Cash sales drop, NJ among top

From HousingWire:

CoreLogic: Cash sales in June drop to 31%

Cash sales made up 31.3% of total home sales in June 2015, down from 33.9% in June 2014, according to the latest report from CoreLogic (CLGX).

The year-over-year share has fallen each month since January 2013. Month over month, the cash sales share fell by 0.7 percentage points in June 2015 compared with May 2015.

The cash sales share peaked in January 2011 when cash transactions made up 46.5% of total home sales nationally. Prior to the housing crisis, the cash sales share of total home sales averaged approximately 25%. If the cash sales share continues to fall at the same rate it did in June 2015, the share should hit 25% by mid-2017.

June’s drop follows a bigger drop in May. Cash sales made up 31.9% of total home sales in May 2015, down from 35.1% in May 2014, according to CoreLogic.

Real estate-owned sales had the largest cash sales share in June 2015 at 57% and was the only sales category to see a year-over-year increase in the cash sales share. Resales had the next highest cash sales share at 30.8%, followed by short sales (28.7%) and newly constructed homes (15.6%).

New York had the largest share of any state at 47%, followed by Florida (45.8%), Alabama (44.8%), New Jersey (40.7%) and Oklahoma (39.6%).

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140 Responses to Cash sales drop, NJ among top

  1. grim says:

    NJ numbers seem way too high to me.

  2. grim says:

    From the NYT:

    A Bold Plan to Remake Camden’s Waterfront

    Plans for a major mixed-use waterfront development represent the latest step in efforts to rehabilitate this city that not long ago was rated as America’s most dangerous.

    The development of offices, apartments and retail space, totaling 1.7 million square feet, would be built along the Delaware River starting in the fall of 2016, according to plans announced by Camden’s mayor, Dana L. Redd, and the developer Liberty Property Trust last week.

    The project, estimated to cost about $1 billion, would be the biggest private sector investment in the city’s history, and the latest in a series of corporate developments and relocations that are beginning to create jobs and drive down the city’s notoriously high rates of crime and poverty.

    Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey announced last week that Liberty Property Trust is planning a $1 billion transformation of a 16-acre swath of the waterfront in Camden. The mixed-use development is scheduled to be complete by 2019. Credit Mel Evans/Associated Press
    The development, scheduled for completion in 2019, will occupy 16 acres directly south of the Benjamin Franklin Bridge to Philadelphia, in an area that is now a parking lot and adjoined by a minor-league baseball stadium and a public aquarium.

    The plans include replacing Camden’s current low-rise profile from the Philadelphia side of the river with four office towers, 325 residential units, a 120-room hotel, 27,000 square feet of retail space and parking garages for 5,000 cars, city and company officials said.

    The city’s renewal program includes the continuing demolition of about 600 vacant or derelict buildings that have scarred neighborhoods and attracted drug dealers. The demolition has been paid for by $7 million in proceeds from a bond sale that was enabled by the city’s first investment-grade rating — BBB+ from Standard & Poor’s — for 15 years, Mr. Corrales said.

    Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey said the changes were allowing Camden to turn its back on a grim reputation. “Camden is no longer America’s most dangerous city,” he said at the announcement event. “It’s where families can come to live and work and do business.”

  3. grim says:

    I was excited for all of about 5 seconds until I saw these two paragraphs in the Philly Inquirer. For f*ck’s sake…

    Liberty is headed by William Hankowsky, a longtime friend of South Jersey Democratic power broker George Norcross, whose insurance company, Conner Strong & Buckelew, is also an investor in the project. In recent years, Norcross has appeared to take a more personal interest in making Camden a more livable city. He also heads the board of Cooper University Hospital, whose future is inextricably tied to Camden’s.

    Investors in the waterfront project are expected to ask for government help in the form of tax credits granted by the state’s Economic Development Authority. Through the Grow New Jersey program, the EDA has already approved more than $1 billion in tax credits to lure firms to Camden, with new facilities being planned by the nuclear energy equipment manufacturer Holtec International, aerospace giant Lockheed Martin, and automaker Subaru of America.

  4. grim says:

    Looking at the radar, the rain appears to be mostly gone at this point. Really? 1-2 inches, probably closer to 1 than 2..

  5. grim says:

    @joysofhomeownership

    Dug up the front yard to replace a section of 4″ PVC drainage pipe that had collapsed (there was a huge rock on top, we think it was crushed from day 1, but only recently clogged up with dirt). Wasn’t too bad, just about 2′ down. We snaked to find the approximate distance to the break, and nearly nailed it when we dug down.

    If you are wondering why so deep, the township permitted us to connect the gutter leaders to the storm sewer directly (which involved a huge “road opening bond”, blah blah blah). So the pipe generally runs pretty deep.

    All hard pack clay, 3-4 years later it’s back to concrete again.

    Finished filling in the pit just about when the rain came in.

  6. phoenix says:

    Grim,
    Use 6″ SDR next time for the main lead if possible next time. Tie the 4″ leaders into that.

  7. phoenix says:

    Also, 2′ hard packed clay is not fun to dig….

  8. grim says:

    We thought we were deep enough to stay out of freeze so we went with 4. It’s only the sump pump and about 60 linear feet of gutter. The rear gutters daylight to the street. Sump hasn’t kicked on since early spring, doubt it’ll kick on again until next spring.

    For the price difference, absolutely we should have just gone with the big pipe and been done with it forever. We crushed the pipe with the bulldozer and the fact that we threw all the boulders back into the trench. A 1′ section was nearly flat.

    The top 3 inches or so of grass and topsoil, easy, everything else was with a pick. I could probably roll up the lawn and take it with me if I ever moved.

  9. grim says:

    Anyone have any thought on heat tape/cables for the gutters? We had our gutters ice up solid last year in the sections that have deep eaves. Haven’t gotten around to the soffits yet, and I know soffit vents are a better option (the ice section also has no soffit vents, and is on the north side of the house). Just going to run them in the gutter and downspouts, not up the roof.

  10. Libturd in the City says:

    “If you are wondering why so deep, the township permitted us to connect the gutter leaders to the storm sewer directly”

    Wow. I didn’t think they would let you do that ever?

  11. nwnj4Trump says:

    #9 If you’re looking for a brand, someone I work with swears by the heating cables on Amazon(Easy Heat). As usual the price can’t be beat.

