Home prices up 5.1% in August

From the WSJ:

U.S. Home Price Growth Gains Strength in August, Case-Shiller Says

Home prices rose in August, according to a report released Tuesday, suggesting the market has momentum heading into the final months of the year.

The S&P/Case-Shiller Home Price Index increased 4.7% in the 12 months ended in August, slightly better than the 4.6% gain recorded in July.

“The last three, four, five months, we’ve been on this very steady pace. I think that’s a good sign,” said Svenja Gudell, chief economist at home-tracker Zillow.

The S&P/Case-Shiller 20-city index jumped 5.1% year-over-year through August, after July’s 4.9% increase. Economists surveyed by The Wall Street Journal expected a 5.1% increase in the 20-city index.

The S&P/Case-Shiller 10-city index increased 4.7% from a year earlier, compared with a 4.5% increase in July.

Economists caution that home prices, which are rising about twice as quickly as incomes, represent one of the market’s biggest long-term challenges. A lack of new construction has created a supply shortage, magnifying the problem.

“People slowly but surely get priced out of the housing market,” said David Blitzer, managing director and chairman of the Index Committee for S&P Dow Jones Indices.

This entry was posted in Economics, Housing Recovery, National Real Estate. Bookmark the permalink.

115 Responses to Home prices up 5.1% in August

  1. grim says:

    From the Record:

    Home prices rise in region, but at a slower pace than in U.S.

    Home values in the New York metropolitan area continue to climb out of a deep downturn, but at a slower rate than the nation as a whole, the S&P/Case-Shiller home price indexes reported Tuesday.

    Single-family home prices rose 1.8 percent in the region in the 12 months ending in August, compared with 4.7 percent nationwide.

    Even with recent gains, values in the region, which includes North Jersey, were no higher than they were in October 2004, and remain about 16 percent below their 2006 peaks. Nationally, values were at the same level they stood in summer 2005, and are about 11 percent below their peaks in mid-2006.

    Home values in the region have not rebounded as strongly as in the nation as a whole, in part because they didn’t fall as far during the housing crash. In addition, while the worst of the foreclosure crisis has passed nationwide, New Jersey is still dealing with a backlog of distressed properties that built up after state courts raised questions about mortgage industry abuses of homeowners’ rights. New Jersey leads the nation in foreclosure activity, and foreclosed properties tend to sell at depressed prices.

    Economists said housing prices nationwide are likely to track their recent pattern of moderate increases.

    “We expect the housing market to continue to make measured progress amid the backdrop of improving demographics and incomes,” said Kristin Reynolds, an economist with IHS Global Insight.

    Case-Shiller does not measure home prices by county. But according to the New Jersey Realtors, single-family home prices in Bergen County rose 6.6 percent in August compared with a year earlier, to a median $499,000. In Passaic County, prices rose 3.3 percent, to a median $313,000. Those prices reflect the mix of properties sold during the month, while Case-Shiller tracks the value of the same properties over time.

  2. grim says:

    From HousingWire:

    Homeownership rate rises for first time in 2 years

    After dropping to the lowest level in 48 years in the last quarter, the homeownership rate in the United States increased during the third quarter, according to data from the Department of Commerce and the Census Bureau.

    The latest quarterly report on residential vacancies and homeownership showed that the national rate of homeownership rose to 63.7% in the third quarter, climbing from 63.4% in the second quarter, which was a 48-year low.

    The increase during the third quarter was the first time the homeownership rate increased in two years.

    Despite the increase, the third quarter’s homeownership rate was still below the same time period last year, when the homeownership rate was 64.4%.

    The overall increase came mostly from the Northeast region, where the homeownership rate rose from 60.2% in the second quarter to 60.8% in the third quarter.

  3. Fabius Maximus says:

    I don’t agree with the sentencing, but he should have been fined up the Wazoo!

    http://www.nj.com/morris/index.ssf/2015/10/man_admits_carrying_2_guns_through_busy_plaza_in_m.html

  4. grim says:

    Clearly the guy is mentally ill. Two guns, bullet proof vest, hollow point bullets, baton, fake badge, in a building that houses the FBI and DHS?

    Right.

    This wasn’t an oversight, momentary lapse of reason, this was one step away from a mass shooting.

  5. leftwing says:

    3.

    Shows the screwed up thought process here regarding firearms.

    Somehow the scary part that caught the headline was possession of the weapons. If that were all, who cares. The scary part is the bullet proof vest, ammo with him, and fake badge.

    My divorce lawyer was in that building. Someone should check the family court records. Maybe he used them too lol.

  6. leftwing says:

    4. Justice at work. Oblivious of the obvious. This guy will be out in a year more PO’ed than ever after which all the morning show hosts will be wondering aloud ‘how could we have missed this’ and blaming the weapon, not this budding sociopath.

  7. leftwing says:

    For our actual and armchair attorneys, from yesterday.

    On what basis can Palm Beach PD publicly release the traffic stop video (‘no wonder you guys get shot’)?

    Isn’t it evidence collected by the authorities in an infraction? I was not aware such evidence was available to be publicly disseminated outside of Court proceedings. Particularly where a party involved is easily identifiable (her license plate number is clearly visible throughout).

    What gives?

  8. Another day closer to oblivion.

  9. D-FENS says:

    4 – Seems obvious to you and me. Maybe they let him off easy to monitor him and see if he had any help? ….Am I giving them too much credit?

  10. Ottoman says:

    Wrong. Anger, not mental illness, is the cause of most gun shootings. And increasingly we’re seeing it as the response of men to being rejected by women they feel entitled to fvck. No different than those that k!ll for the promise of 72 virgens in heaven. The mentally ill are more likely to kill themselves or be killed by guns than kill someone else.

    Thank goodness America isn’t a mysogynistic country. Gamergate was an abhoration, right? Lulz

    grim says:
    October 28, 2015 at 6:50 am
    Clearly the guy is mentally ill.

  11. leftwing says:

    “Am I giving them too much credit?”

    Likely.

    I’d like to know how the authorities discovered the weapons. Article says they were in a backpack. I’ve spent way too much time in that building. No bag check and more than half the time on one tower you can get to the elevators without even signing in.

