C19 Open Discussion Week 53b

From Politico:

Soaring home prices are starting to alarm policymakers 

The booming housing market helped stave off economic collapse in 2020. But soaring prices are starting to worry policymakers, who fear the market could lock a generation of would-be buyers out of homeownership.

Home prices in January — typically a slow month for the market — were up 14 percent over the same month the previous year, while sales jumped 24 percent, despite an unemployment rate that was almost twice as high. Demand for existing homes is so strong that the average residence is on the market for just three weeks, and inventory is at a record low after seeing its steepest drop last year since the data was first tracked in 1999.

It all threatens to freeze broad swaths of the population out of the market, leaving millions of Americans in a less secure financial position, widening the racial wealth gap and forcing millennials, already lagging previous generations in building wealth and forming families, to fall even further behind.

“The dream of homeownership is out of reach for so many working people,” said Senate Banking Chair Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio). “Rising home prices and flat wages means that many families, especially families of color, may never be able to afford their first home.”

Brown, who insists on calling his panel the “Senate Banking and Housing Committee,” vowed that these issues will be a top priority in the months ahead as the country struggles to recover from the pandemic-induced recession. Among other things, he said he plans to work with the Biden administration to address the rising cost of housing and expand access to homeownership “so that more families can rent and own homes in inclusive communities.”

The last time the U.S. saw such skyrocketing home prices, the ensuing crash brought down the global economy. Most industry analysts say the current boom is not a “bubble” akin to that frenzy of more than a decade ago, which led to the financial crisis.

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263 Responses to C19 Open Discussion Week 53b

  1. Hold my beer says:

    First

  2. Libturd says:

    It’s frist.

    Geez Louise!

  3. Juice Box says:

    100 year mortgages @ 3% it’s thy only solution.

    Payment on a 450,000 loan would be $1,475.84 a month instead of $2,188.88 a month for a 30 year. Very affordable to people of any color.

  4. Hold my beer says:

    Juice

    Didn’t japan do something like that back in the 80s?

  5. Juice Box says:

    Yes but sooner than that 1995, but think of it this way the home becomes an ancestral property and is passed on from grandparent to grandchild in a multigenerational fashion.

  6. Hold my beer says:

    These younguns just need to put all their income into etfs or stock of disruptive technology companies that have negative cash flow and massive debt or are valued at 500 times sales and they will be fine. /off sarcasm

  7. Juice Box says:

    Stock? That is a relic. Go long crypto! Cathy says so! Bitcoin $500,000!!!

  8. Fast Eddie says:

    Cancel a few more cartoons and kids toys, because that’s the real issue to every financial and soc1etal ill that befalls us.

  9. The Great Pumpkin says:

    LMAO…what’s sad, I could see them moving onto 50 year loans in the not so distant future. Keep the ship going is the name of the game. Remember, 30 year mortgages were unheard of at one time. 20% down was the requirement…

    Juice Box says:
    March 10, 2021 at 8:32 am
    100 year mortgages @ 3% it’s thy only solution.

    Payment on a 450,000 loan would be $1,475.84 a month instead of $2,188.88 a month for a 30 year. Very affordable to people of any color.

  10. Chicago says:

    Not in Texas

    Libturd says:
    March 10, 2021 at 8:31 am
    It’s frist.

    Geez Louise

  11. 3b says:

    Juice: I saw this morning that policy makers as they call themselves in Washington are concerned about the bubble in real estate as well. But Jerome says it’s not a bubble!! People killing themselves to get into a house and then make mortgage payments on something that just sits there and gets old, and needs constant maintenance. Hurry, hurry!!

  12. Hold my beer says:

    Juice

    My bad. I forgot she recommends 20% in crypto. At least tulips you could plant and look at. Even blockchain trading cards you can look at too. Crypto is a great way to enrich the ccp too with all the crypto mines running over there. As if making china a favored trading partner under Clinton didn’t do enough economic and security damage to the world.

  13. Libturd says:

    Here’s some advice, from me to you. I’m getting tech bubble dejavu!

  14. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Let the Good Times Roll
    The nearly $1.9 trillion relief package heading for House passage Wednesday is projected to help propel the U.S. economy to its fastest annual growth in nearly four decades, reduce poverty and revive inflation. The legislation—following trillions of dollars in federal aid last year and arriving amid rising Covid-19 vaccination rates—prompted economists surveyed by The Wall Street Journal in recent days to boost their average forecast for 2021 economic growth to 5.95%, measured from the fourth quarter of last year to the same period this year. That was up from their 4.87% projection last month and would be the U.S. economy’s fastest since a 7.9% burst in 1983. The analysts also lifted their forecasts for inflation and job growth from last month’s survey. The new poll found that they expected consumer prices would rise 2.48% by December from a year earlier and projected that employers will add an average 514,000 jobs a month over the next four quarters. Some economists warned they might be underestimating the bounce to come, Kate Davidson, Paul Kiernan and Anthony DeBarros report.

  15. Libturd says:

    A printing press infused Frankenstein economy. Remember how Frankenstein ended?

  16. NJ resident 20130310 says:

    Regular follower here, NJ resident. Seeking first-hand advice and/or recommendation regarding local family law firms. I’d particularly love to hear from NJRER regulars who have posted on the subject of matrimonial issues.

  17. ExEssex says:

    I got mine!! The American mantra.

  18. Juice Box says:

    Those crazy kids have pushed GME up again. I wound not be surprised when RBLX starts trading today on the NYSE it will open double the listed $45 a share.

  19. Libturd says:

    Absolutely. on RBLX. Though, I spoke with my son about it and he is adamant that it’s a bad stock. If RBLX couldn’t make money during Covid, then how are they going to turn a profit once kids go back outside. He said they are really a one-trick pony, and their avenue for recurring revenue is short.

    With that said, it will probably go crypto.

  20. Juice Box says:

    Lib – Belief in fundamentals are suspended. We are in the Ca*si*no right now and everyone is flush. DOW is now up 350 points, and the House is now voting to pass the 1.9 Trillion bill. All those stimulus checks will be going out and will be invested. Crazy as it sounds retail traders now account for as much trading volume as mutual funds and hedge funds..

    https://www.ft.com/content/7a91e3ea-b9ec-4611-9a03-a8dd3b8bddb5

  21. SmallGovConservative says:

    Libturd says:
    March 9, 2021 at 3:46 pm

    Libturd says:
    March 9, 2021 at 3:46 pm

    “…If there is one thing that stood out in this election, it’s that if voters are given a mail-in ballot, they are extremely likely to vote. If it were up to me, all elections would be mail-in… I think the chain of custody is actually weaker in in person…”

    The first comment is nonsense. The only things that can be determined from this election are that if ballots are mailed to every person/address listed on the voter registration roll, an extremely large number of them will be returned , and they will overwhelmingly include votes for the Democrat at the top of the ballot. Because of that, your second comment is obviously the wish of every Democrat — mailed ballots to every single registered person/address virtually ensure victory for the Dem at the top of the ballot. And your last comment is wrong and also irrelevant — chain of custody is meaningless when there is no way to ensure legitimacy at the source of the chain. For any given mailed ballot, it is impossible to know if it was completed by the person that it was intended for, or if the person that completed it was assisted, coerced or enticed to complete it in a specific way. Without having any idea who would’ve won a traditional election, it’s obvious for the reasons just noted that mass mailing elections are shams — just the way Dems want them.

  22. No One says:

    Original post – The Fed has been trying to support asset prices for over a decade. Why wouldn’t real estate asset prices rise also? Especially now that the home is becoming the alternative office for so many people, especially the wealthiest workers involved in the information-heavy trades.
    Money spent on housing is likely to provide more personal satisfaction than money spent on bitcoin. Borrowing is cheap. But the residential property asset value pool is massively larger than that of bitcoin, so it’s harder to push that up.

  23. ExEssex says:

    10:18 ok maybe it’ll motivate your party (GOP) to find better candy dates.

  24. Fast Eddie says:

    Without having any idea who would’ve won a traditional election, it’s obvious for the reasons just noted that mass mailing elections are shams — just the way Dems want them.

    If there was no Covid, Trump would have been reelected. Covid was the perfect cover to cry and scream for mail in ballots. You know, we had to protect the masses (gag..). To avoid fraud in the future, voter ID needs to be implemented. There’s a link on your lap tap or app on your phone; access either, enter your voter pin forwarded to you via text or email and vote. As close to flawless and honest as can be. It won’t happen. Why? Because the dems can’t cheat.

  25. chicagofinance says:

    U.S.
    EDUCATION

    Expect College Wait Lists to Be Obnoxiously Long This Year

    With students applying to more schools, admissions officers struggle to predict who will actually accept their offers

    At Stanford University, 68% of students admitted to the freshman class enrolled in the fall 2020.

    By Melissa Korn
    March 10, 2021 7:00 am ET

    Many college admissions officers are stumped this spring over how many applicants to admit.

    Their mathematical models to predict which admitted students might accept their offers and enroll as freshmen are proving useless because the coronavirus pandemic threw most traditional elements of the admissions process—campus visits, standardized tests, essays about busy extracurricular schedules—into disarray.

    Accepting the right number of students is critical. If too many say yes, dorms may be overcrowded. If too many spurn the offers, the school could face a revenue shortfall.

    Applications submitted via the Common App, which is used by more than 900 schools, rose by 11% nationwide through March 1. But the number of applicants increased by just 2.4%, meaning nearly the same number of students are casting a wider net.

    “I think it will be a nail-biter,” said MJ Knoll-Finn, senior vice president for enrollment management and student success at New York University. That school received more than 100,000 applications this year and aims to enroll a first-year class of about 6,000 students.

    Yield, or the share of admitted students who enroll, is closely tracked by enrollment management offices, university leaders and even bond-rating agencies who use the number to determine how much demand there is for a school.

    Nationwide, the average yield for freshmen was about 33% in the years just before the pandemic, down from 48% in 2007, according to the National Association for College Admission Counseling.

    Rates at sought-after schools are higher, but not always by much. Yale University’s yield for the fall 2019 entering class was 69%—and fell to 55% this past fall, meaning nearly as many students declined or deferred their invitations as accepted them. Stanford University’s figures were 82% in fall 2019 and 68% in fall 2020. And Georgetown’s slipped below 45% this past fall.

    Wait lists have been bloated for years, used by colleges as a cushion along with binding early-decision programs, to ensure a complete class without sacrificing selectivity. But this year schools are expecting to turn to them as early as next month and pluck students well into late summer.

    College counselors say they also anticipate that even more will engage in a dance that has hints of a seventh-grader telling a classmate, “I like you, but only if you say you like me too,” confirming applicants would come if they got off the wait list before making the offer.

    “The wait lists are going to be obnoxious this year,” said Rick Clark, director of undergraduate admissions at the Georgia Institute of Technology, meaning they will be both long and active for a long time. Last year, some highly selective colleges dipped into their reserves beginning in early April, and continued to do so through July, and he expected that prolonged process may be even more drawn-out now.

    Mr. Clark ticked off the variables with which schools are contending, including whether international students will make it to campus, if classes will be in-person, how family finances were affected by the pandemic and which way virus and vaccination rates are trending.

    Every time students are taken from a wait list and accept the new offer, they give up a spot elsewhere. That school turns to its wait list, and down the dominoes go.

    Aaron Fulk, director of college counseling at Marin Academy, a high school in California, said he is frustrated by the current system in which schools want high application numbers and a low acceptance rate, but also want to predict and protect their yields.

    “They’re trying to have all the things, and that’s how you create a very complicated, deluded and highly inefficient system,” he said.

    Before the 2008 recession, the yield rate at Furman University in South Carolina was in the low-to-mid 30% range. Since the downturn, the private school, with a strong regional reputation and growing national pull, has hovered in the low 20s. And last year, it fell to 16%, with far-flung students opting to stay closer to home.

    The current first-year class was about 75 people, or 15%, short of the target. Applications rose 36% this year, but Brad Pochard, vice president of enrollment and dean of admissions and financial aid, said he knows it won’t necessarily translate into a jump in enrollment.

    He said Furman doesn’t have the luxury of leaning on wait lists, estimating that there is only a 50% chance it can lure someone away from another midmarket private college or a lower-price public flagship university.

    Mr. Pochard is erring on the side of admitting more candidates outright this year.

    Schools likely won’t know their enrollment numbers until classes begin, as students increasingly make deposits to hold their spots at multiple schools to keep their options open, said Mr. Clark of Georgia Tech.

    “They may double deposit, but they can’t actually show up in two different places,” he said. “It’s not a Hermione Granger situation.”

  26. Hold my beer says:

    He now probably gets to collect disability and Medicaid Medicare for the rest of his life. I bet he’s a hard core conservative too. Because he thought somehow the libs managed to create a worldwide hoax he can no longer work and will need medical treatment for life from covid damage.

    https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/health/idaho-man-thought-the-virus-would-disappear-the-day-after-the-election-he-was-wrong/

  27. ExEssex says:

    11:21 waaaaaaaaaahhhhhh waaaaaaahhhhh

  28. chicagofinance says:

    Spray money on everything in a blunt force way, and the politicians are surprised that the price of durable assets goes up? Sorry, but words cannot stop the law on entropy. Some people use their stimulus for food and basic shelter, but many do not, and tough sh!t.

    No One says:
    March 10, 2021 at 11:06 am
    Original post – The Fed has been trying to support asset prices for over a decade. Why wouldn’t real estate asset prices rise also? Especially now that the home is becoming the alternative office for so many people, especially the wealthiest workers involved in the information-heavy trades.
    Money spent on housing is likely to provide more personal satisfaction than money spent on bitcoin. Borrowing is cheap. But the residential property asset value pool is massively larger than that of bitcoin, so it’s harder to push that up.

  29. ExEssex says:

    WATERLOO, Ontario — People who frequently exaggerate and distort the truth — or peddle in “BS” — often think they won’t fall for the same stunt from someone else. According to a new study, it turns out these “BSers” aren’t so savvy after all. In fact, Canadian researchers say a “BS artist” is actually the most likely person to be fooled by misleading information.

    A team from the University of Waterloo finds those who regularly try to impress or influence others using misleading, impressive-sounding misinformation frequently buy in to the same junk they sell to others. These individuals displayed an inability to distinguish between scientifically accurate facts and impressive-but-meaningless fiction. Study authors add the typical BSer is also likely to fall victim to fake news headlines.

  30. Fast Eddie says:

    A team from the University of Waterloo finds those who regularly try to impress or influence others using misleading, impressive-sounding misinformation frequently buy in to the same junk they sell to others.

    Oblammy was the king!!

  31. JCer says:

    Yes Eddie and SmallGov. that is the issue there are no reasonable controls on mail in voting.

    Amazon can track the toothpaste you ordered from the box in the warehouse it was in, to who picked the order, who packed it, how that package traveled, who handled it and where it went, the same cannot be said for completed ballots.

    But every one can cover there ears say it’s fake news but at the end of all this the Democrats want to enshrine election insecurity into law. That’s not OK. In order for a republic to work the electorate needs to have confidence in the electoral process that means it should be easy to verify fraud has not occurred, that is not the case with mail in ballots, in person is bad enough but it would require a significant number of bad actors vs. mail ins where one person could potentially add/change/remove thousands of votes.

