Big ticket back in BC?

From the Record:

Two houses in Alpine sell for more than $10 million

Two large Alpine homes have sold for more than $10 million this summer — the priciest deals in Bergen County in more than a year, though the properties sold at much lower prices than the owners once sought.

A 22-room brick manor at 44 Rio Vista Drive was sold by Yoram and Yacobina Koby for $13.9 million. The buyer bought it through a trust to remain private, according to the listing agent.

And a 21-room stone chateau at 5 Buckingham Drive was sold for $11 million by Marc Saperstein, a personal injury lawyer who practices in Teaneck, and his wife, Shelly. The buyer, according to public records, is Frank D. Zhang.

Both transactions were cash deals.

Like other homeowners affected by the housing crash, the owners of these luxury properties accepted lower prices than they once expected. Both homes had been on the market, off and on, for years, at significantly higher prices. The Rio Vista Drive property was first listed in 2006 for $24.9 million — $11 million more than its recent sale price.

The Buckingham Drive home was first listed in 2009, for $16.5 million.

Even with the lowered sale prices, the two sales were still the only deals above $10 million in Bergen County since 2013.

Last year, the highest-priced sale in the county was for $7 million, also in Alpine, according to the New Jersey Multiple Listing Service. In 2013, there was a $10.5 million sale in Englewood and a $13.4 million sale in Alpine.

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38 Responses to Big ticket back in BC?

  1. grim says:

    This is insane, from Bloomberg:

    Apple Helps Push U.S. Watch Sales to Biggest Drop in Seven Years

    U.S. watch sales fell the most in seven years in June, one of the first signs Apple Inc.’s watch is eroding demand for traditional timepieces.

    Retailers sold $375 million of watches during the month, 11 percent less than in June 2014, according to data from NPD Group. The 14 percent decline in unit sales was the largest since 2008, according to Fred Levin, head of the market researcher’s luxury division.

    “The Apple Watch is going to gain a significant amount of penetration,” he said Thursday in a phone interview. “The first couple of years will be difficult for watches in fashion categories.”

    The market for watches that cost less than $1,000 is most at risk, as consumers in that price range have indicated they’re the most likely to buy an Apple Watch, Levin said. Sales of watches costing between $50 and $999 registered drops in June, the biggest being a 24 percent decline in timepieces from $100 to $149.99, according to NPD’s data.

    That would suggest the company may have sold at least 1.9 million watches, assuming the Apple Watch had an average selling price of $499. NPD estimates the traditional watch industry sold 927,500 timepieces in June in the U.S.

  2. grim says:

    Also from Bloomberg:

    Full-Time Jobs in the U.S. Just Made a Comeback

    Friday’s labor-market report showed that the number of full-time U.S. jobs as a share of total employment rose to 81.7 percent, the highest level since November 2008. For those worried (including not a few presidential candidates) that this economic recovery has been one that’s created only low-quality jobs, this should be really good news.

    Even so, the share of full-time workers remains below its peak during the last cycle of 83.2 percent in October 2007.

    The pool of Americans working part-time for economic reasons — such as not being able to find a job with more hours — fell last month by 180,000 to 6.3 million. That was the lowest level since September 2008. Additionally, the number of people working part-time for noneconomic reasons — going to school, taking care of family, etc. — plunged by 589,000, the biggest decline since June 2012.

    At the same time, the number of employees on the payrolls of temporary work services also fell, declining 8,900, the report showed. All of these statistics combine to paint a picture of a “shift to full-time work,” economists led by Derek Holt at Scotiabank in Toronto wrote in a note to clients.

  3. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Good article on virtual reality in Time this week. Looks like it’s here and it’s about to change our lives. I might start looking to invest in this sector.

  4. walking bye says:

    Any one notice Zillow no longer list the price history of properties in the north jersey area? do I need to be logged in? or is this a sign of things to come.

  5. Banco Popular Trust Preferred Shares says:

    Children’s Television (clot Edition):

    “Bob Keeshan [who played Captain Kangaroo] was a miserable bastard. He’d played Clarabell the Clown on ‘The Howdy Doody Show’ and had gotten fired. He was very temperamental; the slightest thing would set him off — and did. Sometimes he’d work for half an hour, rip off his wig and go pouting back to his dressing room. He’d start screaming, ‘I’m not Clarabell anymore.’

    “I came back from lunch one day, and I noticed he’d gotten angry and annihilated this bird cage. I said to a stagehand, ‘Should we call the ASPCA?’ He said, ‘Don’t worry. It was a plastic canary.’

    “At the beginning of each show, before the Captain came through the door, Mr. Green Jeans [Hugh ‘Lumpy’ Brannum] would be reading a voice-over behind the set. During the reading, unbeknownst to the little viewers, Bob would take out his [pen!s], put a pencil under it and wave it at Brannum.

    “Once, Bob was backstage reading the final voice-over — and Lumpy began to pee on Bob’s leg. It was a tit-for-tat thing, not malicious.”

