Where’s the money? Here.

From MarketWatch:

Where’s the money in America? This 3D map will show you

The hardest working states and regions in America? Sorry flyover states, better luck next time. The kings of production remain in the most obvious spots: California, Texas and New York.

The Bureau of Economic Analysis and the U.S. Department of Commerce recently pushed out some statistics on gross domestic product in 2014 for the U.S. based on metropolitan areas. The folks at HowMuch.net took that data and turned it into a map that demonstrates just where the growth in the U.S. is coming from. As shown below, the higher the cone rising from the map, the bigger the GDP in that region.

“In analyzing the data, we found that the top 20 metropolitan areas represent over 52% of the total GDP in the U.S.,” said Raul Amoros, director of content development at HowMuch.net.

Spiking right out of the map, was the New York region, which includes Newark and Jersey City., with a whopping contribution of $1.56 trillion in GDP and growth of 2.4% in 2014. That region provided nearly 10% of the total GDP for the whole of the U.S.

Just behind it, the Greater Los Angeles area was second with $866 billion in GDP, with a 2.3% rise over 2013. Third and fourth, respectively, was the Chicago metro area, with $610 billion and growth of 1.8%, and the Houston metro area with $525 billion. Dallas stole the fifth spot with $504 billion.

This entry was posted in Demographics, Economics, Employment. Bookmark the permalink.

123 Responses to Where’s the money? Here.

  1. grim says:

    I read the WP article Grim. Can’t understand how someone as resourceful as you would be impressed by such a whiny, pathetic article.

    Three solid years of character assassinations on Millennials, and one little jab at Boomers has you all upset?

  2. Let’s put death panels back on the table.

  3. grim says:

    And the level boomer outrage in the 3000 comments on that article only proves that they are incapable of accepting the same sweeping generalizations they feel so entitled to dish out. A bunch of hypocrites who had it easier than anyone else. If you think the article is whiny, you clearly didn’t read the circle jerk of self-proclaimed exceptionalism in the comments.

  4. grim says:

    If you trust the numbers in that article, it means that the Northeast Megalopolis (Boston to Washington) – is the 5th largest economy in the world. Larger than UK, France, Brazil, Italy, India, Russia, Canada, Australia, etc etc.

  5. anon (the one one) says:

    Grim, what say you?

    @oshmanm: Extremely interesting. @asymco argues autonomous vehicles disrupt housing

  6. Grim says:

    I don’t believe the liability issue will ever be resolved.

    If auto manufacturers nearly face bankruptcy due to safety recall issues, I can’t possibly envision a legal landscape where autonomous fatalities will not be met with the full brunt of our extremely litigious legal system. Given the recent scrutiny of automotive control software (VW), autonomous control software is fair game, and will be subject to equal scrutiny. I can just see the arguments now – that a 250ms delay in the laser distance processing algorithm is akin to negligence.

  7. anon (the one one) says:

    for many decades Jews, Hispanics, Blacks, Women, immigrants were strictly restricted from access

    now waspy has turned into a whiny little bit ch who cries fault at every turn cause the rules aren’t fair to him

    waaaaaah waah waah!!

    Ben says:
    November 7, 2015 at 10:20 am
    Some reports have politico back pedaling now. And I think it comes down to semantics. From what I read, Carson never said he applied, only that some folks offered to get him in. And if you get in, it’s a full boat. So if he turned down the effort, is it accurate to say he turned down a full boat?

    For my part, the dean of the Accounting program at my alma mater’s notoriously exclusive business school took me aside and asked me to switch to Accounting and said he’d get me in (intraschool transfers were impossible). I declined. So did I turn down admission to an elite business school? I never applied to it. You tell me.

    Not a Carson fan but on what planet does a black student who is number one in the state in something not get offered admission, and if needed, a full scholarship to any school of his/her choice? I’ve watched minority kids definitely smart and high achieving get admission into just about any school they want just for being in the top 10% of their graduating class. Meanwhile, I’ve watched the #1 kid in the school get rejected from 10 schools.

  8. anon (the good one) says:

    @asymco: Cities will go car free but real estate prices will skyrocket. Inequality will rise.

  9. chicagofinance says:

    Dude…you have bigger tits than half the Hunterdon North cheerleading squad…..

    Comrade Nom Deplume, living well off the carrion of the left says:
    November 8, 2015 at 11:43 pm
    [37] Splat What Was He Thinking says:
    November 8, 2015 at 8:08 am
    BTW, dickweed, I’m 55, fit, healthy and ready to work 12 hour days on any oil rig you put in front of me…

    Oil rigs have sommeliers?

