Otteau: NJ home prices to rise 4% in 2016

From the Record:

N.J. housing expert sees 4 percent rise in prices this year

New Jersey home prices are likely to rise about 4 percent this year, as a thriving job market boosts a housing sector that’s still recovering from the worst downturn in decades, a housing analyst said Wednesday.

“Job creation fuels home purchases,” appraiser Jeffrey Otteau of East Brunswick, who researches the real estate market statewide, told an audience of real estate agents in Hasbrouck Heights.

Employers created more than 81,500 jobs in New Jersey last year, the best performance since 1999. Those new jobs, in turn, helped push the number of home sales in the state up 17 percent last year, to the highest level since 2005, Otteau said.

But New Jersey home values are still more than 15 percent below the peaks they reached during the housing bubble, and they will not reach those levels again till 2023, Otteau predicted. That was a less optimistic prediction than he has given in the past; at various points during the housing bust, he forecast that prices would return to their peaks in 2018, 2019 or 2020. His new forecast apparently reflects a slower pace of price increases than he earlier forecast. Average values rose about 1.5-percent annually in the last two years, Otteau said Wednesday.

Areas closer to New York City’s powerful economic engine have fared best, he said. In affluent towns with rail lines to New York, such as Ridgewood and Glen Rock, prices have recovered to their peaks, he said.

“The lowest unemployment rates and the best housing markets, for the most part, are in the places closest to New York City,” Otteau said. Bergen and Passaic counties both have less than a six-month supply of homes for sale at the current sales pace — an inventory level that points to rising prices as buyers bid on a small number of choices.

But sales along the shore are less robust, partly because of changes in flood insurance rules after Superstorm Sandy and partly because baby boomers are at an age where they’re less interested in buying beach homes, Otteau said. And demand for houses in Sussex and Warren counties is also sluggish, because those counties are beyond easy commuting distance to New York City, he said.

Most of the new construction in the state has been in multi-family rentals, Otteau noted. Millennials are renting longer than their parents did, in part because incomes have been flat and in part because young people have seen firsthand that home values can plummet.

“Young people don’t have the confidence in the investment value of homeownership that prior generations had,” Otteau said.

This entry was posted in Economics, Housing Recovery, New Jersey Real Estate. Bookmark the permalink.

69 Responses to Otteau: NJ home prices to rise 4% in 2016

  1. grim says:

    Just wanted to take a second to recognize some of (who I think) are the best housing, business, and economics journalists in NJ. I’ve been looking at bylines for the past 11 years, and I feel like I know some of these people personally.

    Heather Haddon from the Ledger (who I believe is now with the WSJ), Kathleen Lynn at the Record, and Michael Diamond at the APP.

    Today’s is by Kathleen – who has been doing an absolutely bang up job covering North Jersey real estate.

    Not that my opinion is worth much these days. But 11 years ago, the coverage sucked, and I’d argue was also terribly ‘influenced’.

  2. grim says:

    From the Post:

    Bid on the house of a slain New Jersey mob boss, if you dare

    A gated Fort Lee, NJ, mansion once owned by Murder Incorporated mob boss Albert Anastasia — who was himself murdered while at a Midtown barbershop in 1957 — is up for auction this June. The 25-room home at 75 Bluff Road, built in 1947, comes with its own sauna and Jacuzzi room that the current owners converted from a slaughtering room. It had been a tiled room with a drain in the middle of the floor — who knows what (or who) was killed there!

    The home, with great views of NYC, also features extra-thick walls and at least one secret passageway that once joined a closet from one bedroom into another room, Narnia-style. Actor and comedian Buddy Hackett later owned the manse, which is now owned by trucking/ferry mogul Arthur Imperatore. Its reserve price is $5.5 million.

    The property, on 1.3 acres, is on the Palisades cliffs. It was a private enclave so close to New York City that it served as the “ideal setting for many gangland gatherings,” according to auction house Guernsey’s.

  3. Mike says:

    I’m sure this has been posted before, but an Atlantic City lifeguard collecting a $52000 pension.

    http://www.nj.com/opinion/index.ssf/2016/03/lifeguards_with_public_pensions_no_wonder_atlantic.html

  4. Fabius Maximus says:

    #5 (previous thread) 3b

    There were a lot of points in your original thread and to address them would be better done at a gtg. It would be an interesting discussing spanning 40+ countries and a lot of topics.
    I don’t care what nationality you are, if you have an informed argument or point of view, I want to hear it. There have been many Americans that have written and discussed Irish British Relations, far better that I could, and many from other countries that have written and discussed the Founding fathers to the same level.
    Yes Europe is in trouble, but most countries realize that they are better inside than outside. One of the fun parts will be watching the vote.

