Christie wants to raise taxes on NJ

From the Star Ledger:

Christie’s new tax plan would cost 40% of N.J. taxpayers an average $16,682 deduction

Gov. Chris Christie wants to do away with a tax break that his state’s residents use more than almost anyone else.

During Tuesday’s Republican presidential debate, Christie talked about his plan to reduce income taxes, including for the top bracket for the richest taxpayers, and keep only the tax breaks for home mortgage interest and charitable deductions.

Gone under Christie’s plan would be the federal deduction for state and local taxes, which New Jersey taxpayers use more than residents of almost any other state.

“That will put more pressure on governors and on local officials not to keep raising those taxes, saying we can deduct them,” Christie said in Milwaukee, where he participated in the preliminary debate after his poll average was too low to qualify for the main stage.

According to Internal Revenue Service statistics, 41.4 percent of New Jersey taxpayers took the state and local tax deduction, which lowered their federal income taxes, in 2013, the last year for which figures were available. Only Maryland and Connecticut had a higher percentage.

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116 Responses to Christie wants to raise taxes on NJ

  1. grim says:

    From HousingWire:

    CoreLogic: Foreclosures continue downward trend in September

    The national foreclosure inventory continued its downward trend and declined by 24.3%, while completed foreclosures dropped by 17.6% compared with September 2014, according to the latest report from CoreLogic (CLGX).

    On a yearly basis, the number of foreclosures nationwide decreased from 67,000 in September 2014 to 55,000 in September 2015. The number of completed foreclosures in September 2015 is a decrease of 52.8% from the peak of 117,438 in September 2010.

    “The largest improvements in the foreclosure inventory continue to be in judicial states on the East Coast such as Florida and New Jersey,” said Sam Khater, deputy chief economist for CoreLogic. “While the overwhelming majority of states are experiencing declines in their foreclosure rates, four states experienced small increases compared with a year ago.”

    Additionally, number of mortgages in serious delinquency (defined as 90 days or more past due, including those loans in foreclosure or REO) declined by 21.2% from September 2014 to September 2015 with 1.3 million mortgages, or 3.4%, in this category.

    This is the lowest serious delinquency rate since December 2007. The foreclosure rate (defined as the share of all loans in the foreclosure process) was at 1.2 percent as of September 2015, which is back to the December 2007 level.

    “The rate of delinquencies continues to drop back closer to historic norms powered by improved economic conditions and tighter post-recession underwriting standards,” said Anand Nallathambi, president and CEO of CoreLogic. “As we head into 2016, based on almost every major metric, the fundamentals underpinning the housing market are healthier than any time since 2007.”

  2. grim says:

    NJ is now the foreclosure inventory leader by a wide margin.

    Foreclosure Inventory Rate
    New Jersey – 4.6%
    New York – 3.7%
    Florida – 2.6%
    Hawaii – 2.5%
    New Mexico/Maine – 2.1%

    Serious Delinquency Rate
    New Jersey – 8.0%
    New York – 6.5%
    Florida – 5.8%
    Maine – 4.9%
    Maryland – 4.8%

    We’ve only managed to complete 10,398 foreclosures in the past year, compared to faster acting states like Florida, which managed 122k, Ohio, which completed 32k, and Pennsylvania, which completed 21k. NJ’s high foreclosure inventory is being driven, more than anything else, by the Judiciary’s inability to complete foreclosures in a timely manner.

  3. grim says:

    30 Year – What happened in Passaic County? Everyone call it a year and shut down early?

    13th, 20th, 27th look like solid auctions, everything after that is a dribble.

  4. grim says:

    Ah, election day.

  5. Now Spanky be reasonable says:

    And once again Christie shows how much he cares for his fellow citizens of New Jersey. Does anyone really think that Trenton and the local municipalities are going to stop raising taxes just because they will no longer be deductible from federal income taxes?

  6. anon (the good one) says:

    @BenjySarlin:
    Huckabee perfectly articulates the “government hands off my Medicare” position. Says SS/Medicare sacrosanct, but “welfare” another story

  7. Comrade Nom Deplume and his amazing trick back says:

    A niece of mine posted something on her Facebook page that I have seen before. It’s an Internet meme that says “Call me crazy but I love to see people happy and succeeding. Life is a journey, not a competition.”

    It occurs to me that anon, pumpkin and their fellow travelers don’t share that sentiment. They would have you believe that they do, but they simply don’t.

    That’s my deep thought for the day, folks. Early trip down the salt mine shaft today.

  8. grim says:

    7 – Everyone deserves a pony

  9. anon (the good one) says:

    @thenation:
    A Billionaire, Some Millionaires, and a No-Show Senator Debate How Best to Block Wage Hikes

  10. Ragnar says:

    Chris Christie in the junior debate yesterday claimed that he “got government off the backs” of people in NJ. Clearly assumed nobody from NJ was in the audience to jeer that assertion. Govt is on our backs and giving us a “dirty sanchez”.

  11. chicagofinance says:

    from Goodwin

    The speech police are no longer a joke — they’re now a fact of life at the University of Missouri. In the continuing turmoil over protests and the president’s resignation, campus cops urged students “who witness incidents of hateful and/or hurtful speech to call the police immediately.”

  12. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Telling you, globalization starts off well for everyone, but in the long term it’s devastating. We are almost there. Read about the globalization of poverty, and try to understand the negative long term consequences. I thought you were able to think long term and not only short term.

    “The theory of comparative advantage, and the corollary that nations should specialize, is criticized on pragmatic grounds within the import substitution industrialization theory of development economics, on empirical grounds by the Singer–Prebisch thesis which states that terms of trade between primary producers and manufactured goods deteriorate over time, and on theoretical grounds of infant industry and Keynesian economics. In older economic terms, comparative advantage has been opposed by mercantilism and economic nationalism. These argue instead that while a country may initially be comparatively disadvantaged in a given industry (such as Japanese cars in the 1950s), countries should shelter and invest in industries until they become globally competitive. Further, they argue that comparative advantage, as stated, is a static theory – it does not account for the possibility of advantage changing through investment or economic development, and thus does not provide guidance for long-term economic development.