  10. Grim says:

    It’s not a technology issue, it’s a liability issue.

    It can not ever be resolved. The price of an autonomous car needs to include the cost of the lawsuits and settlements that will result. The cost of automobiles will see an increase similar to the cost of healthcare.

    The first to market will be the first to go bankrupt. Tesla is playing with fire.

    It could be arguable that the increase in acceptable commuting distance actually reduces overall real estate prices as the negative impact of longer commuting distances is reduced. Especially if autonomy can also reduce traffic and increase travel speeds, all very possible. You could argue that the autonomous car is the second best thing to ever happen to the suburb, after the car.

  11. D-FENS says:

    Millennials will have come of age under the Obama administration with some of the worst job opportunities in our lifetimes. The complete opposite situation that their parents had politically and economically.

    The youngest probably don’t remember 9/11 very clearly nor the Bush years.

    Will they reject or double down on the political views their parents (the Boomers) have?

  12. grim says:

    I can’t imagine the majority of millennials being pro-establishment. Hope and Change were some pretty big promises.

  13. walking bye says:

    Grim from the map whats that big spike on the coast of Florida from? Never knew there was that much GDP from the sugar cane industry.

  14. Grim says:

    Miami?

  15. Fast Eddie says:

    First day commuting from Haughtyville, train in front of us broke down so we had to couple and push it. :)

  16. Anon E. Moose says:

    Title Post: I think this phenomenon has been addressed before:

    https://xkcd.com/1138/

  17. Not walking Bye says:

    That spike from the Miami area is a lot of “sugar like/but not real sugar” product related economics.

    It also helps that for all intent and purpose – Miami is the defacto Zurich for the Latin American 0.01% crowd.

  18. Comrade Nom Deplume, still fcuking around at work says:

    [10] chifi

    “Dude…you have bigger tits than half the Hunterdon North cheerleading squad…..”

    You should try hitting the gym, then perhaps you’d have massive, rock hard pecs like mine.

  19. Comrade Nom Deplume, still fcuking around at work says:

    [3] [prior thread] Ben

    I don’t disagree but your point necessarily lumps the military academies in with the rest of higher ed. You simply cannot do that: The admissions process to the military academies is completely different. Anyone here who went through it can attest to that (Full disclosure: I didn’t get into West Point. After meeting a decent number of cadets, I’m sure that my app was the first in the trash).

    That said, because I am somewhat familiar with that process, I still think there is a strong whiff of BS to Carson’s story. Carson should be probed on the details, and then perhaps it makes sense to say that the facts don’t measure up to the presentation. But simply parsing semantics to make the argument is not only lazy, it discredits the speaker.

  20. Juice Box says:

    re # 20- I was accepted to NASA even though I did not apply… Yes I did visit and spoke to people about how great it was working there, and all they said to me was that I needed to apply and I might get in. That sounds like acceptance to me…..I am going on record I could have joined NASA and heck I would be up on the Space Station right now, a real Space Cadet!!!

  21. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “-FSB publishes final total loss-absorbing capacity standards
    -Banks’ total TLAC shortfall is up to $1.2 trillion, FSB says”

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-11-09/banking-giants-learn-cost-of-preventing-another-lehman-moment

  22. Alex says:

    1-

    Not upset Grim, just surprised you’d be so impressed by the whine stream. As for character assasinating millennials, you gotta be kidding. I was just providing a little balance to one so fawning of millennials that they went ahead and declared them to be “the greatest generation”.

  23. walking bye says:

    Another note on the map. Since Kennedy, all our presidents have come from or retired to the so called money states. The outlier is Carter.

  24. Juice Box says:

    re: # 25 – Bill Clinton?

  25. grim says:

    23 – I have less issue with self-proclamations of greatness (the “greatest” generation was hardly so, and don’t forget that they got to name themselves), than I do with the fact that the entirety of the boomer generation felt qualified to generalize the “lax work ethic” of what will be the largest single generational cohort in American history, when half the generation wasn’t even old enough to be in the workforce. All the while, not acknowledging any of the benefits they reaped. Much of their success was zeitgeist, not hard work.

    This is nothing more than my own continued defense of the millennials, who are poised to actually be the greatest generation in American history, despite what the boomers and their overvalued self worth might think.

  26. Re: [24];

    “come from or retired to” is pretty convenient, no? You didn’t honestly think Billy Boy was going back to Little Rock, did you? Once Hillary was ushered into the NY senate seat, I knew this country would never be rid of those two.

    Broader point, I’ve never heard of the group of “money states”. Which states? What defines membership in the group? Do you mean the states where people with money like to live — because they’re the nicest places to live? I’m not getting the significance of your comment.