  6. NJT says:

    #4 – I’m still seeing them (along with property taxes) and I’m not logged in. Update your web browser.

  7. anon (the good one) says:

    @realDonaldTrump:

    Wow, CNN just said that Donald Trump won the DEBATE, connected best with audience. Also, Time, Drudge, Newsmax, N.Y.Times and more!

  8. HouseWhineWine says:

    #7. Yeah, well I would say he has turned off many women with his crazy comment about Megyn Kelly last night. So maybe he won but I don’t know about connecting with any women I know.

  9. Not HouseWhiny says:

    Don’t worry, women are going with the Cankle Queen.

  10. walking bye says:

    #6 seems like the listings by Coldwell banker/terie oconner are blocking price history.
    for example 7 jane ct Hillsdale nj

  11. Grim says:

    Really?

  12. homeboken says:

    10 – For Jane Ct. The property shows that it was originally listed 4 days ago, no price changes.

    Listing is 595,000, If I were writing an offer it would be at $539,000 and I may go up to 545,000. Just my opinion of course based on pictures/map/taxes etc

  13. homeboken says:

    To above- If the traffic from the GSP was unbearable – I’d tear my offer up. Price can’t fix that.

  14. walking bye says:

    Traffic off the parkway has been corrected with the new exit improvements in Washington. But I was using the above address as an example. I just seemed to notice on zillow a lot of the newer listings dont seem to have the Price History we are used to seeing, specifically on the Coldwell Banker listings. Pehraps its just the homes I picking but today Im seeing close to 50% listings of newly listed with no price history. maybe its just me (time to change the tinfoil in my head?)

  15. Grim says:

    I suppose if you messed up the lot and block in the listing it wouldn’t find matching tax records.

  16. Anon E. Moose says:

    Gourd [3];

    Good article on virtual reality in Time this week. Looks like it’s here and it’s about to change our lives. I might start looking to invest in this sector.

    Your shallowness never ceases to amaze. The cover itself is absolutely cringe-worthy, not to mention amateurish to the extreme in its execution. https://fstoppers.com/originals/time-magazine-cover-so-bad-i-feel-sad-and-inspired-once-79917

    I see a bright, young, naive kid who got absolutely made a fool of. I’m not exactly sure to what end.

  17. D-FENS says:

    @Bipartisanism: #BlackLivesMatter protesters completely took over the #BernieSanders event in #Seattle and he wasn’t able to speak.
    http://t.co/nGQsovwrpK

  18. Grim says:

    VR is new?

  19. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Jesus, attacking a photograph now? People have no life. The photograph is not meant to look real, it’s trying to exaggerate the point that he is in virtual reality.

    The game is changing, yet you mock VR. This is game changing tech, but you mock it because you fail to understand the impact it will have on your life. Call me shallow, and I’ll call you ignorant.

    Anon E. Moose says:
    August 9, 2015 at 1:51 am
    Gourd [3];

    Good article on virtual reality in Time this week. Looks like it’s here and it’s about to change our lives. I might start looking to invest in this sector.

    Your shallowness never ceases to amaze. The cover itself is absolutely cringe-worthy, not to mention amateurish to the extreme in its execution. https://fstoppers.com/originals/time-magazine-cover-so-bad-i-feel-sad-and-inspired-once-79917

    I see a bright, young, naive kid who got absolutely made a fool of. I’m not exactly sure to what end.

  20. The Great Pumpkin says:

    That kid on the cover figured out the missing link in virtual reality that no one before him was able to figure out. He was paid 3 billion for his discovery by Facebook. In 2016, the Virtual reality industry is going mainstream and will replace the Internet as we know it. It will soon be a part of your everyday life just like driverless cars.

    Moose is behind the times. He/she is the equivalent of someone laughing at the idea of the Internet in the 90’s.

    Grim says:
    August 9, 2015 at 10:45 am
    VR is new?

  21. Libturd at home with Strep says:

    ” In 2016, the Virtual reality industry is going mainstream and will replace the Internet as we know it.”

    http://tinyurl.com/blumpkin-on-VR

  22. Ben says:

    Virtual Reality was supposed to change the world in 1993. All we got were a bunch of unplayable video games.

  23. Ben says:

    Moose is behind the times. He/she is the equivalent of someone laughing at the idea of the Internet in the 90′s.

    Please explain to us the potential of virtual reality that makes it so promising.

  24. Grim says:

    Adult industries

  25. Comrade Nom Deplume, Not a Philadelphian says:
  26. Comrade Nom Deplume, Not a Philadelphian says:

    Frank Gifford<Vigoda

  27. Grim says:

    I hope they ate that pig, what a waste if they didn’t.

    I’d go right for the cheeks and do a little guanciale taco.

  28. D-FENS says:

    Michael you are absolutely right. Invest everything you can spare in VR tech. In fact, you should borrow money to invest.

    You have a fantastic business sense. Great work.