    Much has been written since Ricardo as commerce has evolved and cross-border trade has become more complicated. Today trade policy tends to focus more on “competitive advantage” as opposed to “comparative advantage”. One of the most indepth research undertakings on “competitive advantage” was conducted in the 1980s as part of the Reagan administration’s Project Socrates to establish the foundation for a technology-based competitive strategy development system that could be used for guiding international trade policy.”

    Ragnar says:
    November 10, 2015 at 11:25 pm
    Read up on David Ricardo and comparative advantage. Global trade is good for the same reason interstate trade and intercity trade is good. Constraint of global trade was a key precursor to the great depression.

  13. The Great Pumpkin says:

    13- Ricardo developed his theory using only two countries and two products. It’s way more complicated than that. Also, it changes over time as the globalization trade patterns mature.

  14. Juice Box says:

    re: #12 – Southpark called another one again.

    South Park – Safe Space – “In My Safe Space”

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sXQkXXBqj_U

  15. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “Several arguments have been advanced against using comparative advantage as a justification for advocating free trade, and they have gained an audience among economists. For example, James Brander and Barbara Spencer demonstrated how, in a strategic setting where a few firms compete for the world market, export subsidies and import restrictions can keep foreign firms from competing with national firms, increasing welfare in the country implementing these so-called strategic trade policies.[32]

    However, the overwhelming consensus of the economics profession remains that while these arguments are theoretically valid under certain assumptions, these assumptions do not usually hold and should not be used to guide trade policy.[33] Gregory Mankiw, chairman of the Harvard Economics Department, has said: ″Few propositions command as much consensus among professional economists as that open world trade increases economic growth and raises living standards.″[34]”

  16. D-FENS says:

    Free speech (but only when it doesn’t hurt my feelings)

    https://youtu.be/gM-VE8r7MSI

  17. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “Economist James K. Galbraith refutes these claims of the benefit of comparative advantage. He states that “free trade has attained the status of a god” and that “. . . none of the world’s most successful trading regions, including Japan, Korea, Taiwan, and now mainland China, reached their current status by adopting neoliberal trading rules.” He argues that “. . . comparative advantage is based upon the concept of constant returns: the idea that you can double or triple the output of any good simply by doubling or tripling the inputs. But this is not generally the case. For manufactured products, increasing returns, learning, and technical change are the rule, not the exception; the cost of production falls with experience. With increasing returns, the lowest cost will be incurred by the country that starts earliest and moves fastest on any particular line. Potential competitors have to protect their own industries if they wish them to survive long enough to achieve competitive scale.”[35]”

  18. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “Galbraith also contends that “For most other commodities, where land or ecology places limits on the expansion of capacity, the opposite condition – diminishing returns – is the rule. In this situation, there can be no guarantee that an advantage of relative cost will persist once specialization and the resultant expansion of production take place. A classic and tragic example, studied by Erik Reinert, is transitional Mongolia, a vast grassland with a tiny population and no industry that could compete on world markets. To the World Bank, Mongolia seemed a classic case of comparative advantage in animal husbandry, which in Mongolia consisted of vast herds of cattle, camels, sheep, and goats. Opening of industrial markets collapsed domestic industry, while privatization of the herds prompted the herders to increase their size. This led, within just a few years in the early 1990s, to overgrazing and permanent desertification of the subarctic steppe and, with a slightly colder than normal winter, a massive famine in the herds.”

    “Countries doomed by climate and history to produce bananas, coffee, or cocoa and little else are invariably poor. Why? First, the demand for their products is inelastic: when supply increases worldwide, the price falls, and with it national income. Second, they suffer from diminishing returns. Contrary to Ricardo, it is generally impossible to expand agriculture indefinitely at a constant unit cost: good land and water are in limited supply. Third, a country with just one major cash export will lack a cushion in other products when fashion or technology turns against their specialty. Conversely, diversification pays. Countries with the capacity to diversify across multiple industries are far more likely to weather export demand shocks or insurgent competition from (say) China than those that commit themselves to a single industry or product line. Diversifiers are also better placed to take advantage of new technical opportunities, since by diversification they develop expertise in a range of products and processes.”[36]”

  19. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Clearly you are misinterpreting what you niece is saying and replaced it with an interpretation that fits your agenda of supporting the party line of the right.

    Comrade Nom Deplume and his amazing trick back says:
    November 11, 2015 at 8:10 am
    A niece of mine posted something on her Facebook page that I have seen before. It’s an Internet meme that says “Call me crazy but I love to see people happy and succeeding. Life is a journey, not a competition.”

    It occurs to me that anon, pumpkin and their fellow travelers don’t share that sentiment. They would have you believe that they do, but they simply don’t.

    That’s my deep thought for the day, folks. Early trip down the salt mine shaft today.

  20. Libturd in Union says:

    The pussification of America continues. When it comes time to stop the onslaught of fundamental islamists, there will be no “safe space.”

  21. walking bye says:

    What the hell is a safe space?

  22. Fast Eddie says:

    Life in outer white-landia is slowly coming along. Less and less boxes by the day. I notice my car insurance is going to be reduced. Imagine that! I was standing with the garage open at the entrance last night and 5 feet away from me, from under the car comes a raccoon! The thing was walking towards me, I stamped me feet real fast (lol) and he ran the other way. Whew!! :)

  23. anon (the good one) says:

    @billmaher:
    Trump: “We are a country of laws” Thankfully, bankruptcy laws

  24. Not Fast Eddie says:

    Eddie, as you enjoy your whitelandia. Food for your brain vis a vis the Ragnar world view and how it would affect your future whitelandia.