  27. Grim [26];

    It is the millenials who will be in power when the Locust Generation of boomers are the weakest.

  28. Comrade Nom Deplume, screwing around at work says:

    [21] Juice,

    I would agree with them; you are eminently qualified to be a space cadet.

  29. Libturd in Union says:

    “First day commuting from Haughtyville, train in front of us broke down so we had to couple and push it. :)”

    Why I drive.

  30. Grim says:

    Trump scores best SNL ratings since 2012

  31. From the WP article, Isn’t there a lot wrong with just these two sentences:

    “Then, boomers didn’t invest enough in new training programs for young workers, particularly men, who once could count on factory jobs to bring them a middle-class lifestyle. They allowed college costs to more than double from 1982 to 2012. Though, point in their favor: Many of them took out loans to send their children to school.”

  32. walking bye says:

    Juice Box, yeah I was thinking Clinton was on a bubble, so I added retired to. Always felt he had the Wall Street top dogs and I don’t believe he ever went back to Ark after Washington. Also Stand corrected as you could go back to Eisenhower (never realized he was NY native thought he was a Southerner/Texan) skip of Truman and your back a century of money states.

  33. BTW, I noticed Target in Watertown, MA is hiring. They have a sign on the curb near the street so passersby will see it. “$11/hour to start” says the sign.

  34. Libturd in Union says:

    Trump is very popular. Then again, so is Justin Bieber.

  35. grim says:

    So was Obama, and look what it got him.

  36. Libturd in Union says:

    I’d say Obama did pretty well for himself. For the rest of us and the prisoners in Cuba, not so much.

  37. Juice Box says:

    Re:#38 “prisoners in cuba”

    Plan is to close it down before the end this administration, including shipping them here to Leavenworth etc.

  38. Libturd in Union says:

    We’ll see.

  39. Fast Eddie says:

    The greatest generation earned that title, let’s not even question that one. The boomers were the coolest generation (sorry, it’s true, read it and weep) and probably the most arrogant but don’t f.ucking blame them, they took what was in front of them and anyone else from any other era would have done the same. Let’s stop the sh1t there, ok? As for the millenials, they’re no more intelligent than any other Era and are, well, so soft with their delicate, little, texting, muppet fingers. And let’s be honest, it was the Boomer generation that blew open the doors of technology that the millenials are now using as a platform.

  40. chicagofinance says:

    Mizzou…….ah…..what a fresh drink of water…..
    Concerned Student 1950 has demanded, among other things, that Wolfe “acknowledge his white male privilege,” that he is immediately removed, and that the school adopt a mandatory racial-awareness program and hire more black faculty and staff.

    One of the sit-in participants, Abigail Hollis, a black undergraduate, said the campus is “unhealthy and unsafe for us.”

    “The way white students are treated is in stark contrast to the way black students and other marginalized students are treated, and it’s time to stop that,” Hollis said. “It’s 2015.”

  41. chicagofinance says:

    Mr. Micropeni$….directed at clot…..

    Comrade Nom Deplume, still fcuking around at work says:
    November 9, 2015 at 10:29 am
    [10] chifi

    “Dude…you have bigger tits than half the Hunterdon North cheerleading squad…..”

    You should try hitting the gym, then perhaps you’d have massive, rock hard pecs like mine.

  42. phoenix1 says:

    The same technology that Boomers and senior citizens are mocking the the youth for using them? How many old goats out there are sucking off the stock market profits of Apple and Microsoft….

    “And let’s be honest, it was the Boomer generation that blew open the doors of technology that the millenials are now using as a platform.”

  43. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “Prior to the recession, Iceland had one of the more thriving economies in the world, in spite of the fact that their total population (327,000) wouldn’t even fill a mid-sized American city. When the recession struck, they were among the earliest and hardest hit. However, instead of running to the vaults to shower the banks with money, they let the banks fail. They also resisted traveling down the European/Republican austerity road. Instead, they kept their social programs intact at a time when they were most needed.

    And, they sent fraudulent bankers to jail.

    When Iceland’s three major banks collapsed, it resulted in defaults totaling $114 billion in a country with a gross domestic product (GDP) of only $19 billion. In October, 2008 the parliament passed emergency legislation to take over the domestic operations of the major banks and established new banks to handle them. They did not, however, take over any of the foreign assets or obligations. Those stayed with the original banks, right into bankruptcy.

    They then brought charges against several banking executives for fraud and market manipulation, resulting in sentences ranging from four to five and a half years. As the special prosecutor said,”

  44. Fast Eddie says:

    How many old goats out there are sucking off the stock market profits of Apple and Microsoft….

