of the supermarket. But the move by Target’s new chief executive, Brian Cornell, who runs one of the 10 largest grocery businesses in the U.S., is among the starkest signals yet that the changing tastes of American consumers will leave some big brands in the lurch.

    “That doesn’t mean that mac and cheese is being eliminated, but clearly assortment is being shaped around what consumers are looking for,” Mr. Cornell said in a recent interview. The CEO has personally attended some of the meetings with suppliers ahead of an expected physical restructuring of Target’s grocery areas.

    xxxxxxxxx
    Kellogg Chief Executive John Bryant, while declining to discuss talks with any retailer, said in a recent interview that Kellogg needs to do more to ensure the room devoted to cereal doesn’t shrink meaningfully. “We need to grow the business over time if we expect to hold shelf space,” Mr. Bryant said.

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
    Target is unapologetic. The chain feels its food aisles have lacked the distinctiveness that underpins its success in areas like apparel and home goods. Like all grocers it is strongly courting younger shoppers who favor smaller, organic and natural brands.

    Instead of largely leaning on vendors to determine its assortment, Target is now commissioning its own consumer research and plans to do more curating of products. That may not sit well with suppliers.

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
    While Target stores will be less reliant on packaged and processed foods that are out of favor with many millennials, there will be openings for old-line food companies that are keeping up with changing tastes. Target’s focus on baby products and fresh food matches well with new Campbell acquisitions like Plum Organics baby food and Bolthouse Farms, which sells carrot sticks and fresh juices. General Mills’ Yoplait business aligns with Target’s desire to be a destination for yogurt.

  68. 1987 Condo says:

    Smartcar? maybe Hummer/Tesla?
    I’d think that is the plan to capture share in the organic market…

  69. jcer says:

    applegate farms has always been presumptuous crap, it’s not much better than hormel. I wish America had real food like Europe, less processed and perfect looking, but with more flavor, all our tomatoes look perfect now…unfortunately they taste like nothing.

  70. FKA 2010 Buyer says:

    Times have changed…..

    I assume most of us remember when Target was just another alternative to Walmart and Kmart which was an alternative to Sears. Hell I remember when Walmart introduced the concept of the Super Store and added groceries. And now some grocery stores sell gas (at least in PA).

  71. Liquor Luge says:

    Pretty soon, our food choices will be limited to whavever Funyuns, Pringles and pork rinds we can loot from burning, abandoned bodegas.

    I also predict a booming uptick in consumption of Beefaroni and Spaghetti O’s.

  72. Liquor Luge says:

    Sears? Sears?

    That company might do better if Eddie Lampert got kidnapped again.

  73. Liquor Luge says:

    I should show more respect for Funyuns.

  74. Wily Millenial says:

    > so i’m supposed to give some bumf*** in alabama a voice in my local zoning via the feds because of some theoretical optimal unexecuted growth strategy?

    Preach. There’s plenty of room in Houston for all the people who think zoning needs to be abolished. Academics never seem to hit on the idea that zoning was a response to a real problem of urban conditions.

  75. Wily Millenial says:

    “We assume that capital is supplied with infinite elasticity at
    an exogenously given rental price. ”

    Right, sure. Ctrl-F for “assume” produces 70 assumes. Some of them are awesome.

    “We have assumed that workers do not own the housing stock so
    that an increase in average housing prices lowers welfare holding aggregate output fixed. Suppose we assume instead that the housing stock is owned by the workers in equal proportions, irrespective of where they live”

    “We estimate that if workers were strapped to their chairs and forced to wear blinders, US GDP would have increased by 3.5% over a 50 year period”

  76. Liquor Luge says:

    “The Federal Reserve has simultaneously blown bubbles in the stock, bond, and real estate markets by keeping interest rates at 0% for the last six years, three rounds of QE money printing that created $3.6 trillion out of thin air to prop up the insolvent Wall Street banks, and unending jawboning about inflation being too low as real middle class wages stagnate at 1989 levels. There isn’t a question about whether the bubbles exist, only about how much bigger they will become before bursting again. As John Hussman points out, the financial stability of the world will be endangered when the bubbles burst this time:

    ‘Unfortunately, the Federal Reserve has now created the third financial bubble in 15 years. Focusing on two variables – inflation and unemployment – the Fed has missed the most important consideration: the risk to financial stability. It is the same mistake the Fed made during the housing bubble. This mistake will ultimately end just as tragically. The only question is how much worse the Fed makes the situation in the interim.'”

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-05-27/using-logic-facts-basic-math-you-are-doomer

  77. Wily Millenial says:

    While we’re destroying the better American cities in order to save them, perhaps we could instead reform federal mass transit funding and the EIS process instead.

  78. leftwing says:

    No problem with zoning. Issue is with the if/then of the article which concludes that a national zoning policy superseding local regulation is the answer.

  79. Wily Millenial says:

    Agre

  80. Liquor Luge says:

    Did grim and Punkin ever consummate their man love? ;)

  81. D-FENS says:

    Whew! Thank God they’ll still carry box mac and cheese.

  82. Comrade Nom Deplume, who needs to stop screwing around and get back to work says:

    Shite like this is where the bullet will truly hit the bone, but it doesn’t merit a fart in MSM. No, we’d rather focus on who called who a f@g.

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-05-28/for-puerto-rico-bond-lobbyists-a-much-hated-word-is-now-red-hot

    Once we start seeing a ramp-up in muni defaults, and the drumbeat in DC to bail out PR, Detroit, or their pensions, that is when shite is gonna get real.

  83. chicagofinance says:

    Actually, there was a bit of a falling out……

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tf2ftEnWzDQ

    Liquor Luge says:
    May 28, 2015 at 7:37 am
    Did grim and Punkin ever consummate their man love? ;)

  84. Comrade Nom Deplume, who needs to stop screwing around and get back to work says:

    Grim, a cautionary tale (okay, not so much but something to think about)

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-05-27/bourbon-bait-and-switch-what-s-really-in-your-glass-

  85. JJ says:

    First of all it is not a car but a white van where doors don’t open from inside and the LSD laced lolipops only make it appear I have a clown costume on.

    Liquor Luge says:
    May 27, 2015 at 4:13 pm
    jj (27)-

    …a bunch of teenage girls laughing at you, because your clown suit doesn’t really attract 16 year-olds.

    “So at the HS bus stops this morning on way to the train all I see is …

  86. Essex says:

    67…..Pick up my guitar and play
    Just like yesterday
    Then I’ll get on my knees and pray

  87. JJ says:

    PR does not have a state income tax and high unemployment and they completely are screwing the Pooch on tourism opportunities.

    Recently they finally are raising the gas tax, sales tax and thinking of adding a VAT.

