Will NJ ever recover?

From the Record:

NJ leads the nation in foreclosure activity

New Jersey continued to lead the nation in foreclosure activity in the third quarter, as the mortgage industry deals with a backlog of distressed properties in the state, RealtyTrac reported Wednesday.

Foreclosure activity in the state rose 27 percent from a year ago, with one in every 171 housing units facing a foreclosure filing during the quarter — more than twice the national average. Nationally, foreclosure activity has returned to pre-recession levels, according to RealtyTrac, which is based in California and follows the foreclosure market nationwide.

New Jersey has been slower to deal with homeowners who fell into default during the housing bust because it is one of about two dozen states where foreclosures must go through the courts. In addition, the state put a near-freeze on foreclosure activity several years ago while the mortgage industry faced accusations of abusing borrowers’ rights in the rush to evict. The state is still catching up.

“In states such as New Jersey, Massachusetts and New York, a flood of deferred distress from the last housing crisis is finally spilling over the legislative and legal dams that have held back some foreclosure activity for years,” said Daren Blomquist, vice president at RealtyTrac.

Many of those properties, he said, have been poorly maintained and “will sell at more deeply discounted prices, creating a drag on overall home values.”

In Bergen County, one of every 293 households faced foreclosure activity during the quarter, up 22.6 percent from a year earlier. In Passaic, one in every 139 households faced a foreclosure filing, up 25 percent from a year earlier.
New Jersey continued to lead the nation in foreclosure activity in the third quarter, as the mortgage industry deals with a backlog of distressed properties in the state, RealtyTrac reported Wednesday.

Foreclosure activity in the state rose 27 percent from a year ago, with one in every 171 housing units facing a foreclosure filing during the quarter — more than twice the national average. Nationally, foreclosure activity has returned to pre-recession levels, according to RealtyTrac, which is based in California and follows the foreclosure market nationwide.

New Jersey has been slower to deal with homeowners who fell into default during the housing bust because it is one of about two dozen states where foreclosures must go through the courts. In addition, the state put a near-freeze on foreclosure activity several years ago while the mortgage industry faced accusations of abusing borrowers’ rights in the rush to evict. The state is still catching up.

“In states such as New Jersey, Massachusetts and New York, a flood of deferred distress from the last housing crisis is finally spilling over the legislative and legal dams that have held back some foreclosure activity for years,” said Daren Blomquist, vice president at RealtyTrac.

Many of those properties, he said, have been poorly maintained and “will sell at more deeply discounted prices, creating a drag on overall home values.”

In Bergen County, one of every 293 households faced foreclosure activity during the quarter, up 22.6 percent from a year earlier. In Passaic, one in every 139 households faced a foreclosure filing, up 25 percent from a year earlier.

Among metropolitan areas, Atlantic City had the nation’s highest foreclosure activity during the quarter, with one in every 97 housing units facing a filing in the third quarter. Among states, Florida came in second after New Jersey in the rate of foreclosure activity. New York was ranked 18th.

This entry was posted in Economics, Foreclosures, New Jersey Real Estate. Bookmark the permalink.

163 Responses to Will NJ ever recover?

  1. Marilyn says:

    I have to do this…………. Friskies and First!!! Good Morning NJ. and my little spin……. like Ozzy, I love you all.

  2. grim says:

    TENDER VITTLES OR DIE TRYING

  3. D-FENS says:

    Somebody needs to repost that APP article about the $200,000 police officer.

    The world is upside down.

  4. nwnj3 says:

    #3

    The best part is the paid day off for their birthdays written into the contract. It’s mind boggling.

  5. grim says:

    http://www.mycentraljersey.com/story/news/investigations/watchdog/investigations/2015/10/13/taxes-police/73857732/

    One Toms River police captain will be paid nearly $200,000 this year.

    That’s almost as much as New York City Police Commissioner William J. Bratton’s $214,400 salary.

    Add in pension and health benefits, and the grand total hits $237,700.

    When two other captains with the same package are included, Toms River taxpayers will pay $713,300 for just three officers, according to the township’s business administrator. That’s just for one year. In one of 565 towns in the state.

    Toms River’s violent crime rate is seven times lower than New York City’s, yet a veteran Toms River patrol officer is paid up to 60 percent more. The township of about 91,500 residents has some 255 full- and part-time police employees.

    By further contrast, U.S. Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch makes $199,700 to head the U.S. Department of Justice, which has more than 110,000 staffers, including the FBI.

    Police salaries in New Jersey, on average, are the highest in the nation. Moreover, each municipal force has its own command-and-control structure: a police chief, subordinates, patrol officers, and the civilian staff and equipment to support it. The 27,000 police officers at all levels of government account for $2.6 billion in salaries each year, for an average pay of $95,400, a Gannett New Jersey analysis of pension data show.

    Of those officers, 13,000 were paid a base salary of more than $100,000 last year, Gannett found. That’s a total of $1.6 billion, before overtime and benefits are added in. Twenty-two officers were paid more than $200,000, for a total of $4.7 million.

  6. anon (the good one) says:

    last week or so a moron here had complained about the Donald not being on Today

    @THR: Matt Lauer to Moderate Donald Trump Town Hall on ‘Today’ on Oct. 26

  7. anon (the good one) says:

    @business:

    After canceling a $12.4 billion rail tunnel to NYC, Chris Christie backs a $20 billion one

  8. chicagofinance says:

    One of the most pithy and cogent things I’ve read in weeks…..there is so much in there…

    Splat What Was He Thinking says:
    October 14, 2015 at 11:19 pm
    Ten fcuking years. My hair is all gray now, one kid’s an adult (and the youngest acts like one), my house lost 170K in value, I got out of RE to save the shred of sanity I still cling to…and the sausage grinder’s being primed for another death run, perpetual war is now how the US conducts foreign policy, and I can come to this blog at any hour to find at least three wackadoodle pinheads either barfing up nonsense from the Twittersphere or advocating for the US to adopt the soci@l policies of failed UK backwaters whose citizens are unified by the common traits of alcoholism and consumption of empty starch calories.

  9. anon (the good one) says:

    @Tim_Cahill:

    TBT-
    once upon a time with these two legends. #JUNINHO @thierryhenry @newyorkredbulls @mls amazing memories.

  10. chicagofinance says:

    I know that contextual facts are not the point of your posts……but anyway……the clear issue is that the tunnel is likely a well-over-$20B project, and in the prior version, the Feds and NY were going to stick all of us with the bill in NJ for the cost overruns. Christie has proven to be what he is……but at least in the early years of his tenure, this decision was prudent. Shows what he can produce when he is engaged…..of course he gave up on us years ago.

    anon (the good one) says:
    October 15, 2015 at 8:29 am
    @business:

    After canceling a $12.4 billion rail tunnel to NYC, Chris Christie backs a $20 billion one

  11. anon (the good one) says:

    yep, you should print it and read it every night before going to bed

    chicagofinance says:
    October 15, 2015 at 8:32 am
    One of the most pithy and cogent things I’ve read in weeks…..there is so much in there…

  12. 1987 Condo says:

    #6..my son graduates from NC State in December, daughter waiting on word from UNC-G and UNC-C.

