Why fight it? Go with the flow.

From the Record:

Minimum wage for Bergen County workers is now $15 an hour

Bergen County Executive Jim Tedesco gave thanks for county workers on Tuesday when he signed an executive order that raises the minimum wage for full-time employees to $15 an hour.

Tedesco, riding the progressive wave that swept Phil Murphy into office earlier this month, did his part to help the governor-elect deliver on one of his key campaign promises: to nearly double the minimum wage all around the state, which now stands at $8.44. The freeholder board planned to adopt the wage hike by resolution on Tuesday night, making Bergen County the first of New Jersey’s 21 counties to raise the minimum wage.

“Good people are essential to good government, and good managers understand that their employees need to be valued,” Tedesco said at a news conference, where he was flanked by freeholders, a county union leader, and an advocate for working families. “County employees who put in 40 hours or more every week, in service to their friends and neighbors throughout Bergen County, deserve and have earned a $15 minimum wage.”

The wage hike, which is retroactive to Sept. 1, immediately affects 129 blue-collar and white-collar workers scattered about county government. Some are office clerks, others are drivers, and still others work for the county road department and public works.

The county estimates that the wage hikes will cost $360,647 in the first year, which is less than 1 percent of the county’s $52.8 million budget. Tedesco said the minimum wage increases were part of two contracts that the county signed recently with locals 655 and 755 of the United Services Workers Union. Tedesco said there no plans to give the $15 wage to part-time county workers.

This entry was posted in Economics, New Jersey Real Estate, Politics, Property Taxes. Bookmark the permalink.

86 Responses to Why fight it? Go with the flow.

  1. grim says:

    Already have a pretty deep prospect list of captive contact centers and back office processing centers in NJ.

    I could move all the jobs to the Philippines with zero capital outlay for these clients and reduce their annual spend by 50%. I can take their executives out of crisis-mode, and make them HEROES to their shareholders.

    2018 is going to be a solid commission year. If I play my cards right, I could make more than a million dollars this year. Commission rates in this industry are typical at 1% of the top-line contract value. A somewhat typical 300 FTE operation likely costs $20-25 million in NJ, this is fully burdened including infrastructure, IT, real estate, etc. You can do the same job with better quality out of the Philippines for half this rate, all in. 4 year contract top line, $40 million. This is a $400k commission in the industry. Only need to get 3 companies out of a list of 75 to bite to make a million dollars. That’s it folks, only 3 deals to make a million bucks. You are all idiots for grinding away at a 9-5.

    You think this is far fetched? I really hope you don’t. There are probably 500 people lying in bed right now, plotting this exact course. When an executive hears for the first time that they are incompetent at their job, and running an incredibly wasteful enterprise, they are insulted, infuriated. By the 3rd time, their response is, “Ok, let’s talk some more.”

  2. grim says:

    And before anyone jumps out here and says, NO, they will have loyalty to their employees. Average monthly attrition rates in NJ backoffice/contact centers likely runs 7%. That’s not 7% a year, that’s 7% a month.

    Loyalty to employees? From the start of the year to the end of the year there is 85% turnover. Employees are barely loyal to them. You think they have some kind of honorable qualms about loyalty to employees? What loyalty when on any given day, somebody is just going to quit and not bother calling, or showing up. Or they are just going to walk out. Or they are so entitled that they sit around and don’t bother doing anything at all, so they need to be fired?

    I’ll tell you what. Take your top 15 employees, your most tenured staff. We’ll hire them at their current rates, equal benefit plans, and they can work from home. They’ll all be given leadership/management positions and help oversee the campaign. They will get the same pay, they will have a title, and they can work from their house. If you want to keep those employees, that’s fine as well. We’ll deploy all the infrastructure to let them work from home or your office, no cost to you. You can get rid of all your switches, networking, IT staff managing CRM systems, databases, telephony, call recording, workforce management, etc etc. You’ll probably be able to cut your real estate bill in half by shuttering two floors in this very expensive office building.

    By the way, what’s a reduction in $10m spend with an increase in all contact center metrics do for the executive bonuses?

    How’s that for loyalty?