    Wouldn’t you?

  45. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Of course, but if you are, you shouldn’t be complaining about kids and their technology.

    Fast Eddie says:
    November 9, 2015 at 1:16 pm
    How many old goats out there are sucking off the stock market profits of Apple and Microsoft….

    Wouldn’t you?

  46. Fast Eddie says:

    Complaining? I feel f.ucking sorry for them!

  47. grim says:

    And let’s be honest, it was the Boomer generation that blew open the doors of technology that the millenials are now using as a platform.

    Versus Gen X? I would argue that Gen X has more claim on the current bleeding edge technology than anyone else. I don’t care about the old guy in the C-Suite either. The foundational technology is all preboomer.

    Gen X was significantly more educated than the boomers, and if you go back through the technology boom – the ages line up much better.

    Where do you draw the line? If you are going to go far back, you need to go right to the transistor, which is 1947, which is essentially the defined start of the baby boom generation. So they didn’t invent that.

    First computer? Even earlier, 1946. Not the boomers.

    The next milestone would be the integrated circuit, 1958. I’m pretty sure that wasn’t invented by a 12 year old boomer.

    Perhaps the MITS Altair would be the next logical step. 1974. The first accessible computer. Unfortunately, the founders of MITS were born in 1941 (Roberts) and 1944 (Mimms) – So both of them were not boomers either.

    Maybe TCP/IP should be the start of the revolution? Vint Cerf? Shit, he was born in 1943. Not a boomer. The father of the internet, not a boomer.

    Martin Cooper? Widely proclaimed the father of the modern cell phone? Nope, he was born in 1928. Cooper invented the first handheld cell phone at Motorola in 1973.

    Most of the modern bleeding edge technology CEOs are not boomers.

    So what exactly did the boomers do for modern technology?

  48. phoenix1 says:

    49.
    You feel sorry for using them for profit?

    “Complaining? I feel f.ucking sorry for them!”

  49. Juice Box says:

    re: # 50 – We all know Al Gore the father of the internet is a Boomer.

  50. phoenix1 says:

    They used the technology (that they did not create) to increase efficiency, eliminate blue collar workers, transfer work overseas, and micromanage workers in order to increase stock market profits…

    “So what exactly did the boomers do for modern technology?”

  51. Fast Eddie says:

    So what exactly did the boomers do for modern technology?

    Founded Microsoft and Apple and gave us mainstream access to technology that the world has never seen. A mere simple feat. :o

    I’m sure we’ll be asking the millenial’s grand children the same questions but let’s stop putting them on a pedestal when they haven’t earned it. Bill Parcels used to say, “Don’t but the kid in the Hall of Fame yet.”

  52. grim says:

    Maybe Tim Berners-Lee as the first boomer with a major contribution to modern daily technology?

    Steve Sasson for inventing the digital camera about 10 years before Berners Lee?

  53. Fast Eddie says:

    You feel sorry for using them for profit?

    Awww… the poor things. By the way, who can I blame for having hurt feelings today?

  54. Fast Eddie says:

    test

  55. grim says:

    I would argue that what Gates, Woz, and Jobs did was important, but we’re talking about commercialization of ideas. The creation of the 6502 CPU was far more important as an enabling technology. Without the 6502 – Apple would have never happened.

    Chuck Peddle, of MOS Technology, was born in 1937 – not a boomer.

    Out of Chuck’s low cost CPU designs, came Apple, Atari, Commodore, and Nintendo.

  56. Libturd in Union says:

    This is pretty clever. I gave my dollar.

    https://www.gofundme.com/FireFlood

  57. Fast Eddie says:

    I heard “Love Reign o’er Me” on the radio yesterday and I was wondering why such iconic music is not being created today. You want to know why? It’s because the millennials’ growth has been stunted. Their attention span is 20 seconds long all due to touching glass for hours upon hours wrapped in a world full of trivial sound bites.

  58. The Great Pumpkin says:

    That’s the bottom line. They took the easy way out. They took the low hanging fruit (short term profits) at the future expense of selling out their kids future. They could have grown their business and the economy the honest way, but nope, they sold everyone out and took the money and ran. What a bunch of jokers. Took the easy way out and left the consequences for the future generations. Thanks mom and dad, great job voting for self absorbed losers like Reagan and Clinton.

    phoenix1 says:
    November 9, 2015 at 1:31 pm
    They used the technology (that they did not create) to increase efficiency, eliminate blue collar workers, transfer work overseas, and micromanage workers in order to increase stock market profits…

    “So what exactly did the boomers do for modern technology?”