  12. grim says:

    The leaders were already terminating at the street. They originally approved the replacement, right or wrong. When they came to inspect, the inspector flipped out, but we already had town engineering approval. They tried to reneg and tell us to put in a tank, but we all know that the soil would never perc appropriately to allow for it. So we came to agreement with the engineer that we could connect to the storm sewer, and that would at least keep the water off the street – which was their main concern.

    We liked it better, because we could sink the pipe lower and get better pitch.

    If the existing leaders didn’t terminate at the street, they would have never allowed it.

    The basement, by the way, is fabulously dry. So much so that every piece of framing in the house has shrunk as a result.

  13. Libturd in the City says:

    Grim…with the ice expansion, what kind of damage did you experience? Ours iced up something severe, but no damage whatsoever.

  14. grim says:

    No damage, but it caused dripping on the front stairs and landing that caused them to ice up pretty regularly.

    The ice damming was really minor, it was more so ice buildup in the gutters than on the roof.

  15. Libturd in the City says:

    Thanks for the explanation. I didn’t think they would just let you tap into storm sewers because you wanted to.

    We are still without a good solution except for multiple cisterns to put an end to Lake Libturd.

  16. Libturd in the City says:

    I would just keep on salting the crap out of the steps and landing. My guess is that those gutter heaters will end up being more trouble than they are worth.

  17. Wily Millenial says:

    I have a heat cable in the gutters, it was awesome until it shorted out permanently last winter. I haven’t found anybody willing to even install the new one yet!

  18. grim says:

    One season of damage to the steps was more than enough for me.

    As it stands I already need to repoint my slate next year.

  19. Libturd in the City says:

    “I have a heat cable in the gutters, it was awesome until it shorted out permanently last winter.”

    This is kind of what I was getting at. Anything with a heating element, exposed to the extremities of winter weather, is a sure fire recipe for failure.

  20. chicagofinance says:

    I have a heated cable, but I only use it indoors…..several times outside and in the car when I was younger, but I am too old for that sh!t…….

  21. chicagofinance says:

    grim: you need to repoint your head….

  22. Libturd in the City (answering a Republican Debate question) says:

    “One season of damage to the steps was more than enough for me.”

    Just do a poured concrete set of steps next time. It’s ugly as sin, but it will still be there after Iran drops a nuclear bomb on New York City.

  23. Libturd in the City (answering a Republican Debate question) says:

    I think I’d rather be the caboose on a human centipede than to participate in a Juice Crawl.

  24. Libturd in the City says:

    Bluestone is pretty. The sidewalk on front of my multi is bluestone. Pain in the butt to shovel it is. Also deathly slippery when wet or frozen.

  25. Juice Box says:

    “connect gutter leaders to the storm sewer directly”

    One thing I really like about my home is the plumbing outside, all gutters are piped to the storm sewers front and from the back as well. I even have a cleanout plugs in several places around the house if it ever needs to be snaked. The downspouts go down neatly under my brick patios in the back too, no unsightly spalsh blocks or downspout extensions etc. All my gutters have the mesh leaf guards as well, so far I haven’t had to do any maintenance.

  26. chicagofinance says:

    The End Is Nigh (jj MMA Edition):

    This MMA fighter has two really big problems.

    Brye Anne Russillo, 29, of Nassau County, says her F-cup breasts are forcing her to fight in a heavier weight division.

    “It’s not like I can take a nail file and hack off my t- -s,” the amateur brawler and single mother told The Post after revealing her predicament to My MMA News.

    “It’s not like I have a pink sparkly shelf to put them on. I’m trying to lose weight, but my boobs are what they are. I went to pastry school and I’m Italian, so I ate a lot of cannolis.”

    She is slated to fight Paige Lian on Saturday for the 150-pound title in the Aggressive Combat Championships in Queens.

    It took Russillo’s team more than three months to agree to the bout at the Queens Theatre because she normally fights at 145 pounds, 10 pounds less than Lian’s typical weight.

    “The only reason I’m even fighting at 150 is because my t- -s weigh 12 pounds,” she said.

    The 5-foot-9 bombshell says she’ll try some home remedies to shed weight before the fight.

    “I put makeup remover on [my breasts] and then sit in the sauna, because someone told me that it opens your pores and helps you sweat,” Russillo said. “Then I’ll put hemorrhoid creme on them and wrap them over night. I start doing this three nights before the fight.”

    A pastry chef and bartender by day, she has a 1-1 record in the ring.
    In her first fight, at the Extreme Cage Fighting promotion in Astoria, she won by TKO after shattering her opponent’s shin.

    She lost her second fight, in Delaware, by TKO to a fighter she later called the toughest woman she ever met.

    “I’m doing the best I can,” said Russillo, who has a 6-year-old daughter.

    “I’m a single mom who later in life decided to try and get back in shape. I’ve been a career bartender for 12 years. I was drinking a lot and partying while I was at work. Now I train and don’t drink, and I’m actively trying to better my life.”

  27. anon (the good one) says:

    @business:

    JUST IN: ADP says U.S. companies added 200,000 workers in September

  28. 1987 Condo says:

    #31..woops..what state does that appears to be heading for?

  29. HouseWhineWine says:

    @30. I work in the healthcare field. Busy, busy times. After a few years of limited growth, we are now in a hiring mode. We have to, lots of “demand” for our services. And it’s hard to keep the best talent. Unfortunately, wages aren’t really where they should be, but tons of job security and decent working conditions.

  30. 1987 Condo says:

    #33..supposedly “open” job positions are over 5 million portending a much tighter labor market next year….

  31. Essex says:

    29. They are fake. So yeah they would come out.

  32. HouseWhineWine says:

    I was planning on taking a few months off from work, but too many interesting job opportunities basically fell in my lap. So, I am grateful for them. Anybody with a decent skill set and decent interpersonal skills should be doing o.k. in the job market. Maybe not great, maybe under too much pressure, but should be able to find a job to at least pay the bills.

  33. Libturd in the City says:

    The latest says NJ coast, but there’s a reason why they call it the cone of uncertainty.

  34. Juice Box says:

    Joaquin is now a Category 1 hurricane. Time to buy the bread, eggs and milk?

  35. 1987 Condo says:

    mmmmm…bread……..