    Point being there must have been some type of behavioral issue that subjected him/his bag to search?

  12. anon (the good one) says:

    true. as angry as your average Trump supporter

    Ottoman says:
    October 28, 2015 at 7:53 am
    Wrong. Anger, not mental illness, is the cause of most gun shootings. And increasingly we’re seeing it as the response of men to being rejected by women they feel entitled to fvck. No different than those that k!ll for the promise of 72 virgens in heaven. The mentally ill are more likely to kill themselves or be killed by guns than kill someone else.

    Thank goodness America isn’t a mysogynistic country. Gamergate was an abhoration, right? Lulz

    grim says:
    October 28, 2015 at 6:50 am
    Clearly the guy is mentally ill.

  13. D-FENS says:

    You sound angry. I hope you don’t own firearms.

    Ottoman says:
    October 28, 2015 at 7:53 am
    Wrong. Anger, not mental illness, is the cause of most gun shootings. And increasingly we’re seeing it as the response of men to being rejected by women they feel entitled to fvck. No different than those that k!ll for the promise of 72 virgens in heaven. The mentally ill are more likely to kill themselves or be killed by guns than kill someone else.

    Thank goodness America isn’t a mysogynistic country. Gamergate was an abhoration, right? Lulz

    grim says:
    October 28, 2015 at 6:50 am
    Clearly the guy is mentally ill.

  14. D-FENS says:

    Would you kindly tell secretary Clinton to stop shouting at Bernie Sanders about gun violence? There’s no need to be angry with him about it.

    anon (the good one) says:
    October 28, 2015 at 7:59 am
    true. as angry as your average Trump supporter

  15. D-FENS says:

    Bernie Sanders laughs at the suggestion that he’s a sexist for saying that Hillary Clinton was ‘shouting about gun

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3288950/Bernie-Sanders-laughs-suggestion-s-sexist-saying-Hillary-Clinton-shouting-gun-violence.html

  16. Libtard in Raritan Center at color seminar says:

    Well I see Hilary as mentally ill. Perhaps she’ll off herself? We can be hopeful.

  17. joyce says:

    Is anger the reason behind all of the inner city murders with handguns that account for 90% of gun deaths?

    Ottoman says:
    October 28, 2015 at 7:53 am
    Wrong. Anger, not mental illness, is the cause of most gun shootings. And increasingly we’re seeing it as the response of men to being rejected by women they feel entitled to fvck. No different than those that k!ll for the promise of 72 virgens in heaven. The mentally ill are more likely to kill themselves or be killed by guns than kill someone else.

    Thank goodness America isn’t a mysogynistic country. Gamergate was an abhoration, right? Lulz

  18. joyce says:

    And what the fcuk is gamergate? Had anyone ever heard of that before today?

  19. chicagofinance says:

    Was this a foreshadowing of the Mets loss? :(

    Grim says:
    October 27, 2015 at 9:03 pm
    My colon thanked me.

  20. The Great Pumpkin says:

    I agree with this comment from the article. Get rid of the inheritance tax and estate tax, and offset the taxes by raising the gas tax. Then start to figure out what towns and cities will consolidate their services. They can continue to run it the way they currently are, but there will be a penalty. If you want to maintain the services in your little kingdom, you will pay a certain percentage more that will go towards bringing costs down for every town that has consolidated their services with the towns nearby.

    “I’ll disagree with the author who offers no support of their claims. The inheritance tax impacts people at middle class levels, look at the code. The estate tax has an incredibly low ceiling and negatively impacts the middle class more than the wealthy. Let’s also point out the fact that only 17 states even have either an inheritance or an estate tax. New Jersey is one of two that have both! The other being Maryland.

    You’ll see late life wealth migration by people either leaving or become resident (more than 50% of their days) in another state to avoid this.

    I don’t know if people hate the gas tax, at least not anymore than other taxes. I believe it is a twofold issue:

    1) NJ is the most tax weary state in the country

    2) NJ is the least business friendly state in the country

    3) With all the taxation our bills are still not paid

    Thus adding more to the gas tax is insult to injury when all other taxes, business, property, income, sales, inheritance, estate are so high.

    The second part of the issue is why is NJ so far and away the most expensive state when it comes to cost to maintain the roads? Perhaps the fund would be more liquid if we were closer to Mass. Our costs are 50% higher than the 49th state when it comes to cost. It’s not even being the highest but we aren’t even close to the cost of 49th ranked state. Perhaps if it were 667k / mile (Mass) versus 1mm / mile (NJ) people would feel better about it. I don’t know.

    I don’t understand what goes into all of this but perhaps someone can do an article outlining the reasons why NJ is 50% higher than the second worst state in terms of cost of roads? ”

    http://www.nj.com/opinion/index.ssf/2015/10/on_gas_tax_a_bad_deal_that_will_dig_budget_hole_de.html#incart_river_home

  21. anon (the good one) says:

    @realDonaldTrump:

    No @JebBush, you’re pathetic for saying nothing happened during your brother’s term when the World Trade Center was attacked and came down.

  22. FKA 2010 Buyer says:

    Thought this was pretty funny. The “Strawberry Generation” is Taiwanese counterparty of our Millennials, so named because they “bruise easily” like strawberries.

    Strawberry Generation

    Originating in Taiwan, (Strawberry Generation) was initially a term describing the post-60s generation in Taiwan. It has since mutated to describe the post-80s generation in both Taiwan and mainland China. A list of their typical characteristics from Baidu Baike demonstrates why ‘strawberry’ is the chosen fruit for this group of young people:

    1. Can’t stand pressure
    2. Can’t stand setbacks
    3. Low stability
    4. Highly educated, but low ability to execute
    5. Emphasize appearances, materialism, and pleasure,
    6. Individual benefits before group solidarity
    7. Glamorous and mature on the outside, but immature on the inside
    8. Not good at self-criticism, needs to be sheltered by other people
    9. Not easy to comply
    10. Low practical skills despite their diploma

    The appearance of the Strawberry Generation in mainland China is attributed to the one child policy. In most families, a single child receives mountains of over-attention and cloying amounts of care from their parents, and thus later become vulnerable and soft, like strawberries. As they step into the real world, the poor little darlings can’t hack it, and are quick to go crying to mummy and daddy- poor things. Presumably their parents, who lived during the Cultural Revolution when sh*t got real, are mortified at raising such soft little fruits, who live in a time of plenty.