  59. grim says:

    Technically, Daltry (1944) and Townshend (1945) are not boomers (1946 and onwards), but were part of the Silent Generation – Along with Jimi and Lennon.

  60. Fast Eddie says:

    [62],

    Either is Sinatra but I say the same thing when I listen to him.

  61. chicagofinance says:

    clot out on the town……

    FAIRFIELD – Was a Long Valley man merely “adjusting himself,” or was there something else at play? That will be the question facing the Fairfield Municipal Court on December 3, NJ.com reports, as the 47-year-old man responds to exposure charges. Cops were called to a CVS, where a woman says the suspect was sitting in his Cadillac. She pulled her car next to his. Their eyes locked for a moment. She said he then unzipped his pants and revealed what was inside. Cops arriving on the scene reported finding him “adjusting himself” during last week’s incident. For charges to stick, perhaps prosecutors will retain a sketch artist for the witness to describe what she saw.

  62. Salaries have been effectively flat since 2000. Whoever got their salary up the highest before they all went flat sits in the catbird seat. That just happened to be boomers. Whoever retired before Nixon closed the gold window got the other end of that stick. Everyone else is in the middle.

  63. Fast Eddie says:

    Out of Chuck’s low cost CPU designs, came Apple, Atari, Commodore, and Nintendo.

    This is sort of my point; I keep reading how the millennial muppets are the smartest generation and every generation previous to them created the most exciting moments in science, entertainment and the arts. You think you’ll be listening to “One Direction” in 30 years from now?

  64. chicagofinance says:

    check your site (in lieu of sight; rhymes with white) privilege :

    BOSTON – Apparently, you are totally in your right to be a blind barber. The Boston Herald reports a Norton barber had been working for a year before his boss caught wind of the fact he was legally blind. There was no wiggle room at Tony’s Barber Shop for such a disability, and the blind barber was shown the door (literally). That was after he tripped over a customer’s legs and tripped over a waiting room chair, both in the same day. A court has ruled in favor of the barber, handing him $100,000 in his lawsuit for discrimination. Next up: deaf music teachers.

  65. ^^^^ I mean pensioners living check to check with no other assets. In 1968, $7K per year for life looked pretty sweet.

    “Whoever retired before Nixon closed the gold window got the other end of that stick. “

  66. mute radio announcers?

    Next up: deaf music teachers.

  67. grim says:

    This is sort of my point; I keep reading how the millennial muppets are the smartest generation and every generation previous to them created the most exciting moments in science, entertainment and the arts. You think you’ll be listening to “One Direction” in 30 years from now?

    Let them make a f*cking mark before you brand them as inept.

    Every other generation had the luxury of at least being given the opportunity to do something before they were branded with a name.

    Brokaw didn’t name the “Greatest Generation” (1900 to 1924) until 1998, when nearly all of them were already dead.

    Pretty sure someone ragged on 1920s Flappers as a sign that the world was going to hell. They were considered outlandish, dressed and acted to offend, were sexually promiscuous and largely considered flippant and reckless. Just look back at Hitler’s reaction to the music of negros and jews if you want to put generational music in perspective.

    Just going through this, Millennials seem to have more in common with the Greatest Generation than they do with Boomers.

  68. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Anybody have any first hand knowledge on this?

    “There is nothing in here about digital currency (bitcoin) and the technology which underlies it (the blockchain). Yet, those two will completely revolutionize what are called “anonymous trust” relationships. By doing so, they will greatly impact all financial markets and the way we use them. To be specific, risk factors will become much more knowable, and the process of factoring risk will become much more transparent. Yes– many startups will fail… but they will fail earlier and faster, because their risk metrics will be much more visible.
    How will all this work? To understand it, google “blockchain technology”.”

  69. ChiFi [67];

    Next up: deaf music teachers.

    I get your point, but I personally know several talented musicians (who have also taught) who are legally “deaf”. I don’t think any of them tripped over anything in their activities, though. Nat’l Technical Institute for the Deaf had a one-of-a-kind and successful music education program at one time.

  70. Fast Eddie says:

    They were considered outlandish, dressed and acted to offend, were sexually promiscuous and largely considered flippant and reckless./I>

    I would welcome any of this for the current lot but I fear they won’t take their tender little paws off their electronic devices long enough to achieve bad girl/boy status.

  71. Fast Eddie says:

    Italics off

  72. Fast Eddie says:

    Just going through this, Millennials seem to have more in common with the Greatest Generation than they do with Boomers.

    When they spend most of their childhood sleeping on a dirty mattress in a cold water flat with no electricity for clips at a time, then I’ll agree.

  73. Libturd in Union says:

    “Next up: deaf music teachers.”