    By the way Eddie, your name appeared in the Anonymous dump of 3K membershiplist, I know your post had a certain view, but we thought we knew you.

    http://healthaffairs.org/blog/2015/11/10/to-understand-climbing-death-rates-among-whites-look-to-women-of-childbearing-age/

  25. walking bye says:

    safe space ahh got it. it’s sort of like child daycare center. How will these kids survive when they graduate and move to Brooklyn?

    from the ny times:
    Not long after, Brown’s president, Christina H. Paxson, announced that the university would hold a simultaneous, competing talk to provide “research and facts” about “the role of culture in sexual assault.” Meanwhile, student volunteers put up posters advertising that a “safe space” would be available for anyone who found the debate too upsetting.

    The safe space, Ms. Byron explained, was intended to give people who might find comments “troubling” or “triggering,” a place to recuperate. The room was equipped with cookies, coloring books, bubbles, Play-Doh, calming music, pillows, blankets and a video of frolicking puppies, as well as students and staff members trained to deal with trauma. Emma Hall, a junior, rape survivor and “sexual assault peer educator” who helped set up the room and worked in it during the debate, estimates that a couple of dozen people used it.

  26. Juice Box says:

    re #22 – Safe Space is a weapon for their ideology.

  27. Libturd in Union says:

    Can we ban Anon.

  28. grim says:

    New rule, don’t post random tweets.

  29. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Good for you!! You seem so much happier these days.

    Fast Eddie says:
    November 11, 2015 at 9:56 am
    Life in outer white-landia is slowly coming along. Less and less boxes by the day. I notice my car insurance is going to be reduced. Imagine that! I was standing with the garage open at the entrance last night and 5 feet away from me, from under the car comes a raccoon! The thing was walking towards me, I stamped me feet real fast (lol) and he ran the other way. Whew!! :)

  30. yome says:

    Going from $6 million Trade deficit with China in 1985 to $1.6 B in 1986 to $343B today is fair game? Globalization is about getting in our $17.9 T economy. Interstate trades are domestic. The US enjoys the fruit of this trade.
    Trade with China; US is put into debt with them buying US treasuries. Just like politicians complaining about SS and Medicare but enjoy buying and spending this debt.

    https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/balance/c5700.html


    Global trade is good for the same reason interstate trade and intercity trade is good. Constraint of global trade was a key precursor to the great depression.”

  31. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Not going to lie, I will miss your rants going off on the local real estate for sale.

  32. grim says:

    Is a ball-gag not appropriate in a safe space?

  33. Libturd in Union says:

    “Not going to lie, I will miss your rants going off on the local real estate for sale.”

    Just wait until his house starts losing value!

  34. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Globalization rules! It’ leaves the U.S. with a negative $343B trade balance with one its main trading partners. Yes, this will end well.

    yome says:
    November 11, 2015 at 10:27 am
    Going from $6 million Trade deficit with China in 1985 to $1.6 B in 1986 to $343B today is fair game? Globalization is about getting in our $17.9 T economy. Interstate trades are domestic. The US enjoys the fruit of this trade.
    Trade with China; US is put into debt with them buying US treasuries. Just like politicians complaining about SS and Medicare but enjoy buying and spending this debt.

    https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/balance/c5700.html


    Global trade is good for the same reason interstate trade and intercity trade is good. Constraint of global trade was a key precursor to the great depression.”

  35. The Great Pumpkin says:

    What’s really scary is what happens when China becomes strong enough to stop buying our treasury notes? Will people in America be cheering on globalization when this happens?

  36. Libturd in Union says:

    “Will people in America be cheering on globalization when this happens?”

    I will be. If China gets that strong, I imagine their ability to produce krap that American’s eat up will become just as expensive as it costs for us to produce it domestically. And the trade gap will close.

  37. The Great Pumpkin says:

    What will America do with the debt?

    Libturd in Union says:
    November 11, 2015 at 10:39 am
    “Will people in America be cheering on globalization when this happens?”

    I will be. If China gets that strong, I imagine their ability to produce krap that American’s eat up will become just as expensive as it costs for us to produce it domestically. And the trade gap will close.

  38. walking bye says:

    Grim, I could have used a safe space in my college years when I attended a ” take back the night” rally at Rutgers in the 92. I had gone cause I heard the girls from Douglas were taking off their tops and marching around. Suddenly Im approached by two manly women who threaten to beat my ass if I don’t leave

  39. The Great Pumpkin says:

    All I’m saying is that Ragner is all for the principles of saving and efficiency. I ask, how did globalization provide savings for the U.S? It didn’t, it put us in huge debt. How is shipping water, sand, or whatever non sense they are using finite energy sources to ship around an efficient process for human civilization?

  40. joyce says:

    Please tell me this part is made up?

    walking bye says:
    November 11, 2015 at 10:14 am
    The room was equipped with cookies, coloring books, bubbles, Play-Doh, calming music, pillows, blankets and a video of frolicking puppies, as well as students and staff members trained to deal with trauma. Emma Hall, a junior, rape survivor and “sexual assault peer educator” who helped set up the room and worked in it during the debate, estimates that a couple of dozen people used it.

  41. Fast Eddie says:

    Not going to lie, I will miss your rants going off on the local real estate for sale.

    I still look at them; I just haven’t had time to post any of them. The majority are still outlandishly overpriced sh1tholes and the fat f.uck owners need to be b1tch-slapped. I’ve been so busy with work and home detail that it’s been difficult to post. A lot of people are still really f.ucked and stuck paying for underwater hovels. Nothing has really changed and the market is still very sick in our area. As for me, I just sort of was at the right place at the right time. People were trying to submit bids on my house well after attorney review and well past the time when mortgage commitments and the inspectors lists were finalized.

