Last Call!

From HousingWire:

Black Knight: Will 2016 end refinance demand?

Approximately 5.2 million borrowers could likely both qualify for and benefit from refinancing, but it’s possible that this number will be slashed in half by the end of the year.

Black Knight Financial Services’ latest Mortgage Monitor report, which is based on data as of the end of November 2015, said that a 50 basis point rise in interest rates would eliminate 2.1 million potential candidates from refinance eligibility. A 1% rise in interest rates would eliminate 3.1 million.

Senior Vice President Ben Graboske explained that a 100-basis-point increase would only leave 2 million potential refinance candidates: the lowest population of refinance candidates in recent history.

“This population is diminishing, and as mortgage interest rates rise, it will only continue to shrink further,” said Graboske.

He added that this is already down from over 7 million as recently as April 2015, when interest rates were below 3.7%.

This giant fall out of refinance eligible borrowers could actually come to fruition if Freddie Mac’s predictions for 2016 come true.

Freddie Mac’s chief economist, Sean Beckett, said the market should expect the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage to average below 4.5% for 2016 on an annualized basis.

CoreLogic’s 2016 outlook for housing echoed this saying, “Fixed-rate mortgages will rise, perhaps up one-half of a percentage point between now and the end of 2016, reaching 4.5% for 30-year loans.”

For those who do choose to refinance, Graboske said, “Some 2.4 million are looking at potentially saving $200 or more on their monthly mortgage payments post-refinancing. Again, this is a very rate-sensitive population: after a 50-basis-point rise in rates, a million borrowers would lose out on those savings.”

This entry was posted in Economics, Housing Recovery, Mortgages, National Real Estate. Bookmark the permalink.

64 Responses to Last Call!

  1. grim says:

    Vigoda > Ziggy Stardust

  2. D-FENS says:

    Did the best I could with the time and money I had. Went from underwater to treading water to above water. Then refinanced.

    Yesterday’s article from the APP on property taxes is depressing though. Neither party will fix anything. They’ll just scapegoat each other.

  3. leftwing says:

    Re: the lottery

    From prior thread, anon, if you are going to buy some Congresscritters with your winnings, buy Democrat. They’ll sell out for less.

    CBS This Morning, unverified, had in a report that even with all the demand for the last drawing only approximately 75% of the possible number combinations were sold. Interesting, would have thought that number to be higher.

  4. grim says:

    had in a report that even with all the demand for the last drawing only approximately 75% of the possible number combinations were sold.

    Not surprised, tons of folks are still insistent on picking numbers, which means they end up skewing the numbers selected to the 1-31 range, even though powerball goes up to something like 69. (Because they pick birthdays, overwhelmingly)

    The fact that it goes up to 69 is the big factor, the possible number of combinations is something like 292 million. Even if everyone did the machine pick, you’d probably need to sell 10x that to hit every single combination. Hence the reason the jackpot rolls over so much.

  5. leftwing says:

    That makes sense. Also, with 292m:1 odds, I guess even with a perfect distribution and $2 a ticket the pool would have to increase by $584m to even theoretically have every combination covered?

    Been a while since stats……

  6. D-FENS says:

    99¢ / gal gasoline. Dead ahead.

  7. Kevin says:

    I am SO glad I jumped when I saw rates hit 2.49% in November. I wish they would lend me millions for 30 years at that rate. I will take what I can get though.

    -K

  8. Libturd supporting the Canklephate says:

    Why don’t you all send your two dollars to me. I’ll give you all back $1.50 and you’ll all feel like winners.

  9. Essex says:

    Shhhhhhh Bloomberg secret Poll commissioned. Is he serious? Could be weirdly interesting.

  10. Raymond Reddington formerly Phoenix says: says:

    Teachers union, but just as well could be Social Security or Medicare–

    Q.what’s in common with these 2 teachers?

    A.Both are old goats.

    28 and 30 years of paying union dues, and now they whine. Why wait so long? Follow the money..
    They are tenured (don’t need that anymore, but it was good for 30 years)
    Received regular pay increases (getting out, don’t need that anymore)
    Were protected from losing their jobs (getting out, don’t need that anymore)
    Got their pension locked in (money’s in the bag–UNLESS someone YOUNGER muffs it up by asking for the same thing the old goat is getting).

