Ruining your Friday

From NJ Spotlight:

OP-ED: JIM HUGHES PREDICTS NJ’S POSTSUBURBAN ECONOMY, AND IT ISN’T PRETTY

New Jersey is known for many things, not all of them wonderful. Since World War II, with apologies to Bruce Springsteen and Tony Soprano, it is best known as being the most suburban state in the country.

The United States suburbanized rapidly after the war and nowhere was that more true than in New Jersey. It produced rapid development and became haven to millions of white-collar residents and their families, making New Jersey the wealthiest of the 50 states.

That’s quickly changing for the worse; and without a smart policy approach from our state that to date is missing, New Jersey’s homeowners will soon be facing a fiscal cliff. That’s why the most recent book by Jim Hughes, dean at Rutgers University Bloustein School, must be a clarion call for our next governor, the legislature, and suburban mayors.

Written with his Rutgers colleague Joseph Seneca, Hughes is totally on the mark in the book titled “New Jersey’s Postsuburban Economy.” They write about how New Jersey successfully evolved from an urban manufacturing-based economy to one that made the state an economic success story based on suburbanized information and research-driven employment.

They see the future and are clear that without adapting New Jersey faces a grim future. “The baby boom will soon be yesterday’s workforce. Tomorrow’s workforce will be dominated by a new, expansive generation…such young creatives…currently do not find the car-culture suburbs in which they grew up an attractive place to live, work and play.”

They go on to write, “Suddenly, New Jersey’s greatest core advantage in the late twentieth century — a suburban-dominated, automobile dependent economy and lifestyle — is regarded as a disadvantage.”

Hughes and Seneca are challenging our next governor when they write: “New Jersey will have to adapt and reinvent itself yet again — this time to a postsuburban digital economy that is being shaped by increasingly sophisticated mobile technology and the workforce that employs it.”

So what does all this mean? Simply that the huge suburban office parks that make up millions of square feet in New Jersey are rapidly becoming white elephants that will be subsidized by homeowners in the towns these complexes are located, unless they are repurposed into uses that match the changing economy described by Hughes and Seneca.

As we know, the new generation workforce wants to live, work, and play nearby without needing a car. What’s more, space demands are smaller than they were 20 years ago, and many of New Jersey’s suburban office buildings are technologically antiquated. These office parks must be reimagined to include fine restaurants, supermarkets, shopping, and living — while also providing workspaces and educational opportunities. But with change come concerns and a desire to maintain the status quo. Unfortunately, not evolving is not an answer.

The result will be carcass office buildings whose owners will easily win tax appeals, which effectively raises taxes on all homeowners. Worse, these buildings in a sea of asphalt will become a reputational lag for the towns in which they are located. The office parks — along with our aging malls — are the grayfields of New Jersey that are going to drag our economy and already property-tax-expensive state in the wrong direction.

In their conclusion, Hughes and Seneca ask five important questions our next governor must answer. Among them are what to do with this vast inventory, what are acceptable models to maximize environmental benefits with effective reuse, and what is the best way to keep this new workforce in New Jersey to propel our economy forward?

This entry was posted in Demographics, Economics, Employment, New Jersey Real Estate. Bookmark the permalink.

149 Responses to Ruining your Friday

  1. Mike says:

    Good Morning New Jersey

  2. Mike says:

    OK lets start by making the government workers pay for there own medical including retirees and future retirees and stop the double dipping of pensions. One of the candidates for governor is proposing any retiree collecting 50K or over should pay.
    I know shut up Mike

  3. Comrade Nom Deplume, The GOAT says:

    Every passing day, I’m thinking more that Clot is a prophet.

  4. Anon E. Moose, Ghost of JJ says:

    Nom [20:24, prev thread];

    It must be something about the job. I seem to recall Eric Holder having a lot of memory problems too.

    I think Holder’s bigger problem is that his job as AG was chief of federal prosecution, and he couldn’t win a conviction with the perpetrators on video performing the criminal acts, and having confessed to the crime (Phila. NBPP Voter Intimidation).

  5. Grab them by the puzzy says:

    @StephenKing

    All politics aside,

    the Trump administration reminds me of that Tom Arnould movie,
    THE STUPIDS.

    Really, you guys, this is embarrassing.

  6. The Original NJ Expat says:

    Didn’t I essentially write this article 6 years ago?

    Justice Pumpking has been writing (and re-writing, and re-writing, and re-writing) the dissenting view for his whole time here (which only further affirms my logic).

    Of course, the new filters/black list won’t allow me to re-post it. Check out 12:49PM from May 27, 2011:

    http://njrereport.com/index.php/2011/05/27/happy-days-are-here-again-2/

  7. The Original NJ Expat says:

    LOL. You may not even get to my post, because there is a classic JJ post right before mine, also at 12:49PM from May 27, 2011:

    http://njrereport.com/index.php/2011/05/27/happy-days-are-here-again-2/

  8. The Original NJ Expat says:

    I actually only went to the Jersey short[sic} twice in my life. Very Very Very white trashy. I think Jersey Shore improved their image.

  9. The Original NJ Expat says:

    I will now do things I hate about Jersey Shore:
    No Parking
    Stupid Rules like you can’t drink beer on your front lawn.
    Bars close early.
    Cops sit in parking lot of every bar looking to give everyone a DWI
    Fat girls. I ran 12 Hampton houses. I always did 50/50 girls/guys. If I did not know girls I would do a January or February Cocktail party to meet the prospects. It was like casting a realty show. Do realty shows have ugly fat girls who live at home in New Jersey who wear glasses and dress bad? No and neither did my summer houses. But somehow NJ shore houses look like the before on the biggest loser.

    They you have places like Cape May, they a a stick up their butt, I love the horrible divey places to stay that say no children as they have “valuable” antiques. More like worthless crap.

    Plus what is with all the horrible cars out in the Shore. Please like ten year old japanese cars have no place in a summer house. I expect German/English/Italian high end cars, Cool American 1960’s covertibles or fun new Jeep Wrangler. For me driving a damm Camry or Accord four door car to the Hamptons would be my own personal vietnam

  10. The Original NJ Expat says:

    grim – please, please, please take my JJ quote out of mod. Just in case grim is busy, everyone needs to go to JJ’s post at 12:49PM from May 27, 2011. It is the absolute essence of our dear departed JJ:

    http://njrereport.com/index.php/2011/05/27/happy-days-are-here-again-2/

  11. Grab them by the puzzy says:

    @WSJ

    Jeff Sessions used political funds for expenses in Cleveland,
    where he met Russian envoy

  12. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Yes, let’s go chase flavor of the month trends. No different then chasing the latest kitchen trend for your remodel(out of style before you know it). The car is not going anywhere. Let’s see what happens when they start having families.