  36. Libturd in the City says:

    I never understood the supermarket runs around storms. Fill your gas tanks. That’s about it. I probably have enough dry goods in the house to eat for two months.

  37. Libturd in the City says:

    It’ll be Cat 2 tomorrow. Then the hype machine will be in full effect.

  38. Juice Box says:

    Yes but if you run out of eggs, milk and bread how will you make French Toast? Some of my fondest childhood memories were snow days etc where the first thing we would do is make French Toast then go out and shovel and play.

  39. Libturd in the City says:

    I’m going with mouth of Chesapeake as of this morning. Storm could hit cat 3 too, but won’t be cat 3 at landfall.

  40. Libturd in the City says:

    Old-fashioned steel oats are good enough for me.

  41. Comrade Nom Deplume, from the Hub of the Solar System. says:

    As long as I have power, I’m good. Plenty of gas, food, water. No generator but I can manage everything except heat

  42. Libturd in the City says:

    You could always eat the horses your daughter rides.

  43. D-FENS says:

    @Breaking911: JUST IN: Vatican spokesman confirms Pope Francis met with Kim Davis, declines to elaborate (nytimes)

  44. grim says:

    Horse is good stuff, I could probably eat for a few weeks off the dogs.

  45. Juice Box says:

    Bambi would be the first to go around here.

  46. Libturd in the City says:

    “Vatican spokesman confirms Pope Francis met with Kim Davis, declines to elaborate (nytimes)”

    Who cares?

    The bigger news is that a dumb Democratic congressman from PA swiped the Pope’s cup to drink from it. Oy vey!

  47. Libturd in the City says:

    I absolutely love venison. Shame it only appears on the menu in French restaurants around here.

  48. grim says:

    Usually see it pop up as a special item starting around this time.

  49. Juice Box says:

    So how soon do we find out that the Russians performed sorties against the FSA and not ISIL?

  50. Sima says:

    #33, #36 HouseWhineWine:
    Job opportunities for those under 50 years may be good (with OK salaries), but the contract work in NJ and NY metro area are dismal.
    Pharma/medical device/health care companies have contracted in size to the point that there are fewer contract jobs, and it seems that Indian recruiting companies (who always offer lower hourly rates) are filling the few contract jobs available.
    So many worker trying to get the few contract jobs, so now the hourly rate overall is LOWER than 4 years ago.
    Seems that most of the big pharma companies (Novartis, J&J, etc) are only using low cost Indian companies to fill the jobs.
    Shocking how conditions have deteriorated for contract workers in the last few years…
    I’m hearing that it’s the same for finance contract jobs.
    Truly a spiral to the bottom….

    And for those in denial about this – just wait till you’re over 50…

    And did everyone see this article? Even being an accountant is no longer a good career choice. http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/30/us/toys-r-us-brings-temporary-foreign-workers-to-us-to-move-jobs-overseas.html

  51. Libturd in the City says:

    “And for those in denial about this – just wait till you’re over 50…”

    Which is why everyone should be saving like mutherfcukers from the first day out of college and living within their means. One should be thinking about retiring when they turn 50, not the next contract job.

  52. chicagofinance says:

    I thought “chicken” with broccoli in NJ was code for fresh kill venison?

  53. Libturd in the City says:

    That’s code for feline.

  54. anon (the good one) says:

    sure, whatever.
    other than paying college loans, wedding, d/p house, car, offspring expenses, parents medical emergencies, plenty left to save

    Libturd in the City says:
    September 30, 2015 at 10:57 am
    “And for those in denial about this – just wait till you’re over 50…”

    Which is why everyone should be saving like mutherfcukers from the first day out of college and living within their means. One should be thinking about retiring when they turn 50, not the next contract job.

  55. Anon E. Moose says:

    Lib [90, prev thread];

    Pulling the lever on an R and what they’ll do once in office though, are often two different things. Same often holds true for the D team.

    The key difference is the target audience for the rhetoric, and the similarity is the direction of the moves once in power. A Democrat talks like a conservative to get elected. Perfect example was Obama’s first election. He promised tax cuts, but wasn’t even inaugurated before he reneged on that one (beginning a long line of evidence that every Obama promise had/has an unstated expiration date). By contrast, I don’t think anyone could persuasively accuse Mitt Romney of courting the 47% vote. If anything, he himself moved further right than he was as Gov of Mass. It wasn’t just the leaked cell phone speech, he openly said at a town hall “If you want more free stuff, don’t vote for me.”

    However, once in office, they always move to the left. The leftists move farther left than they promised; the right never go as far right as hoped (some say for lack of trying). When was the last candidate (or SC justice for that matter) who turned out to be MORE conservative than the voters were led to believe?

  56. Sima says:

    #59 anon –
    I agree. It has become an almost impossible dilemma – how to save enough for those over 50 years, especially if one has children – the ultimate luxury.
    My guess is that the birth rate among young adults will drop.

  57. anon (the good one) says:

    dude, if you are over 50 switch career and call yourself a financial advisor. being old gives you credibility and only thing you have to do is hook yourself to feeder shop

    Sima says:
    September 30, 2015 at 10:52 am
    #33, #36 HouseWhineWine:
    Job opportunities for those under 50 years may be good (with OK salaries), but the contract work in NJ and NY metro area are dismal.
    Pharma/medical device/health care companies have contracted in size to the point that there are fewer contract jobs, and it seems that Indian recruiting companies (who always offer lower hourly rates) are filling the few contract jobs available.
    So many worker trying to get the few contract jobs, so now the hourly rate overall is LOWER than 4 years ago.
    Seems that most of the big pharma companies (Novartis, J&J, etc) are only using low cost Indian companies to fill the jobs.
    Shocking how conditions have deteriorated for contract workers in the last few years…
    I’m hearing that it’s the same for finance contract jobs.
    Truly a spiral to the bottom….

    And for those in denial about this – just wait till you’re over 50…

  58. Juice Box says:

    Making it to retirement is getting tougher and tougher.

    Language from the Trans Pacific Partnership trade agreement.