    Both of them say that they decided to become plaintiffs because they don’t want to support a politically powerful union with which they frequently disagree.
    Nope, both want to secure the money that they used the union benefits-30 and 28 years- and the way do do that is to DENY the younger workers of the same benefits these old goats will receive…

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/education/wp/2015/08/11/two-teachers-explain-why-they-want-to-take-down-their-union/

  11. D-FENS says:

    11 – My guess is because Unions always support Democrats…and while Democrats always purport to act in Union interests, Democrats have become extreme in their support of social justice. It probably becomes difficult to teach children who have been raised (brainwashed) to support any and all of today’s social justice causes…and these teacher might disagree with the extreme left of the Democrat party who promote them.

  12. Comrade Nom Deplume, back at sea level says:

    [1] grim
    Daughter fiddling with radio and “Starman” was playing. After song, XM jockey said something about being among the stars and I said to my daughter “that’s an odd quip, does it mean Bowie died?” Had my answer 30 seconds later.

    Time is flying. I had no idea he was that old but then again, I’m getting old

  13. Comrade Nom Deplume, back at sea level says:

    [12] DFENS

    IMHO, many older teachers were more politically diverse than today’s younger, more militant teachers. I had a lot of teachers who seemed pretty conservative but still manned picket lines. Even today, how many Christians or conservatives feel muzzled and keep their heads down lest they be targeted or shunned? I think it is more than we suspect. Ben, care to weigh in here with a more informed view?

  14. Libturd supporting the Canklephate says:

    “IMHO, many older teachers were more politically diverse than today’s younger, more militant teachers.”

    I would say that politics were much less divisive and to a greater extent, people didn’t feel the need to sell their souls to political parties. I recall my parents loving Carter and Reagan. Even my very conservative and Republican dad still thinks Bill Clinton was great. Today, the president of the one party could fart America the Beautiful and the other party wouldn’t appreciate it.

  15. D-FENS says:

    David Bowie: Why are there practically no blacks on the network?

    Mark Goodman: We seem to be doing music that fits into what we want to play on MTV. The company is thinking in terms of narrowcasting.

    David Bowie: There seem to be a lot of black artists making very good videos that I’m surprised aren’t being used on MTV.

    Mark Goodman: We have to try and do what we think not only New York and Los Angeles will appreciate, but also Poughkeepsie or the Midwest. Pick some town in the Midwest which would be scared to death by… a string of other black faces, or black music. We have to play music we think an entire country is going to like, and certainly we’re a rock and roll station.

    David Bowie: Don’t you think it’s a frightening predicament to be in?

    Mark Goodman: Yeah, but no less so here than in radio.

    David Bowie: Don’t say, ‘Well, it’s not me, it’s them.’ Is it not possible it should be a conviction of the station and of the radio stations to be fair… to make the media more integrated?

  16. chicagofinance says:

    Kentucky’s Finest (Essex Edition):

    A Bengals fan relieved himself of his frustrations by relieving himself on another fan Saturday night.

    During the Bengals’ last-minute loss to the hated Steelers — Cincinnati’s eighth-straight postseason loss, dating back to 1990 — a Bengals fan urinated on another fan, police told the Cincinnati Enquirer.

    Martin Cooke, 33, was collared by cops after he allegedly punched and peed on the man sitting in front of him. Cooke, of Kentucky, is facing assault and disorderly conduct charges, the paper reported, and is due in court Monday. It’s unclear what came first, the punch or the pee.

    In total, six people were arrested Saturday night at Paul Brown Stadium, where the Steelers beat the Bengals, 18-16.

  17. leftwing says:

    Noted on CNBC you have a better chance of becoming President this election cycle than winning the lottery.

    Which got me thinking, can we just do away with the next 11 months of silliness and all agree to pick some random citizen’s name out of a hat?

  18. grim says:

    My wife’s opinion on the matter.

    “Statistics aside, someone is going to win”

  19. Juice Box says:

    Probability is someone will eventually win. Luck does in fact exist.

  20. D-FENS says:

    I propose a NJREREPORT lotto pool. Libtard should run it and collect all of our money.

  21. Danilo says:

    whoah this blog is great i love reading your articles. Keep up the great work! You know, lots of people are looking around for this information, you can aid them greatly.

  22. Essex says:

    17. When you gotta go….

  23. Libturd supporting the Canklephate says:

    None of the money will go to seniors. That’s fo sho!