    Basing this all on a certain demographic’s pattern in their 20’s and early 30’s at a time when these individuals are single and priced out of the suburbs. Previous generations could afford to start their family/adult lives at a much earlier age due to cheaper housing and much higher paying jobs to start their career. So now that trend has just been pushed into their 30’s as opposed to their 20’s.

    No kidding, they want to live in the city and have no car when they are in their youth. Does this guy know why? They want to party and avoid dwi’s. When they are done partying and have a family, they will not want to be the person with no fuc!ing car to transport their family.

    Does he know how much it costs to transport a family with no car? Yes, if you want to stay in your little tiny neighborhood in a city and never venture out, it sure makes sense, but what if you want to venture out, which most families do. What are you going to pay to transport a family of 3 or 4 to the jersey shore? Get the f@ck out of here. Not buying it.

    With no car, you are forced to work in a certain area(close to public transportation, where the rich drive up the price of the cost of living). Also, what are people just going to rent their whole life for the sake of being able to pick up and leave every time they have to get a new job. Yes, that’s fine for a certain minority of the population, but not everyone wants to pick up and leave every time they get a new job. That’s not a reality for the majority of the population.

    Another thing, it’s tough to raise a family in such tight quarters with no yard. The cost to have large living quarters and a yard in an urban environment are cost prohibitive for most people. Lots of people like having a fenced in yard and letting the dog and kids go play in the backyard.

    Biggest question mark; what kind of impact will autonomous cars present? Why pay the cost to be right by public transportation when your car can drive by itself while you sleep, or read a book, on your commute to work.

    Maybe I’m wrong, and I’m looking at this all wrong, but I highly doubt it. My prediction is that most of northern nj starts to look like the Ridgewood and Montclair type model. Not with the wealth, but with the layout.

    “As we know, the new generation workforce wants to live, work, and play nearby without needing a car. What’s more, space demands are smaller than they were 20 years ago, and many of New Jersey’s suburban office buildings are technologically antiquated. These office parks must be reimagined to include fine restaurants, supermarkets, shopping, and living — while also providing workspaces and educational opportunities. But with change come concerns and a desire to maintain the status quo. Unfortunately, not evolving is not an answer.”

  13. 3b says:

    I have been saying the same thing as well.

  14. 3b says:

    Pumps you cannot dismiss the author. He is highly respected he does this for a living. People should pay attention. The old surburbsn model is changing. Montvale and park ridge are starting to look like corporate ghost towns. The suburbs were very much like Mayberry when I first moved here. That’s not the case anymore. Nj is in trouble forget about your house and its value and recognize that.

  15. D-FENS says:

    The comment dates have hyperlinks. Just post the link. I’m too lazy to search for it.

  16. D-FENS says:

    This Russia stuff is modern day McCarthyism.

  17. D-FENS says:

    I think the truth about NJ is somewhere in between 3B and Punkin.

  18. D-FENS says:

    All of these “walkable” communities have ordinances that don’t allow you to discharge a firearm in city limits. Who the hell wants that?

  19. 3b says:

    Defens that is a somewhat fair assessment. While mine may be too much doom and gloom I would rather be wrong than live in pumps everything is peaches and cream here. I love nj much as I bash it. I want it to succeed but with pumps mindset and he is not the only one it will be hard.

  20. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “Donald Trump said the following in his recent address to a joint session of Congress:

    To launch our national rebuilding, I will be asking the Congress to approve legislation that produces a $1 trillion investment in the infrastructure of the United States—financed through both public and private capital—creating millions of new jobs. This effort will be guided by two core principles: Buy American, and hire American.

    Barack Obama said the following in his 2011 State of the Union address:

    Our infrastructure used to be the best, but our lead has slipped. …We have to do better. …So over the last two years, we’ve begun rebuilding for the 21st century, a project that has meant thousands of good jobs for the hard-hit construction industry. And tonight, I’m proposing that we redouble those efforts. We’ll put more Americans to work repairing crumbling roads and bridges.

    So, yes, pretty much the same, and a plan absolutely guaranteed to elicit cheers from Congress. The whole business of a Member of Congress is to pass out favors to campaign benefactors, and such bills are the perfect way to go about it. Whenever a president says “infrastructure spending,” politicians think: this is my jobs program!

    Will this Be Different?

    But wait, say Trump’s defenders. His plan will be different because it will emphasize public/private partnerships, instead of just government-run boondoggles. But here again, Obama said the same thing: “We’ll make sure this is fully paid for, attract private investment, and pick projects based [on] what’s best for the economy, not politicians.”

    What is easily forgotten is that most all infrastructure spending ends up in private hands. Surely you don’t think government actually builds roads, bridges, airports, and dams. It’s all contract work because only the private sector can really pull it off. Even the military has come to discover this, with the US hiring private contractors for many operations abroad. The old canard against the market asks the question: “who will build the roads?” But the truth is that the private sector builds the roads now.”

    https://fee.org/articles/here-we-go-with-infrastructure-again/?utm_medium=push&utm_source=push_notification

  21. The Great Pumpkin says:

    I dismissed him because he is much older, maybe he doesn’t realize what I realize about my generation. No one really wants to live in the city unless they have no kids. I mean it only makes sense. When you don’t have kids, you look forward to restaurants, bars, and the night life. Why the hell would this appeal to a family? Why do you have to live within walking distance to this when raising a family? Come on kids, lets go to the restaurant every night, and then let mom and dad go drinking at the local bars. Just perfect. Montclair or Ridgewood model is more the reality. Still have the town center and night life, with access to public transportation to the city, but you also have your car and room for your family to grow in a safe environment.

    Expat busts my balls about living on a double yellow lined road, yet he is advocating for raising families in fast paced environments where your kid battles crossing dangerous streets and a bunch of strangers on the sidewalk. Better teach your kid how to cross a road and how to avoid being kidnapped in that environment.