    The PR Electric company has done a bad job of collecting past due accounts, cutting off services and providing free or discounted rates to non-profits and govt entities. It needs to be run more like a business. That is what is pissing off bondholders.

    I own PR bonds and they can F themselves. I dont really care about market value or paper losses as I am holding to maturity. But states can’t declare bankruptcy and neither can PR Electric Company wants to default go ahead, give bondholders the electric company and let us run it and jack up rates and make a killing.

    Comrade Nom Deplume, who needs to stop screwing around and get back to work says:
    May 28, 2015 at 8:11 am
    Shite like this is where the bullet will truly hit the bone, but it doesn’t merit a fart in MSM. No, we’d rather focus on who called who a f@g.

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-05-28/for-puerto-rico-bond-lobbyists-a-much-hated-word-is-now-red-hot

    Once we start seeing a ramp-up in muni defaults, and the drumbeat in DC to bail out PR, Detroit, or their pensions, that is when shite is gonna get real.

  88. JJ says:

    • Protest – 8AM to 4PM: Uber Drivers – Protest pending regulations that affect their industry – Taxi Limo Commission Office – 33 Beaver St.

    • Flyover – 3 PM, nine Canadian Snowbirds will conduct a flyover over the Hudson River. The aircraft, flying at an altitude of approximately 1500 feet, will fly northeast from New Jersey over the Verrazano Bridge, and will continue north over the Hudson River to the Tappan Zee Bridge. For a photo of the aircraft, please visit http://bit.ly/1PIDSBm

    Fun stuff in Manhattan today

  89. Liquor Luge says:

    I think jj should be declared sole ruler of Puerto Rico.

  90. JJ says:

    It will be Spic and Span when I am done with it

    Liquor Luge says:
    May 28, 2015 at 9:39 am
    I think jj should be declared sole ruler of Puerto Rico.

  91. prtraders says:

    FYI – Puerto Rico does have a state income tax. I used to have to file a “planilla” with the Departamento de Hacienda. Problem there is that you just about everyone just reported whatever they felt like. Which generally amounted to very little.

  92. FKA 2010 Buyer says:

    Ocwen used to be one of the better sub-prime mortgage servicers out there along with Litton who they purchased, but this market has proven to be more challenging than the past. It used to be easy money sitting back collecting mortgage payments and making sure you dial up delinquent payers.

    Pimco, BlackRock Battle Hedge Funds Over Subprime Homeowners

    Eight years after the bottom fell out of the U.S. housing market, investment giants including BlackRock Inc. are facing off against small hedge funds over the detritus of the subprime era.

    The issue: When does it stop making sense to keep struggling subprime borrowers in their homes? The hedge fund faction is better off when loan terms are modified. The BlackRock camp could potentially profit more when banks foreclose.

    At the center of the debate is Ocwen Financial Corp., an embattled mortgage servicer that’s been more aggressive than its competitors in slashing loan balances and lowering interest rates for borrowers — sometimes three or four times. BlackRock, Pacific Investment Management Co. and others say Ocwen is failing to do its job by modifying loans in ways that make no sense in order to avoid foreclosures. The hedge funds dispute that and say everyone gets more money when Ocwen keeps people in their homes. Ocwen says the ways it deals with delinquent home loans are in line with industry standards.
    Questionable Modifications

    In an April 2 letter to bond trustees, Gibbs & Bruns partner Kathy Patrick said her group found more than 1,000 examples of questionable Ocwen modifications. Some of them were given to borrowers who hadn’t made a payment for more than four years, some loans had already been modified three or more times and some borrowers immediately fell back into default after the modification, according to Patrick’s letter. They even found some that increased borrowers’ monthly payments, she said.

    Bond trustees such as Wells Fargo & Co., which oversee the mortgage-backed securities, are investigating the charges. The probe could end with Ocwen forced to change the way it operates or being replaced by another mortgage servicer.

    http://www.newsmax.com/finance/personal-finance/pimco-blackrock-hedge-funds-subprime/2015/05/27/id/647058/

  93. FKA 2010 Buyer says:

    Playing the “kick the can” game is so 50’s. Any questions?

    New Jersey Faces a Transportation Funding Crisis, With No Clear Solution

    Gov. Chris Christie, a Republican, has said little in recent months about roads and transit even as his own transportation commissioner, Jamie Fox, has forcefully called for revenue for the state’s depleted transportation trust fund. Despite the governor’s relative silence, the troubles of the state’s transportation agencies have emerged as a grinding issue for him, including the scandal involving his appointees to the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey and the growing backlash over his decision to halt construction of a new rail tunnel under the Hudson River.

    Officials across the country are wrestling with how to pay for big transportation projects in an era of less federal funding. Nowhere is the problem more pronounced than in the transit-dependent Northeast.

    In Connecticut, Gov. Dannel P. Malloy, a Democrat, is trying to marshal a infrastructure plan that would invest $100 billion over 30 years for roadways and mass transit. In New York, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo, a Democrat, has championed the replacement Tappan Zee Bridge across the Hudson between Rockland and Westchester Counties, even as he faces questions over paying for the crossing’s projected $3.9 billion cost and for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s $32 billion capital plan.

    Here in New Jersey, Mr. Fox has been sounding the alarm over the state’s aging infrastructure for months. He shut down a bridge in Franklin Township in Somerset County in January and has partially closed other bridges for emergency repairs.

    “Our bridges and roads are old, crumbling and getting worse every day,” Mr. Fox told state lawmakers in April. “We can no longer kick the can down the road.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/29/nyregion/new-jersey-faces-a-transportation-funding-crisis-with-no-clear-solution.html?_r=0

  94. Libturd in the City says:

    End the Port Authority. It’s a bigger joke than county government.

  95. FKA 2010 Buyer says:

    Pay that man his money…someone is killing it!

    N.J. pension fund investment managers defend private fees, bonuses

    New Jersey’s pension system is among the worst funded in the country, largely because the state hasn’t kept up with the contributions recommended by actuaries.

    The state spent about $600 million on management fees, expenses and performance bonuses in 2014, according to a State Investment Council annual report.

    In 2013, the state reported less than $400 million in fees and expenses and $25 million in commissions. Labor unions have questioned the continuing shift into alternative investments, growing management costs and changing terminology.

    http://www.nj.com/politics/index.ssf/2015/05/nj_pension_fund_investment_managers_defend_private.html

  96. D-FENS says:

    N.J. home sale prices tick up as Realtors report strong housing market

    http://www.nj.com/business/index.ssf/2015/05/nj_home_prices.html#incart_river

    Realtors report….you decide.

  97. Libturd in the City says:

    Newark may have to lay off top teachers, and the Democrats are to blame

    Republicans, including Gov. Chris Christie, wanted to do the right thing back in 2012, and end the arbitrary practice known as “last in, first out,” which protects absolute seniority rights during times of layoffs.