  24. No Billionaire Left Behind (the good one) says:

    socialized army

    @ianbremmer

    Global defense budgets (billions)
    US $612
    China $126
    Russia $77
    UK $54
    Japan $49
    India $46
    Germany $45
    France $43
    S Korea $34
    Turkey $18

  25. Raymond Reddington formerly Phoenix says: says:

    12 D-FENS
    With Unions, what about the 2 tier wage system. Don’t see the older ones complaining about that–
    Sure, I get the “conservative” thing, it’s convenient, but naah.
    It’s always the money.
    It’s the money in medicine.
    It’s the money in Medicare.
    It’s the money in Law Enforcement.
    It’s the money Government.
    It’s the money in corporations.
    It’s the money in drug dealing.
    And yes, it’s the money in this too…..

  26. Marilyn says:

    #11. I think your reasoning here is correct.

  27. joyce says:

    26
    Not referring to old vs young… I find it amusing that when someone doesn’t want to join a union to work in a certain environment, they are called a freeloader and are told of course you have a choice… you can work elsewhere! However those same people think the advice to “work elsewhere” isn’t appropriate in the private sector.

  28. Ben says:

    28 and 30 years of paying union dues, and now they whine. Why wait so long? Follow the money..
    They are tenured (don’t need that anymore, but it was good for 30 years)
    Received regular pay increases (getting out, don’t need that anymore)
    Were protected from losing their jobs (getting out, don’t need that anymore)
    Got their pension locked in (money’s in the bag–UNLESS someone YOUNGER muffs it up by asking for the same thing the old goat is getting).

    Both of them say that they decided to become plaintiffs because they don’t want to support a politically powerful union with which they frequently disagree.
    Nope, both want to secure the money that they used the union benefits-30 and 28 years- and the way do do that is to DENY the younger workers of the same benefits these old goats will receive…

    I’ll post about this when I can. Didn’t read the whole article but the one woman brings up a ton of points that really hit the heart of the matter.

  29. Raymond Reddington formerly Phoenix says: says:

    29 Ben,
    Why wait till you are there 30 years?
    Cry me a river…..

  30. 1987 Condo says:

    Whether you join the union or not in NJEA, you have to pay the dues. I think the difference is $100 on $1,000 of annual dues ..so you pay $900 if you choose not to join.

  31. Raymond Reddington formerly known as Phoenix says:

    over the last 30 years that was the best money anyone ever spent if they worked in the school system

  32. The Great Pumpkin says:

    11-

    “”I believe that if the unions were to go away, I believe that we as a community of teachers could do negotiating for ourselves for salaries.”

    Yeah, right, keep dreaming, buddy. Teachers where I’ve worked tried that. Our employers refused. They would only negotiate with us as individuals. That way, it was easy for them to give us increases of just 10¢ per hour, if we got raises at all.

    Employers do not HAVE to negotiate with employees as a group unless they are required to by laws that ensure collective bargaining rights, and they much prefer to deal with individuals separately. Often they will instruct workers that they are not to share what their pay is with other workers as well.

    I don’t think these teachers know anything about the history of labor in this country or employer-worker relationships today. In a nutshell, there was no middle class before unions and, except for the rights that unions fought hard for and were able to gain for more than just union workers, employers still hold all the cards.

    And people died fighting for rights which these teachers are so quick to toss aside today, not rights just for themselves, but rights for ALL unionized teachers. And then they wonder why they are viewed with disdain.

    In case these teachers have been living on another planet, one of the primary reasons why the middle class has declined across America is because fewer workers are unionized: https://www.americanprogressaction.org/wp-content/…”

  33. The Great Pumpkin says:

    11- Are these teachers serious? Without becoming a union, you would be getting slapped around like all the private sector workers negotiating for themselves. How is that working out for them….something like be happy you have a job.

    The union is barely alive based on a percentage of our workforce, and you question why jobs are being shipped and the middle class is dying? Why America is becoming the land of rich and poor? Hate the union all you want, but understand it brings balance to the overall labor market. It serves a major purpose. There has to be someone in the worker’s corner fighting for their rights, without it, the entire population of workers gets left out of the discussion at the table when dividing the profits.

    Just remember, having almost no union participation in the labor force is just as dangerous as having a 90% union participation rate. Wish people could understand this.

  34. Ragnar says:

    I need to talk to the head of the Google employee union and find out his or her negotiating secrets.

  35. Juice Box says:

    re # 31- Whether you join the union or not.

