Not time to drop?

From HousingWire:

CoreLogic says U.S. home-price gains will accelerate through 2020

CoreLogic Chief Economist Frank Nothaft said the pace of home-price gains will quicken over the next 12 months as low mortgage rates give buyers the ability to pay more for properties.

Home prices probably will increase 5.8% in the 12 months through August 2020, Nothaft said in an exclusive interview with HousingWire. That’s a faster pace than the 3.6% growth seen in August 2019 from a year earlier. 

Rates for fixed mortgages will probably stay below 4% through the end of 2020, Nothaft said. Cheap financing allows homebuyers to qualify for a bigger loan because the amount they can borrow is based on their monthly payment, which drops as financing costs fall.

“We’re in a very special environment for housing demand – for the first time since at least World War II we have mortgage rates below 4% while at the same time the unemployment rate is below 4%,” Nothaft said. “That’s a golden period that will stimulate activity, and we expect sub-4 mortgage rates and sub-4 unemployment rate through at least the end of 2020.”

This entry was posted in Economics, Employment, Housing Bubble, National Real Estate. Bookmark the permalink.

81 Responses to Not time to drop?

  1. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Sad truth. The irony in our lives. Just like the sad everyday truth we mask in our daily lives; we must constantly kill and take the life force of another to see tomorrow. Vegans can tell themselves they don’t kill all they want, but they are just lying to themselves.

    “In Parasite, the scam ultimately reveals something more insidious: that wealth is always built upon poverty and that the two are locked in a constant struggle. The poor wish to be rich, and in order for someone to be rich, someone else must be poor.”

    https://apple.news/At8iSNNNvS-6OC1_CylN-5A

  2. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Time to buy was past year and now. With the supply of buyers joining the housing market increasing on a daily basis for next 5-7 years, housing market is going to run. Lots of millennials joining the competition on a daily basis.

  3. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Yes, it’s going to lead to the greatest economic boom of our lifetime: roaring 20’s 2.0 first called on this blog by a nobody almost a decade out.

    “That’s a golden period that will stimulate activity, and we expect sub-4 mortgage rates and sub-4 unemployment rate through at least the end of 2020.”

  4. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Unreal, going to witness women becoming the alpha over males in our lifetime.

    “In the game of life, love and re­la­tion­ships, the ed­u­ca­tional dis­par­ity be­tween men and women is a prob­lem.”

  5. Juice Box says:

    Pumps – yet another baloney bias. Those Harvard bitches need to get knocked up just like the rest of them, life finds a way.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dMjQ3hA9mEA

  6. chicagofinance says:

    I thought that an IQ test was merely a method to measure intelligence through calibrating to an index. I did not realize that a person can fail….

    “I was thinking about the Bernie Sanders campaign and Democratic Soc!alism and it dawned on me that slavery was an example of capitalism,” he said. “You’re putting a price tag on things which shouldn’t have a price and that’s people in the case of slavery or health care which people need to live. It’s monetizing things which should not be monetized.”
    https://nypost.com/2019/10/05/nyc-democratic-soc!alists-new-aoc-could-be-this-rising-star-from-brooklyn/

  7. Saturday NoPumpkin says:

    ChiFi,

    Here is a great IQ explanation https://youtu.be/fjs2gPa5sD0

    But, BTW are you Klaus https://youtu.be/D9FauQOXN90

  8. chicagofinance says:

    No guy: that Peterson video is stunningly fantastic!

  9. Saturday NoPumpkin says:

    By the way, this is how healthcare is such a complicated issue that the only solution is Medicare for All. I can see a Medicare program to aid hospital with this issue.

    I remember a conference I attended years back, where Morristown Medical Center brought up a “task force program” they created to address the “the very expensive special usually homeless frequent hospital visitors”. The genetleman they used as an example as why the program was started had already cost them over $650K.

    Another thing, this is what the VA Medical Centers used to do with homeless veterans as social admissions, it was stopped under W. Prior to it the view of the VA was that of a sanatorium/recovery place, instead of a “community hospital”.

    https://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2019/10/why-hospitals-are-getting-into-the-housing-business.html

  10. chicagofinance says:
  11. joyce says:

    Man crush developing?