  5. Anon E. Moose says:

    Mike [3];

    Atlantic City goes broke on April 6th. Of course, I have a poker tournament there April 8. :-/

  6. dentss says:

    Lifeguards lives matter …..

  7. grim says:

    Seems everyone matters but the taxpayers

  8. Juice Box says:

    It’s looking frothy when real estate agents think they can date A-Rod.

    http://nypost.com/2016/03/24/rich-men-like-a-rod-dont-want-to-date-models-anymore/

  9. chicagofinance says:
  10. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “Now, as technology makes more and more jobs unnecessary, maybe it’s time for a different framing of work. Twenty years ago, Jeremy Rifkin estimated that about 75% of jobs in industrialized countries included tasks that could be at least partially automated, and as artificial intelligence and engineering improves, that number keeps getting higher.

    “Society seems to be in denial over this, to a large extent,” Dean says. “So, we see the persistent belief that we can achieve ‘full employment.’ Rifkin showed empirically that this is nonsense, unless we create a lot of make-work, i.e., work for the sake of working. And that’s what, as a society, we seem to be doing. Everywhere you look there are stupid, pointless (and probably environmentally destructive) jobs.

    If we don’t work, how will we pay rent? Dean supports the idea of unconditional basic income—a system in which society pays everyone enough to meet basic needs, so we can all spend our time doing something that truly fulfills us.

    “Society has become wealthier and wealthier,” he says. “Even by traditional measures of total wealth (e.g. GDP) one can see this. But the wealth has become more and more concentrated in the hands of a few. So, the question is primarily not about work, it’s about how you share the wealth more fairly and humanely.

    “The reason that it’s no longer about work is because most of the wealth no longer comes from human labor,” he adds. “But the way the problem is typically presented, you’d think idleness was the problem, and that getting people back into work was the solution. But the global economic collapse wasn’t caused by human idleness, and neither were the previous recessions.”

    If everyone was paid a universal basic income, that doesn’t mean we’d all quit our jobs. It’s just that far fewer people would actually need to work to keep the economy running, thanks to both technological advances and other improvements in efficiency and productivity.

    “It isn’t to say that there’s no need for human labor—obviously there is,” says Dean. “But if you look at the figures for human labor requirements to, say, produce food for a society, you can see what a staggering effect advancements have had—they’ve reduced work requirements to a tiny fraction of previous eras.”

    Others argue that eliminating tax loopholes for the rich could help fund a universal basic income. And though the idea may be theoretical in most countries now, a few places, like Switzerland, are considering actually putting it in place, with a yearly income of 30,000 Swiss francs guaranteed just for being alive.

    Dean hopes that more people will start to question the way society frames the idea of work. “Antiwork is my way of facing up to a huge social obstacle to change,” he says. “That obstacle is the way work—and, in particular, ‘full employment’—is morally framed as inherently virtuous and necessary. This is a moral argument which usually isn’t questioned or investigated. It’s just taken for granted.””

    http://www.fastcoexist.com/3041719/change-generation/work-is-bullshit-the-argument-for-antiwork

  11. grim says:

    These college problems are all caused by a lack of hazing.

    We need a new freshmen seminar requirement where freshmen are repeatedly kicked in the ass and berated.

    This is to make up for all the f*cking gold stars, trophies, and ponies they received, giving them a completely unrealistic world view.

  12. grim says:

    That’s a beautiful house.

    Incredibly tasteful.

    Bone, and the lettering is something called Silian Rail. Look at that subtle off-white coloring. The tasteful thickness of it. Oh, my God. It even has a watermark.

  13. Fast Eddie says:

    It’s Hoboken, not Manhattan. Just like Bon Jovi will never be Springsteen.

  14. collencolm says:

    I’ve been surfing online more than three hours today, yet I never found any interesting article like yours. It’s pretty worth enough for me. In my view , if all webmasters and bloggers made good content as you did, the web w ill be much more useful than ever before. Cayman Real Estate

  15. [2] I used to go to a mob restaurant on Route 17 North, just a little bit North of Route 3, does anybody remember the name? It is one storey, brick, and windowless. The first thing you would notice when you walk through the front door is a large floor to ceiling mirror 10 steps in front of you. The mirror is actually one way glass, and someone stands watch on the other side of it when “notable” guests are dining.

