I dip, you dip, we dip

From the APP:

NJ double dippers: At least 64 public employees make more than Murphy

It’s common for people to have a side hustle to make some extra cash. Then there are those who have many extra jobs.

Working for the public. 

Making salaries — paid for with your tax dollars — that in some cases add up to more than twice that of the New Jersey governor. 

More than 1,000 employees worked more than one public job in New Jersey, according to a USA TODAY NETWORK New Jersey analysis of New Jersey pension data for 2018, the latest available data.

The median New Jersey double dipper worked four jobs and took home a salary of more than $93,000, the analysis shows.

Of those, 64 people took home multiple public salaries that combined earned them more than Gov. Phil Murphy.

At least two dozen people hold five or more public jobs, including one person – a tax assessor in North Jersey – who has nine.

This entry was posted in New Jersey Real Estate, Politics, Unrest. Bookmark the permalink.

161 Responses to I dip, you dip, we dip

  1. grim says:

    Shame how much this contributes to income inequality in NJ…

  2. grim says:

    Mr Cents got lowballed.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2019/04/05/photos-50-cent-sells-his-multimillion-dollar-connecticut-mansion.html

    Purchased 2003 – $4,100,000
    Listed 2007 – $14,500,000
    Sold 2019 – $2,900,000

  3. joyce says:

    The median New Jersey double dipper worked four jobs and took home a salary of more than $93,000, the analysis shows.

    Do we have a better nickname than “double-dipper” for these people?

  4. joyce says:

    Three drugmakers settled with the Department of Justice for a total of $122.6 million over allegations they violated a federal law that prevents pharmaceutical firms from paying copays for Medicare patients prescribed their treatments, the agency said on Thursday.
    https://www.foxbusiness.com/healthcare/drugmakers-settle-with-justice-department-over-claims-they-gamed-medicare

  5. Bruiser says:

    Joyce – “Swamp Scum”

  6. SorryToLeave says:

    And you stupid idiots stay and live there. If you all left, these pieces of garbage could feed on themselves. Think it through, fools.

  7. 1987 Condo says:

    “Some” double dipping may make sense…our town Tax Assessor works for 3 or 4 other towns. The job doesn’t warrant a full time position in many towns with 10,000-15,000 residents so each towns pays a share. It may male sense for each of 4 towns to pay $25,000 rather than a full time salary.

  8. Bystander says:

    Grim,

    2003, paid 4m, middle of nowhere Farmington, CT. You only have to go outside Greenwich town proper to see bloodbath in over 2m country estates. No one has money or desire for those places.

  9. GdBlsU45 says:

    This is also a failing of the big mouth Christie. For all of his talk of cleaning shlt up, he never had the balls to take on the culture of corruption in Trenton. He beat down the unions a bit but he never took on the real insiders. He was a coward.

    No one expected Murphy to change this. Speaking of Murphy, with the new increase to the disability tax, the advantages to working independent seem to have gone off the charts when you factor in the new trump tax plan. Anyone else notice the same?

  10. Libturd, can't say I didn't warn you. says:

    Condo,

    It does make sense in some cases. In many others, these double dippers are somehow working multiple full-time jobs. I personally noticed a few in Montclair’s heralded past. Not as much now. Also, check out what each town pays an assessor. It’s gross. Especially considering the terrible job most of them due. The good ones are constantly adjusting neighborhood values and individual home values based on sales. Most of them do nothing but make adjustments due to permits. Then the town has to pay millions to bring in outside assessment companies every 6 years or so to do the assessors job. GEORGE F LIBRIZZI 2 $86,805 VERONA TOWNSHIP $57,864 ESSEX COUNTY
    GEORGE F LIBRIZZI 2 $86,805 NORTH CALDWELL BOROUGH also used to do Glen Ridge until we fired him. We also paid him about the same amount that Verona and North Caldwell did. He rarely showed up on his one office day per week. Before they fired him, he went completely AWOL. Not bad for a 2008 Montclair State BS in Management Grad. $173K + PERS pension to work two days a week. We really should all move out and watch NJ collapse, like Greece.

  11. Juice Box says:

    50 cents house was featured on MTVs Cribs more than a decade ago now. He spent 6 million renovating it after he bought it from Mike Tyson’s ex-wife.

    History of the house, one if the largest in America.

    https://www.boston.com/news/local-news/2015/07/14/the-long-messy-history-of-50-cents-connecticut-home

  12. grim says:

    The Turbinator is onto the SDA.

    All show, you’ll see. Maybe they’ll boot one or two Republican appointees. Claim resounding victory.

  13. grim says:

    They’ll spend a million dollars on a full audit and the main finding will be that they need to improve their social media presence.

  14. Libturd, can't say I didn't warn you. says:

    I just looked it up. He is actually doing 5 towns now. He also served as a councilman twice, was appointed the Essex County Tax Administrator. No wonder he never showed up in Glen Ridge. And I think we might have hired him back because I see his name on our town website. Wow.

  15. grim says:

    From CNBC:

    Tax refunds so far this year are down by $6 billion from 2018

    Individual tax refunds this year have been only slightly smaller than last year, but those shortfalls are adding up. At the end of last month, the amount of money the government refunded was $6 billion below this time last year, according to IRS figures.

    As of March 29, the Treasury had issued 71.8 million refunds. This time a year ago it had issued 73.4 million. So while the average refund, at $2,873, is only $20 less than it was last year, about 1.6 million fewer people are getting refunds, the IRS said.
    That shrinking pot of money is showing up in surprising ways, including through lower retail sales. Many families use refunds as a forced saving mechanism, as their IRS refund is often largest single check they receive all year. In the weeks after receiving a refund, families tend to splurge on large purchases such as furniture or appliances; credit-card payments and travel, a JPMorgan Chase study found.
    Lower refunds don’t mean Americans paid more taxes—quite the opposite. Most workers paid less in taxes last year and saw higher take-home pay week in and week out. But for many Americans, a slightly higher paycheck doesn’t quite have the same visibility as a single $3,000 check in March or April.

  16. grim says:

    I think we need to let the tax season play out before comparing year over year.

    We’re also running under last year by 1.278 million returns processed.

    Given the average refund of $2,873, that’s about $3.7 billion still pending, making that big $6 billion figure more like $2.3 billion.

  17. 1987 condo says:

    The key?

    “Lower refunds don’t mean Americans paid more taxes—quite the opposite. Most workers paid less in taxes last year and saw higher take-home pay week in and week out. But for many Americans, a slightly higher paycheck doesn’t quite have the same visibility as a single $3,000 check in March or April.”

  18. 1987 Condo says:

    Lib, I think there is some “mayor” or councilman in Bergen cty that has jobs with 9 different municipalities. It pays to be connected I guess

  19. 1987 Condo says:

    I may have been confused with this:

    The mayor of North Bergen, who for years also served as a leading school administrator, has 10 relatives working for the education system, an affiliated public technology school, and the town, according to public records.