  13. Libturd in Union says:

    Anon,

    You truly are a mean-spirited, empty-minded troll. Are you taking out your anger for having to ride the short bus on us?

  14. Comrade Nom Deplume, living well off the carrion of the left says:

    Happy tax filing deadline day for all of us on extension.

  15. Comrade Nom Deplume, living well off the carrion of the left says:

    [14] libturd

    Poor grammar there. anon is stupid enough; using poor grammar just confuses him more.

  16. Libturd in Union says:

    Grim…that article on the exodus from the Garden State is extremely telling. I am firmly convinced that the reason NJ is in the dumpster is due to years of progressive government resulting in over-sized salaries and benefits for the public workers. Can’t wait to get out!

  17. Libturd in Union says:

    Sorry for my poor grammar. For what it’s worth, the ratio of the split on my SATs between math and verbal scores was nearly 2 to 1. I scored pretty high in math, but even if I got an 800, it doesn’t speak to highly of my command of the English language.

  18. The Great Pumpkin says:

    6- If you are raising a family, be careful of moving to this area.

    “That talented, educated workforce may start to dwindle if the state continues on its current trajectory, according to Andrew Broad, an economist at the University of North Carolina Greensboro Center for Business and Economic Research.

    Historically, Broad said, North Carolina has been progressive by Southern standards. That’s changed since Republicans took over the General Assembly in 2010. North Carolina has become a more conservative, low-tax, low-service state, Broad said.

    And it’s hurting education.

    North Carolina’s test scores are among the lowest in the nation, while New Jersey ranks No. 2.

    Per pupil spending in North Carolina during the 2008-09 school year was $8,867 — roughly half of what was spent in New Jersey that year, according to data from the National Education Association. In 2014-15, spending was even lower: $8,620, and that doesn’t account for inflation.

    “It’s true that how much you spend on education isn’t the perfect measure of quality,” Broad said. “But it’s not a bad measure.”

    New Jersey’s per pupil spending went from $16,090 in 2008-09 to $20,923 in 2014-15, according to the NEA data.

    Average teacher pay in North Carolina has dropped from $48,603 in 2008-09 to $47,783 in 2014-15.

    Funding for the state’s public universities hasn’t been restored to pre-recession levels, which is also concerning, Broad said.

    “We know investment matters — and human capital investment are among the most productive investments we can make,” Broad said. “Now, you can’t tell North Carolina apart from Alabama, Mississippi and South Carolina.”

  19. yome says:

    Wow! Almost 40% lost per share from a year earlier

    Goldman said its third-quarter net income fell to $1.43 billion, or $2.90 a share, from $2.24 billion, or $4.57 a share, a year earlier.

    Revenue dropped to $6.86 billion.

    The Wall Street firm was expected to earn $2.91 a share on revenue of $7.13 billion, the average estimates of analysts polled by Thomson Reuters.

    http://www.marketwatch.com/story/goldman-sachs-profit-misses-as-trading-volumes-dip-2015-10-15-74854947?dist=beforebell

  20. 1987 Condo says:

    K-12 in NC is a mess.

  21. Libturd in Union says:

    Pumpkin – With the money you’ll save, you can hire a private tutor to work with your kid 5 days a week. Or you can do what NJ does and just pay the same teachers more.

  22. Fast Eddie says:

    In Bergen County, one of every 293 households faced foreclosure activity during the quarter, up 22.6 percent from a year earlier.

    This is nonsense. I don’t believe it. Everything in Bergen County (at least the parts that count) is justified.

  23. walking bye says:

    Was at the bldg. dept yesterday and saw our bloated govt in action. An older woman in her 70s comes in to replace a screen door and inquire if this will need a permit. They pull out a full permit app, rattle off all the fees needed, tell her she needs to get a site plan, some more forms, and then top it off with you will need to provide proof of workmans comp, and disability coverage from the contractor. The older woman looks up and said “ohh forget it, I’ll just get some duck tape.” I would have helped her but I had my own issues to deal with.

  24. Marilyn says:

    #6, thank you.

  25. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Lib, the classroom setting it what is important. The kids your kids will be learning with is what is important. Today’s education is not focused on the individual. It’s focused on training kids to critically think and work together to solve problems. The tutor can’t teach that. Your kid will be so far behind if you raise them in Carolina. Carolina is good for a Millennial trying to build up some savings and gain some experience in their field. Carolina is also good for retirees. It is not good for people raising families. The reason it is a low cost state, directly correlates to why it is so bad to raise a family there.

    Libturd in Union says:
    October 15, 2015 at 9:22 am
    Pumpkin – With the money you’ll save, you can hire a private tutor to work with your kid 5 days a week. Or you can do what NJ does and just pay the same teachers more.

  26. nwnj3 says:

    From the look of things, it’s time to stop participating in the census. It’s apparently now being used as a data mine for advancing the progressive agenda.

  27. chicagofinance says:

    I scored 790 math…..and I know the question I got wrong…..

    Libturd in Union says:
    October 15, 2015 at 9:09 am
    Sorry for my poor grammar. For what it’s worth, the ratio of the split on my SATs between math and verbal scores was nearly 2 to 1. I scored pretty high in math, but even if I got an 800, it doesn’t speak to highly of my command of the English language.

  28. Libturd in Union says:

    Walking.

    I might have shared this story in the past. In 2004, at my multi in Montclair, I hired Jan fence to install a simple 4 foot slatted wooden fence in my backyard to keep my dog penned in. When they showed up for the install, they claimed they couldn’t do it without a permit. So I trudge on down to the municipal offices to get a permit. Once there, they say I don’t need one. So I go back to the installers who say they know I do need it and the person was wrong. So I go back a second time. They won’t issue me a permit. I then have to beg Jan Fence to do it, and they finally oblige.

    Here is the zoning permit application:

    TOWNSHIP OF MONTCLAIR
    ZONING PERMIT APPLICATION
    Permit Fee: $50
    (Cash or check payable to Township of Montclair)
    • Zoning Permits are required for signs, FENCES, sheds, driveways and parking areas, and temporary uses and structures.
    • This Zoning Permit Application should be submitted to the Planning Department. Please provide a correctly scaled copy of a property survey with the application and show the proposed work drawn to scale including setbacks, height, dimensions, etc.
    • All zoning permits expire within 1 year of issuance.

  29. joyce says:

    LOL

    John Galiano, 76, a retired insurance executive, said “what we’re looking for is a little relief as senior citizens.”

    grim says:
    October 15, 2015 at 8:08 am
    http://www.mycentraljersey.com/story/news/investigations/watchdog/investigations/2015/10/13/taxes-police/73857732/

  30. Libturd in Union says:

    Not bad ChiLatte.