    3b says:
    March 3, 2017 at 8:59 am
    Pumps you cannot dismiss the author. He is highly respected he does this for a living. People should pay attention. The old surburbsn model is changing. Montvale and park ridge are starting to look like corporate ghost towns. The suburbs were very much like Mayberry when I first moved here. That’s not the case anymore. Nj is in trouble forget about your house and its value and recognize that.

  22. Comrade Nom Deplume, The GOAT says:

    Just noticed another commercial development getting started a long my commute. This area is growing pretty dramatically and I’m getting very concerned about congestion. I was sort of hoping that I moved away from all that when I left New Jersey.

    But the growth is outstripping the road capacity; who would’ve thought that I would miss driving in New Jersey?

  23. Juice Box says:

    Pumps – Your worldview is obviously pedestrian and suburban.

    There are about 300,000 kids under the age of 18 living in just the small island of Manhattan. Brooklyn is even higher with 685,000 kids under the age of 18.

    Add up all the kids in Northen New Jersey, not even close.

  24. 3b says:

    Pumps because he is old as you say means he does not understand? He studies these trends? Saying he is old and therefore does not understand is an ignorant and arrogant comment on your part.

  25. D-FENS says:

    Uh oh…that doesn’t fit the narrative…

    Juan Thompson has been arrested in connection with eight bomb threats made against Jewish Community Centers.

    http://heavy.com/news/2017/03/juan-thompson-jcc-jewish-community-center-bomb-threats-suspect-arrest-charge-photos-st-louis-new-york/

    Dude is a Never Trumper…

  26. 30 year realtor says:

    Office parks are finished. Residential development is not the answer for many of these sites as they have no access to mass transit. Warehouse for internet retailers is one of the likely ways some sites will be redeveloped.

  27. D-FENS says:

    Where I work…at an office park in NJ…most people commute by car but the landlord supplies a shuttle bus to and from the train station. It’s an exception to the rule…but we actually have quite a few employees that live in Manhattan.

  28. homeboken says:

    Real Estate Question –

    When doing a home inspection, I am debating doing a thermal scan. Does anyone have any experience with it? Is it worth it? House is 8 years old and I am quoted a price of $220 for the scan (estimate).

    Thoughts?

  29. D-FENS says:

    $220 buys a lot of sweaters

  30. The Original NJ Expat says:

    I wonder if pumps thinks he is actually in, as JJ would say, a realty show.

  31. The Original NJ Expat says:

    When times were really good it used to work like this. The last time I worked in a NJ office park we employed 6500 employees, mostly engineers, at many office parks all around Wayne, Totowa, Little Falls, and Fairfield. You didn’t need a car, but most/many employees had one. It was up to them if they drove to work or not. We had a large fleet of vans and all you needed was to organize 6 or more employees and the company would give you one to ride share. Free. Even at work, you didn’t need a car to get to the other offices because a number of the vans were driven by paid drivers during the workday in a shuttle system between the many locations. My guess is there are nowhere near the number of Brooklynites and Staten Islanders working in Wayne as there once were. Too bad for pumps.

    Where I work…at an office park in NJ…most people commute by car but the landlord supplies a shuttle bus to and from the train station. It’s an exception to the rule…but we actually have quite a few employees that live in Manhattan.

  32. D-FENS says:

    When were the times good? Perception is reality I guess.

  33. The Original NJ Expat says:

    D-FENS – Mid 1980’s. The vast majority of my colleagues were in their early 20’s, making more money than their parents ever did, had college degrees and zero debt, and bought real estate by the time they were 25 (alone, without Nana) with a 20% down payment. Maybe it was just perception.

    When were the times good? Perception is reality I guess.

  34. The Original NJ Expat says:

    Speaking of the mid-80’s, actually the early 1980’s. I used to meet with a half dozen senior citizens every afternoon and listen to their counsel. We used to sit in Joe Ruggierio’s office almost every afternoon around 2PM and listen to the elders speak. In actuality, everyone was an elder except for me, so I was the only one who didn’t speak. Topics of the day were usually the decline of education, decorum, and how much money you could earn without reducing your social security benefits. Joe’s office was his school bus parked early in front of Wayne Valley HS. We were all bus drivers, nee great bus drivers, because the Wayne jobs were reserved for the best and the white-est. I was the only one who was beginning my work life instead of winding it down. Who knew I would graduate college and live 1.5 miles one way on Valley Road and commute to my first job about a mile the other way, also on Valley Road?

  35. The Original NJ Expat says:

    My job was just off Valley Rd, actually. Turn right at the Shell Station (is that still there?)

  36. The Original NJ Expat says:

    Actually, left on Riverview, right at the Shell station, for the sticklers.

  37. grim says:

    You can rent a FLIR thermal camera for $53 at home depot for an afternoon.

    Go have fun with it.

  38. grim says:

    The issue with 90% of thermal scans, is that you would never even remotely consider fixing the issue because of the damage it would do.

    Ok, so you find that one stud cavity on an exterior wall had loose insulation that sagged. What are you realistically going to do? Rip the interior wall apart to stuff in insulation? Nonsense, you’ll never fix it. The ROI is shit, and then you have to look at a wall patch in your living room? Right.

    And the areas that it would help identify – say attic insulation issues – are totally obvious with visual inspection.

    It’s not worthless, by any means, but it’s not going to yield you 100% actionable information. Not to mention odd issues with false positives causing a bunch of concerns about nothing.

  39. grim says:

    Every once in a while you can find the FLIR camera case for the iPhone 5 on eBay for dirt cheap. If you have an old iPhone 5/5s laying around, you can get your own thermal camera for like $80.

    Is it as good as the $5000 imager those guys have? No, but what’s it matter? Hey look, that hot water pipe is hot.

  40. Comrade Nom Deplume, The GOAT says:

    DFENS

    Even better, Juan was a writer for The Intercept and focused primarily on….

    Wait for it….

    Black Lives Matter.

    Seriously, you cannot make this sh1t up

  41. Comrade Nom Deplorable, The G.O.A.T. says:

    DFENS,

    Seriously, this is the gift that keeps on giving. This was dated a month ago.

    http://www.poynter.org/2016/the-intercepts-juan-thompson-fired-for-fabrication/394707/

    Fake Leftist News, anyone?