    A close associate of Democratic Mayor Nicholas Sacco at the Board of Education has 11 of her relatives in local tax-payer funded jobs, most with the North Bergen school system. Some political allies of the mayor also have numerous relatives working jobs inside North Bergen’s Board of Education and with the town.

    Insiders claim nepotism – even corruption – are problems inside the North Bergen Board of Education. An I-Team search of public records found Sacco’s 10 relatives earn $800,000 in taxpayer dollars each year, not including benefits. For example, Sacco’s son and daughter-in-law are both employed by the school system, earning $210,000 annually.

    Sacco has been mayor in North Bergen for nearly 30 years. He had also worked as a school administrator for three decades earning a top salary of about $260,000 in addition to his work as a state senator.

    https://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local/I-Team-Sacco-Family-Ties-Extend-Deep-in-North-Bergen-as-Hiring-Questions-Swirl-500928691.html

  20. Libturd, can't say I didn't warn you. says:

    Yup.

    Nothing to see here. After all, every private company is equally as corrupt.

  21. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Is every local government equally corrupt? Does north bergen apply to Wayne? No, it’s the same as the private sector. It’s exactly the same. Some good companies, and then there are Enron’s that ruin it for everyone else.

    Libturd, can’t say I didn’t warn you. says:
    April 8, 2019 at 10:50 am
    Yup.

    Nothing to see here. After all, every private company is equally as corrupt.

  22. Blue Ribbon Teacher says:

    There was one guy who was politically connected at Rutgers that was awful. He was in charge of purchasing for 4 departments. He backlogged us so bad and research went to a grinding halt because he wouldn’t process any paperwork. We worked our way around him with the secretaries at some point but it took a good 7 years to fire him. When we did, it was like cause for celebration. I swear, a month later, he was on campus at the student center and I tailed him. He went into a nearby building and already had a new office.

  23. homeboken says:

    Why do you keep bringing this point up? You understand, of course, the difference between public & private right? As a taxpayer, I have an economic incentive to remove/reduce public corruption. Private companies answer to their owners/shareholders. Public employees should answer to the source of their operating funds just the same. But they don’t.

    If Xerox has rampant nepotism and double-dipping, I may find it interesting, but I have no recourse to address/change that corruption. It’s not my money so why should I even care?

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    April 8, 2019 at 11:51 am
    Is every local government equally corrupt? Does north bergen apply to Wayne? No, it’s the same as the private sector. It’s exactly the same. Some good companies, and then there are Enron’s that ruin it for everyone else.

  24. No One says:

    For Chifi and Blue Ribbon:
    https://quillette.com/2019/04/01/academes-global-warming-echo-chamber/
    Some of these people sound like pumpkin.

  25. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Simple way of looking at it.

    If private companies are inefficient with their capital, who does it hurt? The economic participants, by hurting long term growth as capital is wasted. Jobs were never created, taxes aren’t paid, and capital for raises is washed down the drain. So keep naively believing our economy is not one big system in which we are all tied together, whether it’s privately or publicly funded. It’s the same damn thing. It’s taking limited resources in the economy and dividing it up so that society can grow and function. Whether it’s public or private, what difference does it make to the economy? It’s one system that drives it all.

    “If Xerox has rampant nepotism and double-dipping, I may find it interesting, but I have no recourse to address/change that corruption. It’s not my money so why should I even care?”

  26. The Great Pumpkin says:

    So you can pay a higher cost in taxes. You can also pay a higher cost in lost wage growth/job creation or with the costs of goods, do not think for one second that private corruption is not hurting you. It is impossible to be immune from the cost of corruption in the economic system whether it is private or publicly sourced.

  27. D-FENS says:

    Did we ever find out who hired Al Alvarez after all of those hearings?

  28. chicagofinance says:

    thx
    No One says:
    April 7, 2019 at 10:54 pm
    This essay is for Blue Ribbon T and Chifi
    https://quillette.com/2019/04/01/academes-global-warming-echo-chamber/

  29. D-FENS says:

    The gas tax will probably have to go up. The “alternative” mileage fee will never be an alternative. No way will they get rid of the gas tax. We will get both.

    https://www.njspotlight.com/stories/19/04/07/revenue-from-gas-tax-down-nj-looks-at-alternative/

    REVENUE FROM GAS TAX DOWN, NJ LOOKS AT ALTERNATIVE
    BRENDA FLANAGAN | NJTV NEWS | APRIL 8, 2019
    Gas tax could be in for a hike, but New Jersey and several other states consider a mileage fee instead of a fee on gas consumption

  30. Yo! says:

    Richard Turner:

    Weehawken Mayor
    Chief of Staff for Albio Sires
    West New York Business Administrator
    Chairman of North Hudson Regional Fire and Rescue
    Owner of Innovative Government Consulting

  31. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Good read, showing another side of the story.

    End of the day, I don’t know what to think anymore. Corruption from both sides has made the argument irrelevant. What’s the true story? Good luck, corruption has destroyed the truth. People are pathetic.

    No One says:
    April 8, 2019 at 12:24 pm
    For Chifi and Blue Ribbon:
    https://quillette.com/2019/04/01/academes-global-warming-echo-chamber/
    Some of these people sound like pumpkin.

  32. Libturd, can't say I didn't warn you. says:

    The real pathetic people are us.

  33. PumpkinFace says:

    No, he doesn’t think there’s a difference between public and private enterprises. He’s insane.

    homeboken says:
    April 8, 2019 at 12:07 pm
    Why do you keep bringing this point up? You understand, of course, the difference between public & private right?

  34. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Pumpkinface,

    You just don’t get it.

    There is a difference between a private and a public company, but not when it comes to the impact of corruption on market participants. If you are capable of understanding how the economy works, you will understand that corruption in the private sector impacts you in the same way that corruption in the public sector does. It hurts the pockets of every single market participant because they are cheating the system, aka cheating every single person that is a part of that system.

    Put it this way, do you benefit from public and private investment differently? Does it treat market participants differently? No, so why would you think corruption impacts market participants differently depending on if it’s sourced from a private or public institution?

    Remember what economics is. It’s the dividing up of finite resources in the most efficient manner. There are different ideas on what vehicle should be used, but at the end of the day, that’s all an economy is. So corruption hurts us all to enrich a few. It’s as simple as that.

    It just makes me sick that people ignore private corruption on the simple belief that it’s not their money(value, that’s all money represents in an economy) being stolen. That they are not being harmed by it which is complete bs. That money had to be taken from somewhere, and when it’s pissed away by scandals like Enron, the market participants get killed. If a private business takes out a loan, and then falls under due to nepotism/corruption, who gets hurt? Everyone. That badly run business took finite capital and pissed it away by conning a bank out of loan it was not worthy of. I can go on and on, but keep thinking I’m the idiot.

  35. ExEssex says:

    And the world keeps turning. Glaciers melt, oceans rise, Trump bloviates.

    As the poet said….”There’s winners and there’s losers they ain’t no big deal…”

  36. PumpkinFace says:

    I will keep thinking you’re the idiot, as will most if not all others here. And thanks for reminding us you can go on and on, but please spare us your mental masturbation. All you’re doing is arguing with you’re own made up assertions – not ones put forward here. Simple as that.