    I worked in a Supermarket in High School. Min wage was $3.35 an hour as it was for most of the 1980s. The Union dues were $8 a week, you could not opt out even though I was a part timer and had no intention of making it a career. Every time I received my paycheck I became a bit angrier. Split that gig to deliver Pizza once I could drive. Cash tips and $2 an hour cash. Much better than any ole job on the books.

  36. The Great Pumpkin says:

    We are talking avg skilled employees. Why do you compare avg individuals with people born with a gift from God in their cognitive abilities? Should we shoot mentally challenged individuals as soon as they are born? Based on your logic, we should.

    Ragnar says:
    January 11, 2016 at 3:36 pm
    I need to talk to the head of the Google employee union and find out his or her negotiating secrets.

  37. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Yes, and you had no intention of ever being a career employee in the supermarket. The union was for the career employees. Protections to guarantee after 20 years of working there, they would have a decent living as opposed to min wage and no benefits.

    Juice Box says:
    January 11, 2016 at 3:50 pm
    re # 31- Whether you join the union or not.

    I worked in a Supermarket in High School. Min wage was $3.35 an hour as it was for most of the 1980s. The Union dues were $8 a week, you could not opt out even though I was a part timer and had no intention of making it a career. Every time I received my paycheck I became a bit angrier. Split that gig to deliver Pizza once I could drive. Cash tips and $2 an hour cash. Much better than any ole job on the books.

  38. Statler Waldorf says:

    MTV has done ENORMOUS damage to American society by glorifying ghetto culture and criminals over the last 25 years. It’s both amusing and sad to watch a seriously-narrated “Behind the Music” episode about “Biggie Smalls” and how he got into shootouts with other moronic “gangsters” on various days of the week.

    “Mark Goodman: We seem to be doing music that fits into what we want to play on MTV. The company is thinking in terms of narrowcasting.”

  39. grim says:

    Unions making campaign donations and vouching for a candidate is as criminal as a wall street executive paying off a pol. Same thing, unions are no better.

  40. Ben says:

    Raymond, did you even read it?

    Friedrichs: I think it was 2008 or 2009, during the big crash of our economy. There were these outstanding newer teachers in our district. The kids loved them, the parents loved them, they were good teachers, doing an outstanding job. They weren’t tenured yet.

    We find out that these teachers are all going to be pink-slipped, which means they’re going to lose their jobs. At the next meeting I said look, the economy is tanking, the parents in this district are losing their jobs, they’re taking huge pay cuts. I said I think that we should consider going to our district negotiations and offering like a 2 to 3 percent pay cut. I think our community would appreciate it. I also thought we could save the jobs of these teachers.

    They looked at me and said oh no way, the teachers will never go for a pay cut. I said how do you know if you don’t ask them?

    They would not go to the teachers. They would not put out a survey, would not even ask them would they be willing to take a pay cut.

    This is what I was told by our union leader: Rebecca, don’t worry about those teachers losing their jobs. The union is going to offer a seminar on how they can obtain unemployment benefits. I swear my jaw dropped. I said are you kidding me? They’ve been paying $1,000 a year to this union and that’s all we’re going to do for them?

    The guy actually tried to reform it from the inside and was ignored. He wanted to take a paycut to help the younger members not lose their job. Seriously, I was in this situation. Our district was cutting a lot of young employees and the union actually supported these layoffs through their silence. They don’t care, and they were hoping to free up money through layoffs so they could get paid more themselves. When we were in this situation, we were hoping that one of the older teachers speak up like this guy did. Not a single one did, because they were content to sit there with their tenure. From what these teachers say, they were probably never represented properly with their dues and they have every right to try to get it back and then some.

  41. Ben says:

    IMHO, many older teachers were more politically diverse than today’s younger, more militant teachers. I had a lot of teachers who seemed pretty conservative but still manned picket lines. Even today, how many Christians or conservatives feel muzzled and keep their heads down lest they be targeted or shunned? I think it is more than we suspect. Ben, care to weigh in here with a more informed view?

    I don’t agree. My observation is the the political spectrum of teachers matches the general population.

  42. Ben says:

    Whether you join the union or not in NJEA, you have to pay the dues. I think the difference is $100 on $1,000 of annual dues ..so you pay $900 if you choose not to join.

    Always toyed with the idea of not doing it just for the extra $100 but it’s not worth being blacklisted and having certain people badmouth you behind your back.