  42. joyce says:

    If it wasn’t for the inflastionistas, trade deficits would be self-correcting. Simple arithmetic would mandate it.

    yome says:
    November 11, 2015 at 10:27 am
    Going from $6 million Trade deficit with China in 1985 to $1.6 B in 1986 to $343B today is fair game? Globalization is about getting in our $17.9 T economy. Interstate trades are domestic. The US enjoys the fruit of this trade.
    Trade with China; US is put into debt with them buying US treasuries. Just like politicians complaining about SS and Medicare but enjoy buying and spending this debt.

    https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/balance/c5700.html


    Global trade is good for the same reason interstate trade and intercity trade is good. Constraint of global trade was a key precursor to the great depression.”

  43. The Great Pumpkin says:

    40- The only thing I could see happening here is that the U.S. has no intentions of ever paying this money back. Why else would they let this madness continue? They must have no intentions of ever paying this back.

  44. Juice Box says:

    Safe Space Classic, Lloyd Christmas starts sucking him thumb.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hm3iwINTF90

  45. Fast Eddie says:

    The room was equipped with cookies, coloring books, bubbles, Play-Doh, calming music, pillows, blankets and a video of frolicking puppies, as well as students and staff members trained to deal with trauma.

    Oh…. my….. G0d! Are you serious?

  46. grim says:

    When Life Slips You a Jeffery, Stroke the Furry Wall

  47. walking bye says:

    I had to look it up as no one here answered my question of what is a safe space, what would cause someone to get so adamant about having one from the Yale video . Well if its good enough for Brown it’s good enough for Yale.

  48. anon (the good one) says:

    @MikeGrunwald:
    Rubio: “What we’re going through is not simply an economic downturn.”

    @JustinWolfers:
    Um, that’s 5.0% unemployment and the longest continuous run of employment growth in U.S. history, bro.

  49. Fast Eddie says:

    Um, that’s 5.0% unemployment and the longest continuous run of employment growth in U.S. history, bro.

    Employment in the Oblama world: “My I take your order?”

  50. Fast Eddie says:

    My = May

  51. Fast Eddie says:

    Everyone deserves a pony

    In white-landia, they have unicorns.

  52. D-FENS says:

    48 – What’s crazy is what students considered violations of their “safe space”. I think the Yale argument was over whether or not to wear Halloween costumes. I guess some consider Halloween offensive?

    The Missouri situation was a bit ridiculous too….some kid smeared feces on the wall at 2:00AM in the shape of a swastika. The police were called (only because it was in the shape of a swastika…other fecal shapes are ok I guess).

    At least that’s how I understand it. Frankly I don’t understand what the fcuk is going on there either.

  53. Fast Eddie says:

    Not Fast Eddie [25],

    Come to the next get-together and we’ll discuss it.

    Okay?

  54. Ben says:

    The only thing I could see happening here is that the U.S. has no intentions of ever paying this money back. Why else would they let this madness continue? They must have no intentions of ever paying this back.

    They never thought anything out in the first place. Executives saw a way to make money for themselves at the expense for workers and politicians were willing to accept donations for the cause.

    It doesn’t have to be paid back by us. Foreigners have been coming in and buying prime real estate. That’s how its getting paid back.

  55. yome says:

    This will be a good thing! We will have to live with in or means. We got into debt because someone is willing to support it, just like the housing market. Take the support out,only that have the means will be in the market

    “What’s really scary is what happens when China becomes strong enough to stop buying our treasury notes? Will people in America be cheering on globalization when this happens?”

  56. Fast Eddie says:

    Could I get a safe space, too? I was very hurt at work today. My boss said some mean things to me and I fell down the stairs and my head got bashed apart. Can I bring my shoes? I’ll bring my glasses, too!

  57. phoenix1 says:

    40 Pumps,
    Anyone who is pro-globalization is not really a pro-American…
    When you are a pro-globalist, and a world war breaks out, exactly who do you cheer for?
    Where is your honor and your allegiance.
    These things to not exist in a true (pure) capitalist.
    A non-pure capitalist understand the need for some regulation.
    A non pure capitalist would look at a playground full of children, assess their abilities, and find a way to make them perform optimally.
    A pure capitalist will only want the 5 best and brightest, then chain the rest of them up in a factory to do menial work….

  58. walking bye says:

    D-Fens, like I said I’m all for this as long as some tops are coming off. We could all use a good “burning your bra day”

  59. Alex says:

    Great article from the WSJ:

    “Yales’s Little Robespierres”

  60. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Globalization provided the means for our national debt. Without globalization, it would not be possible. Thank you globalization for lowering our wages and standard of living while at the same time putting us into huge debt. Awesome! Who were the brilliant individuals pushing this garbage, oh yea, the three stooges (reagan, bush, and clinton). God I wish the American public was smart enough to vote for perot back in the 90’s. Too bad they always support their team in red or blue. Idiots.

  61. phoenix1 says:

    57. Eddie, you fell down the stairs at work? Your boss made offensive statements?
    You do not need a “safe space”, you need a good attorney.
    A very good, pure capitalist attorney. One that will fight for you even if you
    purposely untied your shoelaces and greased your soles with butter in order to fly down the stairs with ease.
    This is America-an attorney with no morals and pure capitalistic abilities can be found almost anywhere…..

  62. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Exactly! Why does America need anyone else? Why? Our market is the biggest in the world. Look what our consumers did for China and Asia in general? We built them all up. Why the hell do we need them? So our executives can sell us out and take advantage of their slave labor? We have all types of climates and vast sums of resources, we do not need anyone else. China and all these other Asian markets do not let foreign companies practice business freely in their borders, so why the fuc! do we? Are we some kind of a joke, where we let all these countries suck the money and resources dry from our own country so a few at the time of our country can make out?

    phoenix1 says:
    November 11, 2015 at 11:16 am
    40 Pumps,
    Anyone who is pro-globalization is not really a pro-American…
    When you are a pro-globalist, and a world war breaks out, exactly who do you cheer for?
    Where is your honor and your allegiance.
    These things to not exist in a true (pure) capitalist.
    A non-pure capitalist understand the need for some regulation.
    A non pure capitalist would look at a playground full of children, assess their abilities, and find a way to make them perform optimally.
    A pure capitalist will only want the 5 best and brightest, then chain the rest of them up in a factory to do menial work….