    My recently deceased grandmother was issued a handicapped licensed plate from the New York DMV for being legally blind due to glaucoma. Is it any surprise that a NY driver’s license won’t get you through security at the airport?

  74. Libturd in Union says:

    “spend most of their childhood sleeping on a dirty mattress in a cold water flat ”

    Problem is, until all of the boomers die, the inheritances left from the boomers to the millennials will keep this from occurring.

  75. Slow Eddie says:

    “I would welcome any of this for the current lot but I fear they won’t take their tender little paws off their electronic devices long enough to achieve bad girl/boy status.”

    Said the guy who posts using a smart phone. And clearly, you don’t know about the wonders of Tinder.

    Enjoy your Medicare Part D!

  76. Fast Eddie says:

    Slow Eddie,

    Truth hurts, doesn’t it? And don’t worry, I’ll be dead before I’m eligible for Medicare nor will it even exist.

  77. Juice Box says:

    re #79 – “wonders of Tinder”

    More than 1 billion profile swipes per day on Tinder, conversion rate to swipe right is about .01%.

    Sounds like you are really killing it spending hours every day swiping right only to occasionally chat the night away with a .01% conversion rate for just the chance to chat, not even meet. How many false positive swipes and buyers remorse chats before you actually get a change to meet a real life mouth breather?

    I bet Eddie and his bad breath could convert quicker at the Cubbyhole.

  78. Ragnar says:

    In my Safe Space music video:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sXQkXXBqj_U

    Everyone likes me and thinks I’m great in my safe space (In My Safe Space)
    People don’t judge me and haters don’t hate in my safe space (In Your Safe Space)
    Bully proof windows, troll safe doors, nothing but kindness in here.
    Reality – our space space will keep you out.
    We can face almost anything. But reality we can do without.

  79. Ragnar says:

    Why no comments on Gen X? Seems to be the forgotten generation. Born between 63 and 80 according to Wikipedia. Or do most of our participants fall into this generation, so we’re “normal” compared to all the other generations?

  80. D-FENS says:

    There aren’t enough of us to make a difference in the political or economic landscape…

  81. Libturd in Union says:

    Gen X is to cool to post on a real estate forum.

  82. Libturd in Union says:

    Plus, we are still trying to figure out what to do with our CD collection.

  83. Juice Box says:

    re #86 – Coasters?

  84. Marilyn says:

    Grim commented on the Gen X ers and tech and he was correct. However the Gen x ers in my opinion were the most drugged out. I mean hair bands , ludes, double barrel microdot mesc. , crack, coke, we had it all. It was a really sick time , we had smoking sections in Paramus HS, dealers dealing blotter acid and microdot mescaline, it was just crazy.

  85. Marilyn says:

    ohh and don’t forget those Ozzy concerts, I can still see the castle.

  86. Marilyn says:

    Hey Pumpkin, what ever happened to Iceland’s economy??

  87. Fast Eddie says:

    double barrel microdot mesc…

    I did this and sat 2nd row orchestra for “Yes” in the round at Madison Square Garden. I think I saw G0d.

  88. walking bye says:

    Libturd, I remember buying my 300 Mega CD Changer on closeout in 2005 as the MP3/Ipod Shuffle was killing CD sales. State of the art D/A convertors from Japan. I still need to keep a ps/2 keyboard so that I could enter in the album info manually.

  89. Slow Eddie says:

    Re. Tinder: A .01% conversion rate is 100,000 hook-ups per day.

    You think that is worse than the faceless “in search of companion” ads the boomers used to post in the local newspaper? Then again, maybe they were too busy playin’ with their psychadelic records and their nifty board games to care.

    (Risk/Monopoly are about as mindless as iPhone games. But go boomers! We owe the world to you.)

  90. Rags [81];

    How about the Yalie screeching at the administrator for failing to create a “Safe Space” — a college student would be what, at least 19 year old? Sounded more like 9. Check your privilege, indeed.

    http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/426765/video-what-social-justice-warrior-looks-david-french

    “SHUT THE F%&^ UP!” A leftist’s best argument.

    The thing really flummoxing me is that the banshee’s name hasn’t been attached to her rant yet. Let’s make her famous…

  91. The Great Pumpkin says:

    We should have done the same thing, instead they socialized the loses. Makes me sick.

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/news/three-charts-that-show-icelands-economy-recovered-after-it-imprisoned-bankers-and-let-banks-go-bust-10309503.html

    Marilyn says:
    November 9, 2015 at 3:38 pm
    Hey Pumpkin, what ever happened to Iceland’s economy??