    Funny, they negotiated 5 straight years of pay decreases for me and I was paying them for the luxury of that. The second I jump ship, I manage to secure a 22k raise…clearly I was not a beneficiary of collective bargaining.

  43. NJT says:

    #40 – And I remember some (David Bowie is one) saying (back in the early 80s) when MTV was only a few years old that black ‘artists’ were being excluded.

    I stopped watching it when Bevis and Butthead ended (mid 90s?).

    *My wife HATED them but then, she was not a suburban teenage boy in the 70s or 80s.

    BTW, Bowie made a killer comeback using the channel. Could it be because of the demographic?

    I’ve worked with many from the U.K., OZ and NZ over the years. They just DON’T get how the U.S. works! – Notice I didn’t mention SF. Almost all of them think our ‘culture’ is as homogenous as theirs.

    *Marketing is not racist, it’s about money.

    Um, havn’t been to the U.K., OZ or NZ in over twenty five years so, they’ve probably changed.

  44. Essex says:

    42. Some districts used Federal money to save jobs of teachers.
    Ben you are a younger teacher in a field where you are readily employable.
    You haven’t got quite the point-of-view of a late career liberal arts major …

  45. D-FENS says:

    In the old days, if you didn’t pay your dues, they just threatened to hit you over the head with a ball peen hammer. It’s now politically incorrect to do that and they’ve just convinced lawmakers to pass laws that force you to pay.

  46. joyce says:

    I thought the article was about individuals with college degrees. I thought they are “professionals” Idiot.

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    January 11, 2016 at 3:50 pm
    We are talking avg skilled employees.

  47. Splat Mofo says:

    NJT (45)-

    The cancellation of Beavis & Butthead was the start of the collapse of Western Civilization.

    Smoke ’em if you got ’em, gang.

  48. Splat Mofo says:

    Take a look at the law man, beating up the wrong guy.

  49. Libturd at home says:

    @ianbremmer

    Global defense budgets (billions)
    US $612
    China $126

    Thank you Obama….How much does Gitmo cost to keep open?

  50. Splat Mofo says:

    Oh man, look at those cavemen go.

  51. Ben says:

    Some districts used Federal money to save jobs of teachers.
    Ben you are a younger teacher in a field where you are readily employable.
    You haven’t got quite the point-of-view of a late career liberal arts major …

    Others saw an opportunity to gut their staff as much as they could hiding behind “less state aid”. I have the point of view in what’s right. If the unions refuse to try to help their new members, their new members deserve their dues back.

    The possibility of me not paying dues is a dream come true. I don’t benefit from collective bargaining and never have. I would also like the ability to opt out of the pension system as well.

  52. NJT says:

    #49 [SMF] – Joyce would enjoy the ‘Couch fishing’ episode (cop is involved).

    Entire thing is on youtube. Hysterical!

  53. Essex says:

    53. I think, Ben, that you may get your wish. Depending upon the ruling. One thing is for sure, change is the only constant. Get used to it I suppose.

  54. The Great Pumpkin says:

    11- Yes, he gets it.

    “I work in the private sector and I have a defined pension account so your statement is not even close to being factual. Lets look at actual facts though. Before the 2006 pension law change defined pensions had a ceiling of every given year that could even be in the fund. After the change it was now that their were subject to a low amount as outlined by the law itself. The reasoning had nothing to with any public sector funds, but because hedge fund managers were buying companies and raiding the pension funds as profit and the US Government then had to reimburse those who had contributed. The law never addressed the actual problem of stealing the funds only that the US Government would no longer honor them those who were financially injured by the raiding of their monies. In 2008 all stocks in the world were depressed by the stock market crash and that included ALL pension funds. All pension plans rely on how monies are invested to make gains. As time has passed all funds have made huge gains as the stock market recovered. All pension funds have 3 categories. Monies for liabilities which are funds to pay current retirees of the fund, Monies to be invested, and new monies collected. There are also 12 different categories of a defined pension and each one is different. To say defined pensions are ” bad ” is deceitful, absurd, and adolescent in financial realities.”

  55. Ben says:

    #49 [SMF] – Joyce would enjoy the ‘Couch fishing’ episode (cop is involved).

    Entire thing is on youtube. Hysterical!

    We need to get Pumpkin a Winger shirt

  56. The Great Pumpkin says:

    What wealth?