  12. 1987 condo says:

    Excellent vid

  13. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Answer to healthcare is simple…socialize the extreme, capitalize the rest.

  14. grim says:

    Peterson video was very good, solid explanation or what will be the next major US crisis. What happens when nearly half the population is unemployable? Socialized healthcare and universal basic income become the only real solution.

    IQ tests at the border are probably a good idea too.

    Unfortunately, you can’t touch any of this stuff politically, it’s toxic.

  15. grim says:

    Climate change video brilliant.

    Low resolution thinking.

    BURN

  16. Blue Ribbon Teacher says:

    That’s exactly the issue I’ve maintained for years. The temperature data is so noisy that the error bars exceed the trends these guys are claiming. There is a group of climatologists that have basically forced Nature and some other journals to retract their papers because they are statistically invalid arguments they try to make.

    The statement that the “science is settled” is pure propaganda. Climatology is a science that hasn’t even begun to be developed yet in comparison to other sciences. They are probably where Physics was in the 1500s. It’s akin to Galileo talking about quantum physics. The science can’t be settled because it was never developed in the first place.

    What is settled is that the average temperature has increased a little over a degree in the past century. I’ve always maintained that this is a benefit to the planet, not a detriment. GDP, standard of living, crop production, human population growth, and a dozen other things have all been positively correlated with the rise in temp over the past 5000 years.

  17. Fast Eddie says:

    I’ve been watching Jordan Peterson for a while. You notice all the mush heads in the audience staring at him in a stupor? Hard to dispute when someone is making sense.

  18. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Okay, so smart people are taking away jobs from low skilled individuals that are only capable of doing these jobs. They then cry about having to support these individuals.

    That’s where we are going.

  19. The Great Pumpkin says:

    It is settled. We impact the planet. So why are you so against investing money to better understand it and be in a much better position to handle a crisis if it does come. Instead, your camp just blows off the whole movement as a waste of money and nothing to be learned or discovered. Just a waste of money..

    “The statement that the “science is settled” is pure propaganda. Climatology is a science that hasn’t even begun to be developed yet in comparison to other sciences. They are probably where Physics was in the 1500s. It’s akin to Galileo talking about quantum physics. The science can’t be settled because it was never developed in the first place.”

  20. Blue Ribbon Teacher says:

    Says the high school history teacher lecturing the person with degrees in geology, chemistry, and physical chemistry.

  21. Blue Ribbon Teacher says:

    Was at the farmers market yesterday in Trenton. Sugar pumpkins were a dollar each. Plus tax. I said, but you don’t tax food right? Apparently Murphy sent reps all around the state farmers markets to tell the vendors they are to tax pumpkins because they are “decorative” and not used for food purposes. This just screams desperation for cash.

    I told her, “but I planned to bake them” and she said well then, I don’t have to tax you.

  22. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Ahh, blue resorting to bs when his position is destroyed.

  23. Fast Eddie says:

    What happens when nearly half the population is unemployable?

    IQ threshold means testing. If you’re unemployable, fall below minimum requirements or can’t produce, then you’re eligible for mandatory sterilization.

  24. Fast Eddie says:

    Hoboken has formed a committee to discuss the reasons why an increasing number of store fronts are empty on Washington Street. I think politicians need to be sterilized.

  25. Blue Ribbon Teacher says:

    Which part is BS, my analysis on statistics or the fact that you teach at an Abbott district?

  26. Fast Eddie says:

    I thought punkin’ seed was a financial analyst of some sort?

  27. Juice Box says:

    There are quite a few mad-scientists who are genetically engineering micro-algae and then want to release this stuff into the oceans. This could end us all.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=72&v=nM65NcMXsE4

  28. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Blue,

    Go look in the mirror and say hi to the loser for me.

    If a rising temperature is good for the planet, let’s get some scientific studies to better understand it.

    You are funny. You are basically against scientific research. Just a waste of money, right?!

    Debbie downer and blue, a match made in heaven.