  16. chicagofinance says:

    Shakers?

    The Original NJ ExPat says:
    March 24, 2016 at 10:32 am
    [2] I used to go to a mob restaurant on Route 17 North, just a little bit North of Route 3, does anybody remember the name? It is one storey, brick, and windowless. The first thing you would notice when you walk through the front door is a large floor to ceiling mirror 10 steps in front of you. The mirror is actually one way glass, and someone stands watch on the other side of it when “notable” guests are dining.

  17. [18] chifi – That doesn’t sound familiar, but if it was oriented like I described, I’ll buy it. I just looked at Google and Bing Maps and I’m sure had to have been where either BJ’s, Staples, or Lowe’s now stand. I also recalled while looking at those buildings that Wang used to be in one of those tall office buildings *just* North of route 3. I almost took a job with them right out of college as a field service engineer for Manhattan. At 23 years old I was thinking what would be a better way to meet hot girls than having a job where I went office to office in Manhattan 5 days a week?

    Shakers?

  18. LOL, no a little bit further North is where the restaurant used to stand.

    http://www.yelp.com/biz/shakers-carlstadt

  19. 3b says:

    11 here we go again!!!

  20. grim says:

    Who reviews a strip club on Yelp…

  21. [18-19] Il Villagio, but it didn’t look anything like that back in the 80’s, that’s why I couldn’t spot it on the map. BTW, I found it by googling Carlstadt mob restaurant.

    http://www.ilvillaggio.com

  22. grim says:

    Il villagio is a wedding joint, it’s still open.

  23. Wily Millenial says:

    @grim #22

    There are people who review NV cathouses on Yelp. Good people with fulfilling lives, probably.

  24. walking bye says:

    Ah good one Chi Fi still laughing

  25. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “Chicago’s plan to ease its $20 billion public-worker pension deficit was ruled illegal by the Illinois Supreme Court in a decision that the city warned may lead to the funds’ running out of money.

    The Chicago plan, passed in 2014, violates the Illinois Constitution, which bars the diminishing of public pensions, the court said Thursday. The finding upholds a lower court decision from July and follows a similar ruling by the Illinois Supreme Court last May preventing changes to the state’s pension funds.

    The city, the third-largest in the nation, shortchanged its pensions over the last decade, creating a $20 billion shortfall that’s left it with a lower credit rating than any big U.S. city except once-bankrupt Detroit. Its projected annual payment of $886 million due this year to its four retirement funds is more than twice what it was a decade ago, spurring officials to adopt a record property tax hike to ease the impact on the budget.”

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-03-24/chicago-s-plan-to-overhaul-city-pensions-ruled-illegal-im6djwqg

  26. chicagofinance says:

    Best part of Yelp reviews……

    Elderly Rutherford local dudes tryna give me advice on how to fold my $1 bills so that I get maximum stripper boob surface area to feel…wtf…this ain’t science, fellas…

    grim says:
    March 24, 2016 at 10:53 am
    Who reviews a strip club on Yelp…

  27. Fast Eddie says:

    I like wedding factories with big cocktail hours and over the top sh1t and I like big malls, too. Does this mean I’m bound to NJ for life? :)

  28. [28] chifi – I can’t believe you didn’t paste the preamble to that review, it’s pretty good too.

    Uber-tanned, fulla-hair-extensions, thick-thighed, thick-hipped, no-waistlined, giant-fake-boobed 35-year-old eastern european honeys shakin they asses for durty cash…and I’m packin a gangsta roll that would choke a donkey…yea, I had fun.

    Elderly Rutherford local dudes tryna give me advice on how to fold my $1 bills so that I get maximum stripper boob surface area to feel…wtf…this ain’t science, fellas…

  29. [24]grim – I saw it, but that’s not the original building that stood in the early 90’s. It used to be one story, red brick, and windowless. Primarily an Italian restaurant at the time.

    Il villagio is a wedding joint, it’s still open.

  30. grim says:

    If that isn’t already rap song, I’m going to steal those lyrics.

  31. Fast Eddie says:

    ExPat,

    It used to be one story, red brick, and windowless.

    I remember it! You are correct!

  32. grim says:

    G – like the Fiesta across the street?