    NJ minimum wage workers will not stand a chance.

  3. grim says:

    And the outsourcers located in NJ? With a commitment to the state? Headquartered here, only one site here, majority of operations here.

    In due time their margins will be squeezed, contracts don’t typically allow for wage increases outside of COLA, and generally specifically exclude wage increases by legislative action. So providers are stuck honoring the same price, while having to pay employees more.

    Generally they start to cut corners to preserve margin. Maybe slower to hire, slower to ramp, slower to backfill attrition, start taking short-cuts on training to get an employee on the floor faster (if they ain’t taking calls, you ain’t getting paid). The culture and morale starts to decline. The client sees it in deteriorating KPIs.

    Will go in and take that business too. Probably put those mom and pop providers out of business. I believe there are 4 of those left.

  4. grim says:

    Here’s what happened in NY State this year.

    Layoffs due to increase in wages
    Utica – 208 (outsourcer)
    Syracuse – 60 (outsourcer)
    Rochester – 178 (outsourcer)
    Glen Falls – 55 (outsourcer)
    Bethpage – 87 (captive -> outsource)
    Williamsville – 250 (captive moving out of state)
    New Hartford – 32 (captive -> outsourcer)
    Amherst – 71 (oursourcer)
    Mellville – 300+ (captive -> outsourcer)
    Rochester – 59 (outsourcer)
    Amherst – 46 (outsourcer)
    Long Island City – 400 (captive moving out of state, telemarketer/surveyor – the fact that they stayed this long is crazy)
    Melville – 61 (captive moving)
    Amherst – another 46 (outsourcer)
    Pittsford – 192 (outsourcer)

    So, a touch over 2000 jobs this year moved out as a result of wage increases in NY State. I can tell you that this is accelerating, you’ll likely see double that in 2018. Most big outsourcers are abandoning NY State entirely now. They’ll run out ops just long enough to plan out the migrations and mothball the sites until the leases are up.

    In the grand scheme, 2000 jobs is a pretty small number (this year), maybe 6000-8000 total over the next 3 years. I’m sure there are tens of thousands who will benefit as a result, no doubt. But don’t for once think that this doesn’t have repercussions. You can tell these people they lost their jobs for the good of society.

    A lot of people are going to make a lot of money in the next few years. Get lucky enough to ink a couple of deals with residuals, you could be retiring at 45 in Hawaii. Just kidding, companies quickly realized that they would pretty quickly lose their best salespeople to retirement, and leadership got jealous of the guys who were getting $1m in residual payout checks every 3-4 years.

  5. grim says:

    Oh, how could I forget, this new NY law penalizing employers for short notice shift changes, requiring 2 weeks notice of adjustments.

    This has all the makings of a bonanza. Does the person who wrote this have any fucking iota of common sense? Last minute shift changes have nothing to do with mean or nasty employers taking advantage of their employees, it’s as a direct response to unexpected and unforcastable issues.

    You know, a kid swallows a LOL doll and dies, and now every toy retailer can barely keep up with the deluge of phone calls from concerned parents, as volumes come in 3x forecast and they are so understaffed that wait times are nearing one hour, and thats with half the people giving up and just hanging up.

    Makes perfect sense. In the Philippines, you make the call out on social media and text message, and send the busses, out. They are so willing to work you’ll have a 100 people in 3 hours.

    Rant off, may you reap what you sew.

  6. Fast Eddie says:

    You’re talking about back office jobs and minimum wage; what am I missing here? I read your posts a few times and I’m not getting the whole picture.

  7. Grim says:

    Not minimum wage, just low wage.

    It’s not uncommon to pay $12-15 already in upstate NY. It’s a demanding job, but the wage is decent. In order to attract the best talent for the wage, you generally need to price above the local alternatives. There is a delta above the base wage rate in the area that needs to be maintained to keep applicant flow high, attrition low, etc.

    This work is call center, inbound, outbound, back office, billing, scheduling, dispatch, data entry, application processing, validation and qa of digital work product. Literally, any job at the other end of a phone call, email, or purse of paper.