    But the state’s largest teachers union insisted on keeping it, and many Democrats — including Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D-Gloucester) — bent to its will.

    So seniority stayed. Now, those legislators have left Anderson no choice but to purge some of her highest performing teachers, as the district downsizes to accommodate the growing number of kids switching to charter schools.

    http://www.nj.com/opinion/index.ssf/2015/05/newark_may_have_to_lay_off_top_teachers_and_the_de.html

  98. [94] Greece has a similar tax policy.
    http://boingboing.net/2010/05/04/satellite-photos-cat.html

    FYI – Puerto Rico does have a state income tax. I used to have to file a “planilla” with the Departamento de Hacienda. Problem there is that you just about everyone just reported whatever they felt like. Which generally amounted to very little.

  99. [100] Unless I read this wrong, the assumption is that the newest teachers are some of the highest performing, right? Unless they all went to different colleges than the recent grads I come into contact with, they may well be the stupidest. Also a lot of new teachers don’t stick with it, so I don’t have a real problem with seniority, absent an absolute measure of merit.

    So seniority stayed. Now, those legislators have left Anderson no choice but to purge some of her highest performing teachers, as the district downsizes to accommodate the growing number of kids switching to charter schools.

  100. The Great Pumpkin says:

    100- Good comment from that article.

    How is having a teacher with no teaching background that only stays for 2 years max good for anyone? Clearly an attack on the union and worker. That’s all TFA teachers and charters are, vehicles used to breakdown the union. Can’t wait to see these awesome results from charter schools paying teachers 40,000 a year and not tied to the same educational requirements as public schools. Best part, charter schools use tax payer funds for a for-profit education system. You are tool if you fall for this. The writing is on the wall. Just think about the corruption that will come from a private for profit education system based on tax dollars. The result will be the workers making nothing and all the money going to the top. Move along, nothing to see here.

    “I know this is an opinion page but this isn’t about Cami’s hands being tied. It’s about getting rid of teachers at the top of the pay scale and replacing them with temporary Teach For America teachers (Anderson was one and then an employee of…)* who last a year or two for their scholarship money and get paid at the bottom of the pay scale for their brief teaching stints. She has purposefully made Turnaround/Renew Schools so she can dump entire staffs calling them EWP (Employee Without Placement) and then go after teachers who are EWP regardless of their experience and exemplary evaluation history. When I read something like this opinion I think, oh boy… here comes another person who isn’t in it who really doesn’t know what’s going on in Newark.

    Right now, everyone – regardless of their service to the community is fearing for their jobs and losing everything they’ve accomplished in their entire adult lives. Please stop saying it’s about the children – if you stay in Newark as a teacher or administrator, you KNOW it’s about the children, and you give them your all. These gross generalizations: “it’s about the children” or “teachers don’t care,” especially the seasoned teachers – the teachers who get to know families and become part of the community – is just another ridiculous generalization and further proof that’s it’s so easy to criticize from a distance.

    *In one of her budgets, she spent $400,000 on TFA recruitment. Tell me there aren’t any Education Graduates from Montclair or Kean that may have wanted to be hired as ‘career educators” in Newark. Instead, Cami has cut them out and filled vacancies with her TFAs who leave, many after one year.”

  101. [98] from the article: A proposed $900 million investment in various Och-Ziff funds spurred the discussion on alternative investment costs. In addition to management fees, Och-Ziff will receive a performance compensation of 20 percent on returns over 6 percent.

    If the investments return less than 6 percent, or the “hurdle rate,” the firm wouldn’t be eligible for a bonus. But if the returns beat 6 percent, it receives 20 percent of the total gains, while the state keeps 80 percent.

    A fixed hurdle rate seems kind of ridiculous to me. Wouldn’t it make more sense to base the performance bonus on beating a benchmark *index*? You should never mistake a bull market for brains.

  102. Fast Eddie says:

    D-FENS [99],

    There’s no mention of the affect property taxes have on the ability to pay the PITI. The property taxes are on par with the mortgage payment and has been the difference of myself pulling the trigger on a few homes. At what point does that discussion become the primary topic? It was yesterday that 10K in taxes was absurd. Now, 15K sounds possible if we only sacrifice A, B, C and D. Salaries haven’t changed in almost a generation now. No one here has explained it logically and no one can because the obvious is simply being avoided.

  103. The Great Pumpkin says:

    This the way I see it. How do we know that she is going to play favoritism. Giving her total power to one individual over who gets to keep their job is dangerous in my opinion.

    “Sure, let’s give Anderson the power to eliminate individuals based on “performance.” Of course, she will be the one to determine “performance.”

    She did such a great job here, in one of her “Renew Schools”, we should give her complete power.

    http://www.njspotlight.com/stories/15/04/19/fine-print-state-arbitrator-slams-newark-and-state-over-teacher-evaluations/

    Or perhaps Tom, you missed her prior record. I don’t believe you saw it, since the Star Ledger never printed anything about it.

    http://www.njspotlight.com/stories/15/02/05/newark-tenure-hearing-scorecard-superintendent-anderson-0-teachers-10/

  104. [105] Property taxes don’t count when evaluating real estate affordability. It’s not like you really have to pay them with your own income, you just go back to Mom and Dad for the money. They wouldn’t lend you money for a down payment on a house you couldn’t afford, would they?

  105. The Great Pumpkin says:

    106- Sorry, really busy. So many mistakes that I had to fix it.

    This is the way I see it. How do we know that she is not going to play favoritism. Giving total power to one individual, over who gets to keep their job, is dangerous in my opinion.

  106. Fast Eddie says:

    ExPat [107],

    Yeah, it really perplexes me. That $1275 per month property tax payment has nothing to do with being qualified or affording the place. F.ucking say what? How the he11 does that not get discussed?

  107. D-FENS says:

    Los Angeles: union hypocrisy on parade #RaiseTheWage

    https://pubsecrets.wordpress.com/2015/05/27/los-angeles-union-hypocrisy-on-parade-raisethewage/

    You have to love the moxie of these racketeers: demand a economically nonsensical minimum wage, $15 per hour, and then, when the city is about to implement it, demand an exception for union members because business owners have threatened to do the logical thing: cut jobs.

  108. Anon E. Moose says:

    Count on The Onion for all your FIFA coverage.

    ,A href=”http://www.theonion.com/article/fifa-frantically-announces-2015-summer-world-cup-u-50525″>FIFA Frantically Announces 2015 Summer World Cup In United States

  109. The Great Pumpkin says:

    I have to research this more. I can’t see this being true.