  92. The Great Pumpkin says:

    This comment from the article is worth sharing, he gets it. You guys complain that it so hard to start a business and it’s the govt’s fault. A govt can not do this, only the people that bought the govt can do this. You know why it’s so hard to start a business, because the corporations and their lobbyists made it that way. They are taking out their competition by buying out the govt, and then making up bs laws to protect their cash cows.

    “Private investors are already working in this space. Since 2009, banks have been calling in commercial loans to small businesses hanging on by a thread to weather the economy. Unable to raise capital to pay the balloon payments, many were forced to resign at high interest rates and agree to tie the loans to personal assets.

    What happens next is the at risk loans a bundled and sold to as a package to private investors. Already stressed businesses, further challenged to meet the terms fall… leaving the investors, lawyers and collectors flush with interest fees and rewards from liquidating the business and personal assets of the small business owner.

    Watch what you wish for. We have created a business climate where the rich prey on small businesses, the barrier to entry for new businesses is risky, and large corporations win as small business is slowly killed off in this country. The losers are communities, employees and families of the dying breed-a small business owner.”

    http://www.wsj.com/articles/the-uberization-of-finance-1446835102

  93. chicagofinance says:

    Moose: posted full commentary……I did not author…..

    Anon E. Møøse, Who never bit anyone’s sister says:
    November 9, 2015 at 2:35 pm

    ChiFi [67];

    Next up: deaf music teachers.

    I get your point, but I personally know several talented musicians (who have also taught) who are legally “deaf”. I don’t think any of them tripped over anything in their activities, though. Nat’l Technical Institute for the Deaf had a one-of-a-kind and successful music education program at one time.

  94. Fabius Maximus says:

    Joyce,

    Your guide to the election. It all comes down to FL, PA and OH.

    http://www.collegehumor.com/post/7034693/why-the-electoral-college-ruins-democracy?ref=homepage

  95. HouseWhineWine says:

    Millenials, my take. Nice people, closer to their parents than my baby boomer generation, at least comparing them in their twenties. Not sure about their resiliency, not sure about their sense of responsibility. I like working with them and I like their attitudes about acceptance of different lifestyles. Not sure about their street smarts, maybe too used to having their elders watch out for them? Can’t blame them for that though, it’s the culture they grew up with.

  96. Ragnar says:

    Moose,
    Us GenX’ers didn’t know that Yale owed each of us a “safe space” so that even the most hysterical bitch can’t think of anything that offends her.

  97. Marilyn says:

    Eddie #90, Was Wakeman there ? Maybe you did!! I mean if Journey to the Center of the earth is not God, I don’t know what is.

  98. Marilyn says:

    Lets not forget all the toxic toys we had. I mean the double barrel purple mirco dot was more natural then the toys and food. The list of toxic shit we were subjected too its not wonder were all messed up.

  99. POS cape says:

    90:

    Me too except it was Grand Funk.

  100. Comrade Nom Deplume, living well off the carrion of the left says:

    [94] punk in

    And should we also repudiate the debt, as Iceland did? Ask the Brits what they think of Iceland?

  101. joyce says:

    Hey genius,

    The number of electors is tied to the number of congressmen (house and senate). While the senate is fixed at 2 per state, the number of representatives is “supposed” to be 1 per 30,000 of population… the fact that the power hungry criminal class in DC have never expanded (thus watering down their individual influence) should not be shocking to anyone with half a brain.

    What would the electoral college look like if the constitution was followed?

    But I’m sure you already knew all of this. And I’M sure that your unwavering support of government intervention and influence will continue unabated.

    Next.

  102. Comrade Nom Deplume, living well off the carrion of the left says:

    [41] chifi

    We may yet see how a university get Detroitified.

    [43]

    Well that’s harsh. I had a frat brother much like you in college. His girlfriends kept leaving him for me. When he was getting married, we didn’t meet his fiancée until the night before the wedding. I think he was afraid of something

  103. joyce says:

    103- Comrade,

    Yes, why should the government (taxpayers) have to take the losses?

    “Iceland’s debt repudiation was considerable too. The three largest banks – Landsbanki, Kaupthing and Glitnir – collapsed in autumn 2008. Rather than nationalising them, the government allowed the banks to go into administration. Foreign bondholders lost some of their money and saw the rest of their loans converted to equity. A hard line was also taken with other creditors. Icesave, an online subsidiary of Landsbanki, took deposits from some 400,000 people in the UK and the Netherlands. When it went bust, these depositors were rescued by the Dutch government as well as our own. Iceland refused to guarantee reimbursement. That saga might, however, have a relatively happy ending. Last week the administrators of Landsbanki said that the estate of the banks should yield more than enough to pay the UK and Dutch governments what they are owed.”
    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/analysis-and-features/iceland-the-broken-economy-that-got-out-of-jail-2349905.html

  104. chicagofinance says:

    These people existed at Cornell (and lots of places) in 1985-1990….the only difference is that they feel emboldened to display their fascism in increasingly provocative ways. In some way it is not fair, because a good number of these people are dealing with serious DSM-IV issues, and it is in their late teens and early twenties where they rage. Now this imbecile has her episode on display for eternity on the interwebs…..