    Section 3 gets more specific about the sectors of the economy where member states will have to allow access to intra-corporate transferees, business visitors, contractual service suppliers, and independent professionals:

    3. Subject to any terms, limitations, conditions and qualifications that the Party sets out in its Schedule, Parties shall allow entry and temporary stay of [contractual service suppliers and independent professionals3] for a minimum of [X%] of the following sectors/sub-sectors:

    Professional services:
    Accounting, auditing and bookkeeping services (CPC 862) Architectural services (CPC 8671) Engineering services (CPC 8672) Integrated engineering services (CPC 8673) Urban planning and landscape architectural services (CPC 8674) Medical & dental services (CPC 9312) Veterinary services (CPC 932) Services provided by midwives, nurses, physiotherapists and paramedical personnel (CPC 93191)
    Computer and related services:
    Consultancy services related to the installation of computer hardware (CPC 841) Software implementation services (CPC 842) Data processing services (CPC 843) Data base services (CPC 844) Other (CPC 845+849)

  59. Juice Box says:

    Interestingly enough about H-1B.

    Can’t really blame the Republicans for this one can we?

    https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/101/s358

  60. Fast Eddie says:

    One should be thinking about retiring when they turn 50, not the next contract job.

    I’m really, really surprised you would even make that statement.

  61. yome says:

    What else do we need to give Companies? Free Trade Agreements guaranteed cheap labor from foreign Countries. Today, we give them Tax Breaks to keep a few Jobs in the Towns. Next is Tax Breaks to bring foreign income back to the US.
    How did this Companies survive before Free Trades?

  62. D-FENS says:

    Get a job outsourcing and offshoring other people’s jobs. It’s a growing industry.

  63. phoenix says:

    Time for Christie to dust off those that dirty old fleece jacket…..

  64. phoenix says:

    65. Many do. They’re called law enforcement.

  65. walking bye says:

    Speaking of the ultimate luxury, children. What is the feeling on the board here for annual salary required to raise kids as middle class, North Jersey? Years ago I heard it was $100k/kid of family income needed annually. 2 kids =$200k. If I had to swag I would say its probably up to $125 a kid at least.

  66. Libturd in the City says:

    First off, the storm is looking more imminent by the hour. Definitely fill up your cars today.

    Moose: “When was the last candidate (or SC justice for that matter) who turned out to be MORE conservative than the voters were led to believe?” I agree with you here. But I don’t necessarily have a problem with soc1alism. Be warned. Where I have a problem is our government’s complete inability gain economies of scale due to the hiring of the least capable (better than paying welfare argument) and then paying them like they are all experts in their field. Cause we all know, they would all be CEO of major global corporations if they chose to work in the private sector. The government needs to be run more like a business. Look at NJ Transit for example. Or better yet, the Port Author1ty.

    Gary: “I’m really, really surprised you would even make that statement.”
    Why is that? People need to understand personal finance. To make it very simple for the dorks like Anon who unfortunately live among us…I don’t plan to buy my kid a car when he turns 17. He knows this. He also knows that he’ll be among a distinct minority in Glen Ridge who will have to pay for their own car. He understands the value of money. The kid is 10 years old and already has $600 in his savings account. It can be done. These are family values.

  67. Libturd in the City says:

    First off, the storm is looking more imminent by the hour. Definitely fill up your cars today.

  68. NJT says:

    Bring on the hurricane! I wouldn’t mind a week of eating fresh veal, steak (Black Angus), pork, chicken, eggs ect. and veggies every day. Our town is surrounded by farms and my son works on a few, part-time, weekends.

    Last time (Sandy) my wife and kids left and stayed with relatives outside the affected area (I lived at the office). This time (if it happens) it’ll be a week long party for all of us!

    *Note – ALL of the farms have large generators and plenty of fuel for them. One even has a still.

    C’mon Joaquin!

  69. Libturd in the City says:

    Walking Bye,

    What does a kid really cost? Really. Map out the average cost of a runt for a year. I bet I could easily cut half of your budget out with sensible substitutions.

  70. Grim says:

    $250 a month for Packanack Co-op Preschool is a killer…

  71. Grim says:

    On Fridays it’s 2 teachers for the 4 kids in her class. Best deal going in NJ.

  72. chicagofinance says:

    As someone who does this type of analysis for a living, one really needs to look at the overall expense profile for big ticket stuff before you answer that question. What are you plugging per year on the house and your cars? Also, how much bank of mom & dad is involved?…….and some of that help is very subtle…..there are people working with a huge safety net and get small amounts of money tossed at them all the time, but no one really acknowledges it.

    I hate to sound like jj, but if you are purely going it alone, and have never received any kind of help or inheritance (or free childcare/babysitting), then the answer is probably $300K for two kids around here………but let me be very clear…..they are very few who completely go it alone…….if you do, you have my respect….

    walking bye says:
    September 30, 2015 at 12:13 pm
    Speaking of the ultimate luxury, children. What is the feeling on the board here for annual salary required to raise kids as middle class, North Jersey? Years ago I heard it was $100k/kid of family income needed annually. 2 kids =$200k. If I had to swag I would say its probably up to $125 a kid at least.

  73. The Great Pumpkin says:

    I’m going to go puke now. This disgusts me. Profits will cause individuals to take advantage of anything and anyone. I’m truly disgusted by this. I say everybody should just stop working and buying stuff for a couple of days as a national boycott against this bs. If you want to sell out american workers by shipping their jobs overseas in the name of higher profits, you can no longer do business here. Bye bye. Go sell to the customers that you pay so little to. Otherwise, you are just sucking the American economy dry. Scumbags!!

    “A temporary visa program known as H-1B allows American employers to hire foreign professionals with college degrees and “highly specialized knowledge,” mainly in science and technology, to meet their needs for particular skills. Employers, according to the federal guidelines, must sign a declaration that the foreign workers “will not adversely affect the working conditions” of Americans or lower their wages.

    In recent years, however, global outsourcing and consulting firms have obtained thousands of temporary visas to bring in foreign workers who have taken over jobs that had been held by American workers. The Labor Department has opened an investigation of possible visa violations by contractors at the Walt Disney Company and at Southern California Edison, where immigrants replaced Americans in jobs they were doing in this country. Four former workers at Disney have filed discrimination complaints against the company. The companies say they have complied with all applicable laws.

    But the Toys “R” Us layoffs — and others underway now at the New York Life Insurance Company and other businesses — go further. They are examples of how global outsourcing companies are using temporary visas to bring in foreign workers who do not appear to have exceptional skills — according to interviews with a dozen current or former employees of Toys “R” Us and New York Life — to help ship out jobs, mainly to India

    These former employees described their experience training foreigners to do their work so it could be moved to India. They would speak only on the condition that their names not be published, saying they feared losing severance payments or hurting their chances of finding new jobs.