    D-FENS says:
    May 28, 2015 at 11:52 am
    Los Angeles: union hypocrisy on parade #RaiseTheWage

    https://pubsecrets.wordpress.com/2015/05/27/los-angeles-union-hypocrisy-on-parade-raisethewage/

    You have to love the moxie of these racketeers: demand a economically nonsensical minimum wage, $15 per hour, and then, when the city is about to implement it, demand an exception for union members because business owners have threatened to do the logical thing: cut jobs.

  110. Libturd in the City says:

    “I have to research this more. I can’t see this being true. ”

    I can!

  111. Anon E. Moose says:

    Con’t [112], re: Nom [5];

    “At press time, the U.S. national team was leading defending champions Germany in the World Cup’s opening match after being awarded 12 penalties in the game’s first three minutes.”

  112. homeboken says:

    Eddie – There is a listing in Livingston. Granted, Essex County is a high cost county, but you do have some solid public schools.

    Some math –
    The house is listed for $750,000.

    Assume 20% down, 4.0% rate. The house costs $150,000 in equity today, $600,000 in principal, $431,000 in interest payments.

    This houses carries a $17,000 annual tax bill. Since 2010, this bill has increased at least 3.9% per year. Let’s assume they get things under control and the bill only increases 3% per year for 30 years.

    Total property tax payments for 30 years = $808,000. And in year 30 when you have that mortgage burning party – Your annual nut to the local/county/state = $40,062 ($3,338/month). Your SS check will cover that right?

  113. JJ says:

    On Long Island in Nassau County they announced yesterday that they are reassessing 100% of properties around 420,000 properties this year and on Jan 2nd will mail out your new assessed value for tax purposes.

    Folks like me who are serial grievers may get slammed and folks who never grieve and are over assessed may get blessed.

    Either way come Jan 2016 the bitching and moaning will be at record highs and anyone who bought a house in 2014 and 2015 with very low taxes and paid a high price partially due to low taxes will get slammed like a vegas hooker

  114. The Great Pumpkin says:

    116-

    This is crazy. This is the definition of insanity. Does this guy even realize what he just did? Nothing more than a corrupt individual taking advantage of the workers he has been entrusted to protect. Doesn’t matter if it’s govt, private industry, or a union; people will ruin institutions with corruption every time. Why are there no good leaders out there? Bad time to be a little guy.

    http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-los-angeles-minimum-wage-unions-20150526-story.html

  115. NJGator says:

    JJ 119 – It was a nice run while it lasted, wasn’t it? Don’t be sorry it’s over, be glad that it happened.

  116. njescapee says:

    The Clintons Want The Races To Fight For Scraps
    Posted By Patrick Howley On 11:51 PM 05/27/2015 I
    Now that Hillary Clinton is running for the position of last white president — appropriating a populist southern accent against the backdrop of nationwide racial tension — it’s time to stop and think about how we actually got to this apocalyptic point. It’s time to think about what the modern progressive movement, which the Clintons started, is really all about.

    We’re at this point because the progressivism practiced by the Clintons is three parts pro-bank, anti-working class corporatism and two parts lip-service racial agitation. Nobody — white or black — is able to move up and get at any of the remaining money. And it’s the fault of Bill and Hillary Clinton.

    Since leaving the White House, Bill has become just another hipster, following pop culture, renting in Harlem, working for a nonprofit. It’s a cartoon version of the life that his presidency mandated for all of us white people. If he actually does move back to Washington, he’ll be moving back to a city rife with the income inequality and racial tension that he and his wife stoked.

    Clintonian progressivism holds that social justice issues must be arbitrated in the lower classes while the top keeps them tethered, fiscally and with government force, to a system driven by profits.

    The reason that white twentysomethings can only live indoors now if we apply to some disgusting group house run by people who tell you that you can’t live there if you have a “gender-normative” worldview or if you don’t have a trust fund to pay for all their weed? Clintons. The reason that the biggest news website is something called BuzzFeed, which prints left-wing agitprop about how racist white people are and then attacks Coca-Cola because it’s the competitor of its business partner Pepsi? Clintons.

    My generation grew up in public schools during the Clinton administration going to all-day seminars on Martin Luther King Day to sing in unison about Raffi’s “green and growing family tree.” We listened to Dr. King envision a mountaintop of multi-racial hand-holding that we could all find together. But here’s the thing our teachers didn’t tell us: the diversity didn’t happen on some regal mountaintop. It was never supposed to. It happened down below in the valleys and the streets. And nobody is holding hands.
    The Clintons revived the progressive movement in 1992 as race riots burned L.A. and opposing interests battled over how to engage with the newly globalized post-Cold War economy. Pat Buchanan railed in the Republican primary against George Bush’s outsourcing while third-party challenger Ross Perot showed Americans pie charts on growing deficits and debt. Bill Clinton used the chaos to his advantage, winning 43 percent of the vote in a three-way race.

    It was deja vu all over again. The progressive movement first came to power 80 years earlier in 1912, when Woodrow Wilson took down weak Republican incumbent William Howard Taft and third-party candidate Teddy Roosevelt with 41.8 percent of the vote. What did Wilson the progressive do in office? He wrested control of the economy away from the people, turned the military into a war machine, and distracted everybody with race. eThe Clintons took note.

    Wilson created the Federal Reserve to act as America’s central bank and gave it the power to print as much money as it wanted, effectively taking America off the gold standard (a job Franklin Roosevelt finished in 1933). He led the country into World War I, which he funded by borrowing $37 billion from his new Federal Reserve. He lowered tariffs at the expense of the American factory-worker. Then he hit up that worker for money when he passed the federal income tax. What an agenda! A perpetual cycle of war and deficit? An all-knowing bank that can run up debt to justify taxing labor? How did southern-bred Wilson get away with all that and still come off as a populist? Easy. Racial identity politics. He got poor white voters angry by pitting them against poor blacks. He championed segregation and screened the pro-KKK movie “Birth of a Nation” at the White House. When race riots broke out in East St. Louis, just miles from Ferguson, it was white union members doing the rioting and beating up black people.

    The Clintons shared Wilson’s progressive vision but played the racial politics in reverse. Trained on college campuses in the Sixties, they saw the value of tense and messy multiculturalism. They knew that for the Democratic Party to survive, racial conflict must be made permanent but minorities (gaining in numbers at a faster rate than whites) needed to be favored in empty symbolic ways. In Hillary’s 1969 Wellesley College thesis on left-wing organizer Saul Alinsky, she partially backed Alinsky’s tactic of engineering conflict to foment change, writing, “Alinsky’s conclusion that the ‘ventilation’ of hostilities is healthy in certain situations is valid, but across-the-board ‘social catharsis’ cannot be prescribed.”

    So Bill Clinton went about solving the race problem without actually solving anything. He named Jesse Jackson his personal White House “spiritual adviser” but also put 100,000 new cops on the street. He got his picture taken with Nelson Mandela but sent 673,000 more people to prison. He told Americans to “clean our house of racism” after the O.J. verdict but he renewed harsher penalties for crack cocaine violators than for powder coke.