  32. The Great Pumpkin says:

    For months now, A-listers and lesser-lights from the world of high finance have been traveling to the Sunshine State while riding out Covid-19. Hopeful locals see evidence that the area’s long-elusive dream of luring Big Finance for good might be coming true at last. Along Worth Avenue in Palm Beach, real estate agents count commissions from a pandemic-induced real estate boom. Private schools fantasize about attracting the Spence set.
    The reality is more nuanced — much more.
    Only a small percentage of Manhattanites moved permanently to Florida last year. And as vaccinations stir fresh hope that the pandemic’s end is near, ebullient talk of South Florida drawing Wall Streeters en masse is already beginning to fizzle.
    Dan Sundheim, founder of New York-based hedge fund D1 Capital Partners, will very likely leave Palm Beach and return to his Park Avenue home, according to a person familiar with his plans. David Tepper, who moved back to New Jersey from Miami last year, is staying in his home state for now, even though he and wife just bought a $73 million Palm Beach mansion.

    Called it.

    “Wall Street A-Listers Fled to Florida. Many Now Eye a Return”

    “The main problem with moving to Florida is that you have to live in Florida,” said Jason Mudrick, who oversees $3 billion at Mudrick Capital Management and has resided in Manhattan for more than two decades.
    “New York has the smartest, most driven people, the best culture, the best restaurants and the best theaters,” he said. “Anyone moving to Florida to save a little money loses out on all of that.”

    https://apple.news/ABrp4A_XrT1a9xvqTa3HUYQ

  33. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Amen, but I’m an arrogant a$$hole for saying it on this blog.

    “The main problem with moving to Florida is you have to live in Florida.”

  34. chicagofinance says:

    Eddie: Here is what Biden caused at the border wall. So much pressure that it gave under the weight…
    https://twitter.com/RojasManuel/status/1369471087508127745?s=20

  35. chicagofinance says:

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    March 10, 2021 at 12:44 pm
    Amen, but I’m an arrogant a$$hole for saying it on this blog.

    “The main problem with moving to Wayne is you have to live near you.”

  36. BRT says:

    lol, GME, bid 260, ask 380

  37. Libturd says:

    You guys are absolutely clueless. You are just as dirty as the politicians you loathe.

    https://www.cnet.com/news/mail-in-voting-fraud-is-nearly-impossible-to-commit/

    Want to know what’s absolutely true? There are still huge SES barriers in place which make voting difficult for a large amount of the population. This election proved it, though we all knew it all along. These barriers, many intentional and especially in swing states where Republicans have enough ruling power to continue to stifle the vote by making polling places difficult to reach, or have limited hours among other tactics, are disgusting and antithetical to our republic. By removing these grossly racist barriers an honest count finally took place. So much so that a diapered and somewhat senile old man, with a history of being racist and creepy/touchy, somehow beat your Mr. Pillow backed closet klansman.

    This is not about fraud at all. The only fraud that exists is the one where a nation continues to intentionally make it difficult to be counted in an election. There was no REAL evidence of fraud in this election. I can provide endless evidence of Republican tactics to make it difficult or nearly impossible for minorities to vote.

    Want some real advice? Take your bumps. Stop lying like a bunch of sissy ass sore losers. And instead of claiming that mail in ballots are unfair. Use your energy to figure out how to increase your voter support among minorities rather than stifle it. This should go without mention, but the number of black and hispanic faces at that Trump Rally on the 6th was next to zero. Really, this is my last post on the matter. I believe in making everyone’s votes count. The Republicans believe in suppressing the vote. Yes, both parties suck and are corrupt. But this election was fair and to say otherwise is complete fabrication. And believe it or not. People could always request an absentee ballot. Der fuhrer did in the last two major elections before this one. Fraud. Come on now.

  38. Bear says:

    How long do these auctions take to complete?

    chicagofinance says:
    March 10, 2021 at 11:35 am
    OK folks….. let’s see what happens…

  39. Libturd says:

    In Georgia, the Republicans are trying to pass a bill that makes you provide an excuse to get an absentee ballot as is the racist policy in many other red states. They also want to require licenses or other difficult to obtain IDs to vote in person. See, this is proof of voter suppression. Where is your fraud? And might I remind you, going to the polls in person would have been a super spreader event. Go tell it otherwise to that long haul trucker. I certainly wasn’t voting in person, but I probably would have been too lazy to request an absentee ballot.

  40. Trick says:

    Had my second Pfizer shot yesterday, felt fine until 20 minutes ago. Neck and back pain just started coming, hope that’s it.

  41. Libturd says:

    Chi,

    Could you imagine if the other central banks didn’t follow our lead? Who would buy our treasuries if these banks weren’t already offering negative interest and free loans?

  42. JCer says:

    Libturd, that article is not factual, it’s opinion. Voter fraud utilizing paper ballots is not impossible, in fact it is quite easy to achieve, there was nothing preventing the insertion of ballots of those who did not vote. Lets call universal mail in ballots what they are, it is a tool for vote harvesting hence my earlier comments about “ground game”. Any organization could literally go door to door offering money for votes….

    It is not about the difficulty of voting lib, it is about caring enough to wait in line to vote. The only thing you don’t have evidence of is actual attempts to suppress minority voters, it’s not voter suppression to require an id, or to maintain an up to date voter registration, etc. Stop making excuses it is not the Jim Crow south if you are not a responsible adult you will not be able to vote or will have to vote using a provisional ballot.

    The election is just that, it should happen on 1 day, be in person unless you have a reason to request an absentee ballot which could be anything from health reasons to be away, to having to work and that is all fine. It’s this other arrangement where we are counting ballots 10 days after the election, permitting ballots received days later, stopping the count, etc these are all things that happen in Banana Republics not first world republics.

    This does not mean I think this actually happened in this election or support the Orange Fuhrer. It just means they have a valid point, universal mail in ballots could be manipulated. Fraud happens look at some smaller local races like what happened in Patterson.

  43. Fast Eddie says:

    The only fraud that exists is the one where a nation continues to intentionally make it difficult to be counted in an election.

    I laughed out loud and stopped reading any further after that statement above. I moved on the moment it was decided. But you’re not going to convince me that this election wasn’t fraudulent. Going forward, if you want your vote to count, register accordingly and vote electronically with an approved pin or authorization, not with counterfeit ballots being altered behind sealed compartments where no one knows what’s going on. I’ll repeat it again: the election passed, the demented guy was sworn in and his lackeys are chewing away like locusts on foliage. The only thing to do know is to obstruct the traitorous, America-hating left and to mitigate the damage.

  44. Libturd says:

    “it’s not voter suppression to require an id”

    Yeah. Even we live in a state where it requires a trip to a DMV to get a standard ID. Not even a Driver’s License. You must go in person. I knew a ton of people in college whose only ID was their high school card and their college ID. No license, no state issued ID, etc. Make believe that voter suppression isn’t, just like you make believe that fraud exists where it doesn’t. This last election spoke so loudly to the existence of voter suppression that Republicans all across swing states are doing everything in their power to put up more boundaries. Believe what you want. Personally, I think you are all full of shit on this one. I will be the first to admit that absentee ballots play in to the hands of increasing the number of Dem voters. I already explained why. What your team won’t do is admit that your efforts to make elections more fraud resistant are a non-veiled attempt to suppress the minority vote. Sorry, but I support counting as many votes as is possible. Until there is widespread fraud proven, then you are lying to yourselves. Chain of custody my ass. It’s harder to fcuk with a mail in ballot then it is to forge a signature of someone you know who doesn’t vote. Learn a little bit about how it works. The lies attempted to be passed in the Red press and here were all laughable, and to be honest, I know why so many monichers suddenly appeared around election time. I too would be embarrassed to attach that garbage to my name.

  45. SmallGovConservative says:

    Libturd says:
    March 10, 2021 at 1:06 pm

    “There was no REAL evidence of fraud in this election…”

    More nonsense — see below. Regardless, a reasonable person doesn’t need example after example of actual fraud to know that the election itself lacks integrity when there is no way to know anything about how any given ballot is filled out. Just admit, you — Dems in general — don’t want elections that have high degrees of integrity because the less integrity, the better the chances for Dems. In a first-world, advanced democracy it shouldn’t be too much to ask citizens to verify their identity in order to vote — it’s asking no more than they’re already asked to do in order to fly on a plane, obtain a driver’s license, or buy a bottle of booze.

    https://www.reviewjournal.com/opinion/opinion-columns/victor-joecks/victor-joecks-nevada-group-offered-gift-cards-for-voting-and-a-state-agency-promoted-it-2187045/

  46. Libturd says:

    Anonymous puzzy? Answer me this? Why is it more likely that a Dem would cheat than a Republican?

    Just shut the fcuk up already! You are embarrassing your unidentified self. Chances are, you owe me a bottle of booze too.

    I’m done arguing with people who are ignorantly blinded by their bias. Post what you want. You will simply embarrass yourself further.

  47. Libturd says:

    “In a first-world, advanced democracy it shouldn’t be too much to ask citizens to verify their identity in order to vote — it’s asking no more than they’re already asked to do in order to fly on a plane, obtain a driver’s license, or buy a bottle of booze.”

    Racist much?

  48. JCer says:

    Exactly SmallGov, you can’t get on a plane, enter many government buildings, buy booze or cigarettes, open a bank account etc. without one but by all means you should be able to vote. And yes to verify ones identity you will have to go to a government office, if you want to be entrusted to select our representatives you should be willing to make the effort to get an ID.

    The view that is to suppress the minority vote is ludicrous regardless of race we all have to go get an ID, what does race have to do with getting an ID, if anything the insinuation that minorities would have difficulty getting an id card is an inherently racist statement.

    I think we need to get off this topic as we all seem to be parroting talking points and no ones mind is being changed.

  49. Libturd says:

    I don’t parrot any talking points. I hate both sides nearly equally. And I even admit when I’m wrong. I can’t stand the Biden/Pelosi crew. But if you honestly think the Republicans are passing these bills to avoid voter fraud? Then you are some kind of mentally ill. Those same guys who didn’t have drivers licenses have never been on a plane either, nor do they check IDs where they’ve been buying booze since elementary school. Like I said before. You are embarrassing yourself. 13% of Americans have never flown and 20% of blacks don’t even have bank accounts. I’m not a big fan of the privilege excuse, but you are making a hell of an argument for it.

  50. Libturd says:

    And remember, it’s nothing personal. Never is with me. I’m just honest.

  51. Libturd says:

    Want a chain of custody? Send a mail in ballot out to every god-damned person in the US, that you just sent a check to. But making it easy for people to vote is not a Republican tenet apparently.

    I’m really done with this.

    Oh wait, no I’m not. You can’t vote early, you can’t give someone a bottle of water while waiting in a line (which you intentionally made as long as possible by reducing voting times and making it more difficult to vote by mail), yet this is about voter fraud?

    I swear you guys are being mentally ill. I’d still have you over for dinner. But only if you first show me ID.

  52. Libturd says:

    In other political news. The asshole who ended up making Mitch eat his words once again, and who was also mentally ill and ruling that PAC donations could be made anonymously by individuals since it won’t lead to nefarius results, was just confirmed as Attorney General in our supposed FIRST WORLD country. We are as corrupt as a pre Castro Cuba.

  53. 3b says:

    Lib: They all suck in the end who cares? I used to passionless, no I could give a toss. I think people should just stay home on Election Day.

  54. Fast Eddie says:

    But making it easy for people to vote is not a Republican tenet apparently.

    You can vote right from your couch, in the n.ude and half-stewed simply by logging in or tapping on the voter app and entering the proper pin. A fraud-free experience!

    And I’ll gladly show you my ID at dinner even though you already know how good-looking I am. ;)

  55. BidenIsTheGOAT says:

    The left is using the race card to argue for the elimination of standards everywhere. It’s the road to soci@lism. It’s pathetic. It’s dishonest. It will destroy the country if we let them.

  56. 3b says:

    BidenGoat: We are going So@ialist in my opinion; it has been building for years. Blame the Boomers, they bear most of the responsibility for this.

  57. JCer says:

    Being poor is no excuse for not being a functioning adult. Lib the fact that 20% of any population doesn’t have a bank account is just incredibly sad, there are plenty of banks offering(still!) free checking accounts with little or no minimum balance mostly the online kind but still hybrid options like capitalone360 exist. A quick google search for free checking accounts comes back immediately with options, public libraries offer computers, printing services at low cost, scanning, many organizations offer financial education for the under served poor. There are resources available for the poor, why do people not take advantage of what is available?

    The same would apply for ID’s if required to vote, there would be plenty of organizations mobilized to help get people who wanted to vote get registered and get id’s. Who said anything about voting being easy, it just needs to be equitable.

    The race arguments are the most racist sh*t you can possibly pull. People need to be personally accountable, those who don’t have an ID haven’t gotten one because they haven’t had a reason, if they wanted to vote and needed an ID they’d be able to get it.

  58. Libturd says:

    I’d be okay with the soc1alism of certain aspects of our lives, but not with the corrupt POS government we have today doling it out.

  59. Libturd says:

    JCer,

    It is sad and quite pathetic.

    There was once this real go getter of an employee who used to work in our in house repro department. He wanted to learn everything and was super book smart, but he was really at the bottom of the totem pole both occupationally and of course, salary wise. He was pretty good with the MS Office suite, so I offered him a junior position on my time. He ended up obsessed with liberal politics to the point where it cost him his job, but not before I was able to teach him to avoid every single scam that separates fools from their money.

    Well the reason I’m sharing this story is because there is just no helping certain people. A few times, I noticed that he would cash his check at the Check Cashing front located across the street from work. He also paid his electric bill there, which I thought was odd. I asked him why he didn’t have a bank account because the check cashing place would take like 2.5% of his check every two weeks. By the end of the year, it amounted to over a grand. I said you would save this with a savings account. He said, he didn’t trust banks with their fees and rules. I told him I would help him and found him a free checking account and told him he must not use the debit card and turn off overdraft protection, to which he did. About two months later, he starts screaming at me over about $5o in fees he was charged for overdrawing the account. I ask to see his statement and he admits he turned on overdraft protection and overdrew with a debit card purchase. I showed him how that $50 fee was about what he was paying every two weeks to the check cashing place anyway but that he ignored my advice. I immediately went with him to the bank to close the account and got the fees reversed, but I learned a valuable lesson. Book smarts often don’t convert into common sense, of which he had the least I’d ever seen in a human. He was also suckered into all kind of rent-to-own crap in his apartment and he used all of his sick days to attend political rallies that he would come into work sick when he really needed the day off. Of course, I sent him home without pay. I ended up letting him go for insubordination (he had forgotten to remove his offensive political pin for the third time in a week). Then the moron finds some sweet NYU student to represent him at his unemployment hearing who had about as much common sense as he did. The mediator told her to leave and not come back until she had a law degree. The mediator finally asks me if I felt he might have actually just forgotten to remove the pin and I said, absolutely he did, for the third time in the same week. She then asked if she thought that was fair. To which I answered, if I knew my really good job was on the line for continuing to wear an offensive political button from my shirt, I sure as hell would have thrown that button in the trash by now. Wouldn’t you have done the same? The mediator agreed, but gave him unemployment coverage anyway to which I really wasn’t bothered since the dude obviously needed the help.

    I heard from a coworker who kept up with him that he absolutely despised me. This is what I get for all of my generosity.