    No one here has said they’re unaffected by private sector corruption. They’ve said they can try to lessen its direct impact on themselves. They’ve said that the government is supposed to be working for the citizens benefit, unlike private organizations, and should answer to us hence all the complaints here. Simple as that.

    That you actually believe statements like these…
    -corruption in the private sector impacts you in the same way that corruption in the public sector does.
    -do you benefit from public and private investment differently? Does it treat market participants differently? No

    … is scary.

    To reiterate, no one is arguing what you claim they are in your last paragraph. Not a single person here. Minus the fact that you’re an idiot. That is near unanimous. Simple as that.

  37. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Shocker…

    I’ll admit, I was getting a little nervous myself with all the negative talk back in December. Told myself to concentrate on what matters and ignore the negative noise…. the economy is fine. Glad I listened to myself. Apple and Amazon have had an amazing run since I yelled and screamed on this blog to buy as much as you can. Hope some people listened to me.

    “Recession fears have captured the markets’ attention in recent weeks, but some investors say the bigger impact could be a surprise return to growth.

    In fact, slowdown risks may be fading already, as recent data pointed in a healthier direction for China and the U.S., the dominant forces in the global economy. On Friday, U.S. jobs data for March came in higher than expected. And Chinese manufacturing surveys for March picked up after a rough start to the year.”

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/a-growth-surprise-could-shock-markets-11554724801?mod=hp_lead_pos7

  38. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Pumpkinface,

    Then believe wtf you want to believe. Whatever makes you feel better. Want to roll around in your own bs and enjoy it, so be it.

    And stop accusing me of making up my own assertions. Go back and read what homeboken directly posted towards me before you start accusing me of making up my own assertions.

  39. PumpkinFace says:

    Everything homeboken said aligns with my comments and none of yours. You honestly can’t be this stupid? I guess you must be. Simple as that.

  40. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Pumpkinface,

    How in the world do you lessen the direct impact of corruption from the private sector? There is a way to dodge this? If so, how? How does one avoid the theft of value from corruption in the system?

  41. PumpkinFace says:

    Use logic

  42. 3b says:

    I popped in and took a look. And then I pooped out!!

  43. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Pumpkinface,

    You are the type that turns a blind eye to theft at a store because you blindly tell yourself that the owner is being robbed, not you. Looking at it too naively. That owner is building into your costs the price for that robbery, you are just too simple minded to realize it.

    Now apply this to your analysis when figuring out how to avoid the costs of private corruption. Not your problem, right? I said right? Think a little deeper than staying at the surface of the issue at hand.

    Guess that’s why private corruption is out of control and has pretty much hijacked our govt. People just ignore it because they think they are immune from the costs…smh!

  44. PumpkinFace says:

    Identify the market participants, individually, and tell me who is affected and by how much in your story?

  45. Bystander says:

    Tell us more, oh great Neo of the economy. I’ve got a red pill for you to swallow. I think we would all be happy if you took it.

    “If you are capable of understanding how the economy works, you will understand that corruption in the private sector impacts you in the same way”

  46. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    ExSex – If you’re wrong you have to drive a girl’s car. That’s right, you already do.

    https://www.cnn.com/2019/03/27/world/climate-change-greenland-glacier-growing-wxc-trnd/index.html

  47. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    Pumps already swallows the red pill…but it’s shaped more like a kielbasa. The guy who feeds him is happy he took it.

    Tell us more, oh great Neo of the economy. I’ve got a red pill for you to swallow. I think we would all be happy if you took it.

    “If you are capable of understanding how the economy works, you will understand that corruption in the private sector impacts you in the same way”

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  49. leftwing says:

    “The gas tax will probably have to go up. The “alternative” mileage fee will never be an alternative. No way will they get rid of the gas tax. We will get both.”

    Absolutely.

    Most ridiculous statements from Murphy…blames needing more tax dollars on electric cars….riiiight…..the fund is down because of SOOOO many electric cars out there…not because of basic supply/demand economics, that when you tax something (gas sales) you get less of it.

    Does he assume the population is truly that stupid, or just disinterested so long as he says something?

  50. ExEssex says:

    Betcha no one ever mistook that Hyundai minivan for a super anything…https://jalopnik.com/the-affordable-supercar-the-ultimate-e46-m3-buyers-gui-1593133171

  51. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    ExSex – which word don’t you understand, girl or car? I’m guessing you are heavier and less structurally stiff these days too.

    Cabrios, though heavier (~3,700 lbs) and less structurally stiff, make fantastic summertime cruisers

  52. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    At 3,700 lbs a girl car convertible is a lot like a minivan with less seating, no?

  53. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    Eric SwallowWell is running for president. He says he has proof of collusion hidden in his prison wallet.

  54. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    …which explains why the evidence was only in plain sight to Adam Schiff.

  55. ExEssex says:

    8:56 sure if your mini van has 330 HP and can hit 60 mph in 4.5 secs.

  56. homeboken says:

    Speaking of BMW’s – Has anyone here seen the new X7 in person or perhaps even given it a test drive? I really like the size and look of it from online photos but the proof is in the test drive, as always.

    Any input?

  57. Blue Ribbon Teacher says:

    Speaking of the gas tax, there’s a tiny bridge out in Hopewell on 518. A bunch of businesses directly across from it are now cut off from everyone who commutes there/home and probably 50% of their daily traffic. The bridge repairs should likely take a week based on what I’ve seen from similar bridges being completely replaced. They said, they would finish it in August. No work being done at all.

    Last time this happened a mile down the road on the other side of 518, it put 4 or 5 shops out of business….but this was when the fund was broke. The one business, Brick Farm Market, who I stop at weekly for meat/coffee or a meal has signs all along the 15 minute detour letting people know they are still open but no one is going to go backwards 15 minute on their commute. I’d estimate that the combined businesses are losing hundreds of thousands of dollars.

    The reason for the 4 month delay on even starting work is unknown and I’m pretty sure the businesses would be better off fixing the bridge themselves.

  58. leftwing says:

    Took 2 years to fix a bridge over NJT in Summit. Not a big detour issue but just fcuking ridiculous.

    Meanwhile, the pension monkeys are out laying down more patch over their previously bad patch over their previously poorly paved county road……looks and feels like driving on a Jackson Pollock painting, but hey it’s “fixed”.

    Seriously, it’s on my way to my bagel place and veggie market, I hit that road 10x a week. If I’m in the convertible I seriously have to downshift into 1st and go 10mph with my flashers on or rattle my molars and fcuk up my rims. But life is good.

  59. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Shocker…

    “But Moody’s Investors Service said in its new report that these hardest-hit, high-tax states aren’t seeing an outmigration fallout. At least not yet.

    “The impact of the SALT cap enacted in 2017 will be felt widely for the first time this tax season and possibly spur some outmigration, but jobs and demographic trends will continue to influence relocation patterns more than tax burdens,” Moody’s Investors Service said in its new report.”