  63. Juice Box says:

    re # 60 – “Yales’s Little Robespierres”

    More like Yales’s Little Maoists.

    For reference…

    http://davidstockmanscontracorner.com/good-little-maoists/

  64. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Forgot to add that we help build up Mexico too. They are doing great at our expense.

  65. phoenix1 says:

    62. Remember Eddie,
    Here in America the only thing that counts is FIRST PLACE.
    No one cares how you get there….

    Which is why so many athletes take performance enhancing drugs.
    Why so many companies pollute instead of cleaning up the mess.
    Why so many cheat on their taxes.
    Why so many companies perform inversions.

    Rules are for suckers in America. They are not made to be broken, but to be bent as far as possible without snapping. The most connected just pay the politician to make the rule that fits them like a lock and key….

    The hypocritical thing about all of this is when a bunch of children act out somewhere the adults keep pushing their morality crap. Every one of these old goats has more skeletons in their closet than the Arlington cemetery…

  66. D-FENS says:

    65 – You sure? I don’t see too many Americans jumping the fence to go to Mexico.

  67. phoenix1 says:

    “Constraint of global trade was a key precursor to the great depression.” Question is, was it the free, unabated global trade prior to the “constraint” that led to the great depression”

    Ragnar says:
    November 10, 2015 at 11:25 pm
    Read up on David Ricardo and comparative advantage. Global trade is good for the same reason interstate trade and intercity trade is good. Constraint of global trade was a key precursor to the great depression.

  68. phoenix1 says:

    69 redux
    and if so, clot’s prediction may come true.Events like hurricane Sandy and the Great Depression are like reset buttons. The strong will survive. I wonder how well the very rich would do in an extreme deflation scenario.
    What does one do with their college degree and no common sense?
    They were not taught to hunt, they don’t hang their clothes outside, someone else installs brakes on their cars.
    That’s what made this country great-those who can do, those that are resourceful.
    Those that make a living out of manipulating others would make good cannon fodder..

  69. joyce says:

    69
    Phoenix,
    Do you have any recommendations to start to undo these problems? I can’t think of any [peaceful] solutions. The govt is not going to relinquish any of its usurped power, and the fraudsters aren’t going to stop bribing/accepting bribes.

  70. yome says:

    The Right all agree. US income that has been stagnant for 3 decades is too high. It needs to come down to compete with the 3rd world. How can we afford their crap?

  71. phoenix1 says:

    63. Pumps,
    Those in power here want absolute power. Oligarchs. They have no need for the middle class, it’s just too pesky. It wants entitlements ( watch the debates from yesterday), clean water, good schools, etc.
    This is the opposite of what was in the debates. Two main themes, cut entitlements (with grandfathering of course) and more militarization (in one particular candidate more local militarization).
    IOW, we are not allow to get rid of those we don’t like in a means that is so unpalatable to them that they start to riot (think slow cook a frog) .
    Cut the Medicare (slowly) cut the S. Security (gradually) transfer tax load to those who can least afford it, and increase enforcement for petty offenses to keep them off balance (and joyce’s article how they cannot be convicted for almost anything). Don’t let them get any help (commercial during debate for CFPB) hey big company /bank can steal without any recourse.
    The stage is set…… The only fly in the ointment is that the youth has got the Old Goat’s number. They are the canary in the coal mine. Girl being thrown around by police in the school because “she did not follow orders”. How many Old Goats aka adults follow orders- yet they squawk discipline. Old goats are full of you know what—hypocrisy. The officer in the video was doing his job-but what exactly is that anymore?
    Where are Reed and Malloy? Not the same anymore, the video is a symptom of a much larger disease.
    You reap what you sow….. The rest of the world is watching…. It’s a known fact that America is the #1 entertainment capital of the world-who would have expected that the joke is on them….

  72. phoenix1 says:

    70 Joyce,
    No, I don’t. But when Comrade made his post the other day about how he was going to get f ####d how he might as well make money off of it I can clearly understand his point of view. He has given up all hope in saving the ship and is headed for the lifeboats.
    I have a kid and this place (America, not Global America) is her home. I have no choice but to stand and defend it as I want her to have the ability to have as good a life as I have had ( I am not rich by no means, worked my whole life, been relatively healthy) yet have little desire for material goods which is what this country is about-consumerism.

  73. Comrade Nom Deplume, the anon-tidote says:

    [20] pumps,

    Your nonresponsive response is duly noted. BTW, since you are going down the Red Guard path with your vocabulary and thinking, you can call me “capitalist running dog” from now on.

    Woof

  74. joyce says:

    73
    If that’s his point of view, which is understandable, he would have had to have given given a couple of decades ago. But anyway, regarding your comment about lawyers not caring about the veracity of the claims their making on behalf of clients… isn’t that the fault of the judges and juries for continuing to reward bad behavior? I won’t provide all the pathetic examples of jury awards to people who by their own stupidity hurt themselves.

  75. Comrade Nom Deplume, the anon-tidote says:

    [73] phoenix,

    Hell yeah, I’ve checked out. It’s increasingly clear that I have to pick a side and I pick the side with guns, fuel, food, and short waits for doctors.

    BTW, Cabelas has one day sale tomorrow on bulk .556. Time to add to inventory.

  76. Comrade Nom Deplume, the anon-tidote says:

    [75] joyce,

    “isn’t that the fault of the judges and juries for continuing to reward bad behavior? ”

    DING, DING, DING, We have a winner!