  29. Grim says:

    Blue – all NJ state and locals have made cash grab the #1 priority.

    This trend has been in place from earlier this year.

    Even trivial revenue is being pursued here. I’m talking about building officials arguing over what amounts to $20 in building permit fees.

  30. Grim says:

    I’ve hear of towns going full out fining property owners for trash/clutter.

  31. leftwing says:

    LOLOLOL.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sz2L7jfI0zg

    We miss all the good stuff being a solid blue state.

  32. Blue Ribbon Teacher says:

    Haha I’m not the one lying about my job and how much I make.

  33. Blue Ribbon Teacher says:

    Eddie nope. I’m not going to dox him but his employment is a matter of public record

  34. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Hilarious.

    Blue Ribbon Teacher says:
    October 6, 2019 at 11:33 am
    Eddie nope. I’m not going to dox him but his employment is a matter of public record

  35. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Again, who gives a damn about what I do. This is what losers do when their position gets smashed to pieces. Starts resorting to nonsense personal attacks. You are cool.

  36. 1987 condo says:

    Did somebody really bring up the “Pumpkin” tax on this blog?

  37. Sunday NoPumpkin says:

    That is what happens when you have a lot of trendy students/hipsters in your town.

    The big thing today is “Stranger Thing” in Netflix. Look at this song https://youtu.be/Z1oB2EDu5XA

    Is all part of going back to the 80’s. That is what Hoboken’s municipal leadership has not realized yet.

    Is back to 80’s. The town should get new fire trucks, because in the 80’s – the arsonist ruled in Hoboken. No more trendy shops, just bodegas and liquor store with rooster (can’t say c**k) fighting in the basement.

    Fast Eddie says:
    October 6, 2019 at 10:43 am

    Hoboken has formed a committee to discuss the reasons why an increasing number of store fronts are empty on Washington Street. I think politicians need to be sterilized.

  38. crushednjmillenial says:

    Wow, thank you, Blue Ribbon for your note re pumpkin. If the state employee is the same guy, then this makes a lot of sense. A state employee:

    (1) has the time to post all day during business hours;
    (2) refuses to see that many in the private employment sector are facing a lot of work for low pay, and fear of losing the job anyway;
    (3) would find New Jersey to be a great place to live compared to alternatives around the US (i.e., state employees make less outside of blue states with less protections);
    (4) would have an inflated sense of his self, his achievements, and his worth to society.

    Wasn’t this guy talking about the work he did to get raises and how people rise in their companies based on merit?

    I always thought he was a private sector employee that just found a niche, but it may have turned out that it is just the niche of the overpaid blue state appartchik. I suppose the public sector person might not be the same guy. But, I am personally trying to potentially get into a government job because working in the private sector is tough and humbling.

  39. Blue Ribbon Teacher says:

    Again, who gives a damn about what I do. This is what losers do when their position gets smashed to pieces. Starts resorting to nonsense personal attacks. You are cool.

    Yes your in depth knowledge consisting of zero actual statements backing your position really smashed my argument to pieces.

  40. crushednjmillenial says:

    Harvard Asian Lawsuit . . .

    Judge rules that Harvard can engage in racism towards Asians to remedy past racism, or whatever. The mental gymnastics from a skim of the 130-page opinion are stomach-turning.

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/harvards-legal-discrimination-11570143828

  41. Blue Ribbon Teacher says:

    Wow, thank you, Blue Ribbon for your note re pumpkin. If the state employee is the same guy, then this makes a lot of sense. A state employee:

    (1) has the time to post all day during business hours;
    (2) refuses to see that many in the private employment sector are facing a lot of work for low pay, and fear of losing the job anyway;
    (3) would find New Jersey to be a great place to live compared to alternatives around the US (i.e., state employees make less outside of blue states with less protections);
    (4) would have an inflated sense of his self, his achievements, and his worth to society.

    Well a few things. I teach as well, but I don’t have the time to post all day during school hours because I’m too busy.

    I actually have respect for the private sector because I still work for myself on the side and have held up to 3 part time jobs in addition to my full time job at various points in my career. I know how hard is it is generate your own money in the private sector as opposed to simply being employed in it when I ran a little weekend business off a farm.