  33. Fast Eddie says:

    The Fiesta has been there since Washington’s troops marched through the state. My prom was there as well as a dozen weddings I attended.

  34. Fast Eddie says:

    Who remembers Fat Mike’s hot dogs when he had a stand on route 17 south not far from these two places?

  35. D-FENS says:

    No, no, no, no, no.

    Remove barriers to entry
    encourage small business creation
    reduce regulation that discourages innovation and small business creation

    Also, another one I heard today…create safety nets for small business creators.

    Someone out there is walking around with an idea in their head that’s the next iphone, or automobile, or light bulb, or internet,…..whatever.

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    March 24, 2016 at 9:44 am
    “Now, as technology makes more and more jobs unnecessary, maybe it’s time for a different framing of work. Twenty years ago, Jeremy Rifkin estimated that about 75% of jobs in industrialized countries included tasks that could be at least partially automated, and as artificial intelligence and engineering improves, that number keeps getting higher.

  36. GOP's broken (the good one) says:

    this is good. can’t have a functioning democracy without a strong, independent press. the fourth power.

    nacional level, very special mention goes to Paul Krugman.
    he’s certainly the conscience of America

    congrats to all recipients!

    grim says:
    March 24, 2016 at 6:53 am
    Just wanted to take a second to recognize some of (who I think) are the best housing, business, and economics journalists in NJ. I’ve been looking at bylines for the past 11 years, and I feel like I know some of these people personally.

    Heather Haddon from the Ledger (who I believe is now with the WSJ), Kathleen Lynn at the Record, and Michael Diamond at the APP.

    Today’s is by Kathleen – who has been doing an absolutely bang up job covering North Jersey real estate.

    Not that my opinion is worth much these days. But 11 years ago, the coverage sucked, and I’d argue was also terribly ‘influenced’.

  37. chicagofinance says:

    Mt. Sinai: an integrated health care system providing exceptional medical care to our local and global communities (jj Edition):

    A prominent Manhattan emergency room doctor charged with e7aculating on the face of one patient and sexually abusing three others offered a jerky explanation to cops.

    Dr. David Newman, 45, told investigators that he m^sturbated in a lounge at Mount Sinai Hospital and may have dripped s3men onto the woman’s cheek or blanket, according to court documents released Thursday.

    “I am embarrassed because I [m6sturbated] in the lounge, and it was possible that the e7aculate may have gone from my hands to the woman’s blanket,” Newman told police in a Jan. 12 interview at his home in Montclair, N.J.

    “S5men may have also transferred from my hand to her face during the time I treated her.

    “I can’t believe this is happening,” he added. “My explanation doesn’t make sense. Is she alleging that I raped her?”

    Newman was charged Thursday after DNA from the victim’s cheek matched the pervy doctor’s, prosecutors said.

    Newman preyed upon the women — ages 18 to 29 — between Aug. 2015 and Jan. 2016 after they showed up at the Manhattan hospital for illnesses including a headache, a cold and a rash, prosecutors said.

    Newman “abused (his) privilege” as a physician and “preyed upon young, vulnerable, minority women,” prosecutor Eun-Ha Kim said in Manhattan Supreme Court.

    There was “no medical legitimate reason to fondle these women’s breasts.”

  38. Raymond Reddington formerly Phoenix says: says:

    All we need to do is tax the robots and equipment more. Charge it a cost by how many hours it operates, it’s throughput, efficiency, power usage, cost, etc.
    Tarriff all of the goods the robot produces, and the income the corporation makes.
    Give that money to Social Security and Medicare, and Medicare part D.
    Problem solved….

  39. joyce says:

    Criminal justice system continues to work flawlessly, borrowing ideas from movies and television.

    Associated Press

    GIRARD, Ohio — An Ohio man chose to wear a sign proclaiming he’s a thief rather than go to jail after trying to steal a 52-inch television.

    Greg Davenport, of Liberty Township, pleaded no contest this month to a theft charge for stealing from a Wal-Mart in the township in December.

    A judge in Girard gave Davenport, 44, the sentencing option of 30 days in jail or wearing a sign saying, “I am a thief. I stole from WalMart.”

    Davenport has to wear the sign in front of the store eight hours a day for 10 days of his choosing.

    Police Chief Richard Tisone said he hopes the sign embarrasses Davenport enough to prevent him from committing the same crime again.