  77. The Great Pumpkin says:

    You are the man. I admire your knowledge and ability to critically think outside the box. The world needs more people like you, that see the picture for what it really is.

    phoenix1 says:
    November 11, 2015 at 12:24 pm
    70 Joyce,
    No, I don’t. But when Comrade made his post the other day about how he was going to get f ####d how he might as well make money off of it I can clearly understand his point of view. He has given up all hope in saving the ship and is headed for the lifeboats.
    I have a kid and this place (America, not Global America) is her home. I have no choice but to stand and defend it as I want her to have the ability to have as good a life as I have had ( I am not rich by no means, worked my whole life, been relatively healthy) yet have little desire for material goods which is what this country is about-consumerism.

  78. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Red Guard path? I want a better America, that’s all. What does that have to do with Communism? Should I adore the current “broken” system, just so I don’t get called a Commie? If the current system is so freaking great, why does it have so many problems? I’m not allowed to think outside the box and think of better ways of doing things? If I think outside the box, I’m considered a Communist? If I think team work beats individual achievement, I’m now a collectivist Commie? Wtf? Team work will always beat out individual achievement, if that makes me a commie, so be it.

    Comrade Nom Deplume, the anon-tidote says:
    November 11, 2015 at 12:47 pm
    [20] pumps,

    Your nonresponsive response is duly noted. BTW, since you are going down the Red Guard path with your vocabulary and thinking, you can call me “capitalist running dog” from now on.

    Woof

  79. joyce says:

    77
    Comrade,
    It would also help if actual frivolous lawsuits were thrown out rather than just the ones that would cause trouble for the government and gov’s friends.

  80. Marilyn says:

    #32, I miss them too. Especially the wrecks with pictures.

  81. 1987 Condo says:

    How panhandling pays: $400 in two hours

    A panhandler outside Grand Central Terminal says he rakes in up to $200 an hour from kind-hearted New Yorkers.

    And the 43-year-old former theater stagehand is only one of a legion of beggars in the city hauling in big bucks and a smorgasbord of food doing nothing but sitting on the sidewalk with hands out.

    “On a Friday morning, I make $400 in two hours,’’ said Will Andersen, who was with his 9-year-old dog, Rizzo, on East 42nd Street between Vanderbilt and Madison avenues on Tuesday.
    As Andersen was talking to The Post, another beggar told him gleefully, “I got three breakfast sandwiches today! And they were all meat! I’m putting on pounds out here!”

    The beggars’ comments came a day after Police Commissioner Bill Bratton urged New Yorkers to simply not give if they want to get vagrants off the streets.

    Panhandling is so lucrative, Andersen said he now rents a room in Inwood after being homeless for three years. He said he’s on the street only to collect handouts.

    “I have gotten $80 or $100 from a single person. And they will say, ‘Just do something good tonight.’ They mean go to a hotel or a hostel,’’ he said.

    “I get people who give me five bucks each day. Five bucks each day, that’s five days a week, two people — that’s $50 a week right there. I get dog food. I put away for rent. I pay $300 a month, that’s nothing.”

    Andersen admitted that the pooch helps.

    “People are more generous because I have a dog, 100%. They throw me a dollar and say, ‘That’s for the dog,’ ’’ Andersen said, sitting next to a duffel bag full of donated food for himself.

    Another beggar, working the northeast corner of West 35th Street and Seventh Avenue near Penn Station, said that just like everything else in the city, it’s all about location for vagrants.

    “There are other spots where people get hundred-dollar bills. I could go over to Fifth Avenue and make $150 before lunch,’’ said the man, 36, who gave only his first name, Daniel. “But I don’t want to deal with the hassle,’’ he said. “There’s people that bully you to get out of the good spots.’’

    Some vagrants even admitted that Bratton is right on the money — New Yorkers shouldn’t be giving them dough.

    “If you stop giving them money and help them with those other things, like blankets, clothing and food, they would definitely leave because they would know they couldn’t get the money to get high or drunk,’’ said Shaunyece Darling, 22, who panhandles with her boyfriend, dog and three cats.

    http://www.marketwatch.com/story/how-panhandling-pays-400-in-two-hours-2015-11-11

  82. The Great Pumpkin says:

    82-

    Condo, that is the biggest piece of propaganda I have ever read. Wow, now people in the streets begging have it good. I have heard it all. I’m quitting my job today so that I can make 200 an hour begging on the streets. What a joke.

  83. Joyce [41]; Eddie [46];

    No they were serious, or at least the NY Times was. http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/22/opinion/sunday/judith-shulevitz-hiding-from-scary-ideas.html

    I don’t give them enough credit to be playing it straight for the humor value.

  84. 1987 Condo says:

    #83..I think there is some debate that these folks are those truly in need and that perhaps the dollars folks are giving them could be better directed elsewhere to those in need and distress.

  85. Ragnar says:

    Everyone likes me and thinks I’m great in my safe space (In My Safe Space)
    People don’t judge me and haters don’t hate in my safe space (In Your Safe Space)
    Bully proof windows, troll safe doors, nothing but kindness in here.
    You might call me a pu$$y, but I won’t hear you in my safe space. (In My Safe Space)
    Bully proof windows.
    If you do not like me, you are not allowed in my safe space. (In My Safe Space)
    Look and you will see there is a very select crowd in your safe space. (In My Safe Space)
    People that support me, mixed in with more people that support me, and say nice things!
    Rainbows all around me. There is no shame in my safe space. (In My Safe Space)

  86. Comrade Nom Deplume, the anon-tidote says:

    [83] pumps

    Surfaced just long enough to tell you that you are full of it. There are such people, some do quite well, and this has been joked about for a long time. Here’s one of my favorite episodes from the 70’s.