  42. Comrade Nom Deplorable, The G.O.A.T. says:

    Man, how quickly they are disavowing their own. This is from Slate.

    SLATE!!!!!

    http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_slatest/2017/03/03/leftist_fabulist_juan_thompson_arrested_for_some_jcc_threats.html

    Come on, puzzy, how about a tweet?

  43. Steamy Cankles Foundation says:

    Who’s misogynistic?

    WASHINGTON― Proving that vile sexism plagues both political parties, Rep. Cedric Richmond (D-La.) made the worst kind of joke about Kellyanne Conway Wednesday night, quipping that the top adviser to President Donald Trump “really looked kind of familiar there in that position” when she was kneeling on the Oval Office couch.

    “You even mentioned Kellyanne and the picture on the sofa,” Richmond said at the Washington Press Club’s annual congressional dinner. “But I really just want to know what was going on there, because, I won’t tell anybody. And you can just explain to me that — that circumstance, because she really looked kind of familiar there in that position there. But don’t answer. And I don’t want you to refer back to the ‘90s.”

  44. The Original NJ Expat says:

    Fed Chair Yellen says a March rate hike is on the table

    Translation: It isn’t, but a June hike is definite. For now.

    http://finance.yahoo.com/news/fed-chair-yellen-says-a-march-rate-hike-is-on-the-table-180440682.html

  45. Steamy Cankles Foundation says:

    Come on Nom. He was obviously a Republican plant.

  46. Comrade Nom Deplorable, The G.O.A.T. says:

    Steamy,

    Liberal is just another term for hypocrite

  47. Blue Ribbon Teacher says:

    IR cameras can useful for finding spots that mice may get into the house when you do it from the outside.

  48. Comrade Nom Deplorable, The G.O.A.T. says:

    Steamy

    “Come on Nom. He was obviously a Republican plant.”

    Trump suggested it was possibly false flag. Personally, I think it was the Russians, who mounted this Operation Patsy to make Trump look prescient.

  49. The Original NJ Expat says:

    I have a picture of Cedric Richmond grabbing his ankles. He doesn’t look too comfortable, though.

  50. D-FENS says:

    Oh snap…

    Sometimes I swear…people get ideas for their columns from Grim’s blog.

    Could Christie replace Jeff Sessions as Trump’s attorney general?

    http://www.nj.com/politics/index.ssf/2017/03/could_christie_replace_jeff_sessions_at_trumps_att.html#incart_most_shared-politics

  51. Tywin says:

    Treason! Pelosi should resign immediately!

    http://www.theamericanmirror.com/video-awkward-silence-pelosi-asked-shes-ever-met-russians/

    After Nancy Pelosi accused Republicans of “splitting hairs” over Jeff Sessions’ reported meetings with the Russian ambassador, she did the very same thing when she was asked a similar question.

    “You’ve been in Congress a little bit and you’re in leadership, have you ever met with the Russian ambassador?” Politico reporter Jake Sherman asked Pelosi on Friday.

    After an awkwardly long silence, Pelosi answered, “Not with this Russian ambassador, no,” before quickly trying to move on.

    “Is it normal to meet with ambassadors?” Sherman asked.

    “Yeah,” Pelosi responded.

  52. Comrade Nom Deplorable, The G.O.A.T. says:

    Grim,

    “Ok, so you find that one stud cavity on an exterior wall had loose insulation that sagged. What are you realistically going to do? Rip the interior wall apart to stuff in insulation? Nonsense, you’ll never fix it. The ROI is shit,”

    Our house in the Brig wasn’t insulated so we had it blown in. All the work was done from the outside. The installer removed shakes by cutting them, drilling holes underneath, blowing in insulation, plugging the hole and then gluing the shake back into place.

    I think the product was Applegate and I was very happy with the difference. I honestly think it returned ROI on heating alone in three years.

    The guy was out of Cranford and while memory is hazy, I want to say his company name was Thresher. If I were there, I’d use him again.

  53. Comrade Nom Deplorable, The G.O.A.T. says:

    On houses with siding, its even easier. They pry off courses of siding, drill, fill, plug, and then put back the siding. I am seriously thinking of having it done here in Pennsy because I think I have the same issue.

  54. Anon E. Moose, Ghost of JJ says:

    Re: FLIR;

    In addition to exterior thermal issues, on my first house inspection the IR detected a likely water leak in the ceiling that wasn’t otherwise visible, which was confirmed by contact moisture meter. A minor issue (if it was worse it would have been visible). I just didn’t think this was the place to save $200. Wouldn’t you be better off negotiating 1/8% off your mortgage rate?

  55. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Juice, come on, don’t act like I stated that there are no children being raised in the cities. I’m only stating that not everyone wants to live in the city or raise their family there like the author of this study concludes (based on demographic trends of millennials in their 20’s/early 30’s). I call bs on it. Ideal location to raise a family is still in a single family home with a yard in a good school system. Raising a family in a cramped tiny apartment, in which you must climb stairs or take an elevator, and walk your kid(s) to whatever place they need to go to is very taxing on an individual. Esp, when you can get a much larger single family home for half the price of your cramped apartment. But hey, what do I know besides actually learning this first hand from my friends and family.

    Juice Box says:
    March 3, 2017 at 10:24 am
    Pumps – Your worldview is obviously pedestrian and suburban.

    There are about 300,000 kids under the age of 18 living in just the small island of Manhattan. Brooklyn is even higher with 685,000 kids under the age of 18.

    Add up all the kids in Northen New Jersey, not even close.

  56. The Original NJ Expat says:

    In our 100 unit, three storey condo (1926 brick, mirror image 50 unit buildings around a garden courtyard) we found 18 inches of air between the roof and the 3rd floor ceilings while redoing the roof and fireplace chimneys. We blew in foam insulation and saved $15K on heating the first year.

  57. chicagofinance says:

    Finally they located jj:

    A man proved that p0rn can be really, really bad for you — when his dead body was found six months after his 6-ton collection of filthy mags toppled on top of him.

    The 50-year-old smut aficionado’s corpse was discovered after the landlord entered his apartment because he had fallen behind on his rent, the Mirror of the UK reported.

    A member of a cleaning crew hired to quietly remove the h0rny hoarder’s stash said he found the former carmaker buried under a massive pile of p0rn.