    “And of those residents who are moving, Moody’s said many are relocating from one high-tax state to another high-tax state.

    “In 2017, 25 percent to 30 percent of people who moved out of New York, Connecticut and New Jersey moved to another one of the five high-tax states. The most popular destination for people moving out of New Jersey and Connecticut was New York.”

    https://www.nj.com/politics/2019/04/trumps-curb-on-property-tax-breaks-isnt-prompting-residents-to-flee-nj-for-lower-tax-states-not-yet-at-least-report-says.html

  60. No One says:

    I didnt know this. Most of Sweden’s roads are private. Probably better than the NJ approach.
    https://devoelmoorecenter.com/2018/02/28/why-the-u-s-should-adopt-the-nordic-approach-to-private-roads/

  61. PumpkinFace says:

    Quick, someone give Pumpkin a math problem and watch him scurry.

  62. Libturd, can't say I didn't warn you. says:

    Smart people leave NJ before the pension explodes. Will make SALT deduction look like what you pay at a parking meter. Fun with numbers. Rounded so the masses can understand.

    ———————————————————

    NJ Population – 8,000,000
    Annual NJ tax revenue – $40,000,000,000 or $5,000 per person
    Average Per Capita income – $40,000 and pays $650 to NJ

    Unfunded Liability – $200,000,000,000 or $25,000 per person

    NOW IMAGINE THIS WITH PROGRESSIVE TAXATION!

    Say you make 200K – You pay $10,600 annually to NJ (yet the pension hole is $25,000 per person). How many families make $400K income a year in NJ? I know that less than 12% make over 200K. Figure 3% maybe?

    NJ’s property tax rate is 2.4%

    Should I run these numbers for New York?

    NY Population – 8,600,000
    Annual NJ tax revenue – $76,000,000,000 or $8,800 per person
    Average Per Capita income – $37,000 and pays $2031 to NY

    Unfunded Liability – $100,000,000,000 or $11,600 per person

    Of course, NY’s property tax rate is 1.6%

    Got popcorn?

  63. Forex Review says:

    Ps – If you’ve been following along with my Insta Stories, you know how pumped I am about growing my own microgreens (that’s them up above in all their glory)! I used some of them to top this dip and felt so good knowing I grew them myself! Shout out out to the folks at Hamama for making it so easy!

  64. 3b says:

    US fertility rate is at its lowest level since 1937. Just saying.

  65. joyce says:

    ^^^In addition to the commerce clause, incentives also violate Federal & State equal protection laws.

  66. Libturd, can't say I didn't warn you. says:

    That’s due to internet pron.

  67. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Sucks for people looking for infinite growth of the economy and profits, but isn’t this a good thing? Do we really want a high birth rate with this enormous population?

    3b says:
    April 9, 2019 at 12:55 pm
    US fertility rate is at its lowest level since 1937. Just saying.

  68. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Spread this cost out over 30 years and it’s not as bad. Bad, but not the end of the world.

    At the end of the day, this is more a reflection of a large elderly population that will be sucking away at the youth. Demographics changed. The federal government will have to step in. This is not a nj problem, but a national issue.

    “Unfunded Liability – $200,000,000,000 or $25,000 per person”

  69. A Home Buyer says:

    Troll,

    That is 25k per person. For a family of 3, you owe 75k.

    And since the poor can’t afford that, it will be even higher for you with all your disposable income.

    And that’s assuming things only stay the same, not get worse or more debt assumed. And considering how many of those projections are based on rosey or unrealistic assumptions, and that NJ still can’t even meet it’s financial obligations…

    It’s going to be a blood bath.

  70. Fast Eddie says:

    Legalize prostituti0n and pot and presto, the unfunded liabilities are now funded.

  71. Fast Eddie says:

    Oh, make route 80, 78 and 287 toll roads as well.

  72. Fast Eddie says:

    US fertility rate is at its lowest level since 1937. Just saying.

    It’s a glass-touching society now. Being docile, dumb and overweight kills the l1bido. Also, men are not allowed to flirt with or pursue women any longer… it opens them up to lawsuit, scorn and ridicule.

  73. Blue Ribbon Teacher says:

    Took 2 years to fix a bridge over NJT in Summit. Not a big detour issue but just fcuking ridiculous.

    Meanwhile, the pension monkeys are out laying down more patch over their previously bad patch over their previously poorly paved county road……looks and feels like driving on a Jackson Pollock painting, but hey it’s “fixed”.

    Seriously, it’s on my way to my bagel place and veggie market, I hit that road 10x a week. If I’m in the convertible I seriously have to downshift into 1st and go 10mph with my flashers on or rattle my molars and fcuk up my rims. But life is good.

    It is ridiculous but this is on another level. The only way to get to the location directly across from the bridge involves 15 minutes of traffic as you literally have to drive a square of 8 miles. If I were a business owner there, I’d be livid.

  74. JCer says:

    Eddie, tolls aren’t the way to go. Look at Germany or Switzerland where you have to buy a vignette(basically a sticker) to drive on the highway, basically you allow people to purchase annual road passes for $100-$200 dollars by mail, then you only sell daily,weekly or monthly passes for actually much higher dollars($10 for a day, $20 for a week, $70 for a month) penalty for driving with no vignette $400. Basically through mechanics frequent drivers don’t pay much at all but people just passing through get hammered. Funding the roads based on a use fee really seems like the right way to go vs. using general fund tax dollars. They also should take all gas tax revenue and use fees out of the general fund, they should be earmarked for the roads. I think this also is a good counter to NYC congestion tax.

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  76. homeboken says:

    JCER – I am intrigued by this highway sticker, I haven’t heard of that before.

    Is it 1 sticker that covers the entire Interstate highway system? State by state? I don’t think individual states in the US would be allowed to charge for a federally funded road.
    Let’s say that isn’t an issue – How does one buy the sticker for other states when planning on multi-state trip? I can imagine that an app could be developed to facilitate the buying of these “stickers” but that of course would be targeted as dis-advantaging the poor.
    It’s a very interesting concept but I am tripping up on thinking of how to implement. Is there any study or article that explains how Germany/Swiss accomplished this?

  77. Blue Ribbon Teacher says:

    Quick, someone give Pumpkin a math problem and watch him scurry.

    What is the summation of (1/n!) as n approaches infinity?

  78. No One says:

    JCer,
    With ubiquitous phones with gps built in, and receivers everywhere, it wouldn’t be difficult for a company like Google to come up with a real-time pay per use road payment system. Tollbooths and stickers are outdated and cause congestion. Then have competitive bidding for the road operation/maintenance job, where road problems cost the road operators/maintainers real money. NJ spends more money per mile than just about anywhere, yet the roads stink. Much like the state-run rail system.

  79. Fast Eddie says:

    Toll roads, road fees, gas taxes, etc… it doesn’t matter how the money is collected; it’s all going to go toward unintended use. It will be squandered, pilfered, wasted and stolen in the guise of good intent. I was being facetious because I’m convinced nothing will make us solvent.

  80. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    Q. What’s the difference between a porcupine and a BMW?
    A. Porcupines have the pricks on the outside.