    I scored a 690 in math. This deemed me a genius at Montclair State.

  31. grim says:

    I was also a 690 Math, and went to Montclair.

    I think I was about a 22 Verbal, which is why I went to Montclair.

  32. grim says:

    Caveat, 690 was my first time, I took it a second time and jumped up verbal significantly, but dropped math a couple points.

  33. Libturd in Union says:

    My verbal was 370. Which is pretty piss poor when considering that you receive 200 points for taking the exam.

  34. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Phoenix, this is your specialty. You believe this guy? Comical, made how much off his house and is currently able to receiver social security benefits that the youth can only dream of. Yet, here he is asking for more from the youth. I have no remorse for senior citizens living in nj complaining about taxes. I just have one question for them, how much money did you make off your home from the younger generations?

    joyce says:
    October 15, 2015 at 9:58 am
    LOL

    John Galiano, 76, a retired insurance executive, said “what we’re looking for is a little relief as senior citizens.”

  35. Libturd in Union says:

    Sadly, I am frequently called upon at work to proofread and sometimes to write office communications for my superiors. If I take my time, I can actually write quite well. With that said, I apologize for the crappy job I do here. Of course here, I am not paid.

  36. The Great Pumpkin says:

    37- Every dollar these senior citizens have payed in taxes has been recouped by the rise in value of their home due to the younger generations. Most have profited significantly from living in their house after all the costs are tallied up. Yet, they complain and whine about how bad they have it. Spare me the tears.

  37. Getting closer again to offering a bounty on Punkin’s head.

  38. Alex says:

    27-

    Pumpty, average SAT score in 2014:

    New Jersey–1526

    North Carolina–1483

    Not much difference in there?

  39. JJ says:

    AFFINION GROUP INC SR SB NT
    11.50000% 10/15/2015

    Calling out CHIFI on this. Back in early 2010 I bought this bond and CHIFI and I sparred as to when it would go BK. Of course CHIF was on the BK side. Today it matured and I got paid. I rarely ever to be honest see a bond with a 11.5% coupon make it all the way to maturity. If I could time travel I would have bought ten million of this bond on margin and called it a day at work.

  40. JJ says:

    Pretty low for NC considering they lynch all the minorities before they get to take the PSAT

    Alex says:
    October 15, 2015 at 10:41 am
    27-
    Pumpty, average SAT score in 2014:
    New Jersey–1526
    North Carolina–1483

    Not much difference in there?

  41. Ragnar says:

    D-FENS,
    That map is missing a couple of Asians on my street, including mine.

  42. The Great Pumpkin says:

    NJ includes lower income students in their test scores. They force our state’s abbot districts to try and reach a 100% participation rate in the sat’s. So imagine what these scores do to the avg scores. Not happening in Carolina or most states. If you are poor, hands down you want to get an education in nj.

    Pumpty, average SAT score in 2014:

    New Jersey–1526

    North Carolina–1483

    Not much difference in there?

  43. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “No seniors at Paterson’s Eastside High School campus last year did well enough on the SATs to meet the College Board’s threshold for being “college ready.”

    In Bergen County, 13 percent of Garfield High School seniors who took the SAT hit that benchmark, along with 18 percent of their counterparts at Lyndhurst High School, according to the new School Performance Reports released Tuesday.

    At a time when helping students become “college ready” is a mantra for New Jersey education officials, a startling share in many poor and moderate-income districts failed to meet the score deemed by the College Board to predict probable success in college — 1,550 points out of a possible 2,400.

    That benchmark has been in the spotlight since Camden Schools Superintendent Paymon Rouhanifard used it last month to say it hit him like a “kick in the stomach” to learn that only three students in his city tested as college-ready. Governor Christie jumped on the figure in his recent State of the State speech to argue for his education agenda, including merit pay for teachers and a longer academic day.

    The College Board, which administers the SAT, says that students who hit the benchmark have a 65 percent or greater chance of earning at least a B-minus average in their freshman year of college, and are likely to get a degree. Studies show SAT scores are highly correlated with parents’ income and education level.”

  44. Ragnar says:

    1400 for me, 720 verbal, 680 math.
    Unfortunately, or perhaps fortunately, family circumstances, finances, and mediocre HS grades led me to start my higher education at a nearby community college in small-town FL, determined to be more purposeful in university than I had been in HS.

    Had I not started making better choices, I’d be delivering pizzas while living at my mom’s house and blogging about and making up excuses for myself about how an unfair world makes it impossible to succeed.
    Some of my old acquaintances are already washed up for life, others have moved up in the world. All tied to the choices they made relating to what they did with the abilities they had and developed.

  45. walking bye says:

    @30 Lib, I wish I could have told her to just go to Home Depot and have them install it, forget about the whole permit thing. In reality most towns do not require permits for window replacements/door replacements.

  46. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Think about the impact on the avg test score. Plus, let me see an area in another state that is as poor as Paterson get 26 kids to have college ready sat scores.

    “In Paterson, only 26 of the 598 seniors in district schools last year who took the SAT met the college-ready benchmark, district data show. Superintendent Donnie Evans said the district has been successful in recent years in raising state test scores and graduation rates, and now must do more to help students handle national tests, such as the SAT and ACT. He said he was “frustrated” by the disappointing SAT scores, but optimistic that they will improve with the current shift to the Common Core – a set of more rigorous standards for what students should learn in each grade.”

  47. yome says:

    John Dennis “Denny” Hastert is an American politician, lobbyist, and member of the Republican Party who was the 59th Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, to plead guilty on Hush-Money Case

  48. My accountant e-filed ours yesterday.

    Happy tax filing deadline day for all of us on extension.

  49. 730/780, I’m pretty sure math was 780.

  50. Ragnar says:

    Maybe 2% of politicians are idealists, while the other 98% are more or less leeches on the populace intent on convincing themselves that they are doing some sort of “public service”. Almost all of them have an unhealthy and excessive interest in other people.

  51. Ragnar says:

    Trumpkin,
    You are formerly known as?
    What are the main reasons for tax extensions? Calculating business accounts?
    I have to do quarterly estimated taxes, but fortunately my company is able to get partnership income accounting done on time to be ready for 4/15 every year.

  52. Repossessions spike 66% as foreclosure crisis lingers

    New foreclosures may be back to nearly normal, but the mess from the epic housing disaster in the last decade is far from gone. Bank repossessions, the final stage of the foreclosure process, jumped 66 percent year over year in the third quarter of this year, according to RealtyTrac, a foreclosure sales and analytics company. It’s the largest annual rise ever recorded in bank repossessions by RealtyTrac. More than 123,000 homes went back to the bank in just three months.