    Also, most teachers are getting the shaft big time on salary. A lot of it has to do with the union’s stronghold on salary negotiations.

    To the last point, it’s all bs. He’s talking out of his butt to try to make people think he’s a success story. He just revealed too much information about himself and the truth is now easily verified.

    I’m not here to dox him…but I ain’t gonna put up with his BS nonsense. Although, I still suspect he’s the person who emailed me on my work email so maybe I do owe him one. But as I said before to that person, you should know my address. Feel free to show up to my house.

  42. ExEssex says:

    State employees vs Private sector.

    It’s funny, I’ve been both. What I will say is the state employment game is the long game. It doesn’t really pay or until you’ve done it for 2o plus years. In the private sector with the right company and stock options you can make the kind of money the state worker will never see. You can do that in a relatively short time span.

    Both jobs can be demanding but there is something especially toxic about the teaching profession especially today. It’s a mental health risk.

  43. The Great Pumpkin says:

    I would never go stalk someone and bring up personal stuff on an individual on this board. I have class. Whatever they want to reveal is fine. So get off your high horse you loser.

    Bs nonsense? There was a reason I didn’t reveal my occupation you jerk off. My family income and my income are all the truth. I’m sorry your stupid source is not up to date.

    And I’m not a success? Wtf?! Then why are you so jealous? Why all the hate? Go out your way to try and throw me under the bus out of pure jealousy. You are a loser.

    Leave my personal life out of this. Other people knew, you are just the jerk off that had to keep saying it on here to make yourself feel better about yourself than you really do.

    I enjoy posting here. Leave me the f alone.

    “I’m not here to dox him…but I ain’t gonna put up with his BS nonsense. Although, I still suspect he’s the person who emailed me on my work email so maybe I do owe him one. But as I said before to that person, you should know my address. Feel free to show up to my house.”

  44. Blue Ribbon Teacher says:

    Here’s the problem, you never know when to shut the hell up. But don’t worry, I have no desire to be you or have your position.

    btw, ” There was a reason I didn’t reveal my occupation you jerk off. My family income and my income are all the truth.” Those two sentences are a direct contradiction of each other.

    I’d be happy to leave you alone…stop replying to my posts with your idiotic nonsense.

    Btw, if my source is out of date, you might want to email the district. You are still on their directory.

  45. Bystander says:

    Blumps is a state worker..hah,hah. I gave him too much credit as a Jr. credit analyst. Too much for his brain. I knew something was up as any legitimate company would have outsourced his a$$ years ago. Also explains why he is so oblivious to financial sector woes and why he can post all day. Right..he is so smart that he can finishes tasks quickly..hah, yep mail scanner in one hand in one hand and phone in other. Hurry Blumpy..the state employees need their mail. 300k income? Alpha Wife 225k, Blumpy 40k, Granny house 45k..he is the beta in whole scenario.

  46. A Home Buyer says:

    Bystander,

    For what its worth, the troll’s public income is reported as nearly double that. So their spouse only makes double, not 5x, presuming the information is valid and also presuming everything else is true…

  47. Juice Box says:

    Here is more followup on my post from Oct 3rd, about what will happen when the really rich pull back on capital investments.

    October 3, 2019 at 9:15 am
    As I have stated before recessions always start with the rich. Their spending patterns depend on the expectation that asset prices will increase. Any pullback in their spending patterns trickles down eventually into the BLS non-farms payroll report. They are the employers, they begin to hire less, smaller raises and bonuses, less capital investment and if their expectation that their incomes will be down then they get more frugal less spending on high end real estate and other luxury goods.

    Read this twitter stream. It focuses on tech startup investing.

    “A butterfly flapped its wings in Riyadh that killed a journalist in Istanbul that killed a fundraise in Japan that killed the hopes and dreams of CEOs and VCs in Silicon Valley. The end.”

    https://twitter.com/jsmian/status/1178999584737107968

  48. ExEssex says:

    Oh poor blumpy. Woe is he.