  23. A Home Buyer says:

    20 – Joyce,

    Yes. It was in MSM for a while.

  24. leftwing says:

    “why is NJ so far and away the most expensive state when it comes to cost to maintain the roads”

    Part of it has to be population density, need to know average miles driven for roads across the sample.

    The other part I’ve noticed…there are major paving projects undertaken in late Sept and Oct. I used to work for our county DPW in upstate NY. No matter what was scheduled no paving equipment left the garages with temps under 60 degrees. Reason was ‘it won’t hold’. Unless there has been major advancements in asphalt technology over the last 30 years (?) the pavement they are putting down on cool Fall days has a much shorter life. Last year a major county road near us had at least two miles paved in 42 degree weather. Guys were waering winter jackets under their vests.

    Not sure why we pave so late (budgetary – use it or lose it?) but it has to be decreasing the life of the road.

  25. Libtard in Raritan Center at color seminar says:

    Anon = mentally ill

  26. phoenix1 says:

    22 Pumps
    The same reason you pay more for home repairs depending on the town you live in. You pay what the market will bear.

    “The second part of the issue is why is NJ so far and away the most expensive state when it comes to cost to maintain the roads?”

  27. Alex says:

    24-

    The Strawberry generation = Millennials = Grim’s Greatest Generation.

  28. phoenix1 says:

    And pumps,
    College is so expensive because they know you can get a govt loan.
    Govt student loans are so expensive and hard to extricate from because students don’t have the leverage to fight.
    NJ gets back pennies on the dollar compared to South Carolina because it is considered a “wealthier” state.
    and #7 Leftwing,
    Great video, was it not. Clear vision of the attitude of the “new” older generation.
    Similar attitude to the guy that ran the motorcyclist off the road in an earlier video.
    These are the people that set the examples for the younger generation. Great role models….

  29. phoenix1 says:

    24 FKA

    These 2 characteristics appear to be plain old ordinary Americans….

    “5. Emphasize appearances, materialism, and pleasure,
    6. Individual benefits before group solidarity”

  30. Comrade Nom Deplume and His Amazing Trick Back says:

    Death by a thousand cuts is one option:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/obamacare-provision-repeal_562f9f2de4b00aa54a4b46ca?ncid=txtlnkusaolp00000592

    I don’t know what the CBO scoring of this will be but it will have an effect on the cost of Obamacare that is more than statistically insignificant.

  31. Comrade Nom Deplume and His Amazing Trick Back says:

    [7] left,

    First, there is no right to privacy in that situation, at least not for the video. Audio? Perhaps, but read on.

    Second, as evidence it isn’t protected. In fact, it must be disclosed to the defendant if it is part of the case in chief or is exculpatory. And if it comes out in court, that is public and there is no protection whatsoever.

  32. Comrade Nom Deplume and His Amazing Trick Back says:

    [31] phoenix,

    “6. Individual benefits before group solidarity”

    If you think this is unique to americans, you live under a rock. I personally find it interesting, and not at all paradoxical, that there is much more civic involvement and group solidarity in this country, with its emphasis on individual liberty, than in other nations. Admittedly, there are many “groups” but Toqueville’s observations are as relevant today as when they were written.

    I think it is because nature abhors a vacuum, and in the US, with a relative vacuum of governance in many spheres of our society, group effort takes over. But, as you doubtless would agree, as government seeks to fill into previously unregulated aspects of civic life, or supplants groups, associations, etc., you see less engagement and identification. One example is charity: If my taxes go to support the underprivileged, I don’t feel compelled to give at the office. In fact, I respond to those who would consider me cruel by pointing out I contributed far more to “the cause” than they did; it just wasn’t my choice to do so.

  33. phoenix1 says:

    34. Funny how the same group of people complain that the youth has no respect for the law…. I found this officer to be polite, well mannered and professional. I would love to know how well she does on her test…..

    repost of the link..
    https://youtu.be/Vd4QACSuBKU

  34. phoenix1 says:

    34. I do not believe it is unique to Americans, nor do I think it is unique to any particular generation.

  35. phoenix1 says:

    CND
    True. Problem is what percentage of your taxes go to waste, inefficiency, theft, apathy, or ignorance. You can throw seed in your lawn with little effect or you can prepare the seed bed before planting. Big difference in the outcome….

    ” One example is charity: If my taxes go to support the underprivileged, I don’t feel compelled to give at the office. In fact, I respond to those who would consider me cruel by pointing out I contributed far more to “the cause” than they did; it just wasn’t my choice to do so.”

  36. The Great Pumpkin says:

    28,30- Phoenix, you are dead on. It’s always what the market will bear, never based on true value. That’s why the free market is a joke. Supply/demand fundamentals doesn’t account for market manipulation…..and there will always be somebody trying to manipulate a system to give themselves an advantage.

  37. leftwing says:

    Nom, guess that’s why I’m asking. Agree no right to privacy so video can be taken. If the case that it only becomes public if it comes out in Court, back to my question. How does the Palm Beach PD release it now?

    On O’Care ruling, interesting. In my business, individual mandate v. company coverage is breakeven at family of three. Not cost effective to go three on company plan. For Silver+ coverage individual mandate is about 700 per adult and 200 per kid. For company it is 550 a head. All without regard to deductibility and taxes.

  38. leftwing says:

    Also now looking at the repost of the youtube video (which is shown as being posted by PBCountySheriff) the officer’s face is now obscured but not the tags.

  39. leftwing says:

    “It’s always what the market will bear, never based on true value”

    Dear L0rd. The ‘true value’ of something is what a free buyer and free seller willingly negotiate, ie what the market will bear.

    Oh, I get it. You’re using the Left’s playbook where only YOU know the inherent value of things and everyone else is wrong (and subject to you legislating YOUR view on them).