    When Clinton repealed the Glass-Steagall Act, allowing for massive consolidation of Wall Street banks, he popped the cherry on the age of super wealth among the corporate/banker class and hyper-inequality across the board. Millionaires became billionaires. Billionaires became tens-of-billionaires. And all of these rich people were welcome to stay in the Lincoln Bedroom in return for a donation to good ol’ DNC chair Terry McAuliffe. The Clintons became so close to Goldman Sachs that when bailout guru Tim Geithner went to Bill Clinton and complained about how the public won’t get on board with rich people having all the money, Clinton brushed it off, saying, “You could take [Goldman CEO] Lloyd Blankfein into a dark alley and slit his throat, and it would satisfy them for about two days. Then the bloodlust would rise again.”

    Bubba never cut taxes on the middle class as he promised and he did nothing about corporate tax havens. There’s $1.2 trillion in American currency out there and some fat Democrat gets to keep two percent of it for himself at some bank in the Cayman Islands guarded by Rastafarian gangsters. You’re welcome.

    As a small group of bankers gained unprecedented control over American currency, Clinton sold out minorities and middle-class whites.

    His Housing and Urban Development agency under Andrew Cuomo forced Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to start giving out risky subprime mortgage loans to minorities at a level sufficient to meet new quotas. What an idea. Housing credit to spur black and Hispanic homeownership! It was a big-government handout backed by nothing — and if those loans all went bust then the federal government would have to bail out Fannie and Freddie and the big banks, anyway. Of course those loans did go bust, the banks did get bailed out at taxpayer expense, people’s homes were foreclosed on, and now folks of all creeds and colors are renting.

    As for working-class white people, they got outsourced. Clinton’s push to get China into the World Trade Organization led to the loss of 11.7 million U.S. manufacturing jobs in eight years. Clinton was giddy when that fuzzy “America Online” test signal went live and Google popped up in Menlo Park. The new frontier in humanity! You know how many people Google, the world’s most powerful corporation, now employs worldwide? 53,600. That’s half the number of people who go to Bonnaroo.

    But at least we have wars to keep us all together! As Monica Lewinsky captured America’s hearts, Bill was shooting a load (excuse me) of bombs at Yugoslavia and Saddam Hussein, who he said probably had weapons of mass destruction. In 2001, Donald Rumsfeld circulated a list of seven Middle Eastern leaders that he wanted to overthrow, including Hussein and Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi (who almost plunged our petrodollar system into chaos by refusing to accept American currency for oil, thus pointing out that the dollar isn’t actually worth anything and revealing that one gown-wearing weirdo is capable of causing hyperinflation here in the states). Bush spent his term preoccupied fighting Saddam — with Hillary’s support — so Hillary as secretary of state finished off Gaddafi. When her intervention went to hell and her ambassador got killed, she relied on talking points about some YouTube video from her Lewinsky-era political hatchet man Sidney Blumenthal.

    The rogressives took away your money and then pointed your rage in the direction of other poor people who look different than you.

    This is the progressive record of the Clintons. And as they left office to the dot-com bust they had the bright idea to keep their vision going with well-funded think tanks and advocacy groups. By 2004, MoveOn.org was hammering Bush, Clinton’s chief of staff (and head of Hillary’s 2016 campaign) John Podesta was running the Center for American Progress, and Clinton fanboy David Brock was running the George Soros-funded Media Matters for America.
    I remember sitting in left-wing seminars during the middle of the Bush administration learning that Jon Stewart — a smug comedian who managed to combine propaganda with lame jokes — was basically Albert Einstein and Mahatma Gandhi rolled into one inspirational role model. I remember the dawn of social media and how Podesta’s progressive infrastructure filled it with youth-baiting lefty propaganda and censored anything that wasn’t politically correct. I remember the first time I ever heard the term “white male privilege.” I remember watching my generation of rich suburban kids being put to work as leaflet-passers for their own demise.

    It’s powerful technology. For a brief moment in 2008, someone named Barack Obama managed to use it to convince college kids that Bill Clinton was a racist and temporarily stole the Democratic Party away from the Clintons. He spent his presidency passing one disastrous health care bill that the Clintons tried to pass 15 years earlier and then sitting around doing comedy bits and waiting for the Clintons to come back. Don’t be fooled: there’s no “progressive” alternative to Billary, be it Elizabeth Warren or Bernie Sanders. The Clintons control their party, and they control their movement.

    This is the modern race war. Blacks and whites will always have different skin colors and different interests. It’s a tale as old as time. But the constant race-baiting in our society today, aimed at white people who are mostly just as poor as everyone else? That’s a new trend.

    It’s all just empty agitation to keep angry poor people — white and black — out of Hillary Clinton’s neighborhood. The Mexicans are fine so long as they use the service door.

    So if you’re a broke-off-his-ass Daily Caller writer, maybe you stop into your old neighborhood bar — once enjoyed by whites and blacks alike — and you find that it’s been bought out by some company that has an innocuous tree logo on its overpriced menu. What’s going on, you say? But nobody can understand you. The servers are 21-year old Mexican guys and they’re playing Justin Timberlake music while small groups of white people look down, bored, at their phones.

    Maybe you go to another bar and strike up a conversation with a beautiful 23-year-old black female graduate of an elite university who now works in the mainstream media. She confronts you, ever so politely, about your white male privilege.

    “People in the black community can’t talk to their uncles and aunts the way I’m talking to YOU in this bar right now,” she says.

    “But doesn’t Beyonce get praised more than me?” I rebut.

    “Beyonce gets praised because she’s fetishized,” the girl replies. “YOU get praised in more subtle ways.”

    “I do?” I ask, subtly plunking down my remaining one-dollar bills for a Pabst Blue Ribbon.

    Welcome to Progressive America, kids. It sure is a privilege to be here.

  117. JJ says:

    When Sandy hit I filed for a huge assessment reduction based on damage. Tax years run from 10-1 through 9-30 each year.

    They reduction started 10/2012 (went retroactive) and with the reassessment they are removing it starting 10/2017. I was hoping to keep it forever. Although paying almost no property tax for five years was pretty nice.

    NJGator says:
    May 28, 2015 at 1:43 pm
    JJ 119 – It was a nice run while it lasted, wasn’t it? Don’t be sorry it’s over, be glad that it happened.

  118. D-FENS says:

    Makes sense if ya think about it…business can choose to be a Union shop…and pay people less….Union gets more dues paying members, and business gets cheaper labor…Union wins and Business wins…..workers..not so much.

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    May 28, 2015 at 12:06 pm
    I have to research this more. I can’t see this being true.