    Perhaps you are right. People like this shouldn’t be allowed to vote. :P

  60. NoName says:

    First!

  61. Juice Box says:

    Lib – you do know broke people don’t have bank accounts because of judgements against them. The sheriff will take it if they can find it.

  62. 30 year realtor says:

    There are undoubtedly cases of voter fraud. Was there voter fraud on the scale that it would have changed the outcome of any state’s presidential election result? Four months gone and a microscope focus on election fraud, yet nothing capable of changing the outcome of the presidential election has been uncovered. Time to move on from this lie! Trump began planting the seeds of distrust in election results during the GOP primary in 2016. The seeds have taken root by the power of suggestion and now a frighteningly large number of people believe the lie.

  63. Libturd says:

    Reminds me a bit of the antivaxers.

  64. Libturd says:

    Juice,

    Sure. I don’t blame them. The Republicans took their free condoms and abortion clinics away. Now they have to pay child support.

  65. ExEssex says:

    Dow seems to like Biden.

  66. Libturd says:

    He’s always been all about big business. He’s about as green as Trump’s hair. The only people who claim him progressive are the right.

  67. 3b says:

    Lib: I don’t disagree. We have Soci@lism for big business. The current system is broke. Ironically, some of the biggest screamers against soci@lism are proud Union supporters!!

  68. chicagofinance says:

    Da’ government better keep their stinking hands off my Medicare.

  69. Hold my beer says:

    Is social media making people crazier, or does it allow crazies to join up and get more attention?

  70. Fabius Maximus says:

    https://twitter.com/AriBerman/status/1369690042713640961

    Florida Senate elections committee just voted to ban all mail ballot drop boxes, which 1.5 million voters used in 2020. 66 of 67 county election supervisors opposed bill

    All across country Republicans weaponizing Trump’s lies to make it harder to vote, even in states they won

  71. leftwing says:

    Said as someone who likes and respects you Lib….@2:11p, you’re sounding a little unhinged. Maybe enforce your self ban on the topic or put in some aspect of a “24 hour rule”.

  72. leftwing says:

    NJR2013….I’m willing to toss my experience into the ring for points applicable that may help you…any question though, even as simple as which law firm, will be better answered if you’re willing to share more….

    First and foremost…is this going to be a friendly or contentious divorce. Even if the parties think and intend it to be friendly, it can quickly go contentious based on:

    Is there a primary earner, is it you, or do both parties earn about the same?

    Are there children and is one parent the logical primary caregiver (eg, one works NYC, one works five minutes away).

    Are there significant assets, are there significant liquid assets, and are there any hard to value illiquid assets (eg, small business).

    Are you and your spouse W2 earners with relatively steady and predictable pay over the past few years or is there variability (positive or negative) around either party’s compensation like large discretionary bonuses, recent job change, business income, etc.

    Once you determine in reality – not hope or stated intent – whether the divorce is more likely to go friendly/hostile the specifics will fall out quickly enough.

    Interesting tangential point on your question, once you have the lay of the land I find it is much more relevant who your spouse hires as counsel. That can tell you volumes.

  73. Hold my beer says:

    https://nypost.com/2021/03/10/gov-cuomo-allegedly-reached-under-aides-blouse-and-groped-her-report/

    What are the odds he does a perp walk, or resigns or gets impeached?

    I despise him and his brother.

  74. Bear says:

    Before gifting money to one of my children, should I talk to an accountant, attorney or both? Any recommendations?
    Thanks!

  75. Juice Box says:

    Surgeanatomy of GME

    “Drive the options (call options), drive the share volume. Drive the volume, drive the price.”

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/georgecalhoun/2021/03/10/gamestop-the-second-surgeanatomy-of-a-gamma-swarm/?sh=1e5501142255

  76. BRT says:

    Is social media making people crazier, or does it allow crazies to join up and get more attention?

    Yes

  77. Fast Eddie says:

    All across country Republicans weaponizing Trump’s lies to make it harder to vote, even in states they won.

    Let’s weed out the lazy and stup1d and demand that you register and secure the means to vote legally, fairly and electronically. If you can’t master this task, you shouldn’t be voting anyway. We’ll make it easy on you; register to vote, obtain your voter ID and all you need to do is show up at your district polling station and pull the lever. It’s free! If you can’t download the voter app and/or can’t afford a cell phone or laptop, all you need to do is show up at the site. But we all know why the democrats don’t want this…. we know the gap between the ivory tower charlatan liberals and the low-informed masses is as vast as the South Indian Ocean. Human shields are valuable to the democrats and is vital to keep them in power.

  78. Bear says:

    Social media shortens time for an idea to materialize often without the right questions being asked.

    Often counter/sane views are ignored by ‘down votes’

  79. No One says:

    Remember when the Dems said “all women must be believed”?
    Remember when the cool “journalists” were declaring themselves “cuomosexual” after falling in love with his endless TV lectures?
    Even guys were singing love songs
    https://youtu.be/2Kydr2a7Uy4

  80. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Housing is going back to its roots that was the norm for most of history…the rich will own most of it. If you own land, “you are in the wealthy class” might become the norm again or is it already here? Any desirable real estate is already out of touch for most of the population. Try buying a nice property in miami, Denver, la, sf, Dallas, nyc, Boston…you get the point.

    “It isn’t easy to find housing markets where prices have fallen since the pandemic. In fact, many are experiencing some of the fastest house-price growth in a decade or more. The latest indication of how things are going came on Thursday from the Real Estate Institute of New Zealand: Prices were up a cool 21.5% year over year in February.”

  81. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Link to the quote from the previous post.

    https://apple.news/Aw1vBLabQRfa-IwkIXdNzHg

  82. The Great Pumpkin says:

    I mean, what do you expect when capital is beating the sh!t out of labor? These people have so much money at the top, they have no choice but to buy up real estate to store their wealth.

  83. Bear says:

    We were in Durham area last week visiting friends. Townhomes that sold for 270k last march are 370k. The one builder we saw was capping 5 home sales a month. I was told price usually jumped 10k month over month

    This is going to end well.

  84. The Great Pumpkin says:

    That’s why I’m always amazed at people that have 100 million and still want more. Wtf do you do with the money? How many cars or houses can you buy? How many vacations can you go on before you get bored of it and miss home.

  85. Libturd says:

    Left, I’m good. Just can’t stand the hypocrisy. I’m not unhinged whatsoever. I stand by my statement until proven otherwise. Republicans are intentionally suppressing the vote (and the will of the country) under the cover of fraud reduction.

    Doesn’t matter much anyhow. If I’m correct, and I know that I am on this one, the legacy of Trump and his inability to fade into the past will ensure the Dems get out the vote at least until he either dies or goes senile. I’m not sure which I prefer over the other.

    Gator told me that Trump had a press conference yesterday to remind everyone that he essentially cured Covid and to not forget it. Of course, continuing his endless streak of bullshit, Pfizer and Astrazeneca were not part of his program.

    As long as the Republican Party continues to embrace the populism of Trump, they will suffer the same fate the Democrats did endlessly parading Hilary Clinton as the savior to the country and especially to her gender.

    What I can’t figure out is what is worse? Hilary losing to Trump or Trump losing to bumbling Biden? It’s pretty close.

  86. NJ resident 20130310 says:

    Leftwing @6:34 am,

    I appreciate your reply and offer. I’m happy to share details privately.

    GRIM… kindly release my email address to LW… thank you.

  87. leftwing says:

    “The latest indication of how things are going came on Thursday from the Real Estate Institute of New Zealand: Prices were up a cool 21.5% year over year in February.”

    Indicative of something, but not what you were thinking…..

    NZ is the refuge for the wealthy….personal, professional, or global disaster, NZ real estate (and passport) is a must have item in the go-bag of the wealthy.

    Extremely favorable (to the person, not government) extradition laws.

  88. Fast Eddie says:

    Halfway into his first 100 days, President Joe Biden has yet to hold a formal, solo news conference, raising questions about accountability with the White House under increasing pressure to explain why.

    Even as the nation deals with multiple crises — a deadly pandemic and the devastating economic fallout — Biden has gone longer without facing extended questions from reporters than any of his 15 predecessors over the past 100 years.

    https://www.yahoo.com/gma/biden-not-yet-holding-formal-100150308.html

  89. 30 year realtor says:

    I will give all you folks who want to make voting more difficult the benefit of the doubt that your intentions are noble. It appears clear that some people who voted in 2020 would be excluded by the changes you propose. It also appears that the vast percentage of those people would be poor and minority voters. Now that you are aware of the impact of the policy you advocate, do you still believe your policy position is appropriate in a democracy? If you believe it to be appropriate, is it your intent to exclude these voters? If so, why?

  90. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Genius. Hilarious. Lefty and Phoenix should enjoy.

    https://youtu.be/R_USJCTIgs4

  91. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Interesting.

    leftwing says:
    March 11, 2021 at 9:25 am
    “The latest indication of how things are going came on Thursday from the Real Estate Institute of New Zealand: Prices were up a cool 21.5% year over year in February.”

    Indicative of something, but not what you were thinking…..

    NZ is the refuge for the wealthy….personal, professional, or global disaster, NZ real estate (and passport) is a must have item in the go-bag of the wealthy.

    Extremely favorable (to the person, not government) extradition laws.

  92. chicagofinance says:

    Pumps: please tell me you listened to me…….

    chicagofinance says:
    March 8, 2021 at 4:22 pm
    Are you schizophrenic? WTF is this pair of posts?

    Bottom line…. I don’t care about the quality of your work, at least be consistent. If you have a discipline, stick to it. Don’t be all over the place. You have no idea whether this is the end of it, or we go down 20% more. So stick with your discipline.

  93. Libturd says:

    I swear it’s all going to collapse after the “pant” up demand subsides.

    And remember dummies. Every TTM economic number being released for the next three months and again in the coming Fall, is compared with the end of days lockdown periods of Covid. So when you see record breaking growth numbers across the board, you are comparing today with greatest outlier period of our lifetimes. Where it settles once the Covid cash is stopped, the FED lifeline is disconnected and landlords can be allowed to evict tenants is what to measure the economy against.

  94. BRT says:

    30 year, we should have voter IDs. My suggestion would be, have each kid register to vote as a senior in high school and issue them their voter ID.

  95. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Yup, and thanks for the good advice.

    chicagofinance says:
    March 11, 2021 at 9:37 am
    Pumps: please tell me you listened to me…….

  96. Libturd says:

    BRT,

    Same SES barrier remains. Let people vote with their SSN. There, done.

  97. Fast Eddie says:

    The O’Biden/Pelosi/Schumer relief package. You know, the one for the people:

    $500 million for museums & Native American language preservation
    $50 million for “family planning” orgs like Planned Parenthood
    $1.5 billion for Amtrak, which still has $1 billion in unspent aid
    $1.5 million for a bridge connecting Canada to New York
    More than $100 million for an underground rail project in Silicon Valley
    $50 million for environmental justice grants
    Foreign Affairs, (no legislation reported yet). Estimated cost: $10 billion
    Science, Space, & Technology (no legislation reported yet). Estimated cost: $1 billion
    Natural Resources (no legislation reported yet). Estimated cost: $1 billion

  98. BidenIsTheGOAT says:

    When is Joe Biden going to collapse? My gut tells me any day. Dudes appearance is disturbing.

    At least then we can drop the pretense of having a moderate government. The radical left us calling The shots.

  99. Libturd says:

    The radical left?

    That’s rich. What do you call the group of q-amorons who stormed the Capital?

  100. JCer says:

    BRT, that’s an acceptable solution to me. I’d advocate not changing process in a major election year, give people time to get in compliance. It shouldn’t be too difficult, issue an ID, we could even go bio-metric(a thumbprint) rather than physical and you have to maintain a current address with your registration. Eddie is right technology easily solves this, even the machines and counts could be made more tamper resistant.

  101. BidenIsTheGOAT says:

    Those who were MAGA people, I call them reactionary fools. A trap was set for them and they walked into it. They got played.

  102. SmallGovConservative says:

    Libturd says:
    March 11, 2021 at 10:29 am

    “The radical left?” — A.k.a. the modern Democrat party. You know, people like Bernie Sanders, Rashida Tlaib, AOC, Liz Warren, Corey Booker.

    “That’s rich. What do you call the group of q-amorons who stormed the Capital?” — Tax payers who were fed up with 4 years of Democrat-supported resistance and rioting, and with the results of a sham election?

  103. Bystander says:

    3b,

    Just remember what the Fed is – a bunch of criminal bankers who won’t stop a damn thing until it explodes. Their goal is to make sure the wealthy stuff themselves with cash so that a few bucks fall off into poor and middle class pockets.

    Thursday, October 27, 2005
    Ben S. Bernanke does not think the national housing boom is a bubble that is about to burst, he indicated to Congress last week, just a few days before President Bush nominated him to become the next chairman of the Federal Reserve.

    U.S. house prices have risen by nearly 25 percent over the past two years, noted Bernanke, currently chairman of the president’s Council of Economic Advisers, in testimony to Congress’s Joint Economic Committee. But these increases, he said, “largely reflect strong economic fundamentals,” such as strong growth in jobs, incomes and the number of new households.

  104. ExEssex says:

    10:51 those aren’t tax payers they are money suckers.
    They suck $$$$ from blue states. There are no high earners in that crowd.

  105. Fabius Maximus says:

    “weed out the lazy and stup1d ”

    Dont recall seeing that in the language for equal protections? The Voter ID requirements will always fail in court. Unless you make the ID free, it will always be struck down as a Poll Tax.

    The DQP (Donnies Q Party) know this so it will always be a blunt sabre to rattle for the masses.

  106. Hold my beer says:

    60 million for a digital art collection of 5,000 pieces

    https://www.theblockcrypto.com/linked/98047/christies-beeple-auction-ends-digital-art

    Maybe it is time to look at new releases of limited edition blockchain trading cards.

  107. Libturd says:

    SGC,

    Okay Coleman Rogers. It’s too easy to spout bullshit anonymously.

  108. Fabius Maximus says:

    Halfway into his first 100 days, he is still about 50% approval rating. Donnie never cracked 50% in his whole presidency.

    Halfway into his first 100 days, he’s about to cross the 100million dose mark.

    Halfway into his first 100 days, he hasn’t spent a day or a Tax Dollar playing Golf. On this day in Donnies presidency, it was his 10th trip to one of his properties. Trump National DC.

  109. Fast Eddie says:

    Unless you make the ID free…

    Why certainly! Show proof of eligibility and you get a voter ID! For free!! Can’t afford a laptop or cell phone? Show up at the polling place. Can’t afford to get to the polling place? Then how do you get to your job? Unless you work from home which means you have a laptop and remote connection. What’s that? You don’t have a job? Then why the urge to vote? You can’t afford a cell or laptop, you have no job, you can’t get to a polling place to pull a lever… in other words, you’re either lazy, stup1d or both.

  110. BidenIsTheGOAT says:

    He’s hiding in the basement the same way he did the whole campaign. He’s not well enough to play golf. His face looks like seran wrap he pumped so full of blood thinners.

  111. 3b says:

    Bystander: The Fed is accountable to no one. They are destroying the country. We have people cheering that we appear to be going backwards rather than forwards. Bring back serfdom!! And the longer this madness continues the more appealing Soci@lism becomes for the young people. Blame the boomers, blame the Fed, screw the young people.