  40. D-FENS says:

    New report out this morning from the World Health Organization. Life gives you cancer.

  41. D-FENS says:

    Also, the FDA warns that we will all die someday.

  42. phoenix1 says:

    redux

    It’s called capitalism. Those who produce more get more. I guess we could tax Trumps room and give some welfare to Christie…

    https://twitter.com/LaCivitaC/status/659099234008891392/photo/1

  43. phoenix1 says:

    For Joyce…

    Officer to be fired in South Carolina classroom altercation: MSNBC

    http://news.yahoo.com/c-sheriff-reveal-findings-probe-black-students-arrest-131457130.html

  44. leftwing says:

    phoenix

    I get your point, lol, but not sure this is jail time worthy.

    Looks like the company tried using temp workers and the govt declared them employees.

    What will likely happen, given the company already has plants in Canada and Mexico, and that some production will likely move offshore where regulatory grey areas are not so arcane.

    Too bad, as that will cause less work for those employees.

  45. phoenix1 says:

    LW,
    How much, in U.S. dollars, theft do you believe should be a cutoff for jail time?
    How many people do you believe have to be affected to be a cutoff for jail time?
    It’s called white collar crime for a reason.
    The fine they received was 20k. Willful, Repeat….
    Yeah, that’s a deterrent.
    ” The labor department also leveled a $20,000 civil penalty for the “willful, repeat nature of the violations”

    White collar criminals don’t have to fear what Escobar did…

    He feared a system in which prison guards and judges could not be easily bribed. One of his mottoes was “Better a grave in Colombia than a cell in the U.S.”

  46. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Not true, I’m talking about the manipulated markets. You are right though, no such thing as manipulation. What’s your opinion of the healthcare system?

    leftwing says:
    October 28, 2015 at 11:41 am
    “It’s always what the market will bear, never based on true value”

    Dear L0rd. The ‘true value’ of something is what a free buyer and free seller willingly negotiate, ie what the market will bear.

    Oh, I get it. You’re using the Left’s playbook where only YOU know the inherent value of things and everyone else is wrong (and subject to you legislating YOUR view on them).

  47. phoenix1 says:

    Bush driving another nail in his coffin-sounds similar to the RomneyVoucherPlan. Hmm, what will the cutoff be-who gets to keep the old system and who gets the voucher?
    “He would gradually increase” –yup, phase in, grandfather, etc…..
    Reminds me of a George Carlin rant about “customer service” — the customer needs service……

    http://news.yahoo.com/jeb-bush-plan-privatize-medicare-cut-social-security-150534463–business.html

  48. phoenix1 says:

    I wonder how many illegals would come here to work if their employers were sent to prison for giving them employment…..

  49. The Great Pumpkin says:

    52- Yes, with no manipulation, supply and demand is a beautiful thing.

  50. leftwing says:

    Punkin, what color is the sky in your world?

    “Not true, I’m talking about the manipulated markets. You are right though, no such thing as manipulation.”

    Seems IIRC I am the one railing *against* manipulation and for *free* markets.

    So you agree an unmanipulated market – ie free market – is the way to go?

  51. D-FENS says:

    Also for Joyce.

    Shocking Moment Teen Threw School Principal To The Ground After He Tried To Break Up Fight

    http://breaking911.com/shocking-moment-teen-threw-school-principal-to-the-ground-after-he-tried-to-break-up-fight/

    phoenix1 says:
    October 28, 2015 at 12:18 pm
    For Joyce…

    Officer to be fired in South Carolina classroom altercation: MSNBC

    http://news.yahoo.com/c-sheriff-reveal-findings-probe-black-students-arrest-131457130.html

  52. daddyo says:

    On the topic of NJ Real Estate – any recommendations for a contractor in union county area to do a small bathroom remodel? The quotes we have are all over the place…it’s absurd.

  53. leftwing says:

    51. Phoenix

    I don’t know what the cutoffs for penalties should be. But they (and the ‘crime’) should be clearly defined and universally enforced.

    The fine was not all they paid. In addition to back wages they also paid ‘liquidated damages’ to the employees, ie basically a penalty that goes straight to workers.

    The amount in dispute for a company this size is not large. It is analogous to you taking a mortgage interest deduction on your 1099 to which you are not entitled. In addition, it sounds as if there were at least some ‘good faith’ on the part of the company. Continuing the analogy, assuming your inadvertent mortgage deduction did not represent intentional fraud, you would likely face the same type of penalty from the IRS if caught. No jail time.

    Now, if this company circumvented $20m of payroll and it was all internal, no good faith they should get slammed and maybe jailed. Similar if you were to intentionally take the dependent deduction for 12 kids while having none.

    Both the company penalty and hypothetical, analogous one sound right with the penalty fitting the crime.

  54. chicagofinance says:

    Trends in Athletics (jj Edition):

    Before Veronica R. went under the knife for a lab!aplasty procedure, the 28-year-old Manhattanite joked around with plastic surgeon Dr. Richard Swift about the anticipated results.

    “Make me look like Barbie!” she told him, with a laugh.

    The striking model, who asked for her last name not to be used for professional reasons, underwent the surgery in September, because she was self-conscious about the size of the lab!a minora (inner lips) of her vag!na.

    She is among a growing number of women signing up for lab!aplasty to reduce the size and “enhance the appearance” of their pr!vate parts, especially when they’re wearing tight-fitting clothes such as workout gear.

    According to the American Society for Aesthetic Surgery (ASAPS,) there has been a significant increase in the number of these tissue removal and restructuring procedures — an astonishing 48 percent rise in 2014 from 2013.

    “More women are pursuing lab!aplasty to correct lab!a-related issues that are interfering with their ability to perform s3xually, to perform daily tasks such as exercise, or are merely causing discomfort,” says Dr. Michael Edwards of ASAPS.

    On New York’s Upper East Side, Swift reports that a large number of his clients are motivated by wanting to look sleeker in so-called “athleisure wear,” made from Lycra-like fabrics which often compress the area.

    They are keen to avoid so-called “cam3l toe” or internal “twisting” when they’re working out at top exercise venues such as SoulCycle, Barry’s Bootcamp and the Fhitting Room.