    Speaking of BMW’s – Has anyone here seen the new X7 in person or perhaps even given it a test drive? I really like the size and look of it from online photos but the proof is in the test drive, as always.

    Any input?

  81. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    Wow. BMW must have lost their design staff. Now the best they can do is copy Buick styling from 5 years ago.

    https://www.kbb.com/buick/enclave/2015/

    Dat Grill….huuuuuuge kidneys
    https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a23792374/2019-bmw-x7-suv-photos-info/

  82. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    Pumpkin no do math.
    Pumpkin no need GED.
    Pumpkin have wife with education and job.

    Quick, someone give Pumpkin a math problem and watch him scurry.

  83. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    They’re dropping off free kids at the border.

    FYI, life expectancy is going down in the US too, but at least it’s culling the stupid. Those who text while driving and those addicted to opioids, probably a large Venn diagram intersection.

    US fertility rate is at its lowest level since 1937. Just saying.

  84. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    I heard a guy from Alcon (NVS just spun off ALC) on CNBC this morning. Big opportunity in providing lenses, sight correction for myopia (near-sightedness). Kids spending their youth focusing on close up phone screens, not going outside and strengthening their distance vision. Remember when kids used to ride bicycles and play ball outside? That’s over.

  85. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    Pretty soon the desired path will be to be on welfare or disability (for all!) and hang out at a bar all day if you are a swordsman. Oh…wait a minute.

    Also, men are not allowed to flirt with or pursue women any longer… it opens them up to lawsuit, scorn and ridicule.

  86. ExEssex says:

    3:06 without exception it looks as if many car models get larger to accommodate the tastes of Americans. BMWs & Toyota’s – look at the early Tundra vs today’s behemoth.

  87. ExEssex says:

    Wait..,what?!??

    NEW YORK (FOX 5 NY) – A magnitude 3.0 earthquake struck in the Atlantic Ocean about 33 miles southeast of Southampton, New York, at about 7:22 a.m. Tuesday, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The earthquake’s epicenter was measured at about 4.4 miles deep.

    A magnitude 3.0 event is “[n]ot felt except by a very few under especially favorable conditions,” according to the USGS, which received about 55 reports of feeling the earthquake from the public as of Tuesday afternoon.

    No damage was reported from the earthquake.

  88. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    I remember driving a 1989 Chevy Tracker (the year before Geo). It was a tiny tin Tonka Truck, but it stood at the same ride height as full size SUV’s (Jeeps, Blazers, GMC Jimmys, etc.) of the day.

    3:06 without exception it looks as if many car models get larger to accommodate the tastes of Americans. BMWs & Toyota’s – look at the early Tundra vs today’s behemoth.

  89. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    It used to piss off the SUVs of that day that I could drag them from a snowy traffic light and kick their collective asses. Low, range, manual tranny, 2400 lbs, and 8ohp split out to 20hp per tire (BFG A/T’s ) seemed to be the magic formula. Low mass to overcome intertia, gearing (it had Lo/Hi) and traction to do the rest. I used to challenge guys at work on snowy days to try to keep up with me for four laps around the building, no other 4wd could.

  90. ExEssex says:

    The Japanese know their shit re: drivetrain. Their best stuff is usually bulletproof.

  91. JCer says:

    It’s not about the sticker could be app based the problem then becomes enforcement(you’d need camera coverage to make it work, with cameras you could catch everyone who doesn’t pay), conceptually the idea is that highways are funded essentially by a use fee, it would be state by state and there would be no issue with federal funding provided everyone has to pay the fee.

    The concept is pretty old rather than a toll they depended on a physical sticker and the honor system with a large fine as an enticement to comply. The highway patrol in Switzerland/Austria/Germany tend to hand out fines for no sticker at roadside establishments/reststops/gas stations and the fine is big enough that people pay as $500 or $1000 fine is enough. You get something like 5km where they do not enforce and you can buy the stickers(1 week or 1 month) in any gas station and some roadside vending machines. It really is a relatively painless process but an app and some cameras would probably be more effective, Germans follow rules so it is rare that people don’t have a valid vignette.

    The key idea is non-residents get a larger burden because they are not buying the heavily discounted annual sticker which is only available from the government. So a pass could be purchased online and tied to the number plate for non-annual passes but an annual pass would need to be purchased from the MVC and comes with a physical sticker(make it even worse and force people to go to MVC facility like inspection sticker).

  92. JCer says:

    It seems as of last year the Austrians have gone to an app….

    It seems the swiss only sell 1 year stickers so if you want to drive through the country once you are paying.

  93. JCer says:

    The whole point is that they fund their roads through a use fee and the funds are dedicated to the entity that maintains the highway. Better to pay for it directly than to feed it through the government sausage factory.

    Jersey politicians cannot be trusted, fund the roads through direct fees that don’t go to the general fund……I’d rather pay for the actual cost of the road directly than pay for it through taxes.

  94. 3b says:

    Jc it sounds great in theory but this is NJ the government will make a mess of it. Even though we are supposed to be the best and the brightest.

  95. Joe says:

    It is more like 5 to 10 years there funds will go insolvent . Not 30.

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    April 9, 2019 at 1:20 pm
    Spread this cost out over 30 years and it’s not as bad. Bad, but not the end of the world.

  96. The Great Pumpkin says:

    First, can we all agree that the pension issue is a national issue…aka you can’t hide from it. There is no running from it, federal govt is coming to bail it all out.

    Second, can we all agree that the bill is not due all at once? Do we understand that the payments will take decades? Nj didn’t pay for two decades and it’s still paying out, so please understand how this works.

    Third, what really happened here is a demographic problem. Japan faced the same issue as us, and are still dealing with it. It’s coming for China too. That’s what happens when populations explode in a short amount of time. Now combine that with extending the life expectancy and you have the coming crises facing us. You are going to have a bunch of old people to take care of and it isn’t cheap. Same thing will happen to social security because of this problem.

    Unfortunately, there is no way around it for the younger generations. You are left with the hefty cost of keeping these old people alive and their population is only rising. That’s why trump is an idiot when it comes to immigration. That was our only chance to raise the population and soften the blow.

  97. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Sounds like a good plan to me. Also, invest in program that tracks every single dollar.

    JCer says:
    April 9, 2019 at 4:27 pm
    The whole point is that they fund their roads through a use fee and the funds are dedicated to the entity that maintains the highway. Better to pay for it directly than to feed it through the government sausage factory.

    Jersey politicians cannot be trusted, fund the roads through direct fees that don’t go to the general fund……I’d rather pay for the actual cost of the road directly than pay for it through taxes.

  98. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    First, can we all agree that the pension issue is a national issue…aka you can’t hide from it. There is no running from it, federal govt is coming to bail it all out. Pumpkin is a moron?

    Second, can we all agree that the bill is not due all at once? Do we understand that the payments will take decades? Nj didn’t pay for two decades and it’s still paying out, so please understand how this works. Pumpkin is uneducated?