  112. D-FENS says:

    I get that you don’t like him, but he absolutely deserves credit for operation warp speed.

    Libturd says:
    March 11, 2021 at 9:08 am
    Left, I’m good. Just can’t stand the hypocrisy. I’m not unhinged whatsoever. I stand by my statement until proven otherwise. Republicans are intentionally suppressing the vote (and the will of the country) under the cover of fraud reduction.

    Doesn’t matter much anyhow. If I’m correct, and I know that I am on this one, the legacy of Trump and his inability to fade into the past will ensure the Dems get out the vote at least until he either dies or goes senile. I’m not sure which I prefer over the other.

    Gator told me that Trump had a press conference yesterday to remind everyone that he essentially cured Covid and to not forget it. Of course, continuing his endless streak of bullshit, Pfizer and Astrazeneca were not part of his program.

    As long as the Republican Party continues to embrace the populism of Trump, they will suffer the same fate the Democrats did endlessly parading Hilary Clinton as the savior to the country and especially to her gender.

    What I can’t figure out is what is worse? Hilary losing to Trump or Trump losing to bumbling Biden? It’s pretty close.

  113. D-FENS says:

    Anytime a Republican modifies voting laws, they do it so they can win. Anytime a Democrat modifies voting laws, it’s so they can win.

    Let’s not be fooled, they don’t do it to make the vote more “secure” or to “expand voting rights”. They do it for themselves.

  114. 3b says:

    I see Democrats here are defending Biden not having a press conference, as has been the tradition for the last hundred years. And reference Trump. Trump is gone, this is now. It’s a legitimate question based on past precedent why Biden has chosen not to have a press conference, and feeds into the narrative that his mental capacities are declining. I would think an honest Democrat would acknowledge that, and stop referencing Trump. It’s the same with The NY Times in an opinion piece over the weekend, that painfully acknowledges Cuomo s alleged sexual harassment, but then references Trump. The article then goes on to defend Cuomo s alleged bullying of those who work for him, but then goes on to defend that behavior, that because New York is a tough place to run, bullying can sort of be understood. So, could one then not argue that running the whole USA is a tough job, and thus Trumps bullying can sort of be understood , merit the same consideration? The hypocrisy of the Democrats just astounds me, more so as they claim to be the good guys.

  115. Juice Box says:

    32 million people are fully vaccinated in the USA. Dose rate is 2.1 million a day. It’s going to be a while before we get anywhere near herd immunity. 462 million shots needed of the two dose vaccines to fully vaccinate enough people to reach that 70% mark of herd immunity, some say it should be higher 85% but let’s stick with the lower percentage for now.

    Point is we have to administer allot more than 2.1 million a day to get there by year end. FEMA is nowhere near 440 community vaccination centers nationwide, and the 20,000 trained people to deliver shots. Biden’s FEMA plan right now has a slim chance of happening even with the extra money passed by Congress, there aren’t enough trained vaccinators willing to go work for FEMA for the rest of the year.

    At this point they should move to send the vaccine to doctors offices, we have figured out how to store even the Pfizer vaccine with regular refrigeration, (-13°F to 5°F) for two weeks in addition to this five-day option to store at standard refrigerator temperature after it’s thawed. We should be able to expand the supply chain using delivery services to get it out quicker, FDA approvals were submitted last month. Biden says it’s a war effort. He should enlist the trained medical professional who have been left out of vaccine administration.

  116. SmallGovConservative says:

    Fabius Maximus says:
    March 11, 2021 at 11:15 am

    “Halfway into his first 100 days, he is still about 50% approval rating. Donnie never cracked 50% in his whole presidency.”

    Don’t forget these as well…

    Halfway into his first 100 days, “Iran and China are taunting the Biden administration, openly flaunting oil sanctions even as Iran raises its enrichment of uranium”, with Chinese imports of Iranian crude increasing to 856,000 barrels per day, up over 100% from last month alone.

    Halfway into his first 100 days, Iranian-backed Houthi rebels have attempted a drone attack on a Saudi oil terminal.

    Halfway into his first 100 days, the number of children and families crossing the border into Texas increased by more than 100% between January and February; likely claiming asylum and disappearing into the woodwork.

    Halfway into his first 100 days, gas prices have surged well beyond pre-COVID levels, with no end in sight.

    Should I go on, or is that enough to make it obvious how quickly things are unraveling under the Slow Joe administration?

  117. 3b says:

    Juice : Why not have Army medics administer the shots as well or trained EMT s?

  118. Libturd says:

    Yes he did something positive. But that something positive is not what really brought about the vaccines so quickly. From what I’ve read, it was more the combined experiences that the pharmaceutical industries have had in dealing with the many pandemics over the last 40 years with the help of WHO, the CDC and the other government organizations that Trump was constantly second questioning and defunding.

    Here is a nice unbiased source as to how we (including the UK) were able to bring about so many vaccines so quickly. Trump taking the credit for it is akin to Obama taking credit for ending the War in Iraq. Both of these happened when they were both in office, but both would have happened regardless.

    Honestly, you really don’t to take credit for ending the pandemic when you encouraged people not to wear masks and held super spreader rallys and huge church gatherings.

    But go ahead and score one for Trump who heralded Mr. Pillow among his science experts when introducing Operation Warp Speed. Now tell me, what did Mr. Pillow do to help find the vaccine?

    What did operation Warp Speed have to do with the Oxford study?

    Read the article below. Nah…not conspiracy laden enough for you.

    https://www.medpagetoday.com/podcasts/trackthevax/90529

  119. Juice Box says:

    3b – Sleepy Pres Joe is speaking tonight at 8pm. Why does the President need to take gotcha questions anyway? I really see no point, every one of those White House reporters want to be a Anchor that is why they take the gig in the first place. The reporters should submit their questions in writing to Jen Psaki and she will go ask Pres Biden and get an answer eventually.

    Just look at the multi million dollar reward this White House reporter got for interrupting Kim Jong Un by asking him a question in English and for four years being basically a nuisance to his colleagues, the president and white house staff every time he could.

    https://www.cnn.com/profiles/jim-acosta-profile

  120. leftwing says:

    Re: Voting

    Been watching, hesitant to engage but here goes, for consideration by everyone.

    The issue I see watching everyone spar seems to be that people ascribe some type of “truth” or immutable law to who should have the vote. Explicitly stating so, or implicitly embedded in their argument.

    There is no such absolute. Voting eligibility in a republic is not governed by some physical law. It is opinion, and changing all the time.

    There are some associated facts. The vote in the US has been…governed by a few dozen words on a couple century old parchment; always restrictive (a privilege) and never universal (a right), and; changed and amended over time to become less restrictive.

    So, before arguing how the vote ought to be currently administered one first needs to define what exact terms should make one eligible to vote. Again, given there is no absolute, in theory or practiced, in this country. It is a viewpoint. Not good. Not bad. Not -ist. And certainly not inherently racist.

    My view? Our government would function the best for the greatest number of people by having the most qualified leaders in office. Getting the most qualified leaders comes from having the most informed, involved, or vested parts of the citizenry elect them, and excluding those people who do not exhibit the above. Further, and this part of my view is more moralistic/ethical, my perspective is that if you do not contribute to and in fact are a net cost long term to an entity you should have no standing in determining the direction of that entity. Hence no vote. Similar to not allowing felons to vote.

    These views would lead to a bandwidth logical conclusions on days of voting, convenience of voting, and other manner of executing an election.

    One could just as easily have an opposing view, that voting in our society should be entirely universal. Literally, everyone. No barriers.

    That view, properly supported, would lead to an entirely different bandwidth of conclusions on how voting ought to be conducted.

    Two views. Each supportable. Each debatable. Neither possessing an absolute truth. Each leading to distinct and opposing outcomes in how an election is run.

    FastEddie, in my prism your solution of digital voting is the most frightening thing I have heard. While arguably solving the narrow question of accuracy and qualification it would move so far toward actual universal suffrage among adults as to include anyone able to fog a mirror. That frightens the daylights out of me.

    You guys are going to continue to talk past each other and throw (wholly unnecessary and despicable) accusations until there is common agreement on the underlying question of with whom should the vote reside? Or at least an agreement that there is disagreement on that most basic principle.

  121. joyce says:

    What’s that? You don’t have a job? Then why the urge to vote?

    Doesn’t sound like the generosity and empathy your father demonstrated made it’s way to you.

  122. Libturd says:

    Not defending Biden. Much like Trump has chosen to change every tradition, to meet his needs, so is Biden. Biden has always been a terrible public speaker. The less he speaks, the better he comes across. He has had plenty of press releases to explain his actions. Unlike Trump who couldn’t get out of the spotlight. Biden (might) prefer to stay out of it. At the end of the day, we will judge both by their accomplishments or lack of. The golfing/vacations/personal grift is for the wonky tabloid lovers to compare their gen1talia size.

    “Let’s not be fooled, they don’t do it to make the vote more “secure” or to “expand voting rights”. They do it for themselves.”

    Finally, an agreement. Though I would still argue, and this is why I appear unhinged, that it is still more important to break down the barriers to voting then it is to erekt more. Fraud impacts both parties equally. Barriers to voting impact minorities which disproportionately impact the Dems. If more Republicans got counted, I would be in support of breaking down those barriers too. In a democracy everyone is supposed to have a voice. Not just those with white skin.

  123. Juice Box says:

    3B – Those trained teams of “medics” from the military generally aren’t physically in the USA. We have them deployed at over 600 bases in 150 countries around the world and who knows how many on ships at sea.

    Here is what our military were able to muster up so far, delivering 6,000 shots a day that will be increased to 12,000 shots a day across the USA.

    https://www.defense.gov/Explore/News/Article/Article/2526831/dod-identifies-more-troops-to-help-administer-covid-19-vaccine/

  124. joyce says:

    Yup

    D-FENS says:
    March 11, 2021 at 11:34 am
    Anytime a Republican modifies voting laws, they do it so they can win. Anytime a Democrat modifies voting laws, it’s so they can win.

    Let’s not be fooled, they don’t do it to make the vote more “secure” or to “expand voting rights”. They do it for themselves.

  125. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Times are changing, that’s for sure. Art is art. Think banksy taught the world that.

    I would never drop money on baseball cards, comic books, or art, but there are many that would.

    Hold my beer says:
    March 11, 2021 at 11:09 am
    60 million for a digital art collection of 5,000 pieces

    https://www.theblockcrypto.com/linked/98047/christies-beeple-auction-ends-digital-art

    Maybe it is time to look at new releases of limited edition blockchain trading cards.

  126. The Great Pumpkin says:

    You know comic books are coming to the NFT market….inevitable.

  127. Libturd says:

    Leftwing,

    Excellent post. In short, who deserves to vote? Personally, I say everyone. I know it can lead to some poor outcomes, but I’d be willing to live with the results as poor as they might be. For, at least they would be fair.

    It’s far easier to say only the educated or only the non-immigrant or only the male members should get a say when you are all three.

    Juice,

    You make an excellent point about needing to answer immediate questions.

    This parallels the difference between how the Montclair BOE and the Glen Ridge BOE as well as their town councils handle the Q & A portion of their respective meetings.

    In Montclair, the council and BOE answer nearly every question on the spot. Often leading to misinformation and opinion. In Glen Ridge, they answer no questions except for perhaps the easiest ones where the answers are fact. They will get back to you with an answer, though usually in about a week’s time via email or at the next meeting if the person who asked the question brings it up again so it can be brought to the public’s attention.

    I definitely like the way we do it here in GR better. It makes it less likely for the lanterns and pitchforks to come out and the answers tend to be much more concise and correct.

    I invite you all to youtube a Montclair BOE meeting. You will quickly understand how the town has had more supers than the Mets or Jets have had managers/head coaches. Same with principal turnover.

  128. joyce says:

    Maybe a poor jobless young adult would like the ability to vote for a congress and president that would enact policy to bring jobs back from overseas so they have more opportunities for work.

  129. Juice Box says:

    Lib – Should be a national holiday once a year all federal, state and local elections. I am all for turnout of everyone that is a citizen to vote and BTW many western democracies also implement voter ID requirements.

    Anecdotal, my mother cast her first vote in the USA in 1960. Liberal New York had a test you had to take a literacy test or show a high school diploma. The literacy requirement kept ‘Undesirables’ from voting and the law was clear and passed all legal challenges. If you wanted to vote, you had to be able to read and write English. So my mother and her young Irish immigrant friends all took the subway to the test center and took the literacy test to get the certificate to present at the NYC precinct to vote for JFK in 1960.

    Allot of that went away with the voting rights act in 1965, and later in 1971 when they let the Boomer generation vote by lowing the age from 21 to 18.

    Voting can be made secure and available to everyone. There is no will to do it however, both sides want an advantage on election day, and will continue to legislate that way.

  130. Fabius Maximus says:

    Show up at the polling place. The GOP keep trying to shut them down. They love to see an 8hr line to vote. The misdemeanor for handing out water to people waiting what a bonus for them. Texas had the one drop box per county. Smallest county has 165 people. The largest county has over 4 million. GOP needs voter suppression, the losses will be worse if they dont.

    Lots of people, walk to work or cycle. Lots of people dont vote because they are working and would need day off to stand in that 8 hour line. Lots of people paid cash in hand or against a 1099. Even ADP perfected the Paycheck debit card. The employer hands them a card and the paycheck gets lodged against it.

    If the Social Security card was proposed, GOP would complain that there are too many lost stolen or forged cards.

  131. SmallGovConservative says:

    Libturd says:
    March 11, 2021 at 12:15 pm

    “In short, who deserves to vote? Personally, I say everyone…”

    Good intentions I’m sure, and perhaps reasonable in theory. But the radical move to the left by the Dem party makes it impossible to agree with this. They already want 16 year-olds and non-citizens to vote — when that doesn’t produce the results they’re looking for they’ll look to extend the vote to even more “everyones”.

    https://thehill.com/homenews/house/434115-pelosi-says-she-backs-lowering-voting-age-to-16

    https://ballotpedia.org/Laws_permitting_noncitizens_to_vote_in_the_United_States

  132. joyce says:

    Libturd,
    I do not agree with Leftwing’s suggestion of limiting eligible voters (except some age cutoff and those currently in prison). However, the statement “at least they would be fair” is just an assumption and one that depends on the definition of fair. Also, I haven’t heard anyone here or elsewhere suggest limiting voting rights of legal immigrants who have obtained citizenship.

    I say all adults (age 16? 18? 21?) eligible to vote. Make registration easier, same-day, etc (does anyone know what controls are in place to prevent registering in multiple jurisdictions?). Expand the day of in person voting to a week, including weekend, and one of the mid-week days is a national holiday. Require ID, no cost to the recipients. Allow for absentee mail-in ballots for certain reasons. I’d like to know more about the review of mail-in ballots to see if a witness signature if warranted (a notary is too much, not needed). I hesitate to go all online or electronic. If that expands, both the voter and the government need paper receipts/backup for auditing purposes.

  133. Fabius Maximus says:

    Small,

    We are back in the Paris accord and we are finally starting to see Sanctions against Russia.

    We can keep going with the tit for tat. Nothings going to change.

  134. Boomer Remover says:

    I went to the COVI19 megasite in Sewell, NJ (Rowan University/College campus). My name was up and they said as long as you got a QR code come on down, and so I did.