    The cleaner, who said he may have suffered a heart attack, had filled every nook and cranny in his joint with the magazines and clippings of his favorite sections.

  58. The Original NJ Expat says:

    I had a friend who bought a house in Framingham. Busy street just like Pumpkin’s. He had this one corner of his family room addition that was cold as f.uck. He pulled off the siding and found nothing underneath. From the inside out the layers were:

    1. Sheetrock
    2. Studs
    3. Vinyl siding attached to the studs.

  59. The Original NJ Expat says:

    A cute little flashback retrospective on our previous AG:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZH4QN_NrgaI

  60. The Original NJ Expat says:

    If Jim Jordan had Romney’s hair there would be no limit to his political aspirations.

  61. The Original NJ Expat says:

    chifi – I have a friend, married 20 years, who is still pissed at his wife for making him throw away his Playboy and Penthouse collection.

  62. The Original NJ Expat says:

    The ideal location to raise a family is far away from the Pumpkin crime family.

  63. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “But it is perhaps not time to wave goodbye just yet. Not all regions have the same problems with office parks. In Santa Clara, mid-size office spaces are doing okay: Properties between 75,000 and 200,000 square feet have just a 2.4 percent vacancy rate. But office spaces at the ends of the spectrum—smaller than 75,000 square feet or larger than 200,000—have a 13.3 percent vacancy rate. In the suburbs of Washington, D.C., by contrast, workers are enamored with nearby restaurants and conference and fitness centers. The office parks with those amenities have a vacancy rate of 6.7 percent, while the overall average for that market is 13.9 percent.

    Which is all to say: Of course it’s the case that different kinds and sizes of companies want different things from their office spaces. But as the world (mostly) marches on without them, what will existing office parks be when they grow up?

    There are models that developers are using to transform older office parks throughout the country, to measured success. They mostly involve turning definitely-suburban office parks into urban-like, albeit still isolated, office “cities.” (It is worth noting that many of these projects involve extensive rezoning efforts.) A facility in the community of Edina, Minnesota, is in the midst of transforming from a sprawling office center into what one local developer called “not your father’s or mother’s office park.” In practice, that means linking the park to 15 miles of bike trails, big-box-store-free retail, and green space. Other developers managing struggling office parks are considering adding farmers’ markets, hotels, and housing.

    Sure, those are familiar buzzwords. But it appears that the office park is not going down without a fight.”

    https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2016/01/decline-office-park/422811/

    30 year realtor says:
    March 3, 2017 at 10:49 am
    Office parks are finished. Residential development is not the answer for many of these sites as they have no access to mass transit. Warehouse for internet retailers is one of the likely ways some sites will be redeveloped.

  64. Steamy Cankles Foundation says:

    1. Plaster
    2. Studs
    3. Aluminum siding attached to the studs.

    That’s my multi. No insulation whatsoever. Tenants pay for heat.

  65. Steamy Cankles Foundation says:

    In other news, Chelsea Clinton continues to “get it.”

    Not only has she scolded her parents about potential and likely improprieties with the Clinton Foundation, but she has also now scolded Cedric Richmond on his incredibly stupid and probably career ending Conway bl0wjob joke. If she ran for a lower office, I’d vote for her.

  66. The Original NJ Expat says:

    I don’t think the boss is a fan of drum solos:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_mB4XOKaH28

  67. The Original NJ Expat says:

    big house on a 50mph highway = pancake in a spray cheese can

  68. The Original NJ Expat says:

    I think Chelsea would give great “lower office”, especially with that big Web Hubbell mouth and lips.

  69. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Exactly what I think will happen to Northern Jersey.

    “They mostly involve turning definitely-suburban office parks into urban-like, albeit still isolated, office “cities.” (It is worth noting that many of these projects involve extensive rezoning efforts.) “

  70. The Original NJ Expat says:

    Your mind is so small and cute.

    Exactly what I think will happen to Northern Jersey./i>

  71. Steamy Cankles Foundation says:

    Now that’s some beautiful fake news there Expat.

  72. The Original NJ Expat says:

    OK, maybe Pumpkin’s mind is just small, but not so cute.

    Now that’s some beautiful fake news there Expat.

  73. Newbomb Turk says:

    12:41 — I won’t lie, this plays right into the Orange One’s hand. Well played Mssr. Trump. Perhaps this nutball — journo/terrorist will go away for a while and think about his very existence.

  74. 3b says:

    Pumps raising a family in an apartment or 2 family house in an urban area was once the norm. It could be again.

  75. Comrade Nom Deplorable, The G.O.A.T. says:

    Listening to the imbroglio emanating from the beltway, I am wondering why none of the high-priced legal talent advising Trump nominees gets their Brendan Sullivan on?

    Seriously, there is a way to neuter the likes of Comrade Franken and his ilk, and that is to qualify and disclaim the hell out of everything. It’s going to be a party line vote on everything so give them nothing, and what you do give them, make sure it has a back door out in case it isn’t completely, unassailably, correct.

    How frigging hard is this?

  76. Juice Box says:

    Thye got under Trump’s skin it seems.

    Donald J. Trump‏Verified account
    @realDonaldTrump

    We should start an immediate investigation into @SenSchumer and his ties to Russia and Putin. A total hypocrite!

  77. Comrade Nom Deplorable, The G.O.A.T. says:

    Expat,

    The profession is quickly disowning him and pushing the (completely plausible) narrative that he is a nutter. Misogynistic and anti-semitic being downplayed.

  78. The Original NJ Expat says:

    Nom – The Republicans are kindergarteners when it comes to fighting fire with fire.

  79. Steamy Cankles Foundation says:

    I’ve been thinking about this for a few weeks now. I think it’s silly to call the increase in bomb threats and antisemitism a DNC strategy, but certainly one could attribute the increase due to copy cat crime, exacerbated by the Lefts endless harping on the subject in social media both prior to the election and even moreso since they lost.

  80. Steamy Cankles Foundation says:

    You know what would have have been great? If Trump wore a white dress to the congressional address.

  81. homeboken says:

    Moose- You have mail from me.

    Grim – Thanks for the input, as always, invaluable and concise opinions. Appreciate it all.

  82. yome says:

    The American Dream of owning your own home remains. But the home itself appears to have gotten smaller.