    In most cases when American workers lost jobs, the positions have been in technology, with employers arguing there are shortages of Americans with the most advanced skills. But in recent years, many jobs that American workers lost have been in accounting and back-office administration — although there is no shortage of Americans qualified to do that kind of work.”

    Sima says:
    September 30, 2015 at 10:52 am
    #33, #36 HouseWhineWine:
    Job opportunities for those under 50 years may be good (with OK salaries), but the contract work in NJ and NY metro area are dismal.
    Pharma/medical device/health care companies have contracted in size to the point that there are fewer contract jobs, and it seems that Indian recruiting companies (who always offer lower hourly rates) are filling the few contract jobs available.
    So many worker trying to get the few contract jobs, so now the hourly rate overall is LOWER than 4 years ago.
    Seems that most of the big pharma companies (Novartis, J&J, etc) are only using low cost Indian companies to fill the jobs.
    Shocking how conditions have deteriorated for contract workers in the last few years…
    I’m hearing that it’s the same for finance contract jobs.
    Truly a spiral to the bottom….

    And for those in denial about this – just wait till you’re over 50…

    And did everyone see this article? Even being an accountant is no longer a good career choice. http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/30/us/toys-r-us-brings-temporary-foreign-workers-to-us-to-move-jobs-overseas.html

  74. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Wtf kind of society are we proposing here, work and save almost every dollar till 50? What the hell kind of life is that? You will totally miss out on life. A 50 year old should have no problem getting a job. This is total bs. Profits are higher than ever, there is no reason for shipping the jobs away or not giving raises. We are building a society based on bs. There is no reason whatsoever that people should be forced to live like that.

    Libturd in the City says:
    September 30, 2015 at 10:57 am
    “And for those in denial about this – just wait till you’re over 50…”

    Which is why everyone should be saving like mutherfcukers from the first day out of college and living within their means. One should be thinking about retiring when they turn 50, not the next contract job.

  75. Juice Box says:

    re # 78 – “I’m going to go puke now.”

    Pumps your back end, heads down, Keywacking out reports day and night job is next.

  76. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Amen, they want it all and are getting it all. Total bs. Part of a role of a business is to take care of a community, not suck it dry. F’ed up business community we have in charge past 30 years. Drunk off greed and forgot about their roles in society.

    yome says:
    September 30, 2015 at 11:44 am
    What else do we need to give Companies? Free Trade Agreements guaranteed cheap labor from foreign Countries. Today, we give them Tax Breaks to keep a few Jobs in the Towns. Next is Tax Breaks to bring foreign income back to the US.
    How did this Companies survive before Free Trades?

  77. joyce says:

    I hope you don’t actually talk like you type… which is to say I hope you don’t actually talk like a 14 year old.

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    September 30, 2015 at 12:59 pm
    Amen, they want it all and are getting it all. Total bs. Part of a role of a business is to take care of a community, not suck it dry. F’ed up business community we have in charge past 30 years. Drunk off greed and forgot about their roles in society.

  78. Comrade Nom Deplume, the Answer says:

    [46] libturd

    “You could always eat the horses your daughter rides.”

    Pound for pound, it may be more expensive than beef. No, if the power goes out and stays out, we are BBQ’ing for days.

    And if it does go out for more than a few hours, I am going to get an earful about buying a standby generator.

  79. HouseWhineWine says:

    I am not part of corporate America, so I don’t know much about contract type jobs. I have to believe what you post is true, that if you are 50+ it’s really hard to get a contract position. That said, my friend is 58 and keeps getting rehired as a project mgr., on a contract basis. Her pay is decent. Also, I do happen to be in my mid fifties, and, as I mentioned, have no problem getting jobs at all. Must be lucky to just be the field I am in, maybe.

  80. NJT says:

    #78 (and others)

    ““A temporary visa program known as H-1B allows American employers to hire foreign professionals with college degrees and “highly specialized knowledge,” mainly in science and technology, to meet their needs for particular skills. Employers, according to the federal guidelines, must sign a declaration that the foreign workers “will not adversely affect the working conditions” of Americans or lower their wages.”.

    Get out of IT and into something else.

    Easy for me to say as I have no payments (mortgage, cars, credit cards) and a few rental properties.

    Utilities and property taxes though, will never go away. Prop. taxes for us however are only $5000 a year (yes Warren County – NOT Pburg.).

  81. Comrade Nom Deplume, the Answer says:

    Had dinner with a frat brother that I haven’t seen since my wedding. He’s been working for a pharma co. in Mass. and Wilmington. Seems that the company is moving more of its operations back to Sweden and will be shuttering the remaining Wilmington and Mass. operations.

    Sweden. It’s bad when we are losing out to Sweden.

  82. leftwing says:

    72, Lib. Leaving for AC by 2pm. F it.

    Pumps, et al. Then shut all the FTA and H1B down. Seriously. Companies will adjust. They will be fine.

    If the gubmint paints field don’t blame the teams for using the entire playing surface and running right down the sidelines. Change the field.

    A corporation would be id10tic to not utilize the current rules to its advantage. In the same way you would be if, say, you decided to pass on deducting your mortgage interest this year.

  83. Comrade Nom Deplume, the Answer says:

    [85] NJT

    What we are seeing now is one reason, and a not insignificant reason, that I chose law back in the early 90’s.

    Writing was on the wall back then if you bothered to look.

    On a related note, I’ve been waiting a long time for auto makers to start offering personal security options in their cars as standard features or widely available options and not simply special retrofits (Onstar doesn’t really count because it isn’t a dedicated security option). Tesla just killed off another one of the canaries I’ve been monitoring.

    http://www.theverge.com/2015/9/30/9421719/tesla-model-x-bioweapon-defense-mode-button

    Clot is looking more and more right by the day.

  84. Comrade Nom Deplume, the Answer says:

    Or as special divisions of an automaker.

    http://www.bmw.com/com/en/general/corporate_direct_sales/security_vehicles/model_overview.html

    When you can walk into any dealer showroom and order leather seats, tech package, and bulletproof glass, it’s pretty close to game over, IMHO.

  85. grim says:

    How do you get out an charge your car in a chemical warfare scenario?