  8. Grim says:

    Tech support, warranty, insurance claims, medical billing, ap/ar, eCommerce, freight and shipping, inbound sales. List goes on and on and on.

  9. Grim says:

    What I think people miss most is context and scale.

    A well known ride share/taxi app has 6000 employees answering phone calls.

    None of these jobs are in the US, despite supporting the US market.

    Six …. thousand.

    Answering phones.

  10. Grim says:

    Right now, today, on the cusp of Black Friday, pretty much every mid size and greater US retailer is employing anywhere from 1,500 to 2,500 contact center agents.

  11. Grim says:

    The big eCommerce one we all know, they have 10,000.

  12. Grim says:

    The scale is so large that two dollars is a massive material impact.

  13. Fast Eddie says:

    I see the picture now. Thanks!

  14. Not Grimsky says:

    Grim, well good luck getting those Filipinos to buy your Jersey Whisky.

    I thought you were more enlightened. Henry Ford enlightened. Like pay $5 a day – so you get better workers, less turnover, and people that can afford your cars.

    What goes around, comes around. Those call centers have high turn over because their pay s*cks already relative to local cost. Every one here is old enough to know that if you want good people you got to pay for it. And wait till we have a nice government to government hacking war, see if any of those call center based VOIP or computers will work.

    PS. Foreign call centers s*ck. They don’t get the cultural points. Last 3 times I need to call someone for services, I gave up. If I can’t do it in a website, and I call and can’t get it done. I move to a new seller, vendor, etc.

  15. nwnj says:

    Meh, the low hanging fruit has been picked. If a CEO could have outsourced a big back office operation it’s been done already. The newer outsourcing models are moving up the food chain and they aren’t going to third world locales.

    Besides, if the wages are increased to 15 the turnover rate would drop substantially, not that I see it going to 15 anyway. It would require too many carveouts and would eventually collapse under it’s own weight. But that won’t stop feel good legislation like the move by Bergen county.

  16. nwnj says:

    I’m thankful this year for president trump and for pervy liberals who are imploding left and right. Whose going to implode today?

  17. Juice Box says:

    We relocated two call centers in last few years one to the western states and one in the southern states. This is the destination not where they were. Grim is right no loyalty they will jump ship ship for a dollar an hour.

    Our Top Line is growing but I bottom line not so much. Eventually the management consultants will get to us, but first we have to go through three rounds like Grim mentioned earlier first the high-priced management consultants, cuff links and gold watches who will bleed us before us we get down to Grim’s bottom basement offshoring.

  18. Yo! says:

    Grim thank you for you’re posts illustrating economic reality.

    My gripe with $15 is it prevents teenagers from getting first jobs. Bad for future of our country.

  19. Fabius Maximus says:

    “Average monthly attrition rates in NJ backoffice/contact centers likely runs 7%.”

    Because the employers have made them sh1t jobs with the constant threat of Offshoring.

    But lets look at the other side. There are buses of workers just waiting to step up. What a crock. The reality is that attrition in India is around 48% in the call centers and 23% in the BPO space. Thats the average some companies are reporting 60-100% attrition rates. Absentee rates are running around 10%. 1 in 10 is a no show. The workforce is young and a lot of turnover is “when I am going to be a manager?” I can get more money over there. I’m burnt out and I’m done.

    Yes you can get those three deals, but those CEOs are in for a shock when they wake up and realize how much they will have pay to fix the train wreck they just caused.

    Here’;s the Kicker. Saint Ronnie promised places like upstate greater riches and a better life by moving away from the manufacturing economy towards the service based industries. Take a look around the country. Hows that really working out?

  20. Times boy says:

    Grim, great on the $1 million payday, we need someone to make up for Tepper!
    Being in outsourcing (benefits admin) since 1990, lots of pain around the outsourced call centers. I think the “near shore” strategy is to put the call center in El Paso, it is almost like being in the US (yuk yuk) and they almost can be understood. Pretty low wages too!

  21. Grim says:

    nwnj – sorry sir, you are wrong. I have nearly 100,000 miles this year backing my position, what do you have?