    Military/National Guard personnel on the perimeter and campus, but the parking lot had only a handful of cars. I snaked my way around campus with my QR card in hand, when I finally got to the kill floor, err sorry, the vaccination room, there were only TEN FKING TABLES set up! Ten. 10. Ten. A megasite with TEN TABLES setup. TEN! The national guard guys were playing games on their mobiles, tons of cops clocking in overtime. Ten tables! With appointments books every fifteen minutes, that’s what? 40 to 80 people every hour, if they got them out faster.

    Also, whoever decided to make this all digital or mostly digital, really screwed the seniors. There are 75+ year old begging for the vaccine on the NJ VAC FB page, while younger people are writing scripts, auto filling fields and pounding the refresh button.

    My 90+ year old home bound relatives in other countries received shots via traveling doctors. Not that as my name suggests I necessarily want these folks to cling to life and siphon resources, but the online nature of this whole thing is really short changing those on the other side of the digital divide.

  135. Libturd says:

    Just curious?

    Why shouldn’t prisoners be able to vote? I understand non-citizens, but prisoners are citizens and they are already paying the price for their crime (supposedly)? I hardly doubt it’s a deterrent.

  136. Juice Box says:

    Lib – because they are all Democrats? I kid of course, actually HR 1 had an amendment to allow prisoners and convicted felons the right to vote in all states. It failed in a 97-328 vote on March 2nd. Not a single Republican voted for the measure, and it also failed among many many Democrats.

    The “Overton Window” has not shifted that far left yet.

  137. chicagofinance says:

    Stu: come one…. the narrative last year was that Trump was influencing the FDA & CDC in a vain attempt to end the crisis and control information. It was an open indictment that Trump was reckless and was going to have a vaccine rushed and endanger the public. All of a sudden everything magically changed in that first week of November…… or maybe it didn’t.

    Why wouldn’t Biden have high approval ratings? There has been no crisis or major acute event to address, he is handing money to everyone, and people are getting vaccines. Let’s withhold judgement until there is something to judge.

    Remember, W basically sleep walked through his first 7 months, even taking most of August 2001 off in Texas. He was a light weight, but there was no real challenge either.

    Libturd says:
    March 11, 2021 at 11:52 am
    Yes he did something positive. But that something positive is not what really brought about the vaccines so quickly. From what I’ve read, it was more the combined experiences that the pharmaceutical industries have had in dealing with the many pandemics over the last 40 years with the help of WHO, the CDC and the other government organizations that Trump was constantly second questioning and defunding.

  138. joyce says:

    Convicted felons, those release from prison whether or not they are on parole, should be eligible to vote in my opinion. I believe the freedoms we curtail as a condition of being incarcerated should include voting. That said, there’s way too many victimless crimes on the books that need to be removed.

  139. Bystander says:

    Say it again “one term loser”. Did not even need a Perot to get rid of him. So funny that you think it is about election fairness. It is Orange butthurt still so why even argue with them. Gerrymandering not even mentioned nor that conservative ND/SD get 4 senators yet represent about zero percent of US population. Popular vote or nothing but we know Rs will do everything to undermine it. Wonder why? Perhaps platform of bigotry and false Christian values does not sell well as a whole? Don’t tell us it is small govt and fiscal conservatism…what a laugh.

  140. The Great Pumpkin says:

    On the issue of voting, now you know why it’s important to have strong public schools. You need an educated populous to have a strong society. We all know what happens to the locations that don’t respect education, they hurt our society.

  141. Juice Box says:

    6 feet of snow coming to the Foothills of Colorado this weekend!!
    I don’t know why I don’t just fly out for some freshies before the season is over. Flights are only $250 round trip. Oh wait I have a wife and kids too…I wonder if they will get mad of I post some pics online of me skiing from 12,000 ft at Telluride or Breckenridge?

  142. Libturd says:

    There’s the narrative and the truth Chifi. I don’t subscribe to most of the narratives. I never said Trump didn’t want an end to Covid. But he did constantly rip into WHO and the CDC and even Dr. Faucci. Read that article I posted. It is insider and unbiased. Operation Warp Speed didn’t find the vaccine. Did collaboration help? Of course. But that would have happened anyway. It always does at time of crisis.

    I weigh these attributions to the President as much as I way Obama’s direct impact on catching Bin Laden or Trump catching Bagdaddy. It would have happened regardless of who is in power. It did not happen because they were in power. Which is why I praise Obama for ACA. This doesn’t happen on it’s own. You have the right to not like it. That’s fine. But I’m not about to attribute that blizzard we just had to Biden or the recent three day market rally to him either.

    What I will attribute to Trump is an absolute denial to wear a mask when had he not politicised it, could have saved a ton of lives and eased the job of front line workers.

    BTW, numbers locally are starting to move upward again. Looks like people are letting their guard down a little early. We are a dumb, selfish species.

  143. Libturd says:

    Juice,

    Have a friend who just left a note on the fridge at home for his wife and just did Wyoming and is on to SLC. Bastard.

    That’s the problem with having kids later in life. And damn this Covid.

  144. No One says:

    BoomerRemover,
    I’m so sick of scripture frontrunning everything these days. Covid, Playstation 5, concert tickets, popular clothes. They snap it up and then resell it at higher prices. People over 70 can barely dial a phone, forget about navigating the e-maze.
    There’s got to be an underground business for covid “appointment consultants” where you give them your data and they use outsourced labor to script you into an appointment.

  145. JCer says:

    Juice, this is just cruel meanwhile in VT it’s like what 60 degrees, this has not been a great ski season, lots of snow but too many restrictions to really go as much as you’d want especially considering we aren’t doing anything else. Hey at least we are not Europe, you can watch the racing on the olympic channel but there is no skiing for the general public in Italy and the people in the alpine towns are p*ssed, ton of snow, nice weather but not opened. Other countries opened but with many, many restrictions so that mountains despite record snow are operating 25% of their terrain.

    Leftwing you eloquently stated what I was thinking which is if you can not be bothered to go to the polls what business do you have voting? An informed electorate is important. I whole hardheartedly agree that those who are not shouldering the bill should not have a say but practically speaking where do draw that line and it will NEVER happen. The founders intended the vote to be for land owners, those with a “vested interest” so to speak but that ship has sailed. Same day registration is madness, if you are going to vote in an election you should not only be registered but at least acutely aware of who and what you are voting for. Democrats want to expand the pool of useful idiots, people they can manipulate, is that right, fair or the right direction for the country? If you can’t get your sh*t together WHY should you vote, by putting a barrier that requires at least a minimum of engagement you at least weed out the disinterested voter?

  146. njtownhomer says:

    BoomerRemover,

    Agree with the screwing the seniors. Mostly towns/high school students organized a bit to help out in my neighborhood (Vax-angels), but mayors, town officials could step up and help out dramatically. Most of them are not doing anything.

    On the other hand, it was those seniors voting mostly NO to any budget increases at schools too or any upgrades in town where they see no direct benefit. Clearly everyone has to adopt to the digital lifestyle, not expect things when they were easy and abundant.

  147. SmallGovConservative says:

    The question of who should be allowed to vote is obviously as old as democracy itself. As Mr. Churchill himself said back in ’45, when the people decided to throw out the guy that won the war and start down the road to the modern welfare state, “The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation with the average voter.”.

  148. ExEssex says:

    F#ck Trump.

  149. 30 year realtor says:

    I love how the cult members who believe the myth of the stolen election talk sh*t about the intelligence of the average voter.
    True irony!

  150. 3b says:

    Njtown: There are no elections anymore for school budgets; they were eliminated 7 or 8 years ago something like that. As long as the budget increase does not go above the cap percentage every year, the budget is automatically passed. The people lost the right to have their say.

  151. Boomer Remover says:

    I need to travel to PHX in April/May for a few weeks. Wife’s sister is there and I am WFH so a week of work from the road and then Zion and Grand Canyon. I just tried pricing a car via Kayak and was slapped with a $275 a week quote for a Kia Rio!? Is this how rental companies are recouping the loss of the business traveler? It’s $400 per week for Nissan Versa FFS! Have they lost their mind?

  152. D-FENS says:

    Prisoners no, but those who have criminal records and have served their time yes. For that matter they should not be denied their right to own a firearm either once their prison sentence is completed.

    Libturd says:
    March 11, 2021 at 12:57 pm
    Just curious?

    Why shouldn’t prisoners be able to vote? I understand non-citizens, but prisoners are citizens and they are already paying the price for their crime (supposedly)? I hardly doubt it’s a deterrent.

  153. The Great Pumpkin says:

     The newest fashion trend in New York is — unironically, hyper-specifically — New York itself.

    https://apple.news/Atzvk3eT3TqmEYcpe-ASCZA

  154. The Great Pumpkin says:

    People looking for local gear can turn into hypebeasts for the city by collecting its most obscure items. That kind of one-upmanship makes sense if you consider that it’s more difficult to find an original Crazy Eddie shirt than a Supreme hat these days.

  155. Fabius Maximus says:

    I use Costco Car rental for all domestic and international that is not work based. The 2 level free upgrade usually gets me into what I need.
    When I pick up the car there are usually other fee upgrades based o. What they need to gets rid of. I usually reject the SUV upgrades as I hate driving them.

    I used to have an annual worldwide travel car insurance policy so I could delclne coverage in most parts of the world. They would put a couple of grand hold on a credit card. But it was worthwhile for the savings. I have had credit cards that have had the car insurance, so that is worth looking into.

  156. njtownhomer says:

    costcotravel is good but nothing beats a google search to get the corporate code of a university like Rutgers, or NYU etc. They have great personal travel discounts.

  157. Grim says:

    Lol, running joke was to just ask for the Oracle corp code during checkin.

    Sorry, I’m new, this is my first trip.

  158. Libturd says:

    Not as easy to use corporate codes as it used to be. Many ask for ID if the deal is too good. Hertz made me call my supposed voice mail (of course I set up a voice mail ahead of time with a free google voice #).

    AutoSlash dot calm – The cost will blow your mind by the time of the rental. The prices don’t drop until the last month, but you’ll get it for next to nothing by the time of the rental. Make a backup reservation on Costco Travel.

  159. joyce says:

    Libturd,
    Always good to know more captain cheapo secrets. Never heard of that website. Thanks. If you were to book something through the site weeks in advance, do they keep alerting you of better deals until trip time?

  160. grim says:

    What floors me is that my travel agent (the human kind), will always beat the best online price I can find, always. Hell, if it’s even close, she can usually throw in a couple of perks to make it worthwhile. There have been times she was able to find airline pricing so good, it made me reconsider using miles for free tickets. The bar has totally swung back in favor of the agencies.

  161. Fast Eddie says:

    I know next to nothing when it comes to making travel arrangements. Taking a ride up to Woodstock for the day is my idea of travel. Just no desire to travel to the four corners of the globe. I drove to Florida, would like to drive across country some day. A decent hotel is a must, can’t do roadside motels, that’s my only requirement. Otherwise, deals, captain cheapo specials, inside exclusives etc. elude me like a running back eludes a linebacker.

  162. Chicago says:

    The Ten is banging on 160 again. I really think it wants to break through. They just signed $1.9T yesterday. Coincidence?

  163. Chicago says:

    Dedicated to Fast Eddie.

    FYI. I have done zero due diligence. I am just putting it out there for laughs. Please do not make an investment decision based on this post.

    https://acvetfs.com/downloads/ACVF_Factsheet.pdf

  164. 3b says:

    Fast:To each his own of course, but I think you would enjoy visiting Europe. It’s so old, so much history. And the food for the most part is fantastic.

  165. BRT says:

    Also, whoever decided to make this all digital or mostly digital, really screwed the seniors. There are 75+ year old begging for the vaccine on the NJ VAC FB page, while younger people are writing scripts, auto filling fields and pounding the refresh button.

    After about a week of trying to convince in laws and parents to sign up, we got fed up and took matters into our own hands getting them signed up. My 9 year old son got in on the action. He had 50 tabs open on 4 different browsers. We got them all in and they have all had their second shots.

    Where are these people’s children at this point and how are they not taking it into their own hands?

    When I was at the mega site, there was a guy, had to have been in his 80s. He brought his wife in for her vaccine. Their kids were able to sign her up. He asked the people and said the site keeps denying him because it says there are too many people signed up with his name (which was a common name). He doesn’t know what to do. How do they not just go…ok, you are of age, lets just give him the jab.

    Seniors should have had walk in privileges from the outset.

  166. 30 year realtor says:

    Reports say 41% of Republicans say they will not get the vaccine. These are the same people questioning the intelligence of the average voter.

  167. BRT says:

    Fast:To each his own of course, but I think you would enjoy visiting Europe. It’s so old, so much history. And the food for the most part is fantastic.

    If you watch that Stanley Tucci show on CNN traveling Italy, it’s pretty ridiculous how much better they are at producing and cooking food than we are. They all know how to make dishes that would blow away 5 star restaurants in the US….meanwhile, we are sending people hello fresh packages with instructions on how to sautee chicken.

  168. BRT says:

    Studies now show 3 ft is no different than 6 ft in a school setting. What’s going to be the excuse to hide behind now? Teachers and admin are trying to run out the clock going into May/June.

  169. Juice Box says:

    BRT -“Seniors should have had walk in privileges from the outset”

    Problem is they older white seniors were doing that in Paterson, the only walk-in place when they started vaccinating, they lined up nice and early. I know because I was there with my mother and aunt @ 6:00 AM. I am not sure why but they had to cut it back, as mysteriously the amount of vaccines the state was allocating was cut back, and then they changed it to walk-ins for “Paterson seniors” only.

  170. Fast Eddie says:

    Reports say 41% of Republicans say they will not get the vaccine. These are the same people questioning the intelligence of the average voter.

    Says the majority of the democrats who would never get the Trump vaccine.

  171. Fast Eddie says:

    ChiFi,

    That ETF looks like an S&P 500 fund… not much difference, all for paying for an actively-managed fund. Amusing nonetheless.

  172. leftwing says:

    “Not as easy to use corporate codes as it used to be. Many ask for ID if the deal is too good. Hertz made me call my supposed voice mail (of course I set up a voice mail ahead of time with a free google voice #).”

    You are absolutely, jury-of-twelve-peers convicted, batshit crazy.

    That is said with a smile, in the best of nature, and meant as a compliment.

  173. grim says:

    I booked almost all appointments for my extended bubble.

    Here’s what I’ll offer about the booking sites.

    Use your back button after you book.

    Often times, you can “cut in line” once on the site, go back again, re-enter new information, and book additional appointments.

    I was able to book 5 appointments back to back this way a few weeks back.

  174. Juice Box says:

    30 year – re: “Reports say 41% of XXXX say they will not get the XXX vaccine.” How many people take the flu shot? In a good year it’s not even 50%.

    Survivability of Covid is what 99%? This is according to Dr. Fauci who was testified to Congress last March and said mortality rate may be as low as 1% when accounting for people who are infected but don’t develop symptoms severe enough to be tested.

    Mortality is ten times worse than the Flu is what he testified. This has been reported over and over on social media.

    Who do we believe anymore? If not Fauci? then who Biden? I should get a shot because Biden says so? He is the last person anyone should believe he has been lying liar since he first took office 48 years ago in Congress.