  86. NJT says:

    #88 CNDP

    “Writing was on the wall back then if you bothered to look.”.

    Yeah, but I was making so much money… I ignored it. Sorta like graffiti in the mens room.

  87. Libturd in the City says:

    “if you do, you have my respect….”

    Well then Gator and I have it.

    My folks live in Florida. Gator’s folks can’t even help themselves and live an hour away one way. Financially, we are 100% on our own. No inheritance. No help from anyone. The only thing we were ever helped with was our wedding. But that was the FILs idea. We didn’t ask, need or quite honestly, want it. Maybe Gator had help paying for college. I paid for my own. That’s it! No brothers or sisters to watch the kids. We are 100% really on our own. And doing just fine.

    I had a free Au Bon Paine salad for lunch today. I printed the free salad on your birthday coupon ten times. Will not pay for lunch in the city for two weeks (when coupon expires). Brought my own diet Coke from home which I probably got for free from using coke rewards. In Union, I usually order salad for lunch from local deli. They had Groupon for $5 for $10. Groupon was 20% off, I also used the Discover it card which offered 20% cash back off Groupon and the cash back is doubled for the first year. So I get $10 lunch for $2.60. Groupon was limited to qty of 4. If I was really cheap, I would have used a 2nd email address and ordered more. But I like the guys at the deli, so I don’t want to screw them too badly so will only do it 4 times.

    This is how one can afford to save. That’s $40 per week. The choice is simple for me. $160 per month x 12 months = $2,000 per year. My money doubles about every 6 years. Do this for 30 years (age 20 to 50) and you have half a million dollars. More than most people retire on.

    Or you can follow the financial advice of Blumpkin, pay full price for your lunch and retire at 70.

  88. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Lib, you have to understand that most people are not going to live like that, and you can’t blame them. If you are in professional career, you shouldn’t have to live like that. Plus, if everyone lived like that, they would stop offering these deals. Better yet, they will still offer the deals, they will just mark up the price and make you work your butt off to get a fair price. Maybe, that’s already what is happening now with so many coupon sites and stores always having sales. The game is terrible, shouldn’t have to play like this.

  89. Ron Jermany says:

    2:

    $1 billion? That’s a lot of bike paths.

  90. 1987 Condo says:

    #93..I think he is living it up..I always brown bagged it, not only cheaper but better control of the quality of the food..my company did not provide free coffee..I bought “coffee singles” to use with their hot water…less than 13 cents a mug.

  91. 1987 Condo says:

    …of course I bought a condo in 1987..so that may explain that! lol

  92. Comrade Nom Deplume, the Answer says:

    [90] grim,

    I don’t know that Tesla’s system could handle that. But I think the idea is to get you away from wherever the zombies are accumulating. So, assuming you can get away from the dispersal area, and there is no issue with residue, just pray you have enough battery life to get you to your charge station (and pray that wasn’t nuked either).

  93. Libturd in the City says:

    “Lib, you have to understand that most people are not going to live like that, and you can’t blame them. If you are in professional career, you shouldn’t have to live like that.”

    What have I given up? I had the same lunch you did. I just didn’t pay the same amount. My profits from AC are plowed into home improvement. Only suckers lose in the cas1no (and in life).

  94. grim says:

    Going to join a new crossfit gym for $100 a week, it’s called painting my house solo.

  95. Comrade Nom Deplume, the Answer says:

    [99] grim

    “Show me ‘paint the house'” Daniel-san!

  96. Comrade Nom Deplume, the Answer says:

    Get to brag on another friend of mine getting some righteous ink:

    http://www.pittsburghmagazine.com/Pittsburgh-Magazine/October-2015/Women-in-Business-October-2015/

  97. NJT says:

    #95

    “#93..I think he is living it up..I always brown bagged it, not only cheaper but better control of the quality of the food..my company did not provide free coffee..I bought “coffee singles” to use with their hot water…less than 13 cents a mug.”.

    Been a ‘brown bagger’ (mostly) since marriage.

    Chubb was the cheapest company I ever worked for…not even free water and the cafeteria (Whitehouse) was a such a ripoff I only took free day old sushi from the chef after hours. Man, that place sucked. Had the highest percentage of sociopaths I’ve ever encountered, too (that’s insurance). On a positive note the pay was OK and vacation great (IF they gave it to you – depended on the ASVP).

    When the last family member was forced out I knew it was over and left.

    ACE has no idea what kind of landmine they are stepping on.

    Eh, enough.

  98. Juice Box says:

    Does anyone else find it hilarious that Tesla added air filters to their revamped
    Treehugger mobile to combat the Coal Rollers?

  99. Ragnar says:

    A professional, white collar financial analyst who shows no particular aptitude for financial matters should be able to pay full price for lunch, go out for drinks most nights, inherit a rental property, blog a lot about bs online, go on vacations, have however many kids he wants, stagnate in his career without studying for advanced degrees and professional certificates, drive a nice car, and be able to retire comfortably, without worrying about where the money and savings comes from.

  100. anon (the good one) says:

    making it by printing coupons is a sad life strategy. not arguing that being thrifty is a bad thing. but if you think about it, using a bday coupon when in fact is not your bday is a form of stealing. maybe legal cause you can get away with it, but certainly not ethical

  101. Juice Box says:

    re # 104 – Rags in all fairness to Plumpkin few financial analysts go far. Only way pumps get promoted is nepotism.

  102. walking bye says:

    @77 So its more like $150k a kid. What I meant to discuss is not how to cheap your way through middle class. I know how to do that as I just treated myself to a nice 8 year old car for under 5k. I finally have Air Conditioning. I meant to ask the average middle class 2 kid family living in North Jersey. The question is when you see the intern at work or the nephew just getting engaged what would number would you tell him to shot for before having kids. I remember hearing the 100k number before kids and it scared the crap out of me. But it also made me jump from dead end jobs quickly so I could hit the numbers.

    As for parents helping out, was amazed when I signed up my girls for dance and the instructor asked are you paying this in full or are the grandparents paying a portion. That idea never even crossed my mind.

  103. 1987 Condo says:

    #107, I told my kid if you want a nice life either here or west coast…you need $350k+

  104. grim says:

    $350k? I’d have a hard time finding enough coupons to live on that.