    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0519120/

    One panhandler I recall had a rather touching schtick outside the State Street station in Boston. Until one day when a Globe reporter saw her get up after rush hour and get into a Lexus SUV. He ran the plate and found out she lived in Marblehead, MA. Google the town to see if it sound anything like the ‘hood.

  87. D-FENS says:

    Safe space

    @JamesOKeefeIII: Journalists on sidewalk at @Yale were detained by police and banned from campus last night for attempting to ask Dean Qs. Video up shortly..

  88. Not Phoenix1 says:

    Your post on #72 is right on.

    But ask yourself, why has the top 20% decided to forgo our traditions and go full steam ahead into a authoritarian state. Stupidity, same type of stupidity that wanted the US to side with Germany in WW2.

    A sizeable percentage of the so called elites, think that our main competitor China, having a authoritarian one-party state, we must have the same to win and we can not let our democratic/open society thingy get in their way.

    What they see as our “thingy” thing has been our saving. Once we lose it, as we are a multicultural heterogeneous society, will have no glue sticking us together. We all have our preferences and dislikes but what keeps us together is the “Constitution”. Take it away in fact or in action, and will fall apart much sooner than later.

  89. jcer says:

    To weigh in on global competition the issue is one of fairness. While America can compete with free countries with open economies we cannot compete with China who manipulates currency and has no notion of workplace safety, environmental protection, etc. Competition works to find efficiencies to exploit to maximize profits and that is the goal, the problem with the globalization is it causes the opposite, it is a race to the bottom all about wage arbitrage and taking advantage of the lack of economic development in certain countries. Bring on the competition but it should be fair and the goal shoul dbe to eliminate the worker not hire 4 instead of one at a dollar a day.

  90. phoenix1 says:

    90 Not,
    For someone who is “not me” you think the same way I do, at least in this post…

    ” We all have our preferences and dislikes but what keeps us together is the “Constitution”. Take it away in fact or in action, and will fall apart much sooner than later.”

  91. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Well said.

    jcer says:
    November 11, 2015 at 3:18 pm
    To weigh in on global competition the issue is one of fairness. While America can compete with free countries with open economies we cannot compete with China who manipulates currency and has no notion of workplace safety, environmental protection, etc. Competition works to find efficiencies to exploit to maximize profits and that is the goal, the problem with the globalization is it causes the opposite, it is a race to the bottom all about wage arbitrage and taking advantage of the lack of economic development in certain countries. Bring on the competition but it should be fair and the goal shoul dbe to eliminate the worker not hire 4 instead of one at a dollar a day.

  92. phoenix1 says:

    Jcer,
    The Chinese could care less about fairness any more than the oligarchs do.
    It’s no accident what is going on. It’s a power ploy.
    They will play the game till some kook pushes the big red button.
    It’s all ego driven….

  93. 1987 Condo says:

    #90….straight from “Bridge of Spies”!

    “What they see as our “thingy” thing has been our saving. Once we lose it, as we are a multicultural heterogeneous society, will have no glue sticking us together. We all have our preferences and dislikes but what keeps us together is the “Constitution”. Take it away in fact or in action, and will fall apart much sooner than later.”

  94. walking bye says:

    @90 That guy looks like he can’t even tie his own shoes let alone maintain a house.

  95. Ragnar says:

    Pumpkin,
    Make the first step towards stopping globalization by personally boycotting and ceasing to use any electronic equipment whose cost has been made progressively cheaper over the years via manufacture and assembly overseas.
    You can call in all of your future comments for the board to grim via a 1960s era Bell rotary phone. His phone number is 555 -3825968

  96. joyce says:

    stupidity should not be against the law

    http://www.mercurynews.com/sports/ci_29098831/rainders-ray-ray-armstrong-under-investigation-barking-at

    Raiders’ linebacker Ray-Ray Armstrong apparently got into a barking session with a police dog before Sunday’s game in Pittsburgh.

    Allegheny County Sheriff’s Office chief deputy Kevin Kraus met with representatives from the district attorney’s office to discuss charges that Armstrong could be facing, according to WTAE.

  97. joyce says:

    Agree with your comment except for calling out China for currency manipulation. Every country with a central bank (at least) is guilty of this.

    jcer says:
    November 11, 2015 at 3:18 pm

    China who manipulates currency

  98. joyce says:

    Ragnar,
    First comment regarding posts much earlier in the day:
    If people are going to change the definition of a word (for example: capitalism) and then criticize the concept (as newly defined), don’t feel the need to defend it … because they won’t understand.

    Second comment regarding below:
    Nothing wrong in my opinion with work being done overseas as long as the work isn’t being done by slave or slave-like labor (which is and isn’t the case in some countries)… also as long as there’s not one-sided trade agreements in place favoring some over the others.

    Last comment reiterating my first:
    Don’t defend the concepts of free trade with people here that are arguing against the Free Trade Agreements (which are anything but).

    Ragnar says:
    November 11, 2015 at 4:04 pm
    Pumpkin,
    Make the first step towards stopping globalization by personally boycotting and ceasing to use any electronic equipment whose cost has been made progressively cheaper over the years via manufacture and assembly overseas.

  99. Ragnar says:

    China doesn’t really have an undervalued currency anymore.
    This view actually came from hawkish Republicans what seems like 5 or 6 years ago. Since then, the RMB has strengthened vs the dollar, and especially against the Yen and Euro, meanwhile inflation has pushed up their local costs, and labor costs have gone up as well.
    It is definitely a more controlled currency than average, because the capital account is semi-closed.

  100. yome says:

    The problem is we can not afford to pay for cheap goods to boycott manufactured outside the US.We were able to afford high standard of living before globalization because our salaries went up same as the cost of buying. We were paid good with good pensions and benefits. Today,after competing us with the 3rd world labor they tell us we are paid extremely high. we can not compete against the 3rd world labor. our salaries need to come down.After 3 decades of stagnant growth in income our salaries need to come down to compete with the 3rd world

    “Make the first step towards stopping globalization by personally boycotting and ceasing to use any electronic equipment whose cost has been made progressively cheaper over the years via manufacture and assembly overseas.”