    “In states such as New Jersey, Massachusetts and New York, a flood of deferred distress from the last housing crisis is finally spilling over the legislative and legal dams that have held back some foreclosure activity for years,” said Daren Blomquist, vice president at RealtyTrac. “That deferred distress often represents properties with deferred maintenance that will sell at more deeply discounted prices, creating a drag on overall home values.”

    http://www.cnbc.com/2015/10/14/repossessions-spike-66-as-foreclosure-crisis-lingers.html

  53. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Do you know how much chance was involved in your choices. That’s how random the universe is. It’s based on chaos theory. You could have very well made what you thought was the right choice, but the universe could have turned that choice right upside down on you. Yes, lots of people make the wrong choices, but lots make the right choices and still end up with the people who made the wrong choices. This continuously flies over your head. You think all you need to do to be successful is work hard and make the right choices. Guess that you never had bad luck before. The world is not as simple as you make it out to be.

    “Had I not started making better choices, I’d be delivering pizzas while living at my mom’s house and blogging about and making up excuses for myself about how an unfair world makes it impossible to succeed.
    Some of my old acquaintances are already washed up for life, others have moved up in the world. All tied to the choices they made relating to what they did with the abilities they had and developed.”

  54. Juice Box says:

    What? You didn’t pay someone to take your SAT?

  55. Alex says:

    58-

    Probably had granny take the test for him.

  56. Ragnar says:

    Pumpkin should listen to this song:
    Freewill by Rush
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OnxkfLe4G74

  57. Juice Box says:

    re: # 57 – “You think all you need to do to be successful is work hard and make the right choices. ”

    What chance? Somewhere around one in every 106 people in this country are millionaires.The number of wealthy households is at the highest level in History of the WORLD. That is pretty damm good odds it isn’t chance but hard work and making the right choices.

    Odds are Pumpkin you too can be in the top % of earners in the country with two incomes and rental properties to boot.

  58. I live in Boston but am not a Sox or Pats fan, that should be hint enough.

    For me the extension is just laziness on my part. Since I trade a lot, I have to do my own cap gains/1099 income and my accountant does the rest and I’m just lazy about getting them done and getting them to him. In fact, he didn’t have my stuff until Monday morning.

    Trumpkin,
    You are formerly known as?
    What are the main reasons for tax extensions? Calculating business accounts?
    I have to do quarterly estimated taxes, but fortunately my company is able to get partnership income accounting done on time to be ready for 4/15 every year.

  59. Ragnar says:

    got it,
    I used to go by another name too, till I started seeing too much craziness.

  60. grim says:

    Found the paper, wow I actually did way better in math than that, I was way off. Clearly having a high SAT math score in not actually a predictor of remembering your score.

  61. grim says:

    By the way, I actually have my Kindergarten report card framed on the wall of my office, as well as my diploma (I routinely point to it if someone asks me a stupid question)

    It was back when everything was “marking periods”.

    Behavior
    Marking Period 1 – B – James has trouble following directions.
    Marking Period 2 – C – James continues to have trouble following directions.
    Marking Period 3 – D – James refuses to follow directions.
    Marking Period 4 – F – James follows directions, his own. Have a nice summer!

    Pretty much nailed my personality, from day 1.

    I’m more proud of that than the two masters degrees hanging right next to it.

  62. Juice Box says:

    re: # 64 – You obviously did not have the pleasure of being taught by Sister Mary and her Westcott wooden ruler.

  63. grim says:

    Probably the opposite, “Ms. Golden”

  64. Libturd in Union says:

    If there is anything that Blumpkin’s post prove. It’s that spending more money on education does not work. Abbott Districts ensure our urban districts are funded to the max, not to mention that the Schools Construction Corporation paid 100% of the costs to build a whole sh1tload of schools in the ghetto less than a decade ago. Yet only 3 students were college ready in Camden. So why are we spending all of this money on schools and education in the inner city when it yields no measurable improvement?

  65. 1987 Condo says:

    Comments on my Kindergarten report card indicated that I was immature. I was 4.

  66. phoenix1 says:

    37. Pumps,
    Some people never have enough…..

  67. phoenix1 says:

    68. Condo,
    Look at the bright side, at least your report card is on paper and not PowerSchool.
    Today’s kids entire history is just 1 click away. Late to school in second grade? Attendance, tardiness, family problem- will all be easily searchable in the future, not in a musty old basement in the cellar of the school….

  68. Fast Eddie says:

    My report card is on parchment paper. The ink bled through in many places.

  69. phoenix1 says:

    64. Using your report card as logic, should we teach our children to follow directions?

  70. D-FENS says:

    Damnit. Now i have that Rush song stuck in my head.

  71. The Great Pumpkin says:

    So those 3 students didn’t deserve a chance to impact the world they live in because they were born poor? They were given the opportunity and took it. It’s unfortunate most of the others did not do as well with their opportunity, but these 3 went to one of the worse districts in the state and came out college ready. Don’t blame the teacher or the school for why the others did not make it, just understand that they performed a miracle by having 3 kids from a terrible district become college ready. Let’s see how well the kids are doing in the ghetto’s of charlestown.

    Libturd in Union says:
    October 15, 2015 at 12:15 pm
    If there is anything that Blumpkin’s post prove. It’s that spending more money on education does not work. Abbott Districts ensure our urban districts are funded to the max, not to mention that the Schools Construction Corporation paid 100% of the costs to build a whole sh1tload of schools in the ghetto less than a decade ago. Yet only 3 students were college ready in Camden. So why are we spending all of this money on schools and education in the inner city when it yields no measurable improvement?

  72. phoenix1 says:

    67. Lib, in subset I see your point, but looking at the whole forest–it does appear thatthe schools here are MUCH better. When you look at it financially, there is a third perspective- Let someone else pay to train somebody and only hire the finished product- if N. Carolina wanted to be even smarter they should close all of their schools completely and let NJ supply them with talented educated students paid for by the suckers of NJ….

    “If there is anything that Blumpkin’s post prove. It’s that spending more money on education does not work.”

    “North Carolina’s test scores are among the lowest in the nation, while New Jersey ranks No. 2.”

    “Per pupil spending in North Carolina during the 2008-09 school year was $8,867 — roughly half of what was spent in New Jersey that year”

  73. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Isn’t the population of the world at its’ highest peak ever? So why should I be amazed that the number of wealthy households is at the highest level ever? I can easily say the number of households living in poverty is at its’ highest level ever.

    I’m def in the 5% of earners or higher based on the tax data. That doesn’t mean I forget about the other 95% of the population.

    Juice Box says:
    October 15, 2015 at 11:50 am
    re: # 57 – “You think all you need to do to be successful is work hard and make the right choices. ”

    What chance? Somewhere around one in every 106 people in this country are millionaires.The number of wealthy households is at the highest level in History of the WORLD. That is pretty damm good odds it isn’t chance but hard work and making the right choices.

    Odds are Pumpkin you too can be in the top % of earners in the country with two incomes and rental properties to boot.

  74. chicagofinance says:

    dude…..I give you Luger’s pie with schlog and you take a cheap shot……YOU are a schlog….