  175. NJ resident 20130310 says:

    leftwing @ March 11, 2021 at 6:34 am:

    (Seeking first-hand advice and/or recommendation regarding local family law firms)

    Here are the details you inquired of:

    summary: 6.5 year union, both in mid-late 50s
    primary earner – me @ ratio 5:1
    no children
    assets
    significant assets – yes
    significant liquid assets – yes
    any hard to value illiquid assets – no
    w2 earners
    me yes
    spouse partial, claims non-w2 income
    friendly or contentious – expect contentious (despite assurances to the contrary)
    spouse counsel – will guess that spouse will seek counsel from Weinberger firm

  176. leftwing says:

    Re: voting ‘fraud’….

    The issue is not one of the actual count. That was never going to change materially. Never does. And no one should expect it to. Yes, there are some crazies (always are) with wild conspiracy theories…but end of day, whatever ballots make it into the facility they are going to be accurately tabulated within a slim margin of error that will not change election results.

    The issue for most Americans questioning the veracity of the election, I believe, has to do with which ballots were actually allowed to make their way to the facility. That issue encompasses many (swing) states circumventing their own laws to expand voting times, postmark dates, etc.

    MSM and the Dems focus on the first issue as it is it to their benefit (they did win the count) and it gives them a very convenient straw man argument to suppress debate…there was a vote, a count, a recount, no fraud in the count, you’re crazy, QED, move on……

    The substantial percentage of Americans who question the validity of the election focus on the second issue….they concede there was an accurate count of what was in the ballot box, but assert the ballot box was stuffed. No amount of recounts, tracing, or other diligence can disprove those assertions. And those concerns and issues among that group of Americans won’t be quelled by the Left continuing to shout the first point at the top of their lungs.

  177. 3b says:

    BRT food in Europe for the most part is not processed. I know people with various food issues, and when they go to Europe they eat whatever they want, as the food is fresh and not processed. You can go to any little restaurant anywhere in Italy and have a fantastic meal. They also seem to enjoy life more than we do.

  178. Juice Box says:

    Chicago – re: “Coincidence?”

    Historically 7 Trillion flowed into our economy from other nations, that is no longer the case, we are not seeing massive Capital inflows, the whole world knows what we are up too. It is something our media never covers what other countries really think about what we are doing here with our 22 Trillion dollar UST debt market.

    Here is one Chinese official recently had to say about what we are doing with UST, their are our second-largest foreign lender but have been a net seller recently.

    “US President Joe Biden’s US$1.9 trillion coronavirus rescue plan has raised the alert level in China, with government officials and advisers openly expressing fear that the massive injection of money into the global market could inflate asset bubbles, cause further financial market turmoil and lead to higher inflation.

    Huang Qifan, former Chongqing mayor and an outspoken government adviser, described the plan as a “fierce flood and savage beast”, warning it posed a huge challenge to the rest of the world, especially China.

    The newly launched US$1.9 trillion rescue plan will largely be funded with a new round of money printing. It will inevitably result in massive liquidity and inflation.

    Huang Qifan “The United States has released an cumulative US$7 trillion of liquidity through [the issuance of] Treasury securities and unlimited quantitative easing [by the Federal Reserve] to save its economy. “The newly launched US$1.9 trillion rescue plan will largely be funded with a new round of money printing. It will inevitably result in massive liquidity and inflation,” Huang told a forum in Beijing on Monday.

    No worries we don’t need foreign money flowing into our economy right. We can just raise our GDP and tax base by adding another 100 million people to the population.

  179. Juice Box says:

    3b – re: “They also seem to enjoy life more than we do”

    Not so sure about that one, as a tourist you see mostly the best as it is a big part of their economy. Rome becomes a ghost town pretty early. Sure they may get out early but it ain’t NYC. I have travelled extensively in Italy, there is allot of poverty. I love how the Carabinieri armed with machine guns have to guard the banks when they are open and how they have mantrap doors at every entrance. Again it’s Naples but lots and lots of poverty. They do however have a higher standard of living than their neighbors the Greeks, the Albanians and way better than the Turks and those other side of the Med like Egypt.

    It is so poor in some villages in Italy now you can even buy a home now for $1 euro.

    https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/italian-town-laurenzana-sells-1-houses/index.html

  180. ExEssex says:

    8:52 it was never a Trump vaccine. Ever.
    Your do-nothing idiot ex-President is a looooooooooser.

  181. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Jealous, Qifan? Are you upset that the U.S. learned the game from your country? How long have you been manipulating your currency and economy? You seem to be doing well with it. What’s the matter, don’t like when we do it?

    Again, all this high inflation talk is nonsense. I heard it before from 2009-2014 before they turned to their “stagflation” position. When I see wages rapidly rising (7% avg), only then will it be the kind of inflation people are scared of. Acting like we are heading for a period of high inflation…yea right.

    “Huang Qifan “The United States has released an cumulative US$7 trillion of liquidity through [the issuance of] Treasury securities and unlimited quantitative easing [by the Federal Reserve] to save its economy. “The newly launched US$1.9 trillion rescue plan will largely be funded with a new round of money printing. It will inevitably result in massive liquidity and inflation,” Huang told a forum in Beijing on Monday.”

  182. Juice Box says:

    Won’t be long before Attorney General Merrick Garland tells us whether the Antifa folks are domestic terrorists or not, they firebombed and smashed up the entrance to the the Federal Court in Portland last night, a pretty big crowd attacked the courthouse, they clashed with the Federal Police and gasp even tear gas was used. Seems someone had the bright idea of removing the barrier fences around the courthouse a few days ago. They weren’t protesting the Orange Clown this time either…..

    The “protestors” also tried to commit another Federal Crime at the Chase Bank too, the ARMED guard there held them back with a gun drawn and ready to fire, not sure if they were trying to make a withdrawal or a deposit.

  183. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Check out this awesome series based on one of the slums of Italy.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gomorrah_(TV_series)

    Juice Box says:
    March 12, 2021 at 9:41 am
    3b – re: “They also seem to enjoy life more than we do”

    Not so sure about that one, as a tourist you see mostly the best as it is a big part of their economy. Rome becomes a ghost town pretty early. Sure they may get out early but it ain’t NYC. I have travelled extensively in Italy, there is allot of poverty. I love how the Carabinieri armed with machine guns have to guard the banks when they are open and how they have mantrap doors at every entrance. Again it’s Naples but lots and lots of poverty. They do however have a higher standard of living than their neighbors the Greeks, the Albanians and way better than the Turks and those other side of the Med like Egypt.

    It is so poor in some villages in Italy now you can even buy a home now for $1 euro.

  184. Libturd says:

    Joyce,

    Exactly! The car rental agencies absolutely hate them. What they do is keep jamming your car rental specs through on every site with every code. It’s not unusual to have to rebook your rental about six times. But I’ve gotten some absolutely unheard of rates with them. They don’t work with the junky outfits either, which is nice as they are not worth the discount if you value your time whatsoever.

    I haven’t figured out how they get paid more than from ad revenue on their site.

    Here’s a little commercial I did for them to try to win a contest. I had it won, but they then changed the rules to make it a popularity contest from a judged contest.

    Captain Cheapo in the flesh. https://youtu.be/V7eoOS6rzgI

  185. Fast Eddie says:

    8:52 it was never a Trump vaccine. Ever.
    Your do-nothing idiot ex-President is a looooooooooser.

    I know it must painful for you to accept the fact that Trump will always be known for delivering the vaccine among numerous other domestic and foreign achievements. He also transitioned the Republican party to the party of the working class while the democrat party has become the party of the resentful, angry and ugly.

  186. BRT says:

    BRT food in Europe for the most part is not processed. I know people with various food issues, and when they go to Europe they eat whatever they want, as the food is fresh and not processed. You can go to any little restaurant anywhere in Italy and have a fantastic meal. They also seem to enjoy life more than we do.

    You don’t have to tell me. I’ve fancied my whole backyard and food prep in the style of Italy. Here’s another mystery. A lot of them constantly eat pasta with guanciale (literally pork fat from jaws of the pigs). In the north, they cook with massive quantities of butter. Still have sky high life expectancy.

    In Italy, they are so strict with tradition and food purity, they literally test to make sure certain cheese and cold cuts come from certain pure bred livestock from the land. The basically have their own division of law enforcement for authentication.

  187. Juice Box says:

    All this vaccine cart before horse talk over Biden and the Orange Clown is pure nonsense..

    The mRNA technology from Pfizer and Moderna was already developed, it did not however have approval from anyone to use anywhere really except for perhaps the third world where the rules are bent to try new vaccines out.

    They just needed approval to use it, that is where the politicians came into play, they dangled money, jobs, favors and influence to everyone in the supply chain and those folks all gladly lined up ahead of time for their payday. They were mass producing the vaccine folks ahead of time before approvals or even completed studies. That has never been done before.

    All they needed was the approval to ship it out. To get an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for this new technology they had to pressure the bureaucrats at the FDA here in the USA and the same for other governments around the world. Trump and team including many Democrats all picked up the phone and did that. You can bet there were plenty of scientists who did not want to role out this vaccine as there were no long term studies.

    Fact is we are the long term study.

  188. Juice Box says:

    roll out the vaccine…oh well another fopaux on my part. Sure they did not want to have a role if the vaccine went badly and people started dying.

    Just check out what is happening now with the blood clots possibly due to the Oxford-AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine. Scary Stuff, luckily we did not approve it here.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/03/11/us/politics/coronavirus-astrazeneca-united-states.html

  189. ExEssex says:

    9:54 you spelled “stupid” class wrong .

  190. Juice Box says:

    Both ExEssex and Fast Eddie have one trait in common, both have soft hands. Use it as something to build upon and meet in the middle, perhaps share stories about all the times all that hand sanitizer and other hand lotions irritated your paper cuts.

  191. chicagofinance says:

    Why didn’t you rap it? I always value your cultural appropriation.

    Libturd says:
    March 12, 2021 at 9:54 am
    Joyce,

    Exactly! The car rental agencies absolutely hate them. What they do is keep jamming your car rental specs through on every site with every code. It’s not unusual to have to rebook your rental about six times. But I’ve gotten some absolutely unheard of rates with them. They don’t work with the junky outfits either, which is nice as they are not worth the discount if you value your time whatsoever.

    I haven’t figured out how they get paid more than from ad revenue on their site.

    Here’s a little commercial I did for them to try to win a contest. I had it won, but they then changed the rules to make it a popularity contest from a judged contest.

    Captain Cheapo in the flesh. https://youtu.be/V7eoOS6rzgI

  192. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Cuomo looks like he is toast..

  193. leftwing says:

    NJR2013…

    Disclaimer…I have literally no training, degrees, or other expertise in this area. I have only my personal experience and what has been shared with me by others the veracity of which I haven’t verified. You need to do your own work.

    Having said that, my opinion? I wish I were you.

    Minimal years together and no children is massively in your favor. Both financially and managing contention.

    Major area of exposure I would guess would be around rights she may have on any co-mingling of assets. Didn’t ask but it is obviously relevant who brought what into the marriage. Anything you brought that wasn’t co-mingled should not even be on the table (IRA, etc).

    Your earning ratio will hurt BUT the short length of the marriage has to play in your favor. I don’t have any view on it since I fell in the old ‘permanent alimony’ box but I’m fairly certain the bandwidth of your potential outcomes is very narrow, ie. not that many points to fight over.

    The knife edge that you are on – everyone experiences – is that you want a friendly divorce yet to be prepared for a contentious one the actions you take can make it more likely that the divorce actually goes contentious…..and if you go ‘friendly’ once you find out she is going ‘contentious’ it can be too late for you….

    Overall, I would be optimistic. You do need to figure out your stance, and your original question was on law firms….I don’t have any specific recommendation for your situation since it is so different than mine. I would say my universe of experience and research show the ‘name’ attorneys (NJ Law 100, etc) are rarely worth their fees (years ago for me, partner at $525/hr).

    Your main exposure given the big picture fact set is going to be legal fees. They add up fast. Interview a bunch of firms – I presume someone has already counseled you to hit the big ones simply to conflict your wife out. It’s highly personal, but I find I work best with any service professional like a lawyer that is senior, committed, and available. I had 2.5 firms during my divorce, the first was a major name with a specialty in family law….useless and needlessly expensive because of tight processes (labelling everything I provided as an exhibit, cost for that alone was obscene). Second firm was a five person family firm that didn’t even really have a ton of experience in family law. Again, people are different and my situation was different…I knew I would need senior access as my situation was much more complicated with a wider bandwidth of potential outcomes so having a reasonably priced, senior attorney with high availability was a key for me.

    On attorneys, find a way to get her liable for her own fees during the divorce and absolutely for any return to court once it’s finalized. The leverage I used for that was exiting my wife out of the house while keeping control of the money…that sent us to pendente lite (a court order pending the actual litigation) where I cut her a fairly good sized check out of common assets and agreed to temporary alimony while as part of it she agreed to cover her own legal….that was a lifesaver.

    Remember, any counsel taking on her case isn’t doing it to bill 20 hours and be done. She will tell them of your substantial assets and the lawyer, depending on your wife’s stance and level of financial sophistication, will see a dollar sign stamped on her forehead to be milked.

    Regarding accounts/money, be careful. The 0.5 firm I used was run by a partner and very good friend who was going through his own divorce concurrently with mine. His soon to be ex- knew enough about his business – business – accounts and found a clueless banker at the local branch to work with…she was able one day to drain his business accounts….he of course applied to the court which basically said “we’ll work it out all in the end, nothing to do now…”.

    It may be prudent for you to front run and move all your moneys to new accounts at a new institution not affiliated with her….of course the second you do you have gone ‘hostile’ on her and increase the probability of a contentious divorce…..the knife edge….

    Bottom line, I’d be optimistic if I were you…work very hard to get her legal fees for her account, determine your stance and execute it in a humane, sensitive but very firm manner, and find the lawyer (not firm, but lawyer) that you feel is aligned with your stance and actually hears you. Don’t worry about labels in that regard, look more for personal experience in front of the Court.

  194. chicagofinance says:

    left: just watching The Ten and reflecting on the action. Something feels very technical about the swap of the on-the-run bond, and the mini-rally which was given back. It was a successful auction, but the respite across those 2-3 days looks like an anomaly in the trend. We go to 185? Has implications……..

  195. SmallGovConservative says:

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    March 12, 2021 at 10:44 am

    “Cuomo looks like he is toast…”

    I’m not so sure. Cuomo has been a bad guy from the day he took office, and should’ve been ousted the moment he interfered with his own anticorruption panel — see below. But Dem control of NYS — and many other places — has become so thoroughly institutionalized that they literally have nothing to fear by protecting their own obviously corrupt colleagues — see Bob Menendez, etc. Some Dems in the legislature have even hinted that they might prefer a weakened Cuomo to a new gov because he might be more amenable to working with them. Again, there will be absolutely zero repercussions to Dems individually, or as a party, if they decide to keep Cuomo around.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/12/nyregion/in-moreland-commission-inquiry-insufficient-evidence-to-prove-a-crime.html

  196. ExEssex says:

    10:28 I use my hands day in and day out. Recommend industrial strength Hand healer from J. Black. Guards against pesky paper cuts. I’ve got significant arthritis in my hands now it’s been bad for a decade.

    Your knuckles crumble and reshape themselves all while you are using the digits and in my case using them more than 8 hours a day on tasks that are both creative and musical. Try power chording a 12-string Takamine from the 80s sometime for a whole song. ALl the way though. I thought so.