    Anon E. Møøse, Who never bit anyone’s sister says:
    November 9, 2015 at 4:07 pm
    Rags [81];

    How about the Yalie screeching at the administrator for failing to create a “Safe Space” — a college student would be what, at least 19 year old? Sounded more like 9. Check your privilege, indeed.

    http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/426765/video-what-social-justice-warrior-looks-david-french

    “SHUT THE F%&^ UP!” A leftist’s best argument.

    The thing really flummoxing me is that the banshee’s name hasn’t been attached to her rant yet. Let’s make her famous…

  105. Juice Box says:

    re # 93 – You must have never been swiped right, it is 100,000 opportunities to chat or message out of a billion swipes, it is not the horizontal mambo or even a kiss on the cheek. The failure success rate of those chats is the real horizontal tango % which is more like 0.001%.

    Lets forget all of that for now the IPO is now asking a few billion, you might as well log into your account and go balls to the walls. $12 and $14 a share and symbol will be MTCH.

  106. Fast Eddie says:

    Marilyn [100],

    Wakeman, Anderson, Howe, Squire, White – in the round! The opened with Excerpts from “The Six Wives of Henry VIII” then broke into Siberian Khatru! My heart almost stopped!

  107. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “When has any government not been controlled by the rich? Even the ones based on workers revolutions rapidly become controlled by the new rich, the party insiders who become rich because they are powerful. See the multibillionaire members of China’s central committee and their privileged children and grandchildren as examples. power begets wealth, wealth begets power. This is true under every system of government known to man.

    The corollary is, that the more powerful the government the more corrupt it must become. The only answer to government corruption is to keep government as weak as possible and maintain as much freedom and power over your own life as you can.”

  108. walking bye says:

    Can’t say Im fully aware of the Mizzou issues and what the sides are. One thing for sure you have to applaud the football team for pulling a potential boycott or strike of the game. The fact that had it backfired those guys could be kicked off a the team and school took some balls. These guys generally could care less about campus life issues, if they are even part of the campus over 4 years. So what ever the issue there was it caught their attention.

  109. Grim says:

    Kids don’t appreciate hallucinogens these days

  110. Juice Box says:

    Re:111 – they should have sent the swastika poop to ancestry.com for analysis. the marketing major grad student running this protest might have find out he is related to Oliver Cromwell.

  111. Juice Box says:

    Meant post # 112 -another win for Mao…

  112. Juice Box says:

    Re# 113 – imagine if choom was legal? Nobody would utter a swear word in anger ever…

  113. Juice Box says:

    #88 – Yup you had Trixter. I was at a record party for them, band mom back then baked a mean celebratory cake for that party it was by the high school.

  114. Grim says:

    And the dots were just acid

  115. joyce says:

    Imagine if there was a War on Drugs and mandatory minimums back in the day

    Grim says:
    November 9, 2015 at 10:08 pm
    Kids don’t appreciate hallucinogens these days

  116. Fabius Maximus says:

    #104 Joyce

    “What would the electoral college look like if the constitution was followed?”
    A congress of 9000, but what’s the point? Hamilton didn’t factor population growth into his calculations.
    You can wrap yourself in the constitution and dream of your Utopia, but back in the real world, FL, PA and OH drive the election

  117. joyce says:

    “A congress of 9000, but what’s the point?”
    The electoral college would increase proportionately and thus the results of certain states would have more or less influence in the total.

    “Hamilton didn’t factor population growth into his calculations.”

    Not sure why you said Hamilton. But yes, the 30,000 figure is right there in the constitution and relates to population expansion.

  118. Marilyn says:

    Ed, must of been great. Sucks getting old. No joy in too much anymore. Happy if you get a good dump out.

  119. Ragnar says:

    Ha ha, Christie at the junior debate just claimed he got government “off the backs” of NJ residents. Clearly counted on having nobody from NJ in the audience burst intof derisive laughter.

  120. Ragnar says:

    I see the NY Attorney general stating his thought crimes witch hunt against Exxon. Chilling that he equates “climate change denial” with fraud. Continuing a long tradition of power-lusting NY AGs going after political targets.

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