    Third, what really happened here is a demographic problem. Uneducated morons found their way to the internet and are interjecting their uneducated, unmedicated rantings between those of educated gentlemen and women joyce.

  99. ExEssex says:

    Another Best Places feature.

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    Colorado cities took the next two spots, with Denver and Colorado Springs ranking second and third, respectively. Fayetteville, Arkansas, and Des Moines, Iowa, rounded out the top five, proving that coastal cities are no longer dominating.

    “Our Northeastern cities, which are epicenters of higher education and economic development, are not growing nearly as much as places in Florida, California and Texas,” Devon Thorsby, real estate editor for U.S. News & World Report, said in a statement. “Plus, they are expensive to live in. Top-ranked places have the characteristics people are looking for, including steady job growth, affordability and a high quality of life.”

  100. ExEssex says:

    Someone just posted “snow in April”…ah good ol’ Mass.

  101. Joe says:

    Their funds will go insolvent around 2024-2027. Not decades.

    “Second, can we all agree that the bill is not due all at once? Do we understand that the payments will take decades? ”

  102. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Let’s go Rangers!! Rangers have a ton of picks in a draft loaded with players. First time ever I can say that rangers will have a young STUD!

    Good day for hockey in our area.

  103. Blue Ribbon Teacher says:

    Second, can we all agree that the bill is not due all at once? Do we understand that the payments will take decades? Nj didn’t pay for two decades and it’s still paying out, so please understand how this works.

    It’s only paying out because they are collecting my current contributions. Bernie Madoff should be hired as a consultant.

    Third, what really happened here is a demographic problem. Japan faced the same issue as us, and are still dealing with it. It’s coming for China too. That’s what happens when populations explode in a short amount of time. Now combine that with extending the life expectancy and you have the coming crises facing us. You are going to have a bunch of old people to take care of and it isn’t cheap. Same thing will happen to social security because of this problem.

    Did you know the life expectancy went down the past year? You’re right, it is a demographic problem…because everyone’s one and done with their kids, we’ll need half the teacher we do 10 to 15 years from now and the ponzi scheme won’t be able to support itself on young teacher’s paychecks anymore.

    Unfortunately, there is no way around it for the younger generations. You are left with the hefty cost of keeping these old people alive and their population is only rising. That’s why trump is an idiot when it comes to immigration. That was our only chance to raise the population and soften the blow.

    Oh yeah…that’s a brilliant way to solve a problem…mass import people. FYI, Trump has not shut down legal immigration or even threatened to. But…I’m sure you think importing Mexicans and South Americans en masse is going to solve the pension crisis. That makes sense….oh wait…you would just add more workers to the system and increase the promised obligations further.

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  105. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Exactly, point being, why does the obligation have to be paid all at once? Is everyone retiring this year? It’s spread out over decades.

    “It’s only paying out because they are collecting my current contributions. Bernie Madoff should be hired as a consultant.”

  106. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Yes, but I expect the life expectancy range to be higher 30 years from now. Much higher.

    I never thought about it, but you are right. We built the capitalist system on a ponzi scheme. Always needs a higher population to feed the growth. Cut off the population and capitalism will most likely fall on its face as people riot in the streets with negative growth.

    “Did you know the life expectancy went down the past year? You’re right, it is a demographic problem…because everyone’s one and done with their kids, we’ll need half the teacher we do 10 to 15 years from now and the ponzi scheme won’t be able to support itself on young teacher’s paychecks anymore.”

  107. The Great Pumpkin says:

    I was simply referring to the entire economy, not the pension issue. We need people, or hard times will be coming 2030 or on due to our low birth rate. Right now, with all the immigration, U.S. demographics are in much better shape than our competitors.

    It’s not a zero-sum game, immigration has its benefits.

    “Oh yeah…that’s a brilliant way to solve a problem…mass import people. FYI, Trump has not shut down legal immigration or even threatened to. But…I’m sure you think importing Mexicans and South Americans en masse is going to solve the pension crisis. That makes sense….oh wait…you would just add more workers to the system and increase the promised obligations further.”

  108. The Great Pumpkin says:

    I’ve read that when the boomers officially all retire, there is going to be a huge labor shortage in our country. I’ve read that the boomer population was partly responsible for keeping down wages as they produced such a large supply of workers.

    Immigration might be our only hope.

  109. chicagofinance says:

    Everyone knows Obi Wan Kenobe is our only hope.

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    April 10, 2019 at 9:08 am
    I’ve read that when the boomers officially all retire, there is going to be a huge labor shortage in our country. I’ve read that the boomer population was partly responsible for keeping down wages as they produced such a large supply of workers.

    Immigration might be our only hope.

  110. Bystander says:

    Blumpy, you have a small, closed brain. I am in mid forties and I can assure you that there is no labor shortage unless at bottom of pay chain. If struggling for workers then it is self-imposed by companies based on their own cheapness. Most boomers have retired. The biggest boom was 1946 – 1956 then births trailed down significantly each year to normal levels by 1964. You also discount the smart people in business lead positions. They look decade out at least. Robotics, AI, cloud are all in response to keeping control over labor costs. Right now, they are outsourcing to get around labor costs but it is not sustainable long term as competition too strong in India. You really do not get it. Keep sucking off your precious economists and their historic, “manufacturing” views of economic cycles. The rules have been rewritten.

  111. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “But things change, as the data show. Perhaps when the machine revolution begins in earnest and there are few jobs left for anyone, Americans with nowhere to go and nothing to do will have large families again and not worry about the expense.”

    https://qz.com/1099800/average-size-of-a-us-family-from-1850-to-the-present/

  112. The Great Pumpkin says:

    This is an old article, but gives the gist of it.

    I would argue the current low unemployment rate is a result of boomers retiring. Like I have said earlier on this blog, lots of boomers are not retiring, hence, wage inflation has been contained. They will retire though, and not even workers to replace.

    “Are fears of a coming “labor shortage” and “knowledge drain” well founded?

    Despite the recent economic downturn, many experts believe that within 10 years there will be a labor shortage in the United States, the United Kingdom, and much of Western Europe resulting from the retirement of many workers from the Baby Boomer generation (those born 1946 – 1964) and the lack of qualified replacements in the generations that follow, Generation X (born 1965-1980) and Generation Y or “Millenials” (born after 1980). In a study entitled After the Recovery: The Coming Labor Shortage and How People in Encore Careers Can Help Solve It, the authors, Barry Bluestone and Mark Melnik from the Dukakis Center for Urban and Regional Policy at Northeastern University, estimated that by 2018 there could be more than five million unfilled jobs in the United States. That projection, however, assumes that the current labor participation and immigration rates remain the same and that the economy grows at a healthy rate. Therefore, the labor participation rate of the Baby Boomer generation will be a major factor in determining whether a labor shortage actually occurs.”

    http://www.thegarnergrp.com/baby-boomers

  113. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “The manufacturing industry is feeling the staffing pinch as nearly 10,000 Baby Boomers reach retirement each day. And it’s only going to get worse. Of the more than 76 million Baby Boomers, only 80% are currently still in the labor workforce. That number is expected to drop to 40% by 2022.”

    https://www.lendio.com/news/small-business-outlook/manufacturing-shortages/

  114. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “Forget robots, the future belongs to workers
    Power to shift from bosses to rank and file, study contends

    Is the future going to be a workers’ paradise? Maybe not, but leverage in the workplace may finally be shifting from bosses to the rank and file after a lost decade for labor.