    “The ubiquitous yoga pants that everyone is wearing are playing a big part in this trend,” says Swift, who performs between three and five lab!aplasties per week at the cost of between $5,500 to $7,500 each.

    “For those whose lab!a are enlarged, they can make them feel uncomfortable and exposed,” adds Swift. “One of my patients was particularly self-conscious doing Pilates in a leotard — so much so that she was afraid to do certain moves.”

    Another factor is women’s growing desire to groom the more intimate areas of their body.

    “If they are getting a Brazilian wax or laser hair removal, they can feel self-conscious about the look or size of their [lab!as],”says Swift.

    As for Veronica, she now feels more relaxed when she wears tight workout gear. “I often used to get caught up inside myself and it hurt,” she explains. “But I never like wearing exercise outfits [that] are too loose.”

    She says her boyfriend approves of her new look, which was achieved during an hour-long operation under local anesthetic and required around three days of convalescence.

    “I did this for myself, not anyone else,” insists Veronica, who hit the gym again around three weeks after the procedure. “I’m about the happiest you can be.”

    Meanwhile, 40-year-old Maria T., another of Swift’s lab!aplasty patients, who also asked for anonymity, claims that self-consciousness about her pelvic region used to impact what she wore — especially for exercise.

    Now, eight years since she had the op, she’s happy to wear trendy Lululemon pants to her yoga class.

    “I am very happy with the result,” says the Manhattan-dwelling mother of two. “When it comes to that part of my body, it’s a definite case of ‘less is more.’ ”

  55. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Lefty, I’m all for a free market system based in capitalism. My problem is the human nature factor. I know in theory, the system works, but when humans start trying to take advantage of the system, you run into problems. This is my basis for regulation, too bad humans have corrupted the regulation process too. What’s the answer? How do we prevent humans from taking advantage when they should just play by the rules of the system?

    leftwing says:
    October 28, 2015 at 12:57 pm
    Punkin, what color is the sky in your world?

    “Not true, I’m talking about the manipulated markets. You are right though, no such thing as manipulation.”

    Seems IIRC I am the one railing *against* manipulation and for *free* markets.

    So you agree an unmanipulated market – ie free market – is the way to go?

  56. phoenix1 says:

    59. LW
    Mistakes, yeah, I get that. Make a mistake, pay a penalty, move on… but this??
    Willful. I interpret that to be intentional.
    Repeat. I interpret that to mean non remorseful.
    Jail time would be the correct penalty for willful, repeat bad conduct……

  57. leftwing says:

    60 chi, post of the week.

  58. joyce says:

    Thank goodness the first responder principal was there to actually do something, unlike porky the pig.

    D-FENS says:
    October 28, 2015 at 12:57 pm
    Also for Joyce.

    Shocking Moment Teen Threw School Principal To The Ground After He Tried To Break Up Fight

    http://breaking911.com/shocking-moment-teen-threw-school-principal-to-the-ground-after-he-tried-to-break-up-fight/

    phoenix1 says:

  59. leftwing says:

    62. phoenix

    Depends over what amount, relatively. I know first person someone who has mid-five figure tax liens (US) and tax judgments (NJ) against him for two tax years. Looks like he has done it again, likely multiple years. This amount represents 20-25% of his *gross* and likely nearly his entire tax liability.

    Should he go to jail? Moreso or less so than the company execs?

    I know of someone who defrauded 44 car owners out of their vehicles. Essentially took them in for service or a TBD trade-in, re-registered and sold them instead, keeping the proceeds. Minority community. Devastated a number of people living paycheck to paycheck. Had some insurance fraud mixed in there. 44 counts of financial fraud. A NJ Supreme Court sentenced him to restitution and five years probation.

    Should he go to jail? Moreso or less so than the company execs?

    I understand when one starts with a certain predisposition one tends to find evidence of that predisposition. You think corporates get treated differently, ergo you see that different treatment.

    Truth is there are bad people everywhere, whether preceded by a “Mr” or followed by an “Inc”. It’s all about context.

  60. Libtard in Raritan Center at color seminar says:

    I’m not sure if I am grossed out or turned on by Chi’s post.

  61. nwnj says:

    #49

    It certainly looks like a justifiable level of force of you are arresting someone. Whether the same threshold applies in the school is a different story. I’m sure the fired cop will consult with an attorney and nothing would surprise me.

    The lesson that I take from the incident is a) cooperate with the police but say nothing, b) send your kids to a school where the student body’s goal is learning

  62. joyce says:

    I hope you’re not implying that there isn’t mountains of evidence clearly displaying privileged and connected people are treated differently under the law when it comes to legislation and enforcement.

    leftwing says:
    October 28, 2015 at 1:25 pm
    62. phoenix

    You think corporates get treated differently

  63. Juice Box says:

    How are you supposed to remove a disruptive kid from a classroom if they won’t comply with a lawful order?

  64. leftwing says:

    68.

    Joyce, provided we are discussing both corporates and individuals I agree. There will always be corporates and individuals who are ‘connected’ getting treated differently. Everywhere, all the time, and it won’t change. From who gets to play shortstop in Little League to which tax break makes it into a bill.

    My point is slightly different. The ‘Occupy’ mindset that wants to lynch every corporate without understanding that on a relative basis individuals are getting away with the same thing. Lock everyone up if we want, but make sure it is everyone.

    That car guy took nearly the same amount from his community as the manufacturer didn’t pay in wages. On a relative basis much more. Restitution and probation.

    I don’t believe that should be the standard but if it is it should be equally applied.

  65. 1987 Condo says:

    #69…procedure is, if child will not leave room, instruct all remaining students and teacher to leave the room then shut door. Then SRO encourages student up and out.

  66. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Supposedly, police are compensated well because it’s a dangerous job. How is teaching in an urban environment any different than a police officer’s job except you have no weapon to protect yourself. Teaching is a tough job, they deal with the same dangerous individuals as cops, yet they are also accountable for teaching these thugs, but they do it at half the going rate of police officers in this state. Sure that makes sense, just like our pricing under a so called market based on supply and demand.

    joyce says:
    October 28, 2015 at 1:22 pm
    Thank goodness the first responder principal was there to actually do something, unlike porky the pig.