    JJ says:
    October 15, 2015 at 10:48 am
    AFFINION GROUP INC SR SB NT
    11.50000% 10/15/2015

    Calling out CHIFI on this. Back in early 2010 I bought this bond and CHIFI and I sparred as to when it would go BK. Of course CHIF was on the BK side. Today it matured and I got paid. I rarely ever to be honest see a bond with a 11.5% coupon make it all the way to maturity. If I could time travel I would have bought ten million of this bond on margin and called it a day at work.

  75. grim says:

    I cant imagine a company that sells steak sauce at the A&P can do a decent steak, seems like it’s so commercialized it’s a trap for suckers. Never been.

  76. Juice Box says:

    US Boots now on the ground in Cameroon, Congress is going to have to vote in less than 60 days #BringBackOurGirls been a year and a half now, they may all be dead by now.

  77. Juice Box says:

    re # 76 – “That doesn’t mean I forget about the other 95% of the population.”

    I am sure a rich guy like you donates 10% to charity every year right? So where are you donating your 30 Grand every year Pumpkin?

  78. The Great Pumpkin says:

    This is the problem when people look at education. They look at the scores of a ghetto district, where these kids are dealing with god knows what issues, and deem these districts failure because they didn’t have 80% of the kids become college ready. Is 80% really a realistic number for one of the worse neighborhoods in America? The whole premise is that you provide these kids with the opportunity. If they don’t take the opportunity, that is their fault, not the school’s or teacher’s fault. So instead of bashing these schools and teachers, we should celebrate that they were able to perform a miracle and get some of these kids college ready and give them the opportunity they deserve.

    Labeling these teachers or schools failures because 80% of the kids did not become college ready is just plain ludicrous. You will never reach these numbers based on their socioeconomic background, but that doesn’t mean you stop offering the opportunity to the kids that will take advantage of the opportunity. You can’t put a cost on it either. One of those kids can grow up and change the world we live for the better. They may even become a doctor and save your life.

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    October 15, 2015 at 12:38 pm
    So those 3 students didn’t deserve a chance to impact the world they live in because they were born poor? They were given the opportunity and took it. It’s unfortunate most of the others did not do as well with their opportunity, but these 3 went to one of the worse districts in the state and came out college ready. Don’t blame the teacher or the school for why the others did not make it, just understand that they performed a miracle by having 3 kids from a terrible district become college ready. Let’s see how well the kids are doing in the ghetto’s of charlestown.

    Libturd in Union says:
    October 15, 2015 at 12:15 pm
    If there is anything that Blumpkin’s post prove. It’s that spending more money on education does not work. Abbott Districts ensure our urban districts are funded to the max, not to mention that the Schools Construction Corporation paid 100% of the costs to build a whole sh1tload of schools in the ghetto less than a decade ago. Yet only 3 students were college ready in Camden. So why are we spending all of this money on schools and education in the inner city when it yields no measurable improvement?

  79. Libturd in Union says:

    It’s a complete guess, but I imagine he claimed his medical leave keeps him from working, yet he probably exploded some combustible material in preparation of mowing the lawn or something of the like. Reminds me of Fireman Ed. Guy is collecting permanent medical disability after 2o years on the force. Does this look like a guy who can’t work anymore?

    http://tinyurl.com/JJs-second-love-after-vidalia

  80. [64] The grade I’m most proud of is a D in Organic Chemistry at Rutgers. All of the exams were 5 answer multiple choice and the grading curve was so ridiculously shifted that 20% was usually a passing grade and 30% was often a high “C”. I never saw so much time and study effort go into a course that was obviously not being taught very well. I had 5 wallet sized cards (I think they were RU football schedules) and on the back of each I wrote, one letter per card, A,B,C,D, E. I would shuffle the cards before each exam and randomly select a letter and write it down on a tiny rolled up piece of paper, once for each question on the exam. I would then just transcribe my random choices onto my exam answer sheet and be the first one out of the exam and in the pub.

  81. Ragnar says:

    The problem with Camden’s schools isn’t that they fail to prepare kids for college. It’s that they pretend that’s their goal, and they fail to achieve it in a spectacularly expensive way. Meanwhile, they fail to even recognize their appropriate goal – achieving basic literacy and numeracy, and providing some useful professional training so that these people could succeed in basic trades. The 1% of the kids that look college track capable can be spotted on tests, and set up a special school or department for them.

  82. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Being in the top 5% of income earned does not mean I’m rich (not yet). You have to remember that people accumulate lots of money in one time instances. If I was getting a 15 million dollar bonus, maybe you could call me rich. I’m just the dope doing most of the work that keeps society going, aka upper middle class. My income will always be near the top, but it’s consistent, it never fluctuates to absurd levels in a given year like all these other true “wealthy” families. Sure, my income might be better than 60 year old retired ceo, but that doesn’t mean I can touch his wealth.

    Juice Box says:
    October 15, 2015 at 12:59 pm
    re # 76 – “That doesn’t mean I forget about the other 95% of the population.”

    I am sure a rich guy like you donates 10% to charity every year right? So where are you donating your 30 Grand every year Pumpkin?

  83. The Great Pumpkin says:

    If you have the answer for getting 80% of the Camden kids college ready, then let us know. That answer will make you one of the richest people in America. Right now, there is no answer. Way too many problems in that community to expect to make 80% of the student population college ready. That’s what we call a dream. So why are we putting these expectations on those schools and teachers, when in reality it’s a pipe dream? Is that school really a failure if it doesn’t get 80% of the population to become college ready? NO, it’s an unrealistic goal.

    Ragnar says:
    October 15, 2015 at 1:23 pm
    The problem with Camden’s schools isn’t that they fail to prepare kids for college. It’s that they pretend that’s their goal, and they fail to achieve it in a spectacularly expensive way. Meanwhile, they fail to even recognize their appropriate goal – achieving basic literacy and numeracy, and providing some useful professional training so that these people could succeed in basic trades. The 1% of the kids that look college track capable can be spotted on tests, and set up a special school or department for them.

  84. phoenix1 says:

    86 Funny,
    One problem, no one ethnicity has the corner on cheating or treachery.

  85. The Great Pumpkin says:

    What a scumbag and I’m a jets fan.

    Libturd in Union says:
    October 15, 2015 at 1:19 pm
    It’s a complete guess, but I imagine he claimed his medical leave keeps him from working, yet he probably exploded some combustible material in preparation of mowing the lawn or something of the like. Reminds me of Fireman Ed. Guy is collecting permanent medical disability after 2o years on the force. Does this look like a guy who can’t work anymore?

    http://tinyurl.com/JJs-second-love-after-vidalia

  86. nwnj3 says:

    #83

    My question is whether the town is paying his salary instead of a partial disability insurance check like the rest of us. It’s a conservative town so if the board of ed is pulling a fast one I don’t think it will go unchallenged.