  105. chicagofinance says:

    EXACTLY the kind of stuff I am talking about…….also a lot of parents don’t intend on saving for college and farm out the responsibility to grandparents……nice house…nice cars….but it will leave you wondering, how do they pull it off when the dad has a middle-of-the road IT job and the wife doesn’t work……..down payments……money being fronted quietly……..

    walking bye says:
    September 30, 2015 at 4:06 pm
    @77 So its more like $150k a kid.

    As for parents helping out, was amazed when I signed up my girls for dance and the instructor asked are you paying this in full or are the grandparents paying a portion. That idea never even crossed my mind

  106. chicagofinance says:

    still remember my first roommate……I took my meager signing bonus to buy some suits for work and also my half of the security deposit……not only does my roommate get from mommy and daddy 10 full suits, 10 shirts, 10 ties and 3 pairs of shoes …..a dry cleaner ripped a shirt accidentally and he gets bent out of shape and demand full compensation…..I was like…dude, you didn’t even pay for the fcking thing…just get a decent amount and stop being a selfish petulant prick…..

  107. chicagofinance says:

    girl I worked with was living in Hoboken near me when it was still The Hood…..she gets mugged for $150 cash……I’m thinking “you stupid idiot…why carry that kind of money around…” didn’t matter, before the end of the phone call to daddy, a check for $300 was in the mail…..she was cute though…..

  108. jj says:

    300K is chump change brotha, I am not kidding as staff is putting off having kids till 35-39 and are dual income. One staff left me for like a 50K pay raise at 33 and his fianance had a better job. Between the two have at least a 450k income and own a coop in city and in line for a big inheritance. And not even married yet. That is how kids roll

    No more getting married like a broke dick like I did. Imagine today a 32 year old girl moving into a one bedroom apt in Queens with a guy with a 20 year old car upon getting married. My wife did it.

    Funny a few weeks ago she got together with her girlfriends she had not seen in 15 years not since we first started dating. She said they were very surprised she was not divorced, had so many kids, was a stay at home wife and had a lot of money. They had very little faith in me. But then again I partied hard and spent even harder and worked very little till marriage.

  109. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Can you smell that? Yes, total bs coming out of her mouth.

    Cost savings, aka, a few need a lot more money that they really don’t need, so let’s throw some families into poverty to make it happen.

    “Kathleen Waugh, a spokeswoman for Toys “R” Us, said the staff reduction there was part of “designing a streamlined, more efficient global organization to make it fit for growth.” She said the contractors were required to comply with “any and all immigration laws.” The outsourcing, she noted, “resulted in significant cost savings.””

  110. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Yes, but he doesn’t understand this. It’s not like it used to be 40 years ago where you work hard and see results for your effort by moving up. Now, it’s work hard to just keep your job.

    The few good jobs at the top all go to nepotism. Yes, they have the skills and educational background to get the job, but so do a lot of other people that will never ever get a job because they don’t know anybody. Welcome to the new economy, cronyism at its best. It’s so corrupted, but hey it could be worse, the corruption could be like it is in China. At that point, I would just give up.

    Juice Box says:
    September 30, 2015 at 3:24 pm
    re # 104 – Rags in all fairness to Plumpkin few financial analysts go far. Only way pumps get promoted is nepotism.

  111. The Great Pumpkin says:

    115- What’s the CPA going to do for me, except get me angry that I’m not in the position I’m qualified for. If I see a purpose for the CPA, I will indeed get it. Right now, I’m making enough with a two income household, plus investments. It’s not worth the headache for me to go chase a limited amount of openings that are already taken by someone “in the know”. If there were realistic chances for me to get these positions, I would get the CPA in a heartbeat.

  112. Juice Box says:

    re #114 – Pumpkin being the astute analyst that you are, take a closer look at Toys. Aren’t they are operating at a loss and have declining sales? They are an albatross right now on the companies that took them private 10 years ago.

  113. The Great Pumpkin says:

    My whole point, there are fewer and fewer good jobs out there. That’s why working hard doesn’t get you what it did 50 years ago.

  114. The Great Pumpkin says:

    I don’t know all the details that it takes to understand why they are operating at a loss and have declining sales, but it’s a shame that highly skilled professionals are taking the hit for it. If they come back due to the strategy of the shipping of high skilled jobs, their competition will just do the same in the race to the bottom. Lucky us.

    Juice Box says:
    September 30, 2015 at 6:16 pm
    re #114 – Pumpkin being the astute analyst that you are, take a closer look at Toys. Aren’t they are operating at a loss and have declining sales? They are an albatross right now on the companies that took them private 10 years ago.

  115. Juice Box says:

    re: #118 – “what it did 50 years ago.” And so what? Go back an additional 30 years when working even harder got you less. You cannot compare the days of Don Draper to today and we are not going back. To do so you would need to kick 20% of the women out of the workforce for starters. Pumps if anything things will coast as they have for the last 5 years, you will be lucky to keep your job as is and nobody will intentionally overturn the apple cart anytime soon.

  116. Juice Box says:

    re # 119 – “highly skilled professionals are taking the hit for it.”
    Highly skilled professionals should see the writing on the wall. There are few places where the salary man can exist anymore. If you don’t like it go down to your town where you pay taxes and apply to shuffle paper in town hall somewhere, after all being a highly skilled professional you can always take your paper shuffling and bean counting skills with you.

  117. The Great Pumpkin says:

    We do see the writing on the wall, it’s called inequality. The system is broken. You better have capital if you want to make it. Even if you have capital, it’s a joke. You have all these hands with money fighting over a very limited amount of investments. All will end well.

    Juice Box says:
    September 30, 2015 at 6:38 pm
    re # 119 – “highly skilled professionals are taking the hit for it.”
    Highly skilled professionals should see the writing on the wall. There are few places where the salary man can exist anymore. If you don’t like it go down to your town where you pay taxes and apply to shuffle paper in town hall somewhere, after all being a highly skilled professional you can always take your paper shuffling and bean counting skills with you.

  118. Juice Box says:

    re #122- re”inequality”

    You the Great Pumpkin have an an entitlement mentality, you are promoting greater redistribution of wealth from the top 1% to the middle class for the USA, but are leaving out the rest of the world.

    Wouldn’t a true progressive like you support equal opportunity for all people on the planet, rather than just for those of us lucky enough to have been born and raised in the USA?