    D-FENS says:
    October 28, 2015 at 12:57 pm
    Also for Joyce.

    Shocking Moment Teen Threw School Principal To The Ground After He Tried To Break Up Fight

    http://breaking911.com/shocking-moment-teen-threw-school-principal-to-the-ground-after-he-tried-to-break-up-fight/

  67. joyce says:

    How did the nuns do it? And they’re orders came from god

    Juice Box says:
    October 28, 2015 at 1:46 pm
    How are you supposed to remove a disruptive kid from a classroom if they won’t comply with a lawful order?

  68. Essex says:

    69.Curtis Lavarello, one of more than 46,000 people employed full time as school resource officers, has seen this kind of scenario “played out hundreds of times, … and it’s one that can be handled so simply.” But he can’t explain why this one was handled as it was.

    “We saw a pretty routine discipline issue become a criminal issue in just a matter of minutes,” said Lavarello, head of the School Safety Advocacy Council. “… It escalated needlessly.”

  69. 1987 Condo says:

    #73..nuns had approval from parents. Just like when I was growing up, if a teacher said I did something, I did it ..if a parent on the block said I did something, I was punished. Now people would assume their kid is right and sue. (Note..I understand we had 20-30 years of learning that “trusted” adults could not be trusted…so the change is in a way understandable)

  70. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Yes, as simple as that.

    1987 Condo says:
    October 28, 2015 at 1:58 pm
    #73..nuns had approval from parents. Just like when I was growing up, if a teacher said I did something, I did it ..if a parent on the block said I did something, I was punished. Now people would assume their kid is right and sue. (Note..I understand we had 20-30 years of learning that “trusted” adults could not be trusted…so the change is in a way understandable)

  71. leftwing says:

    And definitive evidence of dingleberry adults whose opinion ring in at less than a 10 year old’s……

  72. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Is this guy serious? Curtis, how many scenario’s that aren’t caught on tape are even reported? Now that’s the question?

    Essex says:
    October 28, 2015 at 1:58 pm
    69.Curtis Lavarello, one of more than 46,000 people employed full time as school resource officers, has seen this kind of scenario “played out hundreds of times, … and it’s one that can be handled so simply.” But he can’t explain why this one was handled as it was.

    “We saw a pretty routine discipline issue become a criminal issue in just a matter of minutes,” said Lavarello, head of the School Safety Advocacy Council. “… It escalated needlessly.”

  73. Juice Box says:

    re # 73 – Quotes from the MSM media.

    “Fields in the videos shared on social media stands in front of the student, and orders her to stand up or be forcibly removed. She refuses to leave.”

    That sounds like a lawful order to me.

    “In the third video viewed by police, Lott said, it shows the girl hitting the officer in the head once he puts his hands on her: “There’s no question about that.”

    So the smoking gun 3rd video shows a lawful order then an assault on the police officer, who is to say hitting the officer in the face did not cause him to react with more force?

  74. Juice Box says:

    Another little tibit quote from the MSM.

    “Reaction over the video has been swift, and members of the group the Richland Two Black Parents Association called the officers’ actions “unacceptable”.

    What about the kid who refused to comply, with the teacher the vice principal and the police office? Where is there “unacceptable” quote?

  75. joyce says:

    70
    LW
    I don’t think your analogies are on point. If someone robs another with a weapon, they are punished with jail time. If someone robs another or several others via “white collar crime”, apparently jail time is off the table for the most part. Or maybe we should compare a hypothetical 100mm people cheating a little on their income taxes to the trillion dollar libor scandal?

    Restitution to the harmed individual needs to be a major component in the justice system… but so does the deterrent aspect. History and common sense tells us that immaterial fines are not sufficient.

  76. Juice Box says:

    re # 76 – “fear” the nuns instilled was an art form, I don’t remember if they ever had to cuff and stuff someone.

  77. joyce says:

    Who’s to say Ray Rice’s girlfriend getting in his face didn’t cause him to swing his fist a little harder?

    Juice Box says:
    October 28, 2015 at 2:15 pm
    re # 73 – Quotes from the MSM media.

    “Fields in the videos shared on social media stands in front of the student, and orders her to stand up or be forcibly removed. She refuses to leave.”

    That sounds like a lawful order to me.

    “In the third video viewed by police, Lott said, it shows the girl hitting the officer in the head once he puts his hands on her: “There’s no question about that.”

    So the smoking gun 3rd video shows a lawful order then an assault on the police officer, who is to say hitting the officer in the face did not cause him to react with more force?

  78. D-FENS says:

    Watch the video again. School police officer was there too.

    I have to ask…what’s with the cop hatred?

    joyce says:
    October 28, 2015 at 1:22 pm
    Thank goodness the first responder principal was there to actually do something, unlike porky the pig.

  79. Libtard in Raritan Center at color seminar says:

    Taze that beyatch next time!

  80. joyce says:

    While I agree with your implication that this group couldn’t care less what the student did, it doesn’t mean their criticism of the officer is incorrect.

    Why can’t someone criticize something without it automatically being perceived as defending something else? I should be able to critique a cop or judge without being seen as defending entirely someone’s actions? Criticism of the Republicans does not equal support of the democrats. We shouldn’t have to always include disclaimers in our comments.

    Juice Box says:
    October 28, 2015 at 2:16 pm
    Another little tibit quote from the MSM.

    “Reaction over the video has been swift, and members of the group the Richland Two Black Parents Association called the officers’ actions “unacceptable”.

    What about the kid who refused to comply, with the teacher the vice principal and the police office? Where is there “unacceptable” quote?

  81. joyce says:

    Did you see the copper jump into the middle of the fight to help break it up or did you see him slowly walk over when he thought the principal had him subdued? I saw the latter.

    D-FENS says:
    October 28, 2015 at 2:23 pm
    Watch the video again. School police officer was there too.

  82. D-FENS says:

    See whatever you want to see.