  49. Libturd, seen crazy things done with ping pong balls. says:

    I missed it, where does the village liar work?

  50. Bystander says:

    Thanks Home. He is still wearing gimp mask at night. Appears with all big $hit talk, the only real accomplishment is marrying up.

  51. Libturd, seen crazy things done with ping pong balls. says:
  52. Libturd, seen crazy things done with ping pong balls. says:
  53. A Home Buyer says:

    Lib,

    Hopefully no body will provide that level of information here (other then the Troll who cannot stop the word vomit which led him to this ledge) but I pretty sure you have the information you need already to answer that question.

    The unfortunate side effect of being who he is in today’s world means your information is readily visible on the internet with just two search engines. It’s been accessible for years, I’m really surprised ExPat (who I presume must have known, god rest his soul) did not say anything first.

  54. Libturd, seen crazy things done with ping pong balls. says:

    I really don’t care about his real data as I have no interest in meeting him in person. I was simply curious what his REAL job is. I’m not one of those people who get off on determining one’s identity through internet search engines. The fact he lies so regularly provides additional credence to ignoring his posts.

  55. A Home Buyer says:

    Lib,

    Check the post from 10:01 am today from BRT.

  56. Libturd, seen crazy things done with ping pong balls. says:

    Oy. Thought that was a joke. Joyce is right. Ignore the troll until he (or she) goes away.

  57. ExEssex says:

    Real estate (here) 3 homes go up at “market” rate. One sells in two days.
    The others? Still on the market. That’s the middle market here. High end is brutal.
    Stuff on that market sitting for years. People can apparently still be picky. I think it’s all gonna slide from here. 40 years in the desert.

  58. Nomad says:

    BRT – re global warming; what explains the melting of glaciers, polar ice caps etc. Ever been to Banff or Jasper National Park in CA? They mark the end of the glaciers with stones that have the date market in them which can go back as far as 1950 and in those instances, the edge of the glaciers have been shrinking. Crystal Cruises in 2016 ran one of their ships (like 650 ft) from Alaska through the NW Passage to NYC – ice has depleted to the point where this was possible. Not to bust your chops but this kind of thing you don’t think is evidence?

  59. Walking bye says:

    What did happen to expat? Hopefully he is ok and you guys are joking

  60. Libturd, seen crazy things done with ping pong balls. says:

    He passed Walking. Back in August.

  61. chicagofinance says:

    Turd: WTF? That place is a POS shack?

  62. Libturd, seen crazy things done with ping pong balls. says:

    Yup. I recognized the road name, but I don’t see where he’s a high school teacher. I do see a chimney sweeper with that name though.

    I’m pretty sure he was completely full of sh1t.

  63. Bystander says:

    BRT may have saved this blog with that tidbit. You have my gratitude. Happier not knowing another thing about the dufus. If he is sitting in a NJ classroom, teaching the young..god help the future.

  64. Blue Ribbon Teacher says:

    Temperature is rising. There is no dispute of what temperature has done. That’s been recorded in records. Glaciers melting is what naturally follows. The projections and models are what are wildly inaccurate. Even a 1 degree shift upwards in the next 100 years which is likely going to happen is a statistically invalid projection using 100 years of data. 4 degrees? That’s a joke and no data reflects that.

    Beyond that, the misery and catastrophe people are predicting over the course of our lives has no basis in reality. Nice got a good article from a Japanese climate scientist I can post later

  65. Libturd, seen crazy things done with ping pong balls. says:

    I never deny climate change. What I always point out is that we still haven’t determined what caused the ice age. Additionally, we can not attribute the current global warming to man. Though, I am not in support of mass pollution either.

  66. Juice Box says:

    How was it 6 degrees Celsius colder during the glacial maximum? What caused the temp to rise back then to where it is today for the last 8,000 years?

  67. leftwing says:

    LOLOLOL.

    For about five years I’ve posted for Pump’s employer on the thesis that any entity willing to employ him in an ‘analytical’ role was a sure shot short.

    Well come to find out…..he’s part of the biggest short of all, the finances of the State of NJ. Ha! It all makes sense now.