  29. The Great Pumpkin says:

    You guys realize this 22 year old just got paid 3 billion for his contribution to virtual reality, right? But the industry is dead. It’s not going anywhere. You are right. Read the article before you start making ignorant jokes about VR.

    The article states vr will not go mainstream in 2016, it will “begin” it’s move into the mainstream in 2016. That’s why I stated it’s a good investment, still getting in on the ground floor. Problem is, every single player in the tech sector is trying to get into this. So you have to research and make your educational investment bet accordingly. VR is the future, it’s coming whether you believe in it or not. Why? Follow the money.

    D-FENS says:
    August 9, 2015 at 8:32 pm
    Michael you are absolutely right. Invest everything you can spare in VR tech. In fact, you should borrow money to invest.

    You have a fantastic business sense. Great work.

  30. The Great Pumpkin says:

    29- For example, google is making a cheap cost effective VR product out of cardboard. I think that’s what they are actually calling it too…google “cardboard”.

  31. The Great Pumpkin says:

    But laugh at it all you want. They laughed at the internet in the 90’s too.

  32. joyce says:

    Some laughed at pets.com too

  33. Ben says:

    He didn’t get paid 3 billion. His company, which he only owned a percentage of got acquired. Now he did make a lot, but there is definitely a difference. Facebook is the new Yahoo. Trying to gobble up companies left and right as a growth strategy. Only problem is, half the shit yahoo acquired was worthless and obsolete within a few years.

    You still haven’t made the case for VR investment. And, I don’t remember anyone laughing at the internet’s potential in the 90s. If anything, they way overhyped it. Plenty did however, laugh at all the dotcom companies that formed with $200k in startup costs and an idea and then subsequently valued their assets at 50 million on day 2. Facebook, like Yahoo is blindly buying worthless companies left and right for billions of dollars. I still laugh at the fact that AOL bought Winamp for 400 million (I believe they recently sold it off at 10 million). Rupert Murdoch bought Myspace not too long ago.

    Virtual boy was Nintendo’s least successful system. Not everything google comes up with is golden. Google glass has already flopped. Why? No one wants to wear shit on their face. It’s been shown time and time again.

    My brother had a Virtual Boy. Whenever anyone put that shit on and played a game, we would all play some sort of prank on them as they couldn’t see a damn thing. Even that kid on the cover of Time magazine admitted he looked like an asshole in the photo.

  34. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “You don’t have to look very hard to find a group of people eager to tell you how big virtual reality is getting. But it’s difficult to forecast how fast things are actually moving since the first consumer products have yet to go to market. One company is taking a stab at quantifying growth. A research group called SuperData announced is making a bold prediction:

    To put that number in perspective, let’s turn it up to 50. Radio took 38 years to reach 50 million users. TV reached that same number in 14 years. The Internet did it in four. If SuperData’s forecast holds up, VR could reach 50 million by 2018, maybe sooner.

    Mobile or Bust
    If virtual reality adoption does reach critical mass, it will have to be on the back of Mobile VR, As global mobile usage continues to climb, mobile VR applications and content will be so much more accessibly. Specialty virtual reality hardware like the Oculus and Morpheus will be a favorite for gamers and enthusiasts.”

    “It may be a bit early to even reference a “virtual reality industry” yet, since the first bonafide consumer product has yet to be released. Because of this, expect smaller, agile, independent VR creators to shape the medium as it forms over the new several years. In the beginning, gaming is most highly anticipated market for virtual reality. That may be the case for several years, with a broader entertainment industry on deck. However, as VR technologies become more stable, look for adoption across every industry imaginable. Journalism, design, treatment, travel, commerce and education are already being gushed over by people driven to push their fields further with virtual reality.”

    http://vrscout.com/news/analysts-predict-11-million-vr-users-by-2016/

  35. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “It had its crude beginnings. A definition of virtual reality has always been difficult to formulate — the concept of an alternative existence has been pawed at for centuries — but the closest modern ancestor came to life in the fifties, when a handful of visionaries saw the possibility for watching things on a screen that never ends, but the technology wasn’t yet good enough to justify the idea. The promise of the idea was shrouded, concealed under clunky visuals. But the concept was worth pursuing, and others did (especially the military, who have used virtual reality technology for war simulation for years). The utopian ideals of a VR universe were revisited by a small crew of inventors in the late ’80s and early ’90s. At the time the personal computer was exploding, and VR acolytes found a curious population eager to see what the technology had to offer.

    Not enough, it turned out. Though a true believer could immerse him or herself in the roughly built digital landscape, the chasm between that crude digital experience and the powerful subtly of real life was too great. The vision simply did not match the means. In the mid-’90s, VR as an industry basically closed up shop. Though still used in the sciences, those eager to bring VR to the masses found themselves overshadowed by a glitzier, more promising technological revolution: the internet.

    Then, two years ago, Palmer Luckey, a kid born during the waning days of VR’s late-20th-century golden era, put the pieces together using improved technology. “

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