  83. NJT says:

    Pumps;

    No ‘system’ will ever work as designed or intended and not because of humans. ‘Cluster B’ entities (Malignant narcissists all the way up to sociopaths) ALWAYS seek to find a ‘weakness’ and exploit it for personal gain/pleasure. It’s their nature. Anywhere from 2-15% percent (some say more) of the human population contains these creatures.

    No remorse, no empathy, no regrets, no emotions… NO CONSCIENCE. They WILL get what they want (money, power, s-x) by any means they can use or die trying (they never give up unless…).

    *Some cultures and societies have moral and ethical standards that discount their (the Cluster Bs) activities but they are still there, lurking in the background waiting for ANY opportunity.

    As an example I present Hillary Clinton (could also name some former ‘coworkers’ and bosses).

    Think of them as a hurricane/force of nature or, better yet, a wild animal (predator). Can’t get mad a lion or tiger for doing what they do, right? Yeah, humans should be different but…some of us are not.

    Avoid these things, surround yourself with friends and live life well. You have no control over politics unless you want to be a politician but then…(yeah, there have been exceptions, as always but it was usually dumb luck – a large part of life).

    – Down off the soapbox.

  84. Essex says:

    PHILADELPHIA — Film director Quentin Tarantino’s critical remarks about police officers has earned him a boycott by the 14,000 members of the Philadelphia Fraternal Order of Police (FOP).

    In a Wednesday announcement from the order’s Lodge 5, FOP President John McNesby said Tarantino has revealed himself as anti-police.

    “Mr. Tarantino has made a good living through his films, projecting into society at large violence and respect for criminals; he it turns out also hates cops,” McNesby stated.

  85. Not NJTss says:

    I just wanted to completed….

    No remorse, no empathy, no regrets, no emotions… NO CONSCIENCE. They WILL get what they want (money, power, s-x) by any means they can use or die trying (they never give up unless…… a large amount of low level and constant frustration thwarts their intended action and increase their energy spenditures beyond what their internal budgeted energy expected (strictly business here) or a large prey reveals itself to be protector of the intended “victim” ).

  86. Juice Box says:

    Revenge is a common theme in Tarantino’s films…….

  87. leftwing says:

    “I’m not sure if I am grossed out or turned on by Chi’s post”

    They are like abstract art to me. Appreciate each one for what it is and what it can be.

    I get the physical discomfiting issue – I dated a woman where the damn thing should have come with a suitcase handle attached. Absent that situation though I don’t think women appreciate some things they consider gross can actually be a turn on.

  88. leftwing says:

    “If someone robs another or several others via “white collar crime”, apparently jail time is off the table for the most part….Restitution to the harmed individual needs to be a major component in the justice system… but so does the deterrent aspect”

    Again, I don’t disagree. But if you are going to toss larger company execs in jail over $1m or so of underpaid wages across however many workers then you have to toss the guy in jail that defrauds the IRS out of most of his tax liability multiple years. Or the guy that defrauds consumers out of 44 cars.

    Prosecute white collar crime as diligently as you want. Put them away for life, I don’t care. Just make it equitable.

  89. A Home Buyer says:

    D-FENS,

    Can you post a link to a video showing the Spring Hill Student hit the Officer? I keep hearing this “Third Video” shows where the student hit the cop before the take-down, and every one I watch I cannot see the student swing at the Officer.

    I am assuming I must be seeing the wrong videos, but if not, I probably have to side with the student here.

  90. Essex says:

    Dunzo….

    The white sheriff’s deputy caught on video flipping a black high school student out of her classroom chair in Columbia, South Carolina, has been fired, a sheriff said on Wednesday.

    Deputy Ben Fields violated agency policy when he picked up the teenage girl and threw her across a classroom as he attempted to make an arrest, Richland County Sheriff Leon Lott told a news conference.

    “That is not a proper technique and should not be used by law enforcement,” Lott said.

    Videos filmed by students showed Fields, 34, slam a 16-year-old girl to the ground and drag her across a classroom at Spring Valley High School on Monday after she apparently refused to hand her mobile phone to a teacher or leave the room.

  91. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Good write up. You are right, I generalize and apply this mindset of having to get over on the system to all humans, when in reality, it’s a small minority that ruin it for everyone else. It’s like when you were in grade school and that one kid would always ruin it for everyone else, this is exactly what happens in society. Just like you can’t run around the playground anymore because this kid ruined it for everyone else, adult society does the same thing. Laws and policies have to made because of these jokers that can’t play by the rules and ruin it for everyone else. Ever think of why think come out with stupid laws? Some idiot performed the task at hand that caused the stupid law to come about.

    NJT says:
    October 28, 2015 at 2:37 pm
    Pumps;

    No ‘system’ will ever work as designed or intended and not because of humans. ‘Cluster B’ entities (Malignant narcissists all the way up to sociopaths) ALWAYS seek to find a ‘weakness’ and exploit it for personal gain/pleasure. It’s their nature. Anywhere from 2-15% percent (some say more) of the human population contains these creatures.

    No remorse, no empathy, no regrets, no emotions… NO CONSCIENCE. They WILL get what they want (money, power, s-x) by any means they can use or die trying (they never give up unless…).

    *Some cultures and societies have moral and ethical standards that discount their (the Cluster Bs) activities but they are still there, lurking in the background waiting for ANY opportunity.

    As an example I present Hillary Clinton (could also name some former ‘coworkers’ and bosses).

    Think of them as a hurricane/force of nature or, better yet, a wild animal (predator). Can’t get mad a lion or tiger for doing what they do, right? Yeah, humans should be different but…some of us are not.

    Avoid these things, surround yourself with friends and live life well. You have no control over politics unless you want to be a politician but then…(yeah, there have been exceptions, as always but it was usually dumb luck – a large part of life).

    – Down off the soapbox.

  92. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Think of the message being sent to this kid. What a disaster.

    Essex says:
    October 28, 2015 at 3:53 pm
    Dunzo….

    The white sheriff’s deputy caught on video flipping a black high school student out of her classroom chair in Columbia, South Carolina, has been fired, a sheriff said on Wednesday.