  87. joyce says:

    So now not only is every country but the US cooking the books with respect to education statistics, every state in the US is as well except for dirty jersey? tough to argue with that

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    October 15, 2015 at 11:05 am
    NJ includes lower income students in their test scores. They force our state’s abbot districts to try and reach a 100% participation rate in the sat’s. So imagine what these scores do to the avg scores. Not happening in Carolina or most states.

  88. 1987 Condo says:

    #90, not sure that picture tells that he can still carry a scott pack or has full range of motion in his shoulders etc to carry out a person in a fire.

  89. Ragnar says:

    88,
    Clearly pumps doesn’t score high in reading comprehension given his non-sequitur answer to my comment.

  90. joyce says:

    hahahahaahahahahaa

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    October 15, 2015 at 1:27 pm

    I’m just the dope doing most of the work that keeps society goin

  91. joyce says:

    Did you even read his fcuking post?

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    October 15, 2015 at 1:31 pm
    If you have the answer for getting 80% of the Camden kids college ready

  92. joyce says:

    Another retarded comment.

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    October 15, 2015 at 1:31 pm
    If you have the answer … That answer will make you one of the richest people in America.

  93. chicagofinance says:

    Luger’s schtick was always all substance and no frills. It used to be located in the middle of hell on the other side of the Williamsburg Bridge……it hasn’t moved, but you can imagine what it is like now with all the idiots strutting about……anyway, the point is that you were getting a better steak (anyway) without the Manhattan address or the trappings……it had the air what is now considered a Biergarten…….but in the classic Tudor style with no tablecloths, and wooden floors and tables……cash only……the waiters were mostly old white guys that were either descendants of SS soldiers or else fresh-off-the boat Irish guys from Woodlawn……..after going to Luger’s, you realized that everything else was just a more expensive and lower quality knock-off……the “Meal” was the steak for 2….Porterhouse…..carved up in front of you…..creamed spinach and potatoes….served with slabs of bacon…..simple and effective….

    grim says:
    October 15, 2015 at 12:52 pm
    I cant imagine a company that sells steak sauce at the A&P can do a decent steak, seems like it’s so commercialized it’s a trap for suckers. Never been.

  94. joyce says:

    Fair point. My problem with disability pay for police & fire is that the standard is out of whack. If they can’t do the exact same job they were doing pre-injury, boom disability pay. If they can do other jobs, doesn’t matter.

    1987 Condo says:
    October 15, 2015 at 1:56 pm
    #90, not sure that picture tells that he can still carry a scott pack or has full range of motion in his shoulders etc to carry out a person in a fire.

  95. joyce says:

    repost with edit

    joyce says:
    October 15, 2015 at 2:04 pm
    Fair point. My problem with disability pay for police & fire is that the standard is out of whack. If they can’t do the exact same job they were doing pre-injury, boom disability pay (FOR LIFE). If they can do other jobs, doesn’t matter.

  96. yome says:

    GOP Congressman says panel meant to hurt Clinton

    “Sometimes the biggest sin you can commit in D.C. is to tell the truth,” said Rep. Richard Hanna. “This may not be politically correct, but I think that there was a big part of [the Benghazi Committee] investigation that was designed to go after people, and an individual, Hillary Clinton.”

  97. chicagofinance says:

    I think the closest thing that resembles it is Smith & Wolensky, but to be clear…..it is a resemblance of style, not at all the quality, price, or substance………as an aside, the Luger steak sauce is superfluous….so I don’t even understand the point of something you would never even use in the restaurant…….it is like going to Modell’s and buying a football with the words MetLife on it…….

  98. 1987 Condo says:

    #99..the whole thing is out of whack….first discussion once on force is planning to get 3/4 disability, or retire at 42, followed by, I could have been a bond trader making $500k like JJ (I added the like JJ, most don’t know JJ by name)!

  99. The Great Pumpkin says:

    How? If you have the answer on how to get 80% of the student population college ready in Camden, you will be rich beyond your wildest dreams.

    joyce says:
    October 15, 2015 at 2:02 pm
    Another retarded comment.

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    October 15, 2015 at 1:31 pm
    If you have the answer … That answer will make you one of the richest people in America.

  100. Fast Eddie says:

    If you have the answer for getting 80% of the Camden kids college ready, then let us know.

    It starts in the home.

    Now, f.uck you, pay me.

  101. The Great Pumpkin says:

    They do prepare these kids to have basic reading and writing skills, but what does that have to do with being college ready? People only care about college ready, not if you can read or write at a basic level.

    Ragnar says:
    October 15, 2015 at 1:57 pm
    88,
    Clearly pumps doesn’t score high in reading comprehension given his non-sequitur answer to my comment.

  102. joyce says:

    You mean the entrenched bureaucracy and special interests will just disappear?
    Go home and play video games and leave the discussion to us adults.

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    October 15, 2015 at 2:18 pm
    How? If you have the answer on how to get 80% of the student population college ready in Camden, you will be rich beyond your wildest dreams.

  103. The Great Pumpkin says:

    No kidding, so what does this have to do with schools or teachers? Yet, they are continuously billed as failing for things out of their control.

    Fast Eddie says:
    October 15, 2015 at 2:20 pm
    If you have the answer for getting 80% of the Camden kids college ready, then let us know.

    It starts in the home.

    Now, f.uck you, pay me.

  104. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Okay, so what’s your answer to helping kids that survive on free school breakfast/lunches as their sole means of nutrition?

    joyce says:
    October 15, 2015 at 2:21 pm
    You mean the entrenched bureaucracy and special interests will just disappear?
    Go home and play video games and leave the discussion to us adults.

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    October 15, 2015 at 2:18 pm
    How? If you have the answer on how to get 80% of the student population college ready in Camden, you will be rich beyond your wildest dreams.

  105. D-FENS says:

    Why do you hate poor people Michael? We want to help them stand on their own two feet and you insist that they remain poor and be dependent on government.

  106. yome says:

    I think the problem with Public Schools in this Country is mixing the good apple with the good ones. It slows down learning and the good ones starts to get bored and lazy. Put the good ones in a section,lets call section 1. This are the good ones that have opportunity to go to College and go down the ranks in section. If there are 12 classrooms on that grade section 12 will most likely not go to College and start them with Vocational skills.

  107. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Give them a damn job they can survive on instead of shipping the jobs to China. They are dependent on the govt because there are no better options for survival. It’s not rocket science.

    D-FENS says:
    October 15, 2015 at 2:26 pm
    Why do you hate poor people Michael? We want to help them stand on their own two feet and you insist that they remain poor and be dependent on government.

  108. Fast Eddie says:

    Okay, so what’s your answer to helping kids that survive on free school breakfast/lunches as their sole means of nutrition?

    Don’t have kids if you’re not ready to give up just about everything for their health and well-being. And I agree, you can’t blame teachers for failure when the classroom is a f.ucking zoo. But at the same time, don’t ask me to go deeper into my pocket when all it’s doing is maintaining a controlled chaos.