  22. grim says:

    Fabius – You know that I’ve been doing this for more than 20 years right? All my dabbling here and there, real estate, whiskey, whatever else, that has more to do with my ADHD and obsessive compulsiveness, this is my bread and butter. I’m not talking out of my ass, and I’m not being facetious. My rant above is slightly embellished, for effect, but you know that this is par for the course. While slightly colored for effect, it is 100% accurate.

  23. ex-Jersey says:

    Grim, You are a scholar and a gentleman. thanks for everything.

  24. ex-Jersey says:

    Serious question: Is the ‘press’ responsible for leading us into the morass we are in?

  25. nwnj says:

    Just don’t see it. Glad you are making deals but I don’t see the threat of 15 minimum wage as a game changer for NJ back office.

    If a CEO could increase a bonus via offshoring, it’s already been done. Automation is the next big game changer. Why bother hiring a third worlder at all?

  26. chicagofinance says:

    6. SOME PAID, SOME DID NOT – Americans filed 150.5 million tax
    returns in tax year 2015. 66% of the returns (99.0 million) paid
    federal income tax while 34% of the returns (51.5 million) did not
    pay any federal income tax (source: Internal Revenue Service).

    7. NO FEDERAL INCOME TAXES – 54% of the American taxpayers
    (49.8 million out of 92.4 million returns) that reported adjusted gross
    income less than $50,000 during tax year 2015 legally did not pay
    any federal income tax (source: Internal Revenue Service).

    8. MADE A LOT AND PAID A LOT – The 6.75 million tax returns from
    tax year 2015 that reported at least $200,000 of adjusted gross
    income (AGI) represent 4% of all the tax returns filed, received 43%
    of all AGI nationwide and paid 59% of all the federal income tax that
    was paid nationally in 2015 (source: Internal Revenue Service).

  27. grim says:

    If a CEO could increase a bonus via offshoring, it’s already been done. Automation is the next big game changer. Why bother hiring a third worlder at all?

    There are lots of legacy US businesses who continue to service onshore in their own captive sites, and they feel it to be a competitive differentiation, but that doesn’t translate in their financial performance. We had a major US name re-shore 1000 employees back to the US, because it was the American way. It was noble, we complied. Of course it was rushed, despite our recommendations, and it was catastrophic. He was subsequently fired, half the business was moved down to Latin America. Like I said, major US brand.

    Next week I’m meeting with a machine learning startup in NYC with hope that we can ink a strategic partnership. See, our clients don’t care if we provide them with humans, or robots, anymore. Why should they spend all the time and effort investing in building core competence around AI, robotics, automation.

    Funny thing, US companies that are hell bent about staying on-shore, they are very open to automation.

  28. nwnj says:

    Yep, and it’s the and big boys(AMZN, GOOG, IBM Watson possibly) who will be players in the space. Startups will be bought up and folded into the mix.

    People will be lobbing queries, natural language etc. against cloud services and will receive tech support that way. Skeleton crews with domain knowledge and techies will be around to train up the deep learning algos which will render large segments of the workforce obsolete.

  29. Fast Eddie says:

    Fabius,

    Saint Ronnie promised places like upstate greater riches and a better life by moving away from the manufacturing economy towards the service based industries. Take a look around the country. Hows that really working out?

    Give me a f.ucking break. You’ve had a bug up your @ss over the guy forever because nothing from your side could compare to the level of success he achieved. The service based industry gave me a career. It was there and continues to be there for anyone who wants it. Hesitate and you lose. How’s it working out? F.ucking beautifully because the digital age is making me money from both ends. Peddle your bullsh1t to some gender-confused, whining l1beral who gives a sh1t.

  30. Fast Eddie says:

    Serious question: Is the ‘press’ responsible for leading us into the morass we are in?

    No, it’s Reagan and Bush’s fault.

  31. nwnj says:

    And tech support is an example. The scope of business services that will be conducted this way will be quite broad.

  32. grim says:

    You guys know how machine learning and automation platforms work, don’t you?

    I suspect you don’t.

    Most leading platforms have humans providing scoring, validation, and transcription of machine behaviors on the back end. You have pools of people, who are fed speech utterances, test strings, scans, photographs, annotations of actions that occurred as part of an automated transaction. These people, en mass, work to train the machine learning algorithms by providing scoring and feedback for situations where automation failed.