    And, btw, as I’m sure everyone noticed he didn’t deny his employ. He said the records weren’t up-to-date (thereby admitting they were true). Dumbass can’t even issue a good denial after constructing an entirely fake persona. What was that again, Dunning-Kruger? LOL.

  68. leftwing says:

    And, I also have a newfound deep level of respect for Ex. He most certainly had a dossier on all of us…..despite being able to blow the little turd totally out of the water he didn’t. Class act.

  69. ExEssex says:

    Ex was a patriot. Known to play Ben Franklin in local constitution day festivals.
    He bore an uncanny resemblance to the inventor and statesman.

  70. ExEssex says:

    operation.
    CHIP SOMODEVILLA/GETTY
    Donald Trump got “rolled” by Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, a National Security Council source with direct knowledge of the discussions told Newsweek.

    In a scheduled phone call on Sunday afternoon between President Trump and President Erdogan, Trump said he would withdraw U.S. forces from northern Syria. The phone call was scheduled after Turkey announced it was planning to invade Syria, and hours after Erdogan reinforced his army units at the Syrian-Turkish border and issued his strongest threat to launch a military incursion, according to the National Security Council official to whom Newsweek spoke on condition of anonymity.

    The U.S. withdrawal plays into the hands of the Islamic State group, Damascus and Moscow, and the announcement left Trump’s own Defense Department “completely stunned,” said Pentagon officials. Turkey, like the United States, wants regime change in Syria. Russia and Iran support the Assad regime.

  71. 3b says:

    The Kurds get screwed again.

  72. Blue Ribbon Teacher says:

    Climate simulation models are fine tools to study the climate system, so long as the users are aware of the limitations of the models and exercise caution in designing experiments and interpreting their output. In this sense, experiments to study the response of simplified climate systems, such as those generated by the “state-of-the-art” climate simulation models, to major increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide or other greenhouse gases are also interesting and meaningful academic projects that are certainly worth pursuing. So long as the results of such projects are presented with disclaimers that unambiguously state the extent to which the results can be compared with the real world, I would not have any problem with such projects. The models just become useless pieces of junk or worse (worse, in a sense that they can produce gravely misleading output) only when they are used for climate forecasting.
    I hate to say this, because I know well how much of serious efforts have been put into improving these parametric representations (I spent hundreds of hours in vain myself), but all of these parametric representations, even the best of them, are Mickey Mouse mockeries when compared with the reality. …That is, the selection of the parameter values is an engineering process to “make the model work” rather than a scientific process. The models are “tuned” by tinkering around with values of various parameters until the best compromise is obtained. I used to do it myself. It is a necessary and unavoidable procedure and is not a problem so long as the user is aware of its ramifications and is honest about it. But it is a serious and fatal flaw if it is used for climate forecasting/prediction purposes. …
    Even if the best compromise so obtained from the tuning looks very close to the observation, the models’ behaviors are guaranteed to be grotesquely unrealistic, since the tuning requires other aspects of the models to be extremely distorted in order to counterbalance the distortion associated with the Mickey Mouse representations described above. …
    With values of parameters that are supposed to represent many complex processes being held constant, many nonlinear processes in the real climate system are absent or grossly distorted in the models. It is delusion to believe that simulation models that lack important nonlinear processes in the real climate system can predict at least the sense or direction of the climate change correctly. …
    The real or realistically-simulated climate system is far more complex than an absurdly simple system simulated by the toys that have been used for climate predictions to date …{N}one of the climate simulation models used for predictions can reproduce the current climate accurately despite the heavy tuning and engineering efforts by climate researchers.


    With values of parameters that are supposed to represent many complex processes being held constant, many nonlinear processes in the real climate system are absent or grossly distorted in the models. It is delusion to believe that simulation models that lack important nonlinear processes in the real climate system can predict at least the sense or direction of the climate change correctly. …
    The real or realistically-simulated climate system is far more complex than an absurdly simple system simulated by the toys that have been used for climate predictions to date …{N}one of the climate simulation models used for predictions can reproduce the current climate accurately despite the heavy tuning and engineering efforts by climate researchers.