  109. Fast Eddie says:

    Give them a damn job they can survive on….

    http://www.snagajob.com/

    You’ve got to be a complete m0ron, an utter retard (or a l1beral) to not be able to land a job.

  110. D-FENS says:

    Right. We agree then. So, why do you advocate for policies that would hurt them? I don’t get it. I can only conclude you hate them and don’t care about them enough to try and understand what policies would lift them out of poverty.

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    October 15, 2015 at 2:30 pm
    Give them a damn job they can survive on instead of shipping the jobs to China. They are dependent on the govt because there are no better options for survival. It’s not rocket science.

  111. D-FENS says:

    @charlescwcooke: Carson should drop out. http://t.co/pFqyZzto51

  112. yome says:

    An unemployed lawyer, with more than 30 years of experience, has found himself on the wrong side of the law. A Pennsylvania attorney, Steven Cormier, was arrested earlier this week for robbing a Wells Fargo bank. According to WNEP, police reports indicate he was found in the getaway car minutes after the robbery with $15,000 in cash.

    http://abovethelaw.com/2015/10/desperate-unemployed-lawyer-arrested-for-bank-robbery/

  113. joyce says:

    I think $2,000 fine and suspended sentence will act as enough of a deterrent for the future. No need to admit wrongdoing either.

    yome says:
    October 15, 2015 at 2:52 pm
    An unemployed lawyer, with more than 30 years of experience, has found himself on the wrong side of the law. A Pennsylvania attorney, Steven Cormier, was arrested earlier this week for robbing a Wells Fargo bank. According to WNEP, police reports indicate he was found in the getaway car minutes after the robbery with $15,000 in cash.

    http://abovethelaw.com/2015/10/desperate-unemployed-lawyer-arrested-for-bank-robbery/

  114. grim says:

    Lawyer realizes that it’s hard work to be a successful criminal? What gall, right? To think he would be qualified to just go out and knock off a bank, just like that, first shot. Typical arrogant lawyer.

  115. jcer says:

    All this SAT talk is funny. I thought I was the worst, in HS one of my teachers pointed out that I had gotten both the highest and lowest scores of anyone in the School on SAT2’s, I got 800 on the math and 400 on writing. It was really funny going to college for engineering and having to provide a writing sample, I wound up in remedial writing tutoring, I was the only US citizen there.

  116. grim says:

    Correlation between blog comments, high math, and shit verbal is clearly high.

  117. grim says:

    Would be surprised if blog comments correlate with vidalia crop yields either..

  118. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Yes, it’s so easy! Just one quick question, if it’s so easy to find a job, why is there no wage inflation? Why is there an unemployment rate?

    Fast Eddie says:
    October 15, 2015 at 2:37 pm
    Give them a damn job they can survive on….

    http://www.snagajob.com/

    You’ve got to be a complete m0ron, an utter retard (or a l1beral) to not be able to land a job.

  119. Libturd in Union says:

    Randolph Duke: That man is a product of a poor environment. There’s nothing wrong with him, I can prove it.

    Mortimer Duke: Of course there’s something wrong with him… he’s a Negro!

  120. The Great Pumpkin says:

    It’s obvious that the private sector isn’t generating enough jobs for the population. If the private sector did, we wouldn’t need welfare or any other govt assistance. Hell, you would be able to eliminate govt jobs, but we all know the private sector does not come anywhere close to providing enough jobs for the population.

    D-FENS says:
    October 15, 2015 at 2:40 pm
    Right. We agree then. So, why do you advocate for policies that would hurt them? I don’t get it. I can only conclude you hate them and don’t care about them enough to try and understand what policies would lift them out of poverty.

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    October 15, 2015 at 2:30 pm
    Give them a damn job they can survive on instead of shipping the jobs to China. They are dependent on the govt because there are no better options for survival. It’s not rocket science.

  121. Libturd in Union says:

    The private sector might be able to create enough jobs for everyone if businesses weren’t so heavily taxed to pay for all of the government workers. Heck. Everytime the economy slows, heroes of yours, like Krugman, propose government job creation over tax breaks for businesses.

  122. grim says:

    126 – Clearly you are not doing your duty as a consumer to create jobs

  123. grim says:

    Who out there is going to create jobs for these two characters?

    http://www.northjersey.com/news/sheriff-wayne-man-crashes-into-paterson-house-trying-to-elude-drug-arrest-1.1433455

    That guy on the right, I can see him doing very well in retail, high fashion maybe. He’s got the right look.

    I hear he is who we got on trade for Marilyn from NC.

  124. Essex says:

    111. Problem is that it’s never that easy. Different talents and skill levels can coexist and even inspire each other to grow. Just has to be the right management by the teacher and the proper subject matter.

    The problem with the schools is perception. They are perceived as places of intense despair and operant boredom and many probably are, but there are bright spots here and there.

    Educating kids is as much an art as a science. Connecting people with knowledge is a heavy trip and very satisfying for those who do it well. But like a great anything(s) there are only going to be so many great teachers. Most will be OK. Some will be average. Etc, etc. It is the nature of the beast. Call it “society”….

  125. grim says:

    yeah, but…

    What do you call a shitty lawyer? Unemployed.

    What do you call a shitty plumber? Unemployed.

    What do you call a shitty programmer? Unemployed.

    What you do call a shitty teacher?

    Teacher…

  126. grim says:

    You’ve convinced me at in order to fix this, the system needs to be based on merit and not seniority.

  127. Essex says:

    131. Not so much . Read up on it.

  128. Essex says:

    Takes a few years to be really good as a teacher. But after say ten years, a drop off might occur.

  129. Marilyn says:

    129. haha!!!

  130. chicagofinance says:

    Attention Target customers (jj Edition) ….see NY Post for video:

    Family-friendly Target became NSFW on Wednesday when p0rn started playing over the intercom at a store in California.

    Gina Young was shopping at a Target in Campbell, California, with her twin boys when the #-rated audio started blaring over loudspeakers.

    “What is going on at Target right now?!” Young exclaims in a video she made of the incident, while sounds of a woman moaning play in the background.

    Some good Samaritans helped Young cover her twins’ ears, but other customers were upset with the naughty noisemaking.

    “Some people threw things down and walked out,” Young said. “Others were yelling at employees. Lots of people taking videos. Crazy!!!”

    “Employees ran all around the store picking up and hanging up the store’s phones,” trying to turn off the intercom, Young said. The tactic worked for a couple of minutes, but then the p0rn started playing again.

    The audio played for around 15 minutes before the moans were finally silenced for good, witnesses said on social media.

  131. joyce says:

    You disagree, and then agree?

    Essex says:
    October 15, 2015 at 4:02 pm
    131 Not so much . Read up on it.

    Essex says:
    October 15, 2015 at 4:03 pm
    Takes a few years to be really good as a teacher. But after say ten years, a drop off might occur.

  132. Alex says:

    131-

    Right on. The unfortunate part is that there are too many of them, and far to few of the really good ones.