  197. Libturd says:

    Yes.

    Action today does not seem to coincide with the auction yesterday but similar to the day prior.

    Will rap the next contest. To make fun of how bad hip hop is today, I just bought a new midi keyboard and am learning Ableton so I can prove to my son that I can make one of those POS songs.

  198. Bystander says:

    Juice,

    I am sure that Fox wants to label any Portland riot as “ANTIFA” for their political purposes but this was a oil pipeline protest. Nice try though.

  199. chicagofinance says:

    Auction was Wednesday, closed and announced at 1:15PM-ish…..

    As you know, I am not always so obsessed with this metric, it just seems to incremental to everything right now. It is the lynchpin…..and people don’t really understand it, because they think it is Powell-Yellen and also the priceUP/yieldDOWN thing just confounds people.

    Libturd says:
    March 12, 2021 at 11:16 am
    Yes.

    Action today does not seem to coincide with the auction yesterday but similar to the day prior.

    Will rap the next contest. To make fun of how bad hip hop is today, I just bought a new midi keyboard and am learning Ableton so I can prove to my son that I can make one of those POS songs.

  200. chicagofinance says:

    Regardless, at least people aren’t taking cash out of their homes and using it as an ATM. That would concern me……

    WSJ
    FINANCE

    Cash-Out Refinancings Hit Highest Level Since Financial Crisis

    By Orla McCaffrey
    March 11, 2021 5:30 am ET

    Americans extracted more cash from their homes through cash-out refinancings in 2020 than in any year since the financial crisis.

    U.S. homeowners cashed out $152.7 billion in home equity last year, a 42% increase from 2019 and the most since 2007, according to mortgage-finance giant Freddie Mac. It was a blockbuster year for mortgage originations in general as well: Lenders churned out more mortgages than ever in 2020, fueled by about $2.8 trillion in refis, according to mortgage-data firm Black Knight Inc.

    Some borrowers viewed cash-out refis as a way to cushion themselves against an uncertain economy last year. Others wanted to build and redecorate, and being stuck at home gave them the time to do the paperwork. Homeowners also had more equity available to tap: Though home prices tend to fall during economic downturns, they jumped during the Covid-19 recession.

    “The support coming from home equity is unparalleled in helping smooth out the degradations from Covid,” said Susan Wachter, an economist and professor at the University of Pennsylvania. “For those who are in the position to refinance, it’s a major source of support.”
    The median existing-home price rose to about $310,000 in December, an increase of almost 13% from December 2019. The acceleration in price growth has spread past cities to suburban and rural areas as Americans re-evaluate where they want to live during and after the pandemic.

    Cash-out refis got a bad rap after they exploded in the run-up to the 2008 financial crisis. Borrowers tapped their homes like they were ATMs. When home prices plunged, they were left owing more than their homes were worth. Now, in 2021, many economists expect home prices to keep growing.

    “There are genuinely a lot of people who want to buy homes to live in,” said Daryl Fairweather, chief economist at real-estate brokerage Redfin Corp. “They’re not just buying them to buy them or speculating that home prices will continue to rise. People are buying because they want them and they’re not trying to sell again the next year.”

    Low rates—the average rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage fell below 3% for the first time last year—also made cash-out refis appealing. They could become less popular if mortgage rates continue to rise, as they have in recent weeks.

    Cash-out refis let borrowers essentially swap their current mortgage with a fresh one that has a higher balance. That allows a homeowner to pay off the old mortgage and still have cash left over.

    The median credit score of new refis last year approached 800, near the top of the scoring range, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. That includes refis in which the borrower didn’t take cash out.

    Todd Kennedy lowered the mortgage interest rate on his North Texas home by almost a percentage point when he refinanced late last year. Mr. Kennedy, who has a credit score around 780, also cashed out about $30,000 in equity to pay for home improvements including repairs to his home’s foundation and new flooring.

    Mr. Kennedy said he started considering a refi when his mortgage company, Mr. Cooper Group Inc., reached out with an offer last November.

    “They said, ‘Hey, you’ve already got equity. We can do a lower rate and get cash back,’” Mr. Kennedy said.

    Wendi Comello of St. Louis closed on a cash-out refi last week. It was made easier by her home’s steep price appreciation. She bought it for close to $95,000 in 2014. It appraised for about $150,000 this year.

    Ms. Comello used the cash to pay off two loans worth a combined $8,000, including one that helped her with the down payment on her Federal Housing Administration mortgage. She also plans to pay off credit-card debt and renovate her 1950s-style kitchen, including adding more cabinet space for her growing collection of kitchen gadgets.

    Still, Ms. Comello’s credit score in the 600s prevented her from locking in a lower rate. The refi pushed her mortgage rate up to 4.3% from 4%, and her monthly payment went up by about $50.

    There can be other pitfalls to cash-out refis. When homeowners refinance into new 30-year mortgages, they essentially reset the clock on their payments. Over time they can add years to the life of their loan and as a result end up paying tens of thousands of dollars in additional interest, not to mention closing costs.

    Additionally, the 2017 tax overhaul said that borrowers typically can’t deduct the interest on the cash-out portion of a refi unless it is used to improve a home.

    Some borrowers like the idea of paying off credit-card debt with their cash-out refis, since mortgage interest rates are much lower than the typical credit-card rate. But a mortgage, unlike a credit card, is a secured loan. That means that borrowers who fall behind on credit-card payments don’t risk losing an asset, while borrowers who fall behind on home loans risk foreclosure.

    Eric Henning, a mortgage loan officer in Gig Harbor, Wash., said a number of his customers have taken out larger-than-usual sums of cash to do major renovations or additions. Tight housing inventory—the number of homes for sale is at an all-time low—has made it hard for families who are looking for larger homes.

    “They can’t find a house to move into, so they’ve basically decided to make their homes work long term,” Mr. Henning said.

    Still, borrowers who did major cash-out refis withdrew an average of $50,000 last year, down from $59,000 the year before, according to the New York Fed.

    Before the housing-market crash that followed the financial crisis, almost 90% of borrowers who refinanced chose to extract cash. Last year, about one-third of refinancers chose the cash-out option, according to Freddie Mac.

  201. leftwing says:

    chi, haven’t paid nearly as much attention to 10Y as I should….lots of work to do over the weekend.

    I’ve been in and out on defined risk/high return situations….option spreads on MRNA, ATT, some GME put writes…..profitable stuff but needs babysitting….

    Dying to get seriously long rather than swing markets….have eye on AAPL, waiting on technicals, things of that sort…..we’ll see……

  202. Juice Box says:

    Bystander – don’t watch Fox. The pipeline protest?

    ACAB is their protest slogan? Did they tell Antifa they stole it?

    Take a look see from last night.

    https://www.facebook.com/watch/live/?v=668794250654159&ref=watch_permalink

  203. Bystander says:

    ACAB has been used by skinheads for years. It is not exclusive to Antifa. It is used by many groups who don’t like police. Again, I know FoxNews wants to present it that way. Looking at articles, that is who is calling it ANTIFA related

  204. Libturd says:

    I tend to ignore all protests. In the end, they are ALL completely ineffective. Sometimes, they even backfire and bring harm to the cause (Jan 6th).

    I wonder how much of that 1 trillion in non-directly-related-to-Covid money printing will go to pay for police body cams?

  205. Juice Box says:

    Sure and their target was the same federal courthouse that has been attacked for what 10 months now? Some dumb fat white kid from Montana with lots of face tattoos was arrested, seems more like the normal disaffected youth making up Antifa than American Indians protesting against a pipeline on their land.

    No worries there will be more protests and arrests this weekend. Thursday night was apparently a warm up kickoff for anti-America anti-capitalism protest season in Portland.

  206. Libturd says:

    Another Captain Cheapo tip.

    Just ported our 4 smart phones from Verizon to Visible. Went from $165 a month to $100 (when you link the 4 lines together into one party), all unlimited everything and includes 5G. Best yet, if you bring your own phone, you get a $100 gift card per line.

    Just saved over another $1,000 this year and stayed on the Verizon network (the best).

  207. Juice Box says:

    My dig is on our new Attorney General his comment during the Senate confirmation saying attacking a federal courthouse at night does not make it domestic terrorism, well because it was at night and all. Wait until they kill a federal officer. Not to say it will happen but hey these people are crazy anarchists.

  208. Libturd says:

    “anti-America anti-capitalism protest season in Portland.”

    Where can I get an application? I’m still waiting for ANTIFA to send me theirs. Tried to apply for Qanon, but the goat’s blood I sent via flying saucer got lost when it was intercepted by a 5G signal scanning for life on Uranus.

  209. SmallGovConservative says:

    Some questions for Leftwing, NJ resident 20130310, anyone else that has endured a costly divorce (as I’m planning to remarry)…
    – Assuming you wanted the divorce, and that it wasn’t simply forced upon you by your spouse, was the size of the financial hit significant enough that it caused you to consider reconciling/staying in the marriage at any point?
    – For NJ res, as it appears you were older/established when you entered this marriage, did you attempt a prenup? If so, did you abandon it simply because you got pushback? Would you ever marry again without a prenup?
    – In the process of going thru divorce, have you become aware of any other common/easy to implement ‘wealth protection’ strategies (other than prenup), that you wish you had undertaken?

  210. Libturd says:

    I would be more concerned about the FED than the protestors.

    Don’t forget. Not only has the Fed lowered interest rates to near 0%, but they’re also buying up massive amounts of bonds. Each month, the Fed buys $80 billion in Treasuries plus another $40 billion in mortgage-backed securities.

  211. Bystander says:

    PORTLAND, ORE. (AP) — Jan 21st- A group of protesters carrying signs against President Joe Biden and police marched in Portland on Inauguration Day and damaged the headquarters of the Democratic Party of Oregon, police said.

    Some in the group of about 150 people smashed windows and spray-painted anarchist symbols at the political party building. Police said eight arrests were made in the area. Some demonstrators carried a sign reading, “We don’t want Biden, we want revenge!” in response to “police murders” and “imperialist wars.” Others carried a banner declaring “We Are Ungovernable.”

    Should I call these people Trump supporters, same as Capitol Rioters, Juice? Afterall, they were carrying anti-Biden signs and anti-police messages. Wanna bet it is the same group as yesterday? They are anarchists. You want to label them domestic terrorists, go for it but don’t equate it to ANTIFA. That is FoxNews BS.

  212. Libturd says:

    I never wanted to get married. It’s just too damned hard to find someone to partner up with who also experienced firsthand the damage a divorce tends to inflict on the kids. Not that I didn’t love Gator. Just saw only disadvantages in getting the “state” involved. Still do.

  213. Juice Box says:

    Cuomo at his daily new conference now comes out with both guns blazing, he ain’t leaving.

  214. Libturd says:

    Are those guns registered?

  215. Fast Eddie says:

    Even the NY Times knows the old f.uck is full of shit:

    https://www.yahoo.com/news/fact-checking-bidens-speech-exaggerations-130837579.html

  216. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “Six months ago we had an upturn call in the inflation cycle which joined with the earlier business cycle recovery call,” said Achuthan, whose time horizon looks out several months.

    On “Trading Nation” in October, Achuthan warned inflation was making a “pervasive and persistent” comeback. At that time, the 10-year yield was still firmly below 1%. But Achuthan had detected a material change in the future inflation gauge.

    His latest forecast suggests there’s no relief in sight. Any breathers, according to Achuthan, should not be taken as a signal that rates have peaked.

    “You have an upturn call just as we had in the summer of ’16, which is the left-hand side of the chart,” said Achuthan. “You can see those have some staying power, and regardless of the headline narratives, they persist.”

    His key question now is when rates will turn down — not how high they will go.

    “The 10-year yield has actually tripled from really low levels since last summer,” Achuthan said. “To put it in perspective, that’s a bigger move than the 2013 taper tantrum.”

    https://www.cnbc.com/2021/03/10/treasury-yield-trend-shows-higher-rates-inflation-lakshman-achuthan.html

  217. The Great Pumpkin says:

    There goes the herd…

    “Crowded Bet Against 10-Year Treasury Hits Repo Market
    Hedge funds, others are paying to lend cash in exchange for 10-year Treasurys amid bets on rising rates”

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/crowded-bet-against-10-year-treasury-hits-repo-market-11615305873

  218. Bystander says:

    The legacy of Dumpy. What he should be remembered for. LCD screens! No..ventilators..no electrics cars, thats the ticket. 3B in tax incentives…the R way. Public debt investment in desperate dairy area is $1B. Mount Pleasant only has 26K residents.

    From the beginning the lack of transparency, the lack of honesty and the lack of accountability from Foxconn has really plagued the project and investment,” Hintz told WPR. “It’s hard to take them seriously, even if there is a credible announcement.”

    At the local and regional levels, Mount Pleasant and Racine County created a tax-increment financing district in 2017 to pay for a $764 million investment to support the Foxconn project. The public investment was later increased to $911 million.

    Hintz said the company’s Wisconsin operations have appeared to be virtually nonexistent for nearly four years.

    “Time after time you have a company that seems to be trying to buy time in a state that has been waiting almost four years for something to be true, and they string people along by announcing the next best thing, but I don’t know how anyone can believe them at this point,” he said.

  219. Bear says:

    Chifi,
    Cash-Out Refinancings Hit Highest Level Since Financial Crisis

    >>
    I hope this is not the reason why investment property purchases are going through the roof.

    Perfect storm coming up in a few years.

  220. BRT says:

    All they needed was the approval to ship it out. To get an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for this new technology they had to pressure the bureaucrats at the FDA here in the USA and the same for other governments around the world. Trump and team including many Democrats all picked up the phone and did that. You can bet there were plenty of scientists who did not want to role out this vaccine as there were no long term studies.

    Fact is we are the long term study.

    To be honest, I think they are dosing this way too high. The effects of the vaccine destroyed me for 5 days. I’ve been tired ever since, 3 weeks out but can’t be sure if it’s related. Either way, I’m not sure this technology has legs long term unless they figure out how to administer it without generating reactions.

    In covid times, sure I’ll take it. But there is no way in hell I’m going through those symptoms again for something like the flu. I’d rather just have the flu. My guess is, they have to decrease the dosage and spread it out over more shots for it to be effective with minimal symptoms. But bottom line, people take vaccines to not get sick…not to get sick.

  221. Juice Box says:

    BRT – Moderna created a new “top off” booster for the variants too, going to be more than just a cottage industry in mRNA vaccines.

  222. No One says:

    Cathie Wood invests in disruptive innovation to serve God:
    https://www.ft.com/content/4df2b4cf-2ffe-4db5-9594-47e05e1e2240
    She’s probably even weirder than I am.

  223. chicagofinance says:

    pay wall

  224. Hold my beer says:

    I always thought cuomo might go down for pay to play or some other form of corruption. Never thought it would be for what he’s getting investigated for.

  225. Juice Box says:

    Chi you are no geek.

    Here is the FT article.

    Michael Mackenzie 3 HOURS AGO

    Earlier this week, and for no obvious reason, Cathie Wood’s $23bn flagship Ark investment innovation fund rose 10 per cent in a day. On Wall Street that kind of bounce is usually a warning sign of frothy markets, especially given Ark’s recent price falls. Not for Wood. “Buy the dip,” is a catchphrase.