    As American homes grow larger in size (and higher in price) many people say if they decided to move, they’d want to downsize. More homeowners would rather have a smaller house than a larger one (37% compared to 23%), according to research from real estate site Trulia.Here’s how it breaks down: Some 60% of people living in large homes of 2,000 square feet and over said they’d rather pick a smaller one next time around; 69% of people in the smallest of homes under 800 square feet said they’d like to supersize their accommodations.

    Older Americans, more of whom are homeowners, are obviously more likely to want to downsize than millennials. The same percentage of baby boomers (37%) said they plan to move at some point in their life, and 42% of that number said they would prefer to live in a smaller home, according to a separate study released last December by the Demand Institute, operated by the research groups, The Conference Board and Nielsen.

    http://www.marketwatch.com/story/more-americans-want-to-downsize-their-homes-than-supersize-them-2017-03-01

  83. EncuncKep says:

    When you’re working along with a company who’re carrying out a E-Ontario Ecommerce for your online business it is very important that the lines of communication are open continuously. And more importantly that the communication among your company is clear and to the issue. Most contact will happen via email but you may also use IM and unit.

  84. The Great Pumpkin says:

    From the article posted by yome.

    “Almost half of millennials (46%), on the other hand, want to upgrade — even if they were already living in 2,000-square-foot homes. This is evident even among first-time homebuyers, who are choosing to skip the starter homer and opt for a big house in the suburbs.”

  85. leftwing says:

    “@StephenKing
    All politics aside,
    the Trump administration reminds me of that Tom Arnould movie,
    THE STUPIDS.
    Really, you guys, this is embarrassing.”

    Says the author of Huck Finn, Gatsby, and War and Peace LOL.

  86. The Original NJ Expat says:

    Pumpkin is getting scared that he is stuck in a white elephant. Don. ‘t worry. Just keep making your payments. Eventually all the hipsters in Brooklyn will have kids and move to Passaic County. At least say that in your prayers every night.

    Hahahahahahahahahahahaha

  87. Comrade Nom Deplume, The GOAT says:

    Was just listening to Chris Kyle’s widow actually destroy the liberals who were going after Trump and Owens widow about the last speech. She really just destroyed them. I don’t know how that side of the aisle can look at themselves in the mirror in the mornings.

  88. The Original NJ Expat says:

    The last time I had a lawn I had a blank check for overtime at $110 per hour (1997) so I used to pay Schultzie the gardener to tend to my lawn and grounds in Long Island. Flash forward 20 years and I will be pushing a lawnmower this Spring and Summer for the first time since the mid ’70’s. Holy crap, isn’t that like 40 years? Anyway, my landlords have left me a Toro mower (and Lib helped my greatly with my Toro snowblower already), is there anything special I should know about mowing in this century? The lawn still looks fine, but I have about 1000 crocuses already in the back yard.

  89. Grab them by the puzzy says:

    @SenSchumer
    Happily talk re: my contact w Mr. Putin & his associates, took place in ’03 in full view of press & public under oath.
    Would you &your team?

    Juice Box says:
    March 3, 2017 at 3:29 pm

    Thye got under Trump’s skin it seems.

    Donald J. Trump‏Verified account
    @realDonaldTrump

    We should start an immediate investigation into @SenSchumer and his ties to Russia and Putin. A total hypocrite!

  90. Grab them by the puzzy says:

    @Bencjacobs

    Trump misspells “hereby” in two consecutive tweets

  91. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Expat, keep the blades sharp (once or twice a season) and for most of the hot season mow at 3 inches or higher. Enjoy! I find it theruopedic to lawn and garden.

  92. STEAMturd, playing the simpleton Anon says:

    I sharpen blades every two years with each tuneup (oil change). Then again, I have a commercial Honda. Only problem is that the bag is too big and it makes it difficult to dump the grass into those tall brown leaf bags. I use a bag buddy and it helps a ton. In a few more years, once my lawn gets really strong, I’ll just mow to mulch and will leave the bag off.

  93. The Great Pumpkin says:

    That’s the truth, if you are not happy with 75,000, you will never be happy. Consistent food, your health, and roof over your head is all you really need

    “9. “The satiation level beyond which experienced well-being no longer increases was a household income of about $75,000 in high-cost areas…The average increase of experienced well-being associated with incomes beyond that level was precisely zero.”
    This is such a great insight for me. Beyond a certain point, earning more money won’t make you any happier. For investors, it’s encouraging to know that growing a realistic pot of capital over a long timeframe will likely be enough to result in a happy retirement.”

    https://www.fool.com/investing/general/2014/11/24/9-critical-investing-lessons-from-a-nobel-prize-wi.aspx

  94. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Absolutely.

    “7. “Success = talent + luck; Great Success = a little more talent + a lot of luck.”
    These formulas illustrate an important theme in the book. Kahneman feels that luck “plays a very large role in every story of success.” A big challenge for investors, of course, is distinguishing between skill and luck. I’ve noticed that the most successful investors rarely acknowledge the latter as playing any role whatsoever until they have a bad year.”

  95. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Lib, they say the most important thing you can do for the health of your lawn is to sharpen the blade. Simple details sometimes make the biggest difference.

    Def mulch the lawn if you don’t fertilize. It’s a natural fertilizer. Even if you fertilize, you can prob save 1/3 of the fertilizer you would use had you bagged it.

  96. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Out of the big tech stocks, amazon best long term play? Looks like they are taking over everything and anything. Tough for the competition to catch up, imo.

  97. STEAMturd, playing the simpleton Anon says:

    It all depends on how often you mow and how large your lawn is. If you don’t hit rocks nor many branches, the blade stays pretty sharp.

  98. chicagofinance says:

    idiot

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    March 3, 2017 at 9:47 pm
    Out of the big tech stocks, amazon best long term play? Looks like they are taking over everything and anything. Tough for the competition to catch up, imo.

  99. Grim says:

    If Amazon is going to shit the bed, they better do it quick because they are leaving a path of retail destruction in their wake.

  100. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Grim, and the destruction continues. Chi, my position was if you can’t beat them, join them?