    Maybe you were talking to a speech recognition IVR one day, and you just blurt out “what the hell do I owe you”.

    The first time the system hears that, it will not understand, it will ask you to clarify your intent. “I’m sorry, I didn’t get that, can you repeat using fewer words?”

    That recording will go to a human, who will listen to it, and tell the platform that the actual intent of that utterance was “account balance”.

    The next time you call and say “what the F*ck do I owe you”, it might pick out enough of the phrase to ask you to clarify, “Are you looking for your account balance?”. Now this utterance will go down to an agent, who will score the accuracy of the response. Good job robot, 100%.

    This is why Alexa is good, and Siri is not so good. I suspect today, Amazon has north of 2000 people sitting in “call centers” transcribing utterances, providing scoring on actions, etc – training the automation platforms to be more accurate. The thing is, it works kind of like Captcha – the same utterances and validations are provided to a dozen people, they all validate, transcribe, and score it. The aggregate score is the winner. See, we realize that humans are more fallible than machines now. It doesn’t even pay to have someone check their work, when it’s just more cost effective to have multiple people do the same task.

    There is big business here, perhaps it takes a year to tune a platform to be highly effective, at that point you scale back the staffing for one client, and move your expert bot trainers to another campaign.

  33. Libturd, AKA Dr. Howie Feltersnatch says:

    My issue with the $15 wage is simply based on principle. This morning, I mobile ordered a medium hot chocolate for Gator Jr. (who needed x-rays due to a serious cleat stomp to his left ankle) and a medium coffee for yours truly. Nothing fancy. I would have ordered a small hot chocolate, but DD is running a special where the medium costs less than the small. When my son went in to pick it up, they had made a small. This is incredulous since very few people are ordering smalls since it’s price is higher than the medium. This sh1t-for-brains will now get a $5 raise.

    I went into the local hardware store (not the big Orange or Blue Store) a few days ago because I needed to replace a CFC from a ceiling fan. I was pretty certain it was the standard chandelier size, but he was convinced it was something else. I even brought the old bulb with me to match the size. I paid $10 for a LED that didn’t even fit thanks to his advice. This guy too will get a $5 raise easy. I ended up going to the Big Orange store and got 6 LEDs that fit for $8. So much for supporting the little guy. Now that $10 bulb will be going up to $12.

    I know it’s anecdotal, but I swear on my grandmother’s grave that the success rate I’ve received from walk-in retail is about 20%. No one can get it right anymore. I am happy to speak with an Indian or a Philippino as I know my odds of them getting the order right is closer to 90%. I don’t have an issue with the accent since I work with Indians everyday. It’s rare that I call a call center anyway since I find that ordering things online (especially Amazon) are incredibly accurate. In probably 500 items I’ve ordered from Amazon, there was only one mistake and it wasn’t a product fulfilled from Amazon.

    The cost of the $5 raises really is not my issue. It’s the huge reward for incompetence that irks me to no end. I agree with Grim. This will accelerate outsourcing for bigger businesses and will hasten the closing of smaller businesses. Remember the stats. Very, very, very few people depend on minimum wage jobs to make a living. It’s just another feel-good divisive policy that hurts a few teenagers at the expense of the greatest generation who have retired from their real jobs and now work at these minimum wage jobs due to the huge tax advantages.

  34. Juice Box says:

    ML is at peak of inflated expectations.

    Grim don’t tell them what is in the secret sauce in IVR….

  35. Fast Eddie says:

    So, what jobs will be in demand in the U.S. in the next 10 years?

  36. Juice Box says:

    10 years from now jobs in Tech in the USA?

    There will be a demand for Repo Men. That new body you had your head transferred to well you missed three payments and well the repo Man just showed up…. Chinese made synthetic/artificial organs and bodies bought on credit sold to muppets here in the USA.

  37. Grim says:

    Biggest risk of automation is to offshore.

    Very low quality, simple transaction types. Everything that made India attractive for the work makes Automation attractive.