  101. jcer says:

    Ragnar, compared to Euro and Dollar RMB is undervalued, if it wasn’t what is the reason for not allowing it to float freely. When you’re a producer country there is great demand on the FOREX for your currency why do we think the Germans have the euro and would have a stronger currency without the monetary union. The US dollars value is totally driven by being the dominant world power, at this point it is almost disconnected from the actions of the federal reserve. The Chinese government also supports businesses in other ways, basically first world producers need to compete against a criminal government entity. I’m all for having stuff made in china but lets not kid ourselves, we have moved too much and have seriously harmed our domestic capacity. Also we must make the distinction between using market based tools to control the exchange rates and simply setting them and controlling all foreign exchange.

  102. yome says:

    With a Trade Surplus of $330 billion annually against the US, the RMB should be much stronger than the US dollar to cut the imbalance. The imbalance is not a fair play

    “China doesn’t really have an undervalued currency anymore.
    This view actually came from hawkish Republicans what seems like 5 or 6 years ago. Since then, the RMB has strengthened vs the dollar, and especially against the Yen and Euro, meanwhile inflation has pushed up their local costs, and labor costs have gone up as well.”

  103. yome says:

    No more tipping at Joe’s Crab Shack

  104. anon (the good one) says:

    @HillaryClinton:
    For 35 years, Republicans have argued that more wealth at the top will trickle down—and twice, a Democrat has had to clean up the mess.

  105. NJT says:

    #82 [NJ]

    I remember back in the 80s there was a guy out on Long Island that lost his job and didn’t have the balls to tell his wife, kids and friends. Put on a suit an’ tie got on the train to Manhattan and then changed…to beg. Made more money doing that than working at his WS job.

    Re: ‘Safe Space’:

    Back in the 1980s, in the USAF, Drill Instructors were not allowed to hit you but fellow Airmen could (‘blanket party’ ect.). One dumbass thought he could hide in his locker (they were not nailed down and big enough to squeeze into). DI had us beat it with broomsticks for fifteen minutes then threw it down the stairs, with him in it! Heh, heh, so much for a ‘safe place’.

  106. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    from yesterday – joyce – I think perhaps you have not been in enough of these situations to understand the context; and that’s a good thing. I have an illustrious enough past that I have a lot of experience from the John Q. Public side of things. Here is my best advice to anyone interacting with cops: 1. Comply with all requests they make of you. 2. Tell the truth. I have done this so many times in my youth that I quickly realized that it’s a winning strategy. Think about a cop who pulls a car over. Think about how many lies they have been told. Think about how much experience they have in sorting wheat from chaff. I have told a cop that I had 6 drinks at a bowling party and been let go. I have told a cop that I was going 30 mph over the speed limit and been let go. I have told a cop that, “You know how sometimes the right car just makes you do the wrong things?” and been let go. If you do not have a dead hooker in the trunk, your best, best, best, option is being respectful and tell the truth. It’s such a lost art that most cops, who are absolute *EXPERTS* in being lied to, that you are instantly ingratiated to them when they recognize you as one of those freaks who actually shows them respect and goes a step further by telling the truth! As a white guy for whom this always works out well, I can only imagine that if you were a minority who dared do this, the cop might be so astounded at this incredible story he’s going to tell his buddies about at the bar that he might give you 20 dollars walking around money and encourage you to tell your story to your friends, and then let you go as well.

    joyce says:
    November 10, 2015 at 2:01 pm
    The Supreme Court ruled Monday that officers are immune from lawsuits unless it is “beyond debate” that a shooting was unjustified and clearly unreasonable.
    http://www.seattletimes.com/nation-world/high-court-makes-it-harder-to-sue-police-for-using-deadly-force-in-chases/

    wouldn’t be a bad thing if these a-holes in robes drove off a cliff in the near future

  107. Joyce says:

    109
    The odds are stacked heavily against anyone who tries to fight the police whether justified or not. I have never encouraged anyone to resist, and I have never disagreed with you (or others here) when you’ve said compliance is your best strategy.
    I couldn’t disagree more with more about admitting to drinking if you get pulled over. You just handed them probable cause on a silver platter to conduct a field sobriety test and/or a breath or blood test. Your best bet in that situation OR ANY situation is to keep your mouth shut when dealing with the cops. If you’ve admitting to drinking and had success, I tip my hat to you. I also don’t advocate drinking and driving, but if in that situation don’t admit to it!
    Regarding that article, there’s no defending the actions of the police nor the INSANE ruling by the kangaroos.

    PS. I also think you heavily overestimate the cognitive abilities of the average pig.

  108. Joyce says:

    Wis. police retrieve flag burned at GOP debate protest
    By Greg Moore
    Associated Press

    MILWAUKEE — Milwaukee’s police chief said Wednesday that he’s proud of officers who extinguished and respectfully folded an American flag set on fire by a protester near the Republican presidential debate.

    Photos and video of Tuesday night’s incident quickly spread on social media. They show officers putting out the flames near the Milwaukee Theatre and then ceremonially folding the flag.

    Police Chief Edward Flynn said his officers are responsible for protecting the rights of protesters, but also have a duty “to take a treasured symbol of our national unity and freedom and treat it respectfully.”

    Ugh no they don’t chief

  109. Ragnar says:

    Advice to millenials: buy a house you can barely afford today, using a large mortgage, then earn promotions and pay raises.
    Bloomberg – The Case for Buying a Home You Can’t Afford http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-11-11/the-case-for-buying-a-home-you-can-t-afford

  110. Ragnar says:

    Tonight’s South Park features officer Barbrady shooting minority kids.

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