    Malls are digging their own graves by helping Amazon – Business Insider
    https://apple.news/A_ryRtuRuQ1uaqi8_daIMlA

  101. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Asia’s Promise Gives Way to Its Growing List of Troubles – The Wall Street Journal
    https://apple.news/AYKDLW68vTsSx0aPtFHz1CA

  102. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “But this impressive ascent has not reconfigured world affairs, and it is unlikely to. The more important Asia has become on the global stage, the more glaring have its flaws become. The region is deeply fractured, threatened by economic stagnation, political upheaval and flashpoints that could trigger new wars. And in our more integrated global society, its troubles could quickly become everyone else’s. Much of the world’s attention in the coming decades will be devoted not just to accommodating Asia’s growing power but to managing and mitigating its many serious problems.

    The bad news is likely to arrive in five discrete but interrelated varieties. The first major problem is the end of Asia’s economic miracle and the failure of its economies to reform. From Japan to India, Asian countries are struggling to maintain growth, balance their economies and fight slowdowns. The worries they face include uneven development, asset bubbles, labor woes and state control of markets.

    Perhaps the greatest risk is the dramatically slowing Chinese economy. When trading opened on the Shanghai Composite Index on June 12, 2015, its value had skyrocketed more than 100% since the summer of 2014. Then the bubble popped. Fueled by fears of a slowing economy, a weakening currency and an unsustainable debt bomb of some $30 trillion, China’s markets went into free fall.”

  103. Midnite Pumkin Pie says:

    To his credit. On the Showtime series “Circus”about the election and in the final 2hr+ documentary -Trump (something or other). Trump talks Luck. In the final documentary about 3/4 of the way in. The reporters are interviewing Trump while he’s on a plane, and trump makes the point, a very big point of how much luck plays into everything.

    “7. “Success = talent + luck; Great Success = a little more talent + a lot of luck.”
    These formulas illustrate an important theme in the book. Kahneman feels that luck “plays a very large role in every story of success.” A big challenge for investors, of course, is distinguishing between skill and luck. I’ve noticed that the most successful investors rarely acknowledge the latter as playing any role whatsoever until they have a bad year

  104. nwnj3 says:

    Bonehead, the missing piece from your equation is risk taking. Job hopping, relocating, starting business, etc. is how you get ahead.

    I’ve job hopped and will continue to do so until I retire. It’s foolish not to unless you have a gov job. I’d prefer to bust my a$s and try to retire comfortably(and hopefully early) rather than going along for the ride.

  105. nwnj3 says:

    And I like AMZN a lot. I think AWS is still early in the growth cycle. Who knows how big it will be. Cloud computing is the paradigm of the future but as tech has matured overall it will take longer(20-30 years) for the transition to cloud to transpire.

  106. Juice Box says:

    What they are killing is Dell, HP and IBM. Their cloud revenues are now 14 Billion a year.

  107. Juice Box says:

    And just like the threat of Amazon drones their entry into traditional brick and mortar stores so far is bust.

  108. Grab them by the puzzy says:

    @jdawnsey1

    Trump made one of the most explosive claims in recent history,

    moved right along to trashing Schwarzenegger

    and is now at the golf course.

  109. nwnj3 says:

    Hell of a days work for Donald.

  110. Newbomb Turk says:

    Trump’s gotta keep the tinfoil hat industry happy.

  111. EncuncKep says:

    Craigslist is where internet browsers choose to seek listings. From vancouver real estate to freelance jobs the website provides information on a huge astounding variety of themes.

  112. chicagofinance says:

    Pumps is pointing the stock; grim the company…..

    I’ve repeated this axiom many times……the stock and the company are two separate things….they are strongly related, but distinct…..

    of course you can crush everyone when you are committed to being unprofitable and not paying a financial price for it…..ask the greatest ponzi schemer of all time…..Benie Madoff? no Elon Musk……

    chicagofinance says:
    March 4, 2017 at 12:23 am
    idiot

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    March 3, 2017 at 9:47 pm
    Out of the big tech stocks, amazon best long term play? Looks like they are taking over everything and anything. Tough for the competition to catch up, imo.
    Grim says:
    March 4, 2017 at 4:29 am
    If Amazon is going to shit the bed, they better do it quick because they are leaving a path of retail destruction in their wake.

  113. chicagofinance says:

    AMZN really benefits from the fact that rich people love Amazon…..

    Retailers are FUCT because kids spend every extra cent they have on iShit….

    Consumers have learned to buy knockoffs and overstock following The Great Recession and have never returned to their prior buying habits…. why buy my son a brand new Goalzilla basketball hoop, when I can Craigslist a perfectly fine 2 year old one……..

    Why doesn’t everyone just copy Amazon? Because everyone else lives in the real world……..Amazon has AMZN to fund their largesse they pass to consumers in the form of free shipping……it is free shipping that is destroying everyone……

  114. The Great Pumpkin says:

    This is not me boasting that I was right. This is me just trying to prove to this blog I’m not the idiot you think I am. You know I made this call way back in 2012/13, when NO ONE was making this call for 2017/2018 to be the beginnings stages of a boom period that would take off through the early 2020’s (prob end up being the biggest boom period of our lifetime). Obviously, I didn’t read this anywhere, since no one was taking this position anywhere. I did it based on my analysis of the business cycle and demographics. Yes, I will prob never make another call like this in my lifetime, but just give me some respect. If I was some famous economist, I would be a household name after this call.

    “Now, interest rates and inflation forecasts have risen substantially from last winter’s lows; financial markets are shrugging off — or even rallying at the possibility of — imminent Fed rate increases; and it is all taking place during Donald J. Trump’s presidency.

    An economy that seemed locked in some form of “secular stagnation” or “new normal” is at long last showing some signs of being in something closer to an “old normal.” The United States manufacturing sector is showing strength, and the broader mix of market and economic data from around the world in the last few months also points to a world where a vicious economic cycle isn’t looking quite as scary and may even be ending”

    What Booming Markets Are Telling Us About the Global Economy – The New York Times
    https://apple.news/Azd9e-P59SquEQptliAKW0w

  115. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Chi, your previous two posts about amazon are prob the best I’ve read on this blog in 2017. You make some damn good points.

    And that Elon musk line is priceless.

  116. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Agreed. Just stating, at the top, there is almost no difference in level of intelligence, just random luck separates the winners at the top which trump was acknowledging.

    Even apply it to professional sports. Only thing that separates the majority of pro’s is random luck. They all work hard. They all put up similar physical stats. So random luck separates the majority of professional atheletes.