    Long term, we are forecasting to see limited repatriation. As automation eliminated the basic skill work, the newly increased complexity are better suited for higher pay on-shore work. As you automate the easy work, you are still left with the hard work.

    This changes the offshore dynamic dramatically.

  38. No One says:

    Grim – you are putting the economizing back into economics. This is progress, everyone. Anyone who disagrees should go support their local buggy-whip shop, shop at Sears, and get dinner at Howard Johnsons.

    Libturd – there’s a huge conflict in America between the traditional meaning of Justice – meaning that people should get the rewards or punishments they deserve, i.e. earn based on their behavior and actions, and the new meaning of “social justice” which essentially means the opposite – that people deserve the unearned, that losers deserve more, while those who earned things deserve less. I’m glad to hear that you still come down mostly on the side of real justice.

  39. Grim says:

    To elaborate a bit – by reducing TCO through automation, we can free up enough savings to pay for the jobs repatriation.

    When I say US, you can replace that with Canada, UK, Germany, France, Australia – wherever.

  40. Grim says:

    I practice my witchcraft everywhere.

  41. Fast Eddie says:

    …we can free up enough savings to pay for the jobs repatriation.

    What types of jobs? What skill sets?

  42. Fabius Maximus says:

    I know you have been doing this for 20 years and I know a sales pitch when I hear one. Are you telling me Offshoring is all sweetness and light and that Attrition and Absenteeism isn’t an issue.

    I’m old enough to remember Michael Dell and his fiasco.

  43. Grim says:

    Same general domain, more complex skill set.

    This was hugely obvious during the first round of automation deployments. Successfully reduced workload and cut staff, but now the staff aren’t performing. Survey results in the shitter, handle times through the roof, agents complaining about workload.

    What the f@ck? The automation worked? Why did the op go to shit?

    Well sure, 40% of the simple happy calls were automated. Now the workload consists of pissed off customers with major issues, more research, troubleshooting, follow up.

    So those happy calls are gone, agents get pissed off customer after pissed off customer.

    Of course call times spiked, survey results ranked. We took the best 40% of an employers day away from them.

    Job stress high, harder to train, harder to hire thick skinned individuals. I’ve seen agents break down and cry after phone calls from horrendous customers who should be ashamed of themselves.

    This is the unexpected consequence of automation of this kind of work.

  44. Libturd, AKA Dr. Howie Feltersnatch says:

    ” I’ve seen agents break down and cry after phone calls from horrendous customers who should be ashamed of themselves.”

    You should see the conversations I have with the serial cold callers who call my cell phone which is on the do not call list. I’m not sure I make them cry, but I do waste as much of their time as is possible. My favorite move is to let them know how interested I am in their service or ware, but I tell them to please hold. Then I come back on 30 seconds later, make them go through the schpeal again as I acted like I forgot and then I say please hold again. Then when they come back on again, I ask them to repeat the script again, but this time I’d like to record it so I won’t forget it. Then after that, I tell them I’m on the do not call list and ask for their rec0reded acknowledgement. This is where I lose most of them. I generally play these games in my car when I have nothing better to do or when H0ward Stern is in commercials.

    The funniest thing that ever happened to me was when I told one caller that this call was being recorded and if he minded. He said, “this is America. All your calls are being recorded.” We both had a good laugh and he slipped into his British Accent for a moment before hanging up.

  45. The Great Pumpkin says:

    One of the things I do on the side is compile productivity data from company ADP reports. One of the things I’ve noticed over the years is it is absolutely true that CS phone jockeys do indeed turn over at the highest rate in any company. They also use up their vacation and sick days faster at the beginning of the year than any other employees. You might want to mention that to your prospects in December grim, so they can watch those numbers rack up in January and February.

    And before anyone jumps out here and says, NO, they will have loyalty to their employees. Average monthly attrition rates in NJ backoffice/contact centers likely runs 7%. That’s not 7% a year, that’s 7% a month.

    Loyalty to employees? From the start of the year to the end of the year there is 85% turnover. Employees are barely loyal to them. You think they have some kind of honorable qualms about loyalty to employees? What loyalty when on any given day, somebody is just going to quit and not bother calling, or showing up. Or they are just going to walk out. Or they are so entitled that they sit around and don’t bother doing anything at all, so they need to be fired?