    Just imagine if you took Paterson, Passaic, Newark, and Camden out of the equation, the stats would be through the roof.

    “New Jersey is one of the wealthiest states in the United States of America, with a per capita income of $35,928 (2012) and a personal per capita income of $50,781 (2010).[1][2] Its median household income is $71,637 (2012) and its median family income is $87,389 (2012), both the second highest in the country.[3] The median value of an owner-occupied housing unit is $337,900 (2012), ranked fifth in the country.[2][4] New Jersey has the highest percentage of millionaire residents in the country with 7.12% of New Jersey households having $1 million or more liquid or investible assets, not including equity in homes.[5][6]

    New Jersey’s proximity to the metropolitan giants of New York City and Philadelphia greatly influences its wealth. A vast majority of the state consists of suburbs of these two cities, an explanation for much of the state’s high incomes. Approximately 76% of New Jersey places have per capita incomes above the national average[citation needed]; however, according to the 2008-2012 American Community Survey, 9.9% (US average 14.9%) of the population lives below the poverty line.[1] Three of the country’s wealthiest counties are located in the north and central portion of the state, including Morris County (4th nationally), Somerset County (8th), and Hunterdon County(10th).[7] There are also several seaside resorts along the New Jersey shoreline that are particularly wealthy, such as Mantoloking, Sea Girt, and Spring Lake along the coast close to New York and Sea Isle City, Avalon, and Stone Harbor in the south[citation needed]. Southern New Jersey, is less affluent overall, excluding several Philadelphia suburbs in Camden, Burlington and Gloucester Counties and the coast. Camden, the poorest city in the state, has a poverty rate of 35.5%. Other poor areas are the urban cities across the Hudson River from New York City, including Newark, Paterson, and Passaic.

    In 2012, 9.1% of New Jersey households have annual incomes of or over $200,000, and 17.5% have incomes of $100,000 or more. By contrast, 5.3% have incomes of less than $10,000, and 24.9% less than $34,999.[1]”

  57. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Rags was referring to Google. Still think that teacher salary is so great? This is first year compensation for a position at Google. People are making lots of money out there, leave the teachers alone.

    “Google as a software engineer right out of undergrad starting in NY.
    USA:
    Year 1 Compensation : about $175K
    This is where that number comes from:
    105k base salary
    ~40k equity in year one (250 Google Stock Units vesting 25% a year)
    ~15k bonus in year one ( 15% target bonus. Could be up or down )
    5k relocation bonus.
    9k toward 401k ( 50% match if you invest a full 18 k )
    Slew of other benefits to add to your overall comp package.””

    joyce says:
    January 11, 2016 at 5:25 pm
    I thought the article was about individuals with college degrees. I thought they are “professionals” Idiot.

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    January 11, 2016 at 3:50 pm
    We are talking avg skilled employees.

  58. The Great Pumpkin says:

    59- Could you imagine getting a 9,000 match on your 401k? You are set! Never mind a 15,000 bonus in your first year. Why isn’t anybody complaining about this compensation? Because it’s a private company? You are still paying for it? What diff does it make if it’s a public or private employee? You are paying for it no matter what. So why no complaints? If a govt employee was getting $9,000 in 401k contributions or a 175,000 compensation packages in the first year, you would all be complaining. Stating that it’s outrageous. So why is this not outrageous? Yes, I’m playing devil’s advocate.

  59. Raymond Reddington formerly known as Phoenix says:

    In NJ, 9.1 % of homes have income of 200k, they are also 1 illness or job loss away from a 50% pay cut…..

  60. florida says:

    Do you have a Florida house you are looking to sell quick? If so, then you have come to the right place. Hello, and welcome to my “We Buy Houses Gainesville, Florida” website. I am a local real estate investor and I have been buying houses for cash for a while now and I would love to have the opportunity to make you an all cash offer on your property.sell house fast Fl

  61. Ben [42];

    The union always votes for layoffs over pay cuts. First, they don’t want to set a pay cut precedent. “Not one step back[, Comrade]!

    Second, laid off workers aren’t union members and don’t vote for union leaders. The ones that are left have the union leaders to thank for saving their inflated paychecks, (as long as dues are confisc@ted every pay period).

  62. Nice read, I just passed this onto a colleague who was doing a little research on that. And he actually bought me lunch since I found it for him smile So let me rephrase that: Thanks for lunch!

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