    D-FENS says:
    May 28, 2015 at 11:52 am
    Los Angeles: union hypocrisy on parade #RaiseTheWage

    https://pubsecrets.wordpress.com/2015/05/27/los-angeles-union-hypocrisy-on-parade-raisethewage/

    You have to love the moxie of these racketeers: demand a economically nonsensical minimum wage, $15 per hour, and then, when the city is about to implement it, demand an exception for union members because business owners have threatened to do the logical thing: cut jobs.

  119. Yep, it might be the end of the good ride for JJ:

    http://7online.com/news/all-properties-in-nassau-county-set-to-be-reassessed-for-property-taxes/744901/
    As to why property taxes are going up for some and not others, Eyewitness News asked an expert.

    Jeff Gold is an attorney who helped supervise the last property re-assessment, which was 12 years ago. He says the system is manipulated.

    “So people are grieving their taxes four, five, six years in a row and they’re seeing reductions almost every year,” Gold said.

    That’s while others are forced to make up for it. So as for any future re-assessments, Eyewitness News asked where is the oversight going to be?

  120. D-FENS says:

    Damnit. Moderated.

  121. Libturd in the City says:

    “Folks like me who are serial grievers may get slammed and folks who never grieve and are over assessed may get blessed.”

    Don’t worry too much JJ. In a year or two post assessment, you can get back to the grieving game. Don’t forget to encourage your neighbors to improve their properties.

  122. [124] D – That’s what came to my mind too. I wonder if it will open the door for Union
    Disorganizers.

    Makes sense if ya think about it…business can choose to be a Union shop…and pay people less….Union gets more dues paying members, and business gets cheaper labor…Union wins and Business wins…..workers..not so much.

  123. nwnj says:

    #122

    Luckily for Billary adverse selection has taken it’s tool, braindead idi0ts like anon abound.

  124. nwnj says:

    toll

  125. D-FENS says:

    http://urbanismvsmodernism.blogspot.com/2014/03/americas-worst-mistake-redlining.html

    Redlining NJ’s cities

    One of Newark, New Jersey’s greatest assets today is its group of universities. 50,000 students attend 6 colleges and universities in a compact area west of Downtown called University City. The problem is that these schools were never there before the 1950’s, with the sole exception of a tiny portion of the New Jersey Institute of Technology, then known as the Newark School of Engineering. The vast areas now occupied by the schools was once part of a thriving neighborhood with many historic buildings. Unfortunately, post-World War II politicians and decision-makers dismissed the importance of a thriving downtown area at a time when gas was cheap, in limitless supply despite 4 previous years of rationing, and the cities were unfortunately polluted.

    The end of World War II resulted in 15 Million returning war veterans that were in need of a home of their own. Having only recently entered the middle class after 16 years of Great Depression and War Rationing, the United States had a shortage of homes available. As a result, the Federal Government created a program to help the returning veterans afford a new home by Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944, better known as the G.I. Bill. Since so little housing was built between 1929 and then, there was a huge housing shortage. The bill allowed returning war veterans to apply for home mortgages with no down payment and very low interest rates that were subsidized by the government. The key factor was the location where the property was that the loan was for. Believing that cities would become a thing of the past, replaced by sprawling auto-centric suburbs, and that it would be nearly impossible for the government to recoup their investment in the loan due to bottomless urban property values, the Federal Government created a series of maps covering the entire country and color coded based on how successful the investment in a loan there would be. Areas that were safe investments were painted black while areas that were considered to be toxic investments were painted red. The process is called Redlining and was an attempt to reduce risk for the loans, and it was started in 1933 by the Home Owners Loan Corporation as part of the New Deal efforts to reduce the effects of the Great Depression. For the most part, urban areas were painted bright red while virgin land waiting for strip malls and cul-de-sacs were painted blue and considered safe investments. Those in between were yellow, and only highly qualified borrowers could get loans. Commercial districts were excluded from the process. Believing that the Federal Government knew best when dealing with this, despite having almost no experience with mortgages, every bank went along with the system. The inevitable result was that anyone could get a loan for a house in the suburbs while you couldn’t get a loan in a downtown area, even if you were a Rockefeller, Vanderbilt, or Carnegie. Because of this, anyone who wanted to buy a house was forced to move to the suburbs, and anyone who wanted a home in the city had to either rent or have the cash on hand. Far too few people did. Also, in the days before the Civil Rights Movement, anti-African American racism was rampant. The Federal Government happened to be building massive amounts of public housing and desired cheap land to build huge “towers-in-a-park” housing projects that consisted of large numbers of identical towers set far apart and far away from the street with almost nothing except a few trees and grass between them, and they were almost always segregated by race. The grass was quickly replaced by asphalt parking lots. Housing projects for African Americans were clustered in cities, particularly those cities that welcomed them in an attempt to replace their plummeting populations. The mere presence of African Americans drove property values far lower as racist white homeowners, many of whom had regularly wore white hooded cloaks and burned crosses a few years earlier, did not want to be near them. This further expedited suburban sprawl, known as White Flight. This resulted in large vacant areas and many architecturally undesirable apartment buildings.

  126. The Great Pumpkin says:

    That’s the part that makes me sick. A bunch of people feeding off the working class. Soon there won’t be anything left to eat.

    D-FENS says:
    May 28, 2015 at 1:58 pm
    Makes sense if ya think about it…business can choose to be a Union shop…and pay people less….Union gets more dues paying members, and business gets cheaper labor…Union wins and Business wins…..workers..not so much.

  127. The Great Pumpkin says:

    122- Thank you for posting this article. I’m going to puke now.

    “When Clinton repealed the Glass-Steagall Act, allowing for massive consolidation of Wall Street banks, he popped the cherry on the age of super wealth among the corporate/banker class and hyper-inequality across the board. Millionaires became billionaires. Billionaires became tens-of-billionaires. And all of these rich people were welcome to stay in the Lincoln Bedroom in return for a donation to good ol’ DNC chair Terry McAuliffe. The Clintons became so close to Goldman Sachs that when bailout guru Tim Geithner went to Bill Clinton and complained about how the public won’t get on board with rich people having all the money, Clinton brushed it off, saying, “You could take [Goldman CEO] Lloyd Blankfein into a dark alley and slit his throat, and it would satisfy them for about two days. Then the bloodlust would rise again.””

  128. JJ says:

    http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/man-leaps-death-luxury-apartment-building-article-1.2238770

    Right near my office downtown splat and with Uber Protest going on what was he thinking

  129. JJ says:

    I won so many times I think around seven out of last eight times I grieved using so many different strategies it is kinda crazy.