  46. The Great Pumpkin says:

    One of the coolest things you can do with ADP data is calculate the direct cost of labor for manufacturing.

  47. Grim says:

    Stu – that’s the kind of work that is done in India these day. All chop shops, operating outside of the control of US law.

  48. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    In case you are wondering how Pumps put together two cogent posts…he didn’t. It was me.

  49. Grim says:

    Half the time the company they are selling for doesn’t even know they are doing it.

  50. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    I ask cold callers for their first and last name and personal phone number so I can call them back when they are not at work.

  51. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    I don’t get too many nuisance calls on my cell phone. Sure, I win a vacation or an SUV every other week or so. I actually live in a neighborhood where some sales people go d0or-to-door, which I haven’t experienced since I was a little kid. Up until a few weeks ago I think I was the only one in the US who had never talked to a Jehovah’s Witness.

  52. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    By far I get the most robo calls from Boston Public Schools. Absences, snow days, community meetings ( a lot of them), college nights, school open houses, etc. – all are robo calls.

  53. Libturd, AKA Dr. Howie Feltersnatch says:

    Fab,

    Early attempts at outsourcing were terrible (like your Dell example). A lot has changed since then, especially the infrastructure in India that was built around handling this type of work. For example, highways have been built to connect airports with call center campuses/tech centers as they call them to make it much more convenient for people like me to go to train them. Huge battery backups have been built to handle the frequent power outages. Even better buses for commuters verse the inter-city rolling jails everyone used to have to ride. Longer hours into the overnight too to cover the three shifts these campuses all serve since they are 12 hours ahead of us.

    And here is the real kicker, especially in my line of work. They work ethic is much better than their counterparts here and they are better educated. The biggest struggle is the cultural differences and the language barrier. They speak English pretty well, but they occasional screw up translations. I recall a case of an undone assignment that they misunderstood me when I said,”If I were you, I would blah, blah, blah.” They translated that to mean, “I would blah, blah, blah and not them!” Our other major issue is that they are not good with gray. Everything must be black and white.

  54. Grab them by the puzzy says:

    @MaxBoot

    The latest reason I can’t be a Republican anymore: I’m against pedophilia.

  55. Grab them by the puzzy says:

    @ShaunKing

    Friends.

    We only have a few more Thanksgivings with this horrible man as our President.

    We will beat him in 2020. I’m sure of it. It’s not inevitable, but we will come together and do whatever it takes to win.

    HANG IN THERE.

    Happy Thanksgiving!

  56. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    Up until at least 1998 or so Dell had the best customer service in the world. By 2002 it was absolute offshore crap. I had the smallest, lightest, high end corporate laptop that Dell made, the C400. It was so popular that Dell produced them for years. It was one of the first laptops to have no floppy and no optical drive. Instead it had a short, thick proprietary IDE cable to connect to an external floppy or DVD drive. One of the plastic press buttons on one end broke, but the cable still worked. I figured, what the hell, I’ll just make a 5 minute call to Dell and they’ll send me a new one. I spent about 25 minutes on the phone with some guy in Bangalore who could not even discern what type of cable I was talking about. I finally hung up and called back just to get another body. This time I got a Texas accent. It still took a little longer than it used to, but it was fine. I told the guy who helped me if he saw this guy around the cafeteria to tell him he should consider another field. He laughed and said,” I don’t think I’ll be going to Bangalore any time soon.”

    I’m old enough to remember Michael Dell and his fiasco.

  57. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    It’d be funny to see Hillary wearing a “Puzzy Needs Grabbin'” T-shirt.

  58. Grim says:

    Stop talking about India – what decade is this?

  59. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    Here’s my fastest, easiest turkey stuffing recipe

    1. Stove top stuffing
    2. Add walnuts
    3. Add Apple Cherry Juice

    Fill up your turkey and cook.

  60. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    I guess grim had a bad experience in India.

  61. Libturd, AKA Dr. Howie Feltersnatch says:

    “Stop talking about India – what decade is this?”