  119. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    Rode my bike to work, haven’t missed a day since the beginning of July. The driest part of my commute was the shower I took when I got to work.

  120. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Redistributing? It’s called taking back what was stolen. Big difference.

    Also, one step at a time. Before we can worry about the rest of the world, let’s fix the problems over here first.

    Juice Box says:
    September 30, 2015 at 7:16 pm
    re #122- re”inequality”

    You the Great Pumpkin have an an entitlement mentality, you are promoting greater redistribution of wealth from the top 1% to the middle class for the USA, but are leaving out the rest of the world.

    Wouldn’t a true progressive like you support equal opportunity for all people on the planet, rather than just for those of us lucky enough to have been born and raised in the USA?

  121. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “One technology manager, an immigrant from Europe, recalled that when he was hired at the insurer. “There was an open position that had to be filled,” he said. “Nobody lost their job because I got my job.””

  122. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Pretty good comment from that article.

    “I don’t mean to be snarky, but this is old news. The H1B program has long been large businesses’ legal means to do what small firms do illegally when hiring undocumented workers (illegal aliens, if you will) off the parking lot of your local [fill in the blank]. One often hears business say that there is a shortage of American workers of this sort or another. But there’s only a shortage at a wage level that Americans are unwilling to accept. Business managers are graded on their contribution to the bottom line, so they’re going to do everything possible to pay lower wages and salaries. Hence the desire to pay foreign workers who demand less. If the income of middle class Americans continues to fall in real terms, internal demand for consumer products will also fall. Since America runs a huge trade deficit, it seems to me that the labor practices of American business will just turn into a death spiral of reduced economic activity, and America will become poor—eventually.”

  123. Comrade Nom Deplume, from the Hub of the Solar System. says:

    So pumpkin, I assume you will object strenuously to the flood of foreign trained doctors that this administration intends to import to handle the doctor shortage being exacerbated by Obamacare?

  124. The Great Pumpkin says:

    This is precisely what I try to explain to all of you. You have to have wage inflation or the system is done. Are these profit kings so naive to the long term impact of cutting wages and jobs? It’s suicide, or like this guy likes to describe it, “death spiral of reduced economic activity”. You can’t keep cutting wages in the name of savings and think it has no impact on the rest of the economy.

    “If the income of middle class Americans continues to fall in real terms, internal demand for consumer products will also fall. Since America runs a huge trade deficit, it seems to me that the labor practices of American business will just turn into a death spiral of reduced economic activity, and America will become poor—eventually.”

  125. Comrade Nom Deplume, from the Hub of the Solar System. says:

    [125] pumpkin

    “Redistributing? It’s called taking back what was stolen. Big difference.”

    That tells me all I need to know about your mentality, one other things. Personally, I hadn’t assigned you to the anon/footrest camp but I think you just assigned yourself.

    Now, I will pose the question that I pose to all other leftists that take this position: if the holdings of the wealthy were in fact stolen, why don’t we prosecute? Why are we calling for changes to Title 26 when we already have Title 18?

    If you want any modicum of respect from me, you’ll try to answer the question.

  126. The Great Pumpkin says:

    It was stolen the minute they turned on the lending machine to make up for the demand that would be lost from not getting raises and losing jobs. Making people debt slaves is just as bad as buying slaves.

    Comrade Nom Deplume, from the Hub of the Solar System. says:
    September 30, 2015 at 8:39 pm
    [125] pumpkin

    “Redistributing? It’s called taking back what was stolen. Big difference.”

    That tells me all I need to know about your mentality, one other things. Personally, I hadn’t assigned you to the anon/footrest camp but I think you just assigned yourself.

    Now, I will pose the question that I pose to all other leftists that take this position: if the holdings of the wealthy were in fact stolen, why don’t we prosecute? Why are we calling for changes to Title 26 when we already have Title 18?

    If you want any modicum of respect from me, you’ll try to answer the question.

  127. grim says:

    IMHO – Half the open job postings in IT are fraudulent. They are posted with no intention of ever hiring against them, and are posted to create a fictitious scenario where there is difficulty filling positions. Just my 2 cents.

  128. The Great Pumpkin says:

    How about the poor souls who have to go through an interview with the interviewers knowing the job is already taken.

    grim says:
    September 30, 2015 at 8:42 pm
    IMHO – Half the open job postings in IT are fraudulent. They are posted with no intention of ever hiring against them, and are posted to create a fictitious scenario where there is difficulty filling positions. Just my 2 cents.

  129. Fabius Maximus says:

    Before I get into a lot of this, here is some interesting reading. In NJ upper limit on middle class is $140K!

    http://thebillfold.com/2015/04/new-chart-lists-middle-class-income-in-each-state/

  130. Fabius Maximus says:

    $250 a month for Packanack Co-op Preschool is a killer…

    A lot of preschools (especially if they are parochial) are capped on what they can charge

  131. Fabius Maximus says:

    #77 ChiFi,

    “I hate to sound like jj, but if you are purely going it alone, and have never received any kind of help or inheritance (or free childcare/babysitting), then the answer is probably $300K for two kids around here………but let me be very clear…..they are very few who completely go it alone…….if you do, you have my respect….”

    He respects me!, pity its not mutual.

    So according to this, my 3kids and stay at home wife should mean I’m at a $375K salary. I’ll have to talk to my wife and my boss on that one.

    So where is the line, youre drawing here. Can I afford to live in your hood?
    Lets start with that!. I’m sure there are better deals to be had but I’ll go with this.

    http://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/144-Black-Point-Rd_Rumson_NJ_07760_M60029-28197?row=10

  132. Fabius Maximus says:

    So how do you make it with no safety net? Good friends and a long list of Baby Sitters.
    I have probably 50 sitters in my phone. I have kids that have basic first Aid, that will take my kid to the afterschool practice, through to the special list of sitters that can go to 1am (on a school night)!

    Outside of that, it is all financing and more importantly budgeting. Don’t buy what you can’t afford, and make sure you can afford your current and future planned life!
    If you can’t, where is your plan to downscale?

    While many in here may scream at the idea, “The Two Income trap” by Elizabeth Warren should me mandatory reading in these times.

  133. grim says:

    But Wayne still a hold out, no full day kindergarten yet – comes up for vote in November.

  134. phoenix says:

    128. Are the doctors quitting? Or are there just too many patient’s now?

Comments are closed.