    The stage is set, according to a new survey of the U.S. and global labor markets. The world economy is stronger than it’s been in years, good talent is increasingly hard to find and an aging population suggests labor shortages are only going to get worse in developed countries.”

    https://www.marketwatch.com/story/forget-robots-the-future-belongs-to-workers-new-report-says-2018-04-13

  115. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Boomers retiring? Yea, right!

    You guys laughed me off when I said people are working into their 70s at my place of employment. Executives that will not leave, they are too important. Seems to be on point.

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2019/01/09/boomers-older-workers-work-longer-driving-job-growth/2496893002/

  116. The Great Pumpkin says:

    55 and over make up half of all employment gains in 2018 and you guys laugh me off.

    “Baby boomers should be hanging it up and kicking back.

    Instead, they’re still driving U.S. job growth.

    Americans 55 and over made up about half of all employment gains in 2018, according to an analysis of Labor Department data by The Liscio Report, a research publication for investors. That’s an eye-popping share considering that demographic made up only a quarter of last year’s labor force — which includes people working and looking for jobs.”

  117. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “Employers are struggling to find workers
    With unemployment at 3.9 percent, it has gotten harder for employers to find qualified workers. In October, there were a near-record 7.1 million job openings but just 6 million unemployed workers, Labor figures show. As a result, more employers are willing to hire and accommodate older Americans by letting them work from home, for example.

    That has drawn in more older workers. The share of 55-to-64 year-olds in the workforce increased to 65.5 percent in December from 64.5 percent a year earlier, Koropeckyj notes. And the portion of 65-and-older Americans in the labor force averaged 19.6 percent last year, the highest in decades, according to AARP and Labor.”

  118. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “Although robots aren’t going to put everyone out of a job — a popular theme these days — companies are already investing more money in automation to help get around rising labor shortages. That’s likely to accelerate, but it’s no panacea.

    Companies will need bodies — and lots of them.

    “The much larger risk in the next 10 to 15 years is not enough workers,” Levanon said in an interview. “As long as baby boomers are retiring in large numbers, that’s the biggest problem.””

  119. ExEssex says:

    Nipsey Hustle died fo our sins.

  120. ExEssex says:

    The H-1B Cap for FY 2020 has been reached. USCIS’s annual April 1 start for taking visa petitions is the business version of Black Friday. On Black Friday, consumers buy up all the cheap TVs and video game consoles that are available. On April 1, businesses buy up all the cheap foreign labor that is available.

    A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America counters the persistent myth that the United States is falling behind in STEM (science, technology, engineering, math). The study looked at the skills of computer programmer graduates around the world by using a standardized programming test.

    The study strikes several blows to the great American STEM shortage myth.

    Blow No. 1 to the STEM Myth. The study found that “Seniors in the United States exhibit much higher levels of [computer science] skills than seniors in China, India, and Russia.”

    Blow No. 2 to the STEM Myth. “Although seniors in elite programs score much higher than seniors in nonelite programs in China, India, and Russia, they still score lower than seniors in the United States.”

    Blow No. 3 to the STEM Myth. U.S. computer science seniors from elite schools greatly outperform computer science seniors from elite schools in the foreign countries.

    Blow No. 4 to the STEM Myth. “The substantial advantage of [computer science] students in the United States is not driven by the presence of international students.”

    Collectively, foreign computer programmers do not bring higher skills to America. They simply bring cheap labor.

  121. Fast Eddie says:

    Americans 55 and over made up about half of all employment gains in 2018, according to an analysis of Labor Department data by The Liscio Report, a research publication for investors. That’s an eye-popping share considering that demographic made up only a quarter of last year’s labor force — which includes people working and looking for jobs.”

    It’s eye-opening yet I get it. The older crowd (me included) has a different mind-set and work ethic. We love the taste of success, achievement, learning and earning. I love the smell of potential and money. I love that I’m making money and my money is making money as I write this. I’m sentimental and I feel more relentless now than at anytime in my life. So, I get it. Steam roll anyone that gets in the way… f.uck the coddled crowd. Locusts? Sure, whatever you say. You want a piece of the pie sweetie? Work for it.

  122. ExEssex says:

    11:14 and yet…. here you are reading 8th English lit sitting in your cube. Giving yourself pep talks and reminding yourself not to put that piston in your mouth just yet…

  123. ExEssex says:

    Jessy Taylor, 21, from Tampa, Florida – who boasted more than 113,000 followers – said that she isn’t cut out for work because she is ‘worthless’ and ‘brings nothing to the table’.

    Sharing a video to YouTube, the vlogger explained she was in the middle of editing when she realized her account had been deleted, and that she fears she’ll end up a ‘homeless prostitute’ without her Instagram account.

    Breaking down in tears, she said that she needs her Instagram account for her career and can’t go back to working at McDonald’s – although she didn’t specify exactly how she earns money from her account.

    It’s believed Instagram deleted her account after it was reported as spam by trolls.

  124. Fast Eddie says:

    Essex,

    What is “reading 8th English” and “piston” mean?

  125. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Lmao….I love Florida! Some special people living there.

  126. Bystander says:

    So Blumpy, 33m boomers representing 20% of work force with 2% retiring each year for 10 years will suddenly tip it all in favor of rest of us. If the economy swallowed 43m already without some much as a blip in wage uptick then please provide more expert theory on our future.

  127. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “Pflug, a former Bundestag MP and long-term East Asia expert who has visited China more than 60 times, is proud of Beijing’s obsession with his city. But he also has red lines when it comes to Chinese investment.

    He wants to ensure Duisburg doesn’t share the same fate as Hambantota, a Sri Lankan port, which in 2017 passed to Chinese control under a 99-year lease.

    “We must preserve our independence and at all costs avoid falling into a debt trap with the Chinese,” Pflug said. “We don’t want to end up like Sri Lanka.””

    https://www.ozy.com/fast-forward/the-unlikely-end-to-chinas-new-silk-road-is-in-germanys-rust-belt/93751

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  129. Yo! says:

    Sales history of 1302 Garden Street, Hoboken

    1993 $215,000
    2010 $1,200,000
    2012 $1,643,500
    2015 $1,890,000
    2019 $2,250,000

  130. chicagofinance says:

    Can you split out appreciation versus mere capital upgrade. It was an ugly as sin row house on a busy corner that was probably chopped into apartments. It was probably resurrected and reconfigured as a single home.

    Yo! says:
    April 10, 2019 at 1:25 pm
    Sales history of 1302 Garden Street, Hoboken

    1993 $215,000
    2010 $1,200,000
    2012 $1,643,500
    2015 $1,890,000
    2019 $2,250,000

  131. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Over half of the job gains this past year went to boomers. Think about that and its implications. That means businesses are getting desperate. If half of the gains are coming from baby boomers, I don’t know of a stronger signal that there will be extreme pain in trying to find workers in due time. The warning signals are there for us to see…you think Walmart and amazon raise their wages to 15 dollars or higher because they are nice?