    Deputy Ben Fields violated agency policy when he picked up the teenage girl and threw her across a classroom as he attempted to make an arrest, Richland County Sheriff Leon Lott told a news conference.

    “That is not a proper technique and should not be used by law enforcement,” Lott said.

    Videos filmed by students showed Fields, 34, slam a 16-year-old girl to the ground and drag her across a classroom at Spring Valley High School on Monday after she apparently refused to hand her mobile phone to a teacher or leave the room.

  93. The Great Pumpkin says:

    I’m sure she will do this again and know damn well that there is nothing anyone can do about it. You have to be insane to sign up to teach someone like this.

  94. joyce says:

    What did you see?

    D-FENS says:
    October 28, 2015 at 2:32 pm
    See whatever you want to see.

  95. Comrade Nom Deplume, living well off the carrion of the left says:

    Going forward, I foresee that stops involving minorities will resemble bank hostage standoffs. Police will have “flying teams” that will respond only to support calls. They will have nonlethal weapons and cams.

    So in the school situation, the resource officer would call in support, evacuate the room, and wait for the cavalry. Then the cavalry would perform a force superior arrest, all caught on camera.

    Naturally, the vast majority of such stops and arrests will target minorities. The standard however will be any objective pushback from a detainee. So just give a little attitude and you will be detained 20 minutes for the squad to arrive. Lots of constitutional issues to be resolved but I predict this will become the norm.

    The other norm will be a hands off approach. Police will lay off minorities. Predictably, minorities will behave more lawlessly. That will result in an increase in citizen self defense. In some places, it will resemble the scene from Blazing Saddles where all the white folks get out their guns when a black guy shows up.

    Not saying it will be widespread but I’ve observed it in the past so I know it happens. It will simply become the default.

  96. joyce says:

    Agreed. I guess we won’t agree on how equitable or inequitable it is at the moment, but I agree with this statement.

    leftwing says:
    October 28, 2015 at 3:37 pm

    Prosecute white collar crime as diligently as you want. Put them away for life, I don’t care. Just make it equitable.

  97. Comrade Nom Deplume, living well off the carrion of the left says:

    BTW, as part of any settlement, the parents will be told to send her to private school. Here in PA, they’d try to get her sent to the Intermediate Unit.

  98. NJT says:

    #91.

    Yes. However, I prefer NOT to fight the ‘tar babies’ (that’s what my taxes pay the police to do – yes, I use them, especially as a landlord).

    *Not even light can escape a black hole. Avoid them.

  99. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    #blacklivesmatterunlessyouareablackguywithagunlookingtokillanotherblackguy

    Is anger the reason behind all of the inner city murders with handguns that account for 90% of gun deaths?

  100. Yeah, man. Just buzz that bitch with a taser.

  101. Ben says:

    anyone who thinks that the officer was justified in his roid rage is blind. I’ve watched bouncers remove 250 lb belligerent men from a bar with more finesse.

  102. Juice Box says:

    Watch the high def version of the arrest, slow it down, the girl pushed off the ground and hit the officer, like it or not the cop was called in by the vice principal to arrest her, it was an arrest she broke a law in South Carolina. Could it have been handled differently by the school administration? Sure don’t call the cops.

    https://instagram.com/p/9USCrLCnDz/

  103. Pete says:

    The cop is a thug. I can’t believe anyone is trying to justify this as a legitamit way to handle a unarmed teenage girl sitting in a desk.

  104. Juice Box says:

    Police officers are trained to use pain compliance, he asked her to comply and explained what would happen if she did not, the next move is pain compliance and arrest. don’t let the media fool ya, there was also a boy and another girl arrested, the boy well he is still in jail, girl is yapping in the press and this cop won’t be charged with any crime…

    My point is the teacher and the vice principal should not have called in the cops to deal with their problem, and now well there will just be more violence in schools, the police assigned to babysit schools will no longer do anything, feet up on the desk and punch the clock waiting for their pensions.

  105. Joyce says:

    Yup, they are just following orders.

    We need to pay them a ton so they never question anything they’re told to do. Plus, we’re not exactly dealing with the cream of the crop either:
    http://abcnews.go.com/US/court-oks-barring-high-iqs-cops/story?id=95836

  106. Comrade Nom Deplume, living well off the carrion of the left says:

    Based on all I’ve seen and read, I’m guessing this girl has a mood disorder, most likely ODD. The behavior before and during is classic ODD response.

  107. Fabius Maximus says:

    3 redux

    Interesting that the 2nd amendment folks in here are surprisingly quiet on this one?

    I am very pro gun control, but for me, this guy should not be in this situation. One of my tenets in life is “Yes, you do have to legislate for stupid!” Lets leave aside the ammo, that is a discussion on its own. He admits that he does not know the laws that apply to him, so he is not a responsible gun owner and for me he shouldn’t have had the guns in the first place.

    It is the sentencing here that I have the biggest issue with. Justicia wears a blindfold for a reason. If the guy is out of state, this goes to PTI and we’re done. Slap on the wrist, some big fines and he’s home for the first pitch. But he is a resident, there is no flexibility in the sentencing rules. The judge is giving him 5, the prosecutor gives the judge an out, to drop to 3 with 1 minimum. If this guy was a genuine threat, that doesn’t happen.

    So what are we left with, a lot of circumstances that can be explained. Why was he there? He dropped someone off and was waiting. While the jacket and badge is strange, it is no more than I’ve seen on my local Mall cops, especially now in BC after the last incident at Garden State Mall. I’m sure someone went to the range to ask if he is a regular and if he normally shows up in a vest. If this is normal for him, its not illegal.

    For those that know the location, if you look at the contents of the bag, it doesn’t make a Rubik’s Cube, let alone a Matrix, if you know what I mean. If this guy was in anyway a threat, this story would be completely different. Although the psych report was sealed, there is a good chance it was clean. If not the judge does not reduce. The Judiciary need the ability to inject some common sense into these cases.

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    I seen a template on http://www.nuttythemes.com which could look alot better on your site. At the moment this theme doesn’t make your blog look that great in my opinion. Please correct me if I’m wrong.. what do you think?

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