    Wood is the public face of a speculative tech boom many liken to the dot.com boom and bust of the early 2000s. The success of Tesla and other technology stocks that Ark owns has, together with massive investor inflows, propelled the combined value of the five exchange traded funds she manages to $60bn from $3bn just a year ago.

    This extraordinary performance has made Wood a cult figure among some investors. Doubters say her bull run is due to a mix of self-publicity and investor mania fed by abundant financial liquidity. Supporters are undaunted: an image of her face with the slogan “invest with conviction” adorns a clothing range created for fans, with profits donated to charity. 

    “What happened in the past year was a recognition among asset managers and advisers that they were missing innovation in their portfolios,” Wood explained this week during Ark’s monthly webinar, where she extolled the shares of companies that she holds, such as music streaming service Spotify and telemedicine provider Teladoc Health. “Innovation . . . finally got some recognition.”

    The open secret to Wood’s investment beliefs lies in the name of her fund — a direct reference to the gold-covered chest described in the Book of Exodus as containing the two stone tablets of the Ten Commandments.

    Indeed, the 65-year-old divorced mother of three is a devout Christian who starts every day by reading the Bible while her coffee brews, and who relies on her faith during testing moments, such as the many market upheavals she has experienced over a four decade career in finance. “Each of those times was a time of deepening my faith,” Wood has said. 

    Born in 1955, Wood is the eldest child of can-do Irish immigrants — her father joined the US air force as an engineer. At the peak of her career, today she radiates a congenial air with colleagues, most of them young researchers who track technological innovation and are fervent about why investors need to “stay on the right side of change”.

    She got her start in finance when her life-long mentor, Arthur Laffer, helped her get her first job. The Reagan-era economist taught Wood at the University of Southern California, and recommended her to Capital Group, where she worked as an economist before graduating in 1981. She then moved to New York to work at Jennison Associates, an equity portfolio manager. It was there that the penny dropped for her.

    Wood covered data publishing companies, such as Reuters and Telerate, which “nobody wanted”, as she later recalled. Yet the concept they embedded “ended up becoming the world wide web”. This made her appreciate how innovation is underestimated, and “how exponentially explosive growth can be”. They also shaped the investment philosophy that made her name and fortune.

    “Cathie is an expansive dreamer and an absolutely tireless consumer of research,” said Lisa Shalett, chief investment officer at Morgan Stanley wealth management who was Wood’s boss when she moved in the early 2000s to AllianceBernstein, a fund manager. “She can see the big trend and has no problem being very patient, not a typical quality of most growth investors.”

    That patience is also true of her career. Wood only struck out on her own in 2014, aged 58, when she founded Ark with her own money. It was a difficult first few years, but she stuck to her investment style, with its emphasis on disruptive companies that could shape the future. “This is where the world is going and innovation will be in core investment portfolios in the next 10 to 15 years,” she told the Financial Times last month.

    Tesla is one bet that turned out spectacularly well. In early 2018, with the carmaker’s share price around $300, Wood shocked Wall Street when she projected a share price of $4,000 in five years. Based on its five for one stock split last year, Tesla blasted through the adjusted $800 target in January.

    Recent weeks have been tough. Markets have moved against tech stocks, betting instead that companies beaten up during the pandemic will bounce back as vaccination spreads. At one moment this week, the Ark Innovation fund stood 30 per cent down from its mid-February peak.

    Sceptics think Ark’s tech holdings are wildly overvalued, an inevitable reckoning will burn retail investors, and see in Ark a replay of the Janus Twenty fund, which enjoyed a huge run up in the 1990s but hit a wall after the 2000 crash. “These companies need to exceed high expectations and that’s where it gets difficult,” says Peter Garnry, head of equity strategy at Saxo Bank.

    Wood is unrepentant. She dismisses talk of a bubble, and is open with investors that her bets are long term. After all, Amazon’s share price took a decade to reclaim its 1990s internet bubble peak — but investors who held on eventually made huge gains.

    As Wood sees it, it’s all God’s work anyway. “It’s not so much about me and my promise. It’s about allocating capital to God’s creation in the most innovative and creative way possible.”

  226. Bystander says:

    But I will also throw a carrot Ed on this fine day. Hope live music returns soon

    https://youtu.be/9cNEMoDrJwY

  227. Hold my beer says:

    Went to hmart and 99ranch today. I only saw 2 people not wearing masks. They weren’t together but they were both obese and white. So big they waddled and the guy had his arms way out to the side like bodybuilders with huge lats do.

  228. dollarbill says:

    To justify TSLA’s current valuation, one must believe that the company will have the same competitive advantages in the auto industry as AMZN has in the online retail market. This is not going to happen. One also has to believe the hype about autonomous driving. IMO, until Level 4 or 5 is proficiency is obtained, the monetary value just won’t be there. Level 4 and 5 are at least a decade away.

  229. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Florida, right? I said right? Tell me some more lies like NYC is dying..

    “Wall Street is flocking to Florida. And well-heeled buyers can’t stop snapping up pricey properties there. It seems like everybody wants a piece of the Sunshine State, especially during the coronavirus pandemic.

    It’s a narrative that politicians and real-estate professionals have been pushing hard, as the state grabs headline after headline as being the mecca for people in search of warmer weather and lower taxes. What’s less talked about is how many people are leaving Florida—because of hurricanes, stifling heat and red-hot real-estate prices. The state’s population growth has slowed in the pandemic to its lowest rate since 2014. Read more here.”

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/people-moving-to-florida-during-covid-11615463911?st=tawygih8qhfu2lp&reflink=article_copyURL_share

  230. No One says:

    Sorry Chifi I thought the FT had a more generous free view policy.
    I find it annoying how pinko the FT paper has become. The Economist too.

  231. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Tesla has developed an enormous amount of data…if you don’t think they have an enormous advantage over everyone else, you are not paying attention.

    These other companies are just getting into bringing an electric vehicle to market. Lol…they are so far behind. Tesla has the best engineers. Best of all, they have musk. A significant advantage.

    Bet against them, but I don’t know why you would.

    dollarbill says:
    March 12, 2021 at 3:56 pm
    To justify TSLA’s current valuation, one must believe that the company will have the same competitive advantages in the auto industry as AMZN has in the online retail market. This is not going to happen. One also has to believe the hype about autonomous driving. IMO, until Level 4 or 5 is proficiency is obtained, the monetary value just won’t be there. Level 4 and 5 are at least a decade away.

  232. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Don’t think of Tesla as car company…that’s the first step. Think of them as an innovative disruptive tech company.

  233. The Great Pumpkin says:

    They are changing the world right before your eyes. They just forced the car industry to go electric, and you think this is a one trick pony show. Open your eyes.

  234. Libturd says:

    A jam Essex will appreciate.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ijMMy0T0NJM

    I swear, there’s a part about 3 minutes in that almost sounds like EDM.

  235. ExEssex says:

    Oh yeah I love Traffic !
    I’m in it right now on the 210E….

  236. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “Other ar­eas of Flor­ida, while see­ing boom­ing high-end sales, have slow­ness at the lower end of the mar­ket. In Mi­ami-Dade County, for ex­am­ple, there were 197 con­tracts signed for sin­gle-fam­ily homes over $1 mil­lion in Jan­uary, more than dou­ble the 77 in the same month of last year, ac­cord­ing to a Dou­glas El­li­man re­port. Dur­ing the same pe­riod, con­tracts for homes un­der $500,000 plum­meted 56%. In the Naples area, there were 624 sin­gle-fam­ily-homes sales over $2 mil­lion in Jan­uary, a 62% jump from the same month of the prior year, while sales un­der $300,000 sank 20%, ac­cord­ing to data from the Naples Area Board of Re­al­tors.”

  237. No One says:

    Wealthy people leave Florida every spring/summer. Thus Pumpkin will claim he “called it” right every single year.
    Here’s some data I found about the population of Florida vs the population of NJ.
    From 1980 to 2020:
    NJ Population has risen from 7.4m to 8.9m
    FL Population has risen from 9.8m to 21.7m
    Over the last 10 yrs the FL population has grown about 13%, while NJ’s population has grown 0.6%.

  238. NJ resident 20130310 says:

    > SmallGovConservative @ March 12, 2021 at 12:51 pm

    I can’t reply to the first question, as this was a 1st for both spouse and I.

    I consulted with an attorney beforehand and took away the understanding that NJ recognizes that property owned by each spouse before the marriage is not subject to division. While my atty strongly advised me to obtain a prenup, he admitted they’re not foolproof and that courts have the power to nullify them. As you might imagine I was rebuffed by my spouse when I brought up the subject at that time, and after another unsuccessful attempt decided to let it go. Hindsight being 20-20 I would have insisted on one, but in those moments I was perhaps overly optimistic in trying to make things work out and, at least in my case the rose-colored glasses were in full effect to blur some now-obvious red flags.

    Regarding asset protection I learned that one can set up a trust, but on this also I was advised that the cost and administration may not be worth it for someone of my relatively modest net worth.

    Like Lib stated above, I rather didn’t want to get married but my wife did. Maybe that’s all one would need to conclude about my predicament. :-)

  239. The Great Pumpkin says:

    For These Medical Workers, Housing Near Hospitals Is Just What the Doctor Ordered

    Developers are building high-end condos and suburban homes to cater to healthcare professionals flocking to expanding medical centers

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/for-these-medical-workers-housing-near-hospitals-is-just-what-the-doctor-ordered-11615395978?st=6qez3s0eys3pf2b&reflink=article_copyURL_share

  240. Fast Eddie says:

    Bystander,

    When are we going? Listening to your link reminds of outdoor shows where we had a cooler of wine and beer and more than enough weed!

  241. Yo! says:

    No one, thanks for the stats. Going to be entertaining to watch the NJ redistricting when state loses a congressional seat to TX or FL.

  242. ExEssex says:

    4:07 Tethla is in fact a battery company.

  243. Bystander says:

    Nice vid with Rebop on congos. Guy was great.

    Name it Ed. Just not pnc arts Center first. Some outdoor venues up north of NJ like Bethel woods, NY and Ives Park in Danbury is supposed to be chill. Indoor- if you have not been to updated Capitol theatre in Port Chester then that is good one. My fav small theatre outside Beacon and maybe Tarrytown music hall.

  244. Hold my beer says:

    Pumps

    Those areas near hospitals also didn’t lose power in Texas since the hospital is essential their grid stayed up. I know a guy who lives on the same block as a jail. He also never lost power. Same with people who live close to fire and police stations.

  245. Juice Box says:

    ExEssex – yes and no, one day Telsa will be a battery company. They are ramping up their own “tabless” battery to replace the “prismatic” Panasonic produced batteries.

    Neat Stuff actually should reduce costs once they have the battery lines running and they can boot Panasonic and other suppliers. Perhaps 3 years from now.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wyv4ZFInGsQ

  246. Juice Box says:

    Met’s curse just got A-Rod too and he does not even own the team.

  247. chicagofinance says:

    How do you think the journalism landscape has changed since you first became a columnist? Do you feel the face of journalism/news coverage/op-ed) faces specific challenges?

    “The great change has been the rise of social media. People can now customize their information diet in a way that plays to their prejudices, shields them from opposing points of view, and provides a megaphone for personal nastiness. It should be called anti-social media.” Bret Stephens, UChicago AB ‘95,

  248. Fast Eddie says:

    Bystander,

    The tappan zee is minutes away, will gladly meet. Too much tragedy this year… guys I grew up with, dropping here and there, just got bad news about a cousin, too much. I want warmer weather, want a beer and a hit and some head music. Getting too old too quick.

  249. chicagofinance says:

    This part really bothers me. It is a red flag, but not an overwhelming one. It suggest the potential for a martyr/messianic complex. I wouldn’t say it reflexively. I’ve watched her interviewed and positing opinions. I respect her quite a bit, but that said, there is also something off with her……. a little bit tunnel-visioned. Knowing the devout angle is rather bothersome.

    Juice Box says:
    March 12, 2021 at 3:40 pm
    As Wood sees it, it’s all God’s work anyway. “It’s not so much about me and my promise. It’s about allocating capital to God’s creation in the most innovative and creative way possible.”

  250. Juice Box says:

    Chi re: “Knowing the devout angle is rather bothersome.”

    Cathy knows the score it’s print until the cows come home. So it’s YES and NO to your perhaps apathy. Cathy is what 64? She did not invent it, as it is definably not the first time leadership in the investment community have invoked GOD.

    “God’s work” remember that coming from Billionaire Lloyd Blankfein? This was even said post crash June 2009. I hate to say it but we are gonna see the FED buy stocks when it comes time. 85 Trillion are tied up in stocks. It’s now TBTF…..

  251. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Isn’t that the good thing about her, she feels like she is fostering innovation through her fund. She feels like she is accelerating the positive change in our lives. It’s remarkable how she is able to see the entire forest… blows my mind.

  252. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Same thing with musk…he feels like he is on a mission to save mankind. He’s not doing this for money or material possessions, as exhibited by his sell off of real estate.

  253. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Think of Cathie as a magnet and mediator for efficiently sending capital where it needs to go in terms of disruptive tech trends. She is doing God’s work.

  254. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Look at me…if I didn’t have her, I couldn’t invest in disruptive trends. If I tried on my own, I would just be wasting precious capital on rabbit holes.

  255. Juice Box says:

    BRT: re: “To be honest, I think they are dosing this way too high”

    There is a news story of a man who got a double dose at the same time, a late 70 year old too he survived but complained.

    Hope you are feeling well get some sunshine. I pulled out a recliner today from my shed and laid out for a bit. Vitamin D and sunshine does wonders for health.

  256. Libturd says:

    “Vitamin D and sunshine does wonders for health.”

    Absolutely. Whenever I am sick, I sit in a chaise lounge in the sun. It really helps.

  257. Juice Box says:

    Pumps. I fail to see why you need our validation either implicit or explicit. You do not see me and many others here asking for validation other than asking a question or more about subjects we know nothing about.

    Perhaps if you thought of this as an extension of a poker game you would fare better.

    Cards or no cards we appreciate your contribution. You do know that right?

  258. BRT says:

    Overly and openly religious as if god has a master plan…these types are usually woefully ignorant and often reject science. Kinda weird that she does have tunnel vision in those particular areas. Tunnel vision works when all of those companies pop…good or her. Someone tweeted that Goldman has an index call the “Non profitable tech index”, and it correlates perfectly to ARK. Lol, they made an index of companies that don’t make money.

  259. Hold my beer says:

    Karen of the day

    Maskless grandma can’t comprehend businesses can require you to wear a mask. Gets taken down and cuffed by cop

    https://www.wfaa.com/article/news/crime/woman-arrested-refused-to-wear-mask-galveston-bank/285-0f8cfe86-52ad-43f9-8686-5407dbeafdad

  260. The Great Pumpkin says:

    She knocked it out of the park on companies we laughed at. I took an L and joined her team, you would be wise to do the same. So much money to be made when you are so ahead of the herd.

    BRT says:
    March 12, 2021 at 9:16 pm
    Overly and openly religious as if god has a master plan…these types are usually woefully ignorant and often reject science. Kinda weird that she does have tunnel vision in those particular areas. Tunnel vision works when all of those companies pop…good or her. Someone tweeted that Goldman has an index call the “Non profitable tech index”, and it correlates perfectly to ARK. Lol, they made an index of companies that don’t make money.

  261. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Now is not the time to take an old school approach to a new school game.

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