    “Maybe you can get to their inner side. Maybe they’re a little embarrassed by the fact they have to hold a sign up, so it might affect some of these individuals, so I’m all for it,” he said.

    Davenport said the sign is better than being in jail, and he just wants to finish his punishment. He said he isn’t embarrassed by the punishment.

    “I stole, I got punished. That’s it,” he said.

  40. D-FENS says:

    Joyce, the story the other day…about the NJ Republican legislator who wants CCW’s for Judges and Legislators…

    Seems to be a very pro gun guy. People on gun websites say they’ve called his office and he’s trying to chip away at the restrictive carry laws in NJ.

  41. 1987 Condo says:

    RIP Gary Shandling, only 66

  42. My wife just blew my mind with something she heard on the radio.

    Average teacher salary in Boston: $90,000

    Confirmed, actually Google says $90,799.

    Guidance counselors making $160K. Jesus.

  43. [48] BTW, I made her stop before she told me. The number that popped into my head was $57K, but then I thought about how many teachers just hung in there, got a master’s degree (which automatically raises your salary), and were 30 years in, so I raised my estimate to $67K. There has to be some huge striation where old-timers are pulling in $130K while new teachers are just dropping like flies, being replaced each year with the next gang.

  44. The Great Pumpkin says:

    46- “Trumps rhetoric (script?) is anti-corruption, anti-globalization, and anti-Political Correctness. All of which are held and defended as unquestionable virtues by the educated elite. All three are seen more objectively by the people who have to live them, rather than simply promote them.”

    “Best comment yet. People spend a lot mental effort trying to intellectualize this crap, but that’s the wrong approach. People are suffering and they want to lash out. And they especially want to lash out at these self-satisfied elite pricks who’ve been living high on the hog off this new crony-capitalist global economy they’ve created. Trump is winning because he’s the only one offering a vent for the rage.

    Also, in response to Pettis’ seeming mystification about Trump and his attempt to understand and rationalize what’s going on with Trump’s supporters–that’s pointless. The job of the elites is not to understand why they’re about o be dispensed with; it’s to stretch their necks across the board when the time comes. The situation is already well past being salvageable.”

  45. The Great Pumpkin says:

    46- Makes a lot of good points here.

    “And they are not as stupid as we want to believe. Does immigration hurt them? Yes it does, and while I believe that immigration has always been one of the greatest and most powerful sources of American success, and will continue to be for decades, if not centuries, I also fully understand that only someone who treats trade as a matter purely of ideology can deny that there are short-term costs. But Dani and millions of Americans do risk paying these costs, and it is unnecessary and even stupid to point out the irony of Dani’s own immigrant background as if this conclusively proved anything because it is wholly besides the point. When Dani worries about immigration it is because he is worried about his daughters’ education, and not because he has forgotten that his mother is Dominican. Trump’s supporters know that some of them may end up paying the short-term cost for what many of them even know is America’s long-term benefit, and they know that they do not have enough slack in their incomes and savings to afford it.

    And what about their fury at what they believe to be unfair international trade? While there may well be global benefits to free trade, and almost certainly are, it isn’t so incredibly hard to recognize that the global trading environment is systematically gamed by many countries – and yes, sometimes by the US too – and that they do so because there are gains to be had at the expense of other countries. The global trade regime has undoubtedly benefitted certain constituencies in the US, but it has also created significant costs for the US and, more importantly, has resulted in a redistribution of income, and while the hard-working if uneducated millions who support Trump may not be able to explain the costs to them as glibly and as self-confidently as they are denied by bankers and other winners from free trade, they are right to complain. Trade is undoubtedly a complex issue, but there is a real case against the current system of free trade that must be addressed in a way that makes sense to Trump’s supporters.

    And finally Trump’s supporters are enraged by the inexorable rise of income inequality. The only response they have been offered is that this rise in income inequality is natural, probably the result of technology, and cannot in any way be reversed, so we might as well get used to it. This response is so profoundly untrue that it can only be seriously proposed by someone for whom American history is a total mystery. We have had periods of rising income inequality before, and they have always been reversed once there was a political determination to do so. Dani, and the millions like him, have every right to be enraged by the past three decades of rising income inequality, and if they dismiss every anti-Trump witticism as completely irrelevant until it addresses income inequality, they are right to do so.