  73. Blue Ribbon Teacher says:

    I figured it out the day of the ping pong house article. But yeah, I thought ExPat was saying it as well here:

    http://njrereport.com/index.php/2019/08/30/june-case-shiller-2/

    But it must have been someone else as it was posted in August and he had already passed.

  74. chicagofinance says:

    “But it is a serious and fatal flaw if it is used for climate forecasting/prediction purposes. …”

    or used as justification for trillions in superfluous spending;
    or used as a political platform;
    or used to incite an affluent and impressionable young girl on the autism spectrum into being a grotesque puppet for hire.

  75. GdBlsU45 says:

    lol. When do we find out that nana got pumpkin his job too.

  76. Truther says:

    1. THE EARTH’S CLIMATE HAS ALWAYS CHANGED

    Over the course of the Earth’s 4.5-billion-year history, the climate has changed a lot. This is true. But the rapid warming we’re seeing now can’t be explained by natural cycles of warming and cooling. The kind of changes that would normally happen over hundreds of thousands of years are happening in decades.

    Global temperatures are now at their highest since records began. In fact, 17 of the 18 warmest years on record have all taken place since 2001.

    This much faster warming corresponds with levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, which have been increasing since the industrial revolution. So, when people talk about climate change today, they mean anthropogenic (man-made) climate change. This is the warming of Earth’s average temperature as a result of human activity, such as burning coal, oil and gas to produce energy to fuel our homes and transport and cutting down trees to produce the food we eat.

    2. PLANTS NEED CARBON DIOXIDE

    Plants do need carbon dioxide (CO2) to live. Plants and forests remove and store away huge amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere each year. But the problem is, there’s only so much carbon dioxide they can absorb and this amount is getting less, as more and more forests are cut down across the world, largely to produce our food.

    Let’s be clear, CO2 itself does not cause problems. It’s part of the natural global ecosystem. The problem is the quantity of CO2 that’s being produced by us as humans; there hasn’t been this level of CO2 in the atmosphere for 800,000 years.

    Twisted tree
    3. GLOBAL WARMING ISN’T REAL AS IT’S STILL COLD

    Global warming is causing the Earth’s average surface temperature to increase. This is not only making heatwaves and droughts more likely but it’s also causing changes to our natural climate systems. These changes are making extreme weather events more likely and more severe. For example, hurricanes and storms are becoming more intense, moving slower and taking longer to die down.

    Because of where we are, the UK & Ireland are likely to get more rain and wind as a result of climate change while New York will see more snow.

    4. CLIMATE CHANGE IS A FUTURE PROBLEM

    This is no longer an excuse not to act on climate change and push the burden onto future generations. Last year, the world’s leading climate scientists warned we only have 12 years to limit global warming to a maximum of 1.5C and avoid climate breakdown.

    We’re already seeing the devastating effects of climate change on global food supplies, increasing migration, conflict, disease and global instability, and this will only get worse if we don’t act now. Man-made climate change is the biggest environmental crisis of our time. It threatens the future of the planet that we depend on for our survival and we’re the last generation that can do something about it.

    5. RENEWABLE ENERGY IS JUST A MONEY-MAKING SCHEME

    It’s a commonly-held belief that renewable energy is expensive, but this simply isn’t true! Solar power and onshore wind are the cheapest ways of generating electricity; meaning the energy they produce is cheaper than using nuclear, gas and fossil fuels.

    The cost of renewables has fallen faster than anyone could have predicted. And yet the government are still backing dirty fossil fuels. Did you know the UK has the biggest fossil fuel subsidies in the EU? That’s right, they spend an eye-watering €12bn (£10.5bn) a year supporting dirty fossil fuels.

    6. POLAR BEAR NUMBERS ARE INCREASING

    This isn’t the case. Climate change is the biggest threat faced by polar bears. The Arctic is warming roughly twice as fast as the rest of the world, causing sea ice to melt earlier and form later each year. This makes it more difficult for female polar bears to get onto land in late autumn to build their dens, and more difficult for them to get out onto the sea ice in spring to feed their cubs. Their main source of prey, seals, are also affected by climate change, as they depend on sea ice to raise their young.