    Ever wonder why players come out of nowhere when opportunity presents itself? Were they not good as a non-starter? No, luck fell their way and they ran with it. Hell, if tom Brady didn’t get that lucky fumble taken away in the 2001 playoffs vs Oakland, he might have never had another shot in the NFL again. But we all know what happened, and he is now considered one of the goat.

    That’s what the author is implying. He’s not implying doing nothing and luck can carry you to wealth. He’s stating that not much separates the competition at the top besides luck.

    nwnj3 says:
    March 4, 2017 at 12:26 pm
    Bonehead, the missing piece from your equation is risk taking. Job hopping, relocating, starting business, etc. is how you get ahead.

  117. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Wage inflation cometh! Going to wish you maximized low cost loans for real estate investments in the past five years. Now we see the inflationary measures increase the price of real estate. A lot of dollars will be chasing real estate in the coming decade.

    “So if tax cuts, more military spending and other Trumpian policies add to deficits at a time the economy is already running at full blast, rising prices and rising rates are exactly what we would expect to see”

  118. Nomad says:

    Speaking of military spending, looks like we have some pressing needs:

    http://breakingdefense.com/2017/02/62-of-f-18-hornets-unfit-to-fly-dod-hill-focus-on-readiness/

    Is the F-18 is the only fighter we have that can depart / land on an aircraft carrier?

    Does an aircraft carrier at sea without fighter jets become an anchor.?

  119. The Great Pumpkin says:

    You know how many times I’ve been told that it doesn’t matter when so much money gets concentrated in a few hands, that the pie is not fixed. Well it seems Mr. Buffet agrees with me. This was written in 1999, before the rise in income inequality. We have seen capital take an ever increasing piece of the economic pie at the expense of labor. It has raised political problems as Trump is specific evidence of this. Will trump be able to return some of the pie taken by capital by forcing companies to remain here and pay higher labor costs or through protectionist trade policies?

    “If corporate investors, in aggregate, are going to eat an ever-growing portion of the American economic pie, some other group will have to settle for a smaller portion. That would justifiably raise political problems–and in my view a major reslicing of the pie just isn’t going to happen.”

    Mr. Buffett on the Stock Market The most celebrated of investors says stocks can’t possibly meet the public’s expectations. As for the Internet? He notes how few people got rich from two other transforming industries, auto and aviation. – November 22, 1999 – archive.fortune.com
    http://archive.fortune.com/magazines/fortune/fortune_archive/1999/11/22/269071/index.htm

  120. Comrade Nom Deplume, The GOAT says:

    Escapee,

    That is the sort of priority shifting that was done frequently by agencies in the prior administration and would either be unreported or lauded under a democrat. However I expect it to be an attack line shortly now that it has been teed up.

  121. Comrade Nom Deplume, The GOAT says:

    Nomad,

    A “peace dividend” perhaps?

    I know I have stated it here before, but it bears repeating. When W launched the war in Afghanistan, much was made of the fact that military was going to drop “daisy cutters” on the Taliban. To some, it did not make sense that these very large bombs, used to clear landing areas in jungles, was to be used in war. The press characterized it as a morale buster.

    A year later, a colleague of mine, who was an Army intelligence officer in Afghanistan, came back to the world and told me about the real reason for the daisy cutters. He said it was because the Air Force was literally running out of bombs. The DOD was cut back so much during Clinton, who was using the “peace dividend” to balance the budget, that the military was very short on materiel when Bush started the war in Afghanistan.

  122. STEAMturd, playing the simpleton Anon says:

    Peace Dividend? I still want to know where I can apply to serve on the ACA death squad.

  123. Raymond Reddington says:

    Nomad, how about reducing Medicare spending and use that for defense.

  124. Juice Box says:

    Airforce was running out of bombs last year too, they were dropping 2500 bombs a month over Iraq and Syria. That may seem like allot but the Russians have been running about 60 sorties a day compared to our coalition average of 7.

  125. Grab them by the puzzy says:

    @BruceBartlett

    Take Nixon in the deepest days of his Watergate paranoia,

    subtract 50 IQ points,

    add Twitter,

    and you have Trump today.

  126. STEAMturd, playing the simpleton Anon says:

    How simplisticly stupid. Not surprising though. It’s just one Twitiot trying to make fun of another Twitiot. And the simpleton follower lapping it up like a starving feral puzzycat.

  127. Grab them by the puzzy says:

    @esheick_

    First try : “hear by”
    Second try : “hearby”
    Third try : “hereby”

    #CoveringTrump

  128. nwnj3 says:

    No doubt bomma used the apparatus of the state to prop up and advance Hillary’s chances of winning. He politicized the gov the extent he could to secure a legacy. He failed. Was any of it criminal?

    I’d like to see what evidence of the Clinton crimes he buried. What was offered or threatened on that runway in AZ? So many questions…

  129. Grab them by the puzzy says:

    @Kasparov63

    One of the fixed contradictions of the strongman ethos is that he and his followers must always play the victim,
    even when holding power.

    @Kasparov63

    If Trump insists on acting like he lost the election,
    there are millions of people happy to accept his resignation.

  130. Comrade Nom Deplume, The GOAT says:

    Grim,

    Can we have an original thought requirement?

  131. Comrade Nom Deplume, The GOAT says:

    Given a choice between being Bruce Bartlett and The Donald, I would take Trump every day of the week and twice in Sundays. Being President and a billionaire > being a bitter liberal.

    And if I had to be puzzy, I’d hurl myself in front of an Amtrak train. Of course, I would have to know that before becoming puzzy.

  132. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    Meet the Todd and Face the Dickerson aren’t even entertaining any more, much less informative. It’s pretty obvious now that the Administration is boycotting both shows.

  133. BlueRibbonTeacher says:

    I know someone who’s a painkiller addict that exhibits the worst drug seeking behavior. She has had nearly 50 ct scans in the past year, all the on the government’s dime. If anyone has ever viewed the bill for one of these, I’ll let you do the math to see how much that cost.

  134. Comrade Nom Deplume, The GOAT says:

    Juice,

    Not crazy. Brent art was right; we have been in a Cold War with the Left. Maybe the left would like to heat it up a bit? I think they’ll find plenty of folks to give her what she seeks.

Comments are closed.