    Last one I won by a small amount and rejected and requested mediation as I felt it was not enough, then in mediation the town said I should have got no reduction so I got nothing, but I had 30 days to go to court and pay a court fee if I disagree which I did. The courts get overwelmed and throw all cases back to assessor to tell them to clean up as many as you can and at that point I won. At some point assessor needs to close the tax books so easier to offer a reduction and call it a day. Trouble is if you do this every year and same folks always grieve eventually assessed values get very low on those houses and other houses assessed value gets way too high.

    It is a crazy system that lawyers and folks like me who like to fill out forms can tie them up. At my condo complex I am in charge of tax grievances since I took over as treasurer in Nov 2013. Since then I filed 62 tax grievances for a building with 30 units. The lady in assessor told me it is a gigantic thick file and her boss has ordered her to make it go away. I get results in the summer of 2015.

    Libturd in the City says:
    May 28, 2015 at 2:02 pm
    “Folks like me who are serial grievers may get slammed and folks who never grieve and are over assessed may get blessed.”

    Don’t worry too much JJ. In a year or two post assessment, you can get back to the grieving game. Don’t forget to encourage your neighbors to improve their properties.

  130. Walking Bye says:

    @137, this has been going on for years and not only in this country but in what many of you would consider 2nd 3rd world. Had a family member in Eastern Europe cited for building a shed and creating/enclosing a field on goverment land. They sent him the photos, cease and desist letter and an envelope for the fine.

  131. 1987 Condo says:

    #137..good use for a drone.

  132. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Oh boy, this news just keeps getting worst. Where the hell are we going to get jobs for all these workers? Less people paying taxes and more collecting welfare. Never mind the harm this does to the consumer driven demand on the economy. I’m not feeling too positive right now. The wage inflation is not coming, the greedy bastards are going to crash the economy by creating a consumer base that can not consume due to their inability to create an income.

    I truly believed that the elite class would see what is wrong with the economy and stop slashing jobs and pay, and instead create jobs and raises. Nope. They are either too stupid or too greedy. The idiots are going to be the first to burn if this all goes up in flames. I really can’t believe how stupid they are. They are doing a great job of destroying the economy.

    Juice Box says:
    May 28, 2015 at 3:27 pm
    JPM axe man cometh.

    5K tellers + 5K others.

    http://www.marketwatch.com/story/jp-morgan-chase-expected-to-lay-off-more-than-5000-by-next-year-2015-05-28?dist=countdown

  133. Juice Box says:

    re: #140 – Robots will buy your POS in Wayne no worries Pumpkin.

  134. Fast Eddie says:

    Juice Box,

    Prices never go down here. A chubby house agent told me. Besides, we’re insulated because of our proximity to NYC. And they’re not making any more land.

  135. Fast Eddie says:

    Pumpkin Seed,

    When are you going to post as RE Investor again?

  136. chicagofinance says:

    I want Pumpkin and RE101 in a threesome with Pat…..

  137. The Great Pumpkin says:

    All that money Google takes in gets redistributed to 53,600 people world wide and they wonder why the economy can’t grow. Lmfao. These people are f’en idiots.

    Who is going to buy shit if the majority of the population has no jobs or is one pay check away from the street? Take those billions and invest in what exactly? Whatever you invest in, you will lose money on. There will be no successful business investment if there are no consumers with money to support it. How the hell are you going to get a return on your investment if 90% of the gains in the economy since 2010 have gone to less than 1% of the population? So the 1% investors are going to feed their own investments? Where exactly is the money going to come from in order for them to get a return on their investment? Try making sense of that mathematical equation (based on what happens when too much money is at the top).

    “As for working-class white people, they got outsourced. Clinton’s push to get China into the World Trade Organization led to the loss of 11.7 million U.S. manufacturing jobs in eight years. Clinton was giddy when that fuzzy “America Online” test signal went live and Google popped up in Menlo Park. The new frontier in humanity! You know how many people Google, the world’s most powerful corporation, now employs worldwide? 53,600. That’s half the number of people who go to Bonnaroo.”

  138. Fast Eddie says:

    ChiFi,

    Lol! We can call it the “Sybil” match!

  139. joyce says:

    “Where exactly is the money going to come from in order for them to get a return on their investment?”

    The Federal Reserve System. This has been explained to you numerous times recently.

  140. Juice Box says:

    re: “Who is going to buy shit if the majority of the population has no jobs or is one pay check away from the street?”

    Why the Robots of course.

    Who do you think buys and sells billions and billions of shares of stock all day actual people?

  141. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Yes, but it’s not creating any value in the currency. So where is this value going to come from to create a return on the investment if 90% of the value is taken by less than 1%? Are they going to feed their own investments (if that makes any sense). How are they going to have the ability to gain more on that investment, where is this growth going to come from? They are sucking the consumer dry.

    joyce says:
    May 28, 2015 at 4:44 pm
    “Where exactly is the money going to come from in order for them to get a return on their investment?”

    The Federal Reserve System. This has been explained to you numerous times recently.

  142. leftwing says:

    Punkin, ready to toss in your blue jersey yet?

    Said it before, and some of your teammates chided me. Liberals are people who want to take your money and control your life. As long as they don’t have to live by those same rules.

    120. This is crazy. This is the definition of insanity. Does this guy even realize what he just did? Nothing more than a corrupt individual taking advantage of the workers he has been entrusted to protect.

    133. Thank you for posting this article. I’m going to puke now.

  143. The Great Pumpkin says:

    The whole point of a monetary system in a capitalist system is to be a messenger of information based on supply and demand(product becomes less available price goes up etc). It’s also to incenticize the population to participate in the system. So how exactly is this monetary system going to work when most is stuck at the top? You have millions of people worth nothing and another guy worth 79 billion. How can the monetary system serve its purpose under those conditions? How can the currency give an accurate picture of information with such an unbalance?

  144. chicagofinance says:

    By PAUL H. TICE

    While many American parents are angry about the Common Core educational standards and related student assessments in math and English, less attention is being paid to the federally driven green Common Core that is now being rolled out across the country. Under the guise of the first new K-12 science curriculum to be introduced in 15 years, the real goal seems to be to expose students to politically correct climate-change orthodoxy during their formative learning years.

    The Next Generation of Science Standards were released in April 2013. Thirteen states and the District of Columbia have adopted them, including my state of New Jersey, which signed on in July 2014 and plans to phase in the new curriculum beginning with the 2016-2017 school year. The standards were designed to provide students with an internationally benchmarked science education.

    While publicly billed as the result of a state-led process, the new science standards rely on a framework developed by the Washington, D.C.-based National Research Council. That is the research arm of the National Academy of Sciences that works closely with the federal government on most scientific matters.

    All of the National Research Council’s work around global warming proceeds from the initial premise of its 2011 report, “America’s Climate Choices” which states that “climate change is already occurring, is based largely on human activities, and is supported by multiple lines of scientific evidence.” From the council’s perspective, the science of climate change has already been settled. Not surprisingly, global climate change is one of the disciplinary core ideas embedded in the Next Generation of Science Standards, making it required learning for students in grade, middle and high school.