    Trump’s followers may not articulate it very well, and they may too easily allow their anxiety about immigration and trade to spill over into nativism and hatred of foreigners, but they do have a strong case that makes them in fact part of a venerable history. Trump is almost certainly not going to resolve any of these issues for them – the historical precedents are pretty clear on that point – but it isn’t stupidity that drives them anyway to Trump. It is the recognition that because anyone that belongs within the political establishment has clearly proven himself unwilling or unable to resolve any of these issues, then gambling on someone “outrageous”, who they identify as outside the political establishment, is perfectly reasonable because it has no possible downside. Their logic is the logic of successful hedge funds: when there is no cost to being wrong, then you must gamble, no matter how small the chance of being right.”

  46. Juice Box says:

    Secretary Kerry headed to Belgium tomorrow. I wonder if he’s bringing James Taylor for another awkward moment. Meanwhile our President attempts the tango in Argentina. You just can’t make this stuff up.

  47. Essex says:

    48. you get what you pay for? And Boston aint cheap.

    Once Christie capped the salaries for school supers everyone employable jumped the fence to NY. Damn shame really, because NJ is stuck with some mouth breathers.

  48. Essex says:

    52. Geezus the optics on that were surreal.

  49. joyce says:

    You get what you pay for is a great phrase to bring out when it fits your argument.

    Why didn’t all the supers move to the private sector and make even more dough? They tell us they can. And what happened to the people they replaced in NY, sounds like they’d be looking for job openings?

  50. joyce says:

    While I can appreciate that, it’s never a good idea to pass laws that favor or disfavor individuals, groups, or classes as compared to everyone else.

    D-FENS says:
    March 24, 2016 at 3:26 pm
    Joyce, the story the other day…about the NJ Republican legislator who wants CCW’s for Judges and Legislators…

    Seems to be a very pro gun guy. People on gun websites say they’ve called his office and he’s trying to chip away at the restrictive carry laws in NJ.

  51. Libturd at home (Gator in the Childrens Specialized) says:

    Steve’s Sizzling Steaks

    Right next to Fiesta. Worst steak ever. Who puts salt on steaks and then cooks them to leathery grizzleness regardless of how the were requested to be cooked when ordered?

  52. Essex says:

    55. your argument shows how little you understand business.

  53. Anon E. Moose says:

    Grim [14];

    Bone, and the lettering is something called Silian Rail. Look at that subtle off-white coloring. The tasteful thickness of it. Oh, my God. It even has a watermark.

    How do you feel about Huey Lewis and the News?

  54. Ben says:

    Once Christie capped the salaries for school supers everyone employable jumped the fence to NY. Damn shame really, because NJ is stuck with some mouth breathers.

    Not really true. They all retired early to get their pension. Now they are being hired as “interims superintendents” while collecting pension.

    This idea that there are these great supers out there is really laughable. More often than not, the administrators in New Jersey are the biggest group of hacks inside the system. Just because they rose to the top doesn’t mean they did a single thing of merit along the way.

  55. joyce says:

    Are you referring to the educational system as a business?

    Essex says:
    March 24, 2016 at 8:03 pm
    55. your argument shows how little you understand business.

  56. Juice Box says:

    grim #63 plz release

  57. D-FENS says:

    @politicalshort
    In an ebook published by ISIS called “Black Flags from Rome” the unholy alliance b/t Left & jihadists is explained
    https://twitter.com/politicalshort/status/713113570620256256

  58. Ben says:

    There’s not much work for supers in the private sector. They are teachers who went to grad school to get additional certification. That’s pretty much it. The only thing some of them tend to do is become “consultants” and rip off Newark and Jersey City. That’s still public money though. I’m in favor of the super cap. I don’t see any of the existing supers quitting anymore after the glut of early retirements when it was instituted. They are paid enough.

    I wouldn’t be that flabbergasted by $90k for a teacher who works in Boston. You have some districts here in NJ where they make $80k. You aren’t living the high life on that. Boston is more expensive. You go below that, and you are asking to attract crap teachers.

  59. The Great Pumpkin says:
  60. Anon E. Moose says:

    Ben [65];

    Its not just the salary – private sector has far less job security; far less generous benefits; doesn’t have two months off every year.

  61. Essex says:

    62. Business is sbout verticals. In the rare event that people cross them i.e. Gerstner from cookies to IBM and succeed, they kore than often fail. Sculley at Apple.

    So lets look at the average administrator, their vertical? You guessed it. Not for profit.

Comments are closed.