    Bystander says:
    April 10, 2019 at 12:27 pm
    So Blumpy, 33m boomers representing 20% of work force with 2% retiring each year for 10 years will suddenly tip it all in favor of rest of us. If the economy swallowed 43m already without some much as a blip in wage uptick then please provide more expert theory on our future.

  132. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Min wage is 7.75 at the federal level, and you think two of the cheapest employers out there doubling the wage at entry is a sign of bs? Writing is on the wall…

  133. The Great Pumpkin says:

    I know grim claimed that the pension problem can’t be solved by inflation, but he is wrong.

    Right now, you have a huge supply of retirees coming from boomer generation. If you take away cola and raise all wages, how will this not eat away at the debt obligation? You are putting more into the fund through collection of wages. On top of that, current workers are not due a pension for 20-40 years. Inflation will eat that debt obligation for lunch under this scenario.

    Yes, current raises will raise the obligation for future pension costs, but if you have removed cola, you are getting a ton of help as the debt obligation doesn’t keep up with inflation.

  134. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Yes, the workers are blindly robbed through this process and it’s exactly why they will use it. It’s an easy out for people trying to stay in leadership positions.

  135. Joe says:

    It’s a good thing they still get social security which still has a cola on top of their pension on top of their health care benefits during retirement.

  136. Joe says:

    ohhhh. The Horror. The horror I tell you.

  137. Bystander says:

    Sure, it is an article so therefore fact. I would look at it a different way. The job gains have been primarily at lowest level of pay. Lots of 60 – 64 year olds are ground out of workforce but need to survive to until SS kicks in. They probably had good paying 75 – 100k jobs and now will take 40k to survive until full retirement. It is not like Wall Street turned around and started hiring 60 year olds to fill gaps. The job mixture since recession is main issue with economy.

  138. Bystander says:

    Hey, an article. It says something. Will use it to backup my argument. This is fun

    https://www.axios.com/most-jobs-created-since-recciu-1536269032-13ccc866-5fb0-44e8-bd14-286ae09c296f.html

    “Three-quarters of U.S. jobs created since the 2008-’09 financial crash pay less than a middle-class income”

  139. PumpkinFace says:

    Bystander,

    All you need to do is look at Neo’s article: (four snippets)
    After being on Social Security disability for five years, Janene Evans, 55, of Bozeman, Montana, decided to get a part-time job as a Walmart cashier in 2018 to earn some extra money. Although her disability paycheck rose 2.9 percent last year, she also faced a higher health insurance premium.

    The 2007-09 downturn also left many boomers unemployed. When they finally did get jobs, many had to accept lower-level positions for less pay.

    While the position pays about a third of his former salary, it allows him to avoid tapping his retirement savings and delay going on Social Security, a strategy that will increase his monthly Social Security payments.

    At least part of the surge in older workers last year seems to be related to strong seasonal hiring for temporary jobs in November and December. Employment for those 55 and over increased by 342,000 in that period, the largest two-month total since last spring.

    Bystander says:
    April 10, 2019 at 3:05 pm
    Sure, it is an article so therefore fact. I would look at it a different way. The job gains have been primarily at lowest level of pay. Lots of 60 – 64 year olds are ground out of workforce but need to survive to until SS kicks in. They probably had good paying 75 – 100k jobs and now will take 40k to survive until full retirement. It is not like Wall Street turned around and started hiring 60 year olds to fill gaps. The job mixture since recession is main issue with economy.

  140. Bystander says:

    Nah, Pumpkinface. Neo-dufus sees the economy in its green matrix like grid. We are just the liquified pod balls that are too dumb to understand.

  141. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    There you go. Uneducated dumb f.uck with ADD trumps educated critical thinker with no mental problems every time, just by saying so.

    I know grim claimed that the pension problem can’t be solved by inflation, but he is wrong.

  142. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    Pumps – you are doing the best thing possible for society – letting your gene pool run dry.

  143. ExEssex says:

    12:10 this is you now isn’t it: https://youtu.be/ve9ikd7fK48

  144. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    35 years from now, the last of the Pumps genes will be nonviable and surrounded by 8 or 9 cats, and the world will be saved.

  145. 1987 condo says:

    Shocking??

    https://www.marketwatch.com/story/these-are-the-states-where-tax-bills-have-shrunk-the-most-2019-04-10?mod=mw_theo_homepage

    The states where residents’ tax bills have shrunk the most
    The H&R Block findings broke out which states residents had the sharpest average tax liability drops:

    • New Jersey, with a 29.1% decline, amounting to $1,972 less in taxes
    • Massachusetts, with a 27.6% decline, coming to $1,875 less
    • California, with a 27.1% decline, equaling $1,695 less

    Those are states with higher taxes on the whole where residents could be crimped by the $10,000 cap on state and local deductions.

    Nathan Rigney, lead tax research analyst at H&R Block’s Tax Institute said the decreased taxes could relate to the fact that more people suddenly had access to the $10,000 deduction because they were no longer filing under the tax code’s alternative minimum tax. It also could be linked to the increased child tax credit

  146. Yo! says:

    Chicagofinance – I checked the history of 1302 Garden. According to tax records, the last time the property was substantially improved was sometime before 2010. I compared 2012 images of the interior to 2019 images, and the place looks the same. For example, the last kitchen upgrade was before 2012 because the 2012 and 2019 kitchens are identical. So I conclude with high confidence the last $1,050,0000 of value appreciation was due to local market conditions, not upgrades to 1302 Garden.

  147. Yo! says:

    $1,050,000 not $1,050,0000. Hoboken is a 6 and 7 figure appreciation town, not 8 yet.

  148. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    I’m guessing the H&R Block data is based on their own customers, which would self-select for middle class and below incomes?

    1987 condo says:
    April 10, 2019 at 4:55 pm
    Shocking??

    https://www.marketwatch.com/story/these-are-the-states-where-tax-bills-have-shrunk-the-most-2019-04-10?mod=mw_theo_homepage

    The states where residents’ tax bills have shrunk the most
    The H&R Block findings broke out which states residents had the sharpest average tax liability drops:

    • New Jersey, with a 29.1% decline, amounting to $1,972 less in taxes
    • Massachusetts, with a 27.6% decline, coming to $1,875 less
    • California, with a 27.1% decline, equaling $1,695 less

    Those are states with higher taxes on the whole where residents could be crimped by the $10,000 cap on state and local deductions.

    Nathan Rigney, lead tax research analyst at H&R Block’s Tax Institute said the decreased taxes could relate to the fact that more people suddenly had access to the $10,000 deduction because they were no longer filing under the tax code’s alternative minimum tax. It also could be linked to the increased child tax credit

  149. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    ^^^Which, OTOH, tells you that Trump’s new tax law is helping out the working class.

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