  133. Essex says:

    Shut up Joyce

  134. Ben says:

    The grade I’m most proud of is a D in Organic Chemistry at Rutgers. All of the exams were 5 answer multiple choice and the grading curve was so ridiculously shifted that 20% was usually a passing grade and 30% was often a high “C”. I never saw so much time and study effort go into a course that was obviously not being taught very well. I had 5 wallet sized cards (I think they were RU football schedules) and on the back of each I wrote, one letter per card, A,B,C,D, E. I would shuffle the cards before each exam and randomly select a letter and write it down on a tiny rolled up piece of paper, once for each question on the exam. I would then just transcribe my random choices onto my exam answer sheet and be the first one out of the exam and in the pub.

    We were probably in the same class. That being said, I hope you aren’t referring to Dr. Pat O’Connor as the person who poorly taught it. He was easily the most amazing professor I had and I modeled a big part of my teaching methodology from his style. The other guy was Dr. Roth. I took those exams too. But I broke the curve. O’Connor was that good that I knew everything inside out. First 3 exams, I had 100% on each of them. Come the final, Roth was proctoring and 1 hour into it, I’m 75% through the exam. I had to piss bad. Roth said I couldn’t. I filled out the rest of the bubbles because there was no way I didn’t have an A. The curve was steep, but not nearly as steep as you suggested.

  135. ccb223 says:

    Peter Luger’s is tight.

  136. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    [141] I’m referring to 1978 RU OChem Ben. I’m sure you came around a little later.

  137. Ragnar says:

    http://hechingerreport.org/poverty-and-education-reform-and-those-caught-in-the-middle/
    16 percent of Camden’s elementary students pass basic literacy tests.

  138. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    I almost went down this rabbit hole once.

    1. I just kind of fell into a tutoring gig for Physics that was paid by this kid’s M.D. grandfather. I never did it before and after the grandkid’s first “A” on his next exam the granddad doubled by pay to $10/hour (1982)
    2. I got a referral and started tutoring another kid in physics for the same price, and then was lured into taking a Physics exam for him.
    3. As I was a young looking early 20’s guy, the kid who I took the exam for contracted with me to take his younger brother’s SAT. At one point I went over their house and found out that his parents were on board with this activity. That disgusted me. If it was some conniving kid who was trying to set his brother up for a better education opportunity, I could live with that, but that his parents were in on it just drove me past my moral edge, which had already been compromised. I stood the kid’s brother up for the SAT and never got involved in that crap again.

    What? You didn’t pay someone to take your SAT?

  139. Ben says:

    [141] I’m referring to 1978 RU OChem Ben. I’m sure you came around a little later.

    Whoops, muh bad. I read your name as Pumpkin.

  140. I spent one week in kindergarten. My parents were then given the choice of putting me in first grade or removing me from the school.

    They should’ve pulled me out of that school. Eight years of daily fights, verbal altercations with teachers & students and general mayhem ensued. Once I reached puberty and was the same size as my peers, the issues stopped.

    One benefit to that whole sad affair was that I learned how to fight really well.

  141. Grim says:

    50% drop out of high school?

    And people point to the wealthy as the problem behind income inequality?

  142. rags (144)-

    These kids should be drafted into the infantry right now.

    “16 percent of Camden’s elementary students pass basic literacy tests.”

  143. Grim says:

    Oh, sorry, poverty isn’t something that comes from ones own free will, they were clearly forced into it.

  144. The Great Pumpkin says:

    You were a kid once. Imagine living in an environment of no rules or guidance. What do you think will happen to you? Even worse, how about you were born to poor parents that purposefully held you back. You take away public education from these kids and they have absolutely no chance. They already almost have no chance even with access to a public education. What will happen if you take away public education from these kids? You have no idea about this because you were born to an actual “family”. You had a mom and dad that actually taught you something. Most of the people that are poor, are there for one reason. They are there because of a messed up child hood. Now they go and have babies, and the same thing happens again to a new generation. So most people are poor due to situation, not individual effort. I feel terrible for each every one of those poor kids born to the harshness of never ever being taught anything. Never really having parents. That’s how the poor are created.

    Who in their right mind would drop out? Who in their right mind would let their kid drop out? Now you know how deep this problem goes. These are broken people.

    Grim says:
    October 15, 2015 at 7:24 pm
    Oh, sorry, poverty isn’t something that comes from ones own free will, they were clearly forced into it.

  145. Ben says:

    They are there because of a messed up child hood. Now they go and have babies, and the same thing happens again to a new generation. So most people are poor due to situation, not individual effort. I feel terrible for each every one of those poor kids born to the harshness of never ever being taught anything. Never really having parents. That’s how the poor are created.

    Yet, you’ve mentioned often how you are opposed to them ever being able to attend another public school such as Ridgewood and prefer they stay in the system they are confined to. I’ve taught in very rich towns in NJ. Every time some kid has entered the school from a nearby school like Plainfield, they somehow change their demeanor and fall in line with the rest of the kids around them.

  146. Ragnar says:

    Splat, I spent one day in kindergarten, then entered first grade at age 5. Height wasn’t an issue, and I did well in elementary, but I could have used an extra year of maturity in high school as well as some parental guidance.

  147. grim says:

    My daughter was born 2 days after the cutoff, and it’s a hard cut. So she’s starting kindergarten at 6. I thought she would be the oldest kid in the class. Not so, about 1/4 of her pre school class parents are planning on holding their 5 year olds back.

    My birthday was the day before the cutoff, so I started on my 5th birthday. I feel sorry for the kid just turning 5 now, he’ll be a 4 year old in a class of 6 year olds.

  148. Sima says:

    #154 Grim:
    Good choice.
    Kindergarten is no longer “play, games, and creativity” like it used to be. Instead sit quietly and do worksheets for hours. Energetic and active children (typically boys) have it the hardest.

    Good article. http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2015/10/the-joyful-illiterate-kindergartners-of-finland/408325/

  149. Libturd in Union says:

    Grim,

    Tell me you had Theodore Price in the English Department. Worst educator ever!

    http://www.ratemyprofessors.com/ShowRatings.jsp?tid=13849

  150. Essex says:

    147. Never discount that. It has been handy.

  151. Joyce says:

    Once again, something that NO ONE here is advocating for. Last comment to you, you fcuking retard.

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    October 15, 2015 at 8:00 pm

    You take away public education from these kids and they have absolutely no chance.

  152. Marilyn says:

    I love Joyce!

  153. leftwing says:

    blog/sat correlation

    790 math, nearly 200 lighter writing

    chifi you frighten me. made it my personal mission to find out which question i missed. took a couple months.

    also, lugers sauce is not for the steak. it’s for the tomato and onions.

  154. Ragnar says:

    Joyce,
    I do argue against government-run education. But I’m very much in favor of education as a service, operated by people interested in it and under the right incentive structures, namely customer satisfaction.

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