    This means that in some parts of the Arctic, polar bears are having to survive with less food than they did previously. Polar bear populations are predicted to decline by 30% by the middle of this century.

    Two curious young Polar bears © naturepl.com / Steven Kazlowski / WWF
    © naturepl.com / Steven Kazlowski / WWF
    7. RENEWABLE ENERGY CAN ONLY WORK WHEN IT’S NOT CLOUDY OR WINDY

    Industry is developing new techniques for storing electricity and managing demand at peak times meaning that even if the sun isn’t shining or it’s not blowing a gale, it’s still possible to rely on renewable energy sources.

    The majority of UK homes get their electricity from the National Grid. When you switch to a clean supplier, they guarantee that for every unit of electricity you take out of the Grid, they’ll put the same amount of clean energy back in, helping to clean up our energy supply.

    8. ANIMALS WILL ADAPT TO CLIMATE CHANGE

    This one isn’t a myth, Darwin got the adaptation part right. But let’s be clear, some plants and animals will adapt but not all.

    To survive, plants, animals and birds confronted with climate change have two options: move or adapt. There are several examples of species that have begun to adapt to climate change already.

    But increasingly, it’s a different story for many. Given the speed of climate change, it’s becoming impossible for many species to adapt quickly enough to keep up with their changing environment. And, as habitats are destroyed by roads, cities and dams, moving becomes increasingly difficult.  For those that can’t move or adapt, the future doesn’t look so positive.

    9. GETTING RID OF HUMANS WILL FIX THIS

    This, we firmly believe, is wrong. It’s easy to start feeling that we’ve gone too far already and that the planet won’t be able to support the world’s growing population.

    It’s WWF’s mission to build a world where people and nature thrive together. The technology and systems we need to move to 100% renewable energy by 2045 and use our planet’s resources sustainably are already available. What’s now needed is for political and business leaders to take bold and urgent action towards using these solutions to address the climate crisis and restore nature.

    10. CHINA IS THE ONLY COUNTRY RESPONSIBLE FOR CLIMATE CHANGE

    Despite being one of the largest emitters of greenhouse gases, China is currently one of the largest investors in renewables. The increase in investment has been in response to the rapid growth of green business and the need to clean up air pollution in its major cities.

    Climate change is a global issue and we all have a responsibility to step up to the climate crisis. Action on it will need serious investment but has the potential to deliver huge benefits for nature and people. We all need to raise our voices and fight for our world!

  77. Blue Ribbon Teacher says:

    This is no longer an excuse not to act on climate change and push the burden onto future generations. Last year, the world’s leading climate scientists warned we only have 12 years to limit global warming to a maximum of 1.5C and avoid climate breakdown.

    This is exactly what I’m talking about. The idea that any sort of model out there even exists with any sort of precision is beyond ridiculous.

    Global temperatures are now at their highest since records began. In fact, 17 of the 18 warmest years on record have all taken place since 2001.

    You can look at the data taken at Central Park since 1860.

    https://www.weather.gov/okx/CentralParkHistorical

    Fact is, it’s less than 10% of record highs temperatures by day occurring in this decade.

    Global warming is causing the Earth’s average surface temperature to increase. This is not only making heatwaves and droughts more likely but it’s also causing changes to our natural climate systems. These changes are making extreme weather events more likely and more severe. For example, hurricanes and storms are becoming more intense, moving slower and taking longer to die down.

    Again, completely statistically invalid argument based on the number of data points. The idea that storms have become more intense is usually cited by dollars in damage. They rarely adjust for inflation.

    It’s a commonly-held belief that renewable energy is expensive, but this simply isn’t true! Solar power and onshore wind are the cheapest ways of generating electricity; meaning the energy they produce is cheaper than using nuclear, gas and fossil fuels.

    Not true

    We’re already seeing the devastating effects of climate change on global food supplies, increasing migration, conflict, disease and global instability, and this will only get worse if we don’t act now.

    Absolutely false

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