    The National Research Council framework for K-12 science education recommends that by the end of Grade 5, students should appreciate that rising average global temperatures will affect the lives of all humans and other organisms on the planet. By Grade 8, students should understand that the release of greenhouse gases from burning fossil fuels is a major factor in global warming. And by Grade 12, students should know that global climate models are very effective in modeling, predicting and managing the current and future impact of climate change. To give one example of the council’s reach, these climate-change learning concepts have been incorporated almost verbatim into the New Jersey Department of Education model science curriculum.

    Many of the background materials and classroom resources used by instructors in teaching the new curriculum are sourced from government agencies. For example, the Environmental Protection Agency has an array of ready-to-download climate-change primers for classroom use by teachers, including handouts on the link between carbon dioxide and average global temperatures and tear sheets on the causal relationship between greenhouse-gas emissions and rising sea levels.

    Similarly, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Energy Department have their own Climate Literacy & Energy Awareness Network, or Clean, which serves as an online portal for the distribution of digital resources to help educators teach about climate change. One such learning module requires students to measure the size of their family’s carbon footprint and come up with ways to shrink it.

    Relying on a climate-change curriculum and teaching materials largely sourced from federal agencies—particularly those of the current ideologically driven administration—raises a number of issues. Along with the undue authoritative weight that such government-produced documents carry in the classroom, most of the work is one-sided and presented in categorical terms, leaving no room for a balanced discussion. Moreover, too much blind trust is placed in the predictive power of long-range computer simulations, despite the weak forecasting track record of most climate models to date.

    This is unfortunate because the topic of man-made global warming, properly taught, would present many teachable moments and provide an example of the scientific method in action. Precisely because the science of climate change is still just a theory, discussion would help to build student skills in critical thinking, argumentation and reasoning, which is the stated objective of the new K-12 science standards.

    For instance: Why has the planet inconveniently stopped warming since the late 1990s even as carbon dioxide levels have continued to rise? How reliable are historical measurements of average global temperatures and atmospheric carbon dioxide levels when, before the 1950s, much of the data are interpolated from such diverse sources as weather balloons, kites, cloud observations, primordial tree rings and Antarctic ice bubbles?

    How statistically significant is a 1.4-degree Fahrenheit increase in average global surface temperatures since 1880 for a 4.6 billion-year-old planet with multiple ecosystems and a surface area of some 200 million square miles? How dangerous is the current level of carbon dioxide in the world’s atmosphere, when 400 parts per million expressed as a percentage of the volume of the atmosphere would equate to only 0.04% or approximately zero?

    Employing such a Socratic approach to teaching climate change would likely lead to a rational and thought-provoking classroom debate on the merits of the case. However, that is not the point of this academic exercise—which seems to be to indoctrinate young people by using K-12 educators to establish the same positive political feedback loop around global warming that has existed between the federal government and the nation’s colleges and universities for the past two decades.

    Mr. Tice works in investment management and is a former Wall Street energy research analyst.

  145. The Great Pumpkin says:

    I hate them both, but I might hate the blue more now. Don’t act like your helping people when you are really robbing them. At least the republicans are honest in who they support. Dems are straight liars. Act like they are working for the common man and common good….sick bastards. It just scares me that the republicans are now trying their best to take up the dem plan. They want to act like they care about the avg man now just to get the presidency. Burn them all.

    leftwing says:
    May 28, 2015 at 4:53 pm
    Punkin, ready to toss in your blue jersey yet?

    Said it before, and some of your teammates chided me. Liberals are people who want to take your money and control your life. As long as they don’t have to live by those same rules.

  146. The Great Pumpkin says:

    The democrats act like Robin Hood, only they keep the money for themselves.

  147. Libturd at home says:

    Glad you are seeing the light Plumpy and understanding the importance of 1) maintaining the right to bear arms and 2) lobbying for a third party that is not owned by corporate interests.

    The reason for #1 is that at some point, the government might use its military might to stifle the much needed revolution. There simply can be no revolution without arms.

  148. NJT says:

    “…expose students to politically correct…orthodoxy during their formative learning years.”

    I was exposed to the Benny Hill show. Learned a lot. Very educational. Oh, and funny, too.

  149. Wily Millenial says:

    As high as taxes are here, everywhere else is catching up… I have family in relatively inexpensive New England whose bills have doubled in the last 10 years, while the value of the property has basically gone sideways.

    Parents want to sell the house and retire. Proportionally speaking their tax bill is the same as mine. But the house is worth half as much. (And the economy’s shit up there)

    Livingston NJ is 12.6% > age 65, compare to 13.1% nationally… plenty of room for that number to go down.

  150. Libturd at home says:

    I was exposed to the Benny Hill show.

    I loved that old bald guy. And the large-breasted women. I think I was ten when I saw it last.

  151. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Some people have no idea how important it is to be able to have the right to bear arms. It’s everything. Without it, you have nothing.

    Libturd at home says:
    May 28, 2015 at 6:21 pm
    Glad you are seeing the light Plumpy and understanding the importance of 1) maintaining the right to bear arms and 2) lobbying for a third party that is not owned by corporate interests.

    The reason for #1 is that at some point, the government might use its military might to stifle the much needed revolution. There simply can be no revolution without arms.

  152. The Great Pumpkin says:

    159- That union article was a dagger through my heart. Just one of those moments where the picture became clear of how far the corruption stretches. The more limited govt you have, the less corruption you have. Now I know why people want limited govt, they realize how corrupt it is.

  153. Gotta thank jj for yet another spiffy new handle.

    Looks like Punkin is either getting deprogrammed here or he’s back on his meds.

  154. Ben says:

    How is having a teacher with no teaching background that only stays for 2 years max good for anyone? Clearly an attack on the union and worker. That’s all TFA teachers and charters are, vehicles used to breakdown the union.

    Seniority within the teaching ranks ensures that the most useless person on the planet keeps his job. That’s the only purpose of it. I’ve seen several teachers let go during budget cuts while the useless ones get to keep their jobs. I would love it if they disbanded the union, I really would. The union suppresses wages. I’m leaving my current teaching job for another one this year. I’ll negotiate for myself. I can’t rely on the union. They’ve negotiated so that I’ve kept the same dollar amount in my paycheck for six straight years. What’s the point of paying dues?

  155. Libturd at home says:

    Ben,

    Glad that you see it that way. If you really want to see corruption, check out the NJEA marketing budget. Keep in mind, I think you all should make a lot more salary wise. I’ve always said that. But it’s those benefits that my drive me crazy. Personally, I hope YOU get what you were promised. But realistically, I just don’t see it happening.

Comments are closed.