    No. India got expensive. I know!

  62. Libturd, AKA Dr. Howie Feltersnatch says:

    Africa is the next frontier. Will be great to hear hip-hop when put on hold.

  63. Libturd, AKA Dr. Howie Feltersnatch says:

    I’m gonna try to reproduce my smoked turkey chili that I made last year. It was the best chili I ever had. I made vats of it too.

  64. Grim says:

    China is commercializing vast portions of Africa. While most of the western world ignored it, the Chinese have come in and built out.

  65. Blue Ribbon Teacher says:

    I’m cooking two turkeys tomorrow. Smoking one on the Weber grill with fig wood from one of my fig trees and pecan wood. IMO, smoked turkey is the best. Contemplating a deep fryer on the other so I can more oven space. Still pondering but need to make the decision by tonight.

  66. Libturd, AKA Dr. Howie Feltersnatch says:

    Do the fryer outside. Far from the house!

  67. Libturd, AKA Dr. Howie Feltersnatch says:

    Only problem with smoking the bird is that the skin is ruined. Otherwise, juicier than any other method besides frying, but significantly healthier.

  68. JJ fanboy says:

    I outsourced thanksgiving. Went to a local bbq chain and got 2 pounds of meat with 4 different 1 pound sides. Just reheat it tomorrow and make some stuffing.

  69. No One says:

    Smoked turkey is the best for sure. But I don’t have the patience, so have been ordering a smoked turkey from Burger’s Smokehouse for the last 12 years. The family and the guests have universally loved it.

  70. Libturd, AKA Dr. Howie Feltersnatch says:

    “I outsourced thanksgiving. Went to a local bbq chain and got 2 pounds of meat with 4 different 1 pound sides. Just reheat it tomorrow and make some stuffing.”

    I hope no one grabs you by your puzzy!

  71. 3b says:

    Outsourced Thanksgiving too! Happy Thanksgiving all!!

  72. Fast Eddie says:

    Liberals don’t celebrate Thanksgiving; they consider it racist. What a miserable f.ucking group of people.

  73. JJ fanboy says:

    3b,

    It’s the way to go

  74. Grim says:

    I’m glad my 5 year old participated in. Thanksgiving Pagent today.

    They made cute costumes, Native Americans and Pilgrims. They talked about sharing and being Thankful for what they had.

    It was a perfect lesson for the kids, they all really understood the meaning of thanksgiving.

    Not everywhere is f&cked up.

  75. JJ fanboy says:

    I am thankful I don’t live in Edison or on Staten Island

  76. exJersey says:

    I am thankful for my puppers.

  77. exJersey says:

    5:00 i celebrate by slathering whipcream on my May pole and flogging my potato.

  78. grim says:

    I like how the Bergen County Unions stopped the county from extending minimum wage increases to non-union part time workers.

    Im thankful that this kind of douchbaggery still exists in the world. The Unions negotiate a wage increase, and they paint it as being progressive legislation, in the meantime, the union finds a way to f*ck someone over.

  79. Libturd sporting Tiger Wood says:

    So…What’s everyone think about removing the Christopher Columbus ttatue from Columbus Circle in NYC? Have we become the Taliban?

  80. Lurker says:

    It’s the American way!

    grim says:
    November 22, 2017 at 8:00 pm
    I like how the Bergen County Unions stopped the county from extending minimum wage increases to non-union part time workers.

    Im thankful that this kind of douchbaggery still exists in the world. The Unions negotiate a wage increase, and they paint it as being progressive legislation, in the meantime, the union finds a way to f*ck someone over.

  81. Lurker says:

    White privilege!!

    Libturd sporting Tiger Wood says:
    November 22, 2017 at 9:27 pm
    So…What’s everyone think about removing the Christopher Columbus ttatue from Columbus Circle in NYC? Have we become the Taliban?

  82. 3b says:

    Lib yes we have.

  83. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    “I’m good enough, I’m smart enough, and dog-gone it, people like me to grab their ass.”

    https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/al-franken-two-more-women-groping_us_5a15a455e4b09650540ec295

Comments are closed.