Race to 70%

Updated Vaccination by Age Range for NJ:
6/8 vs 6/14

At Least 1 Dose
Total Pop: 9.2m 
Total 1st Doses: 5.1m – 55% of total pop (Up from 54%) – Bloomberg reporting 62.6%

12-15 – 450k population – 102k dosed – 23% 1 Dose (Up from 22%)
16-17 – 240k population – 102k dosed – 43% 1 Dose (Up from 42%)
18-29 – 1.5m population – 714k dosed – 48% 1 Dose (Up from 43%)
30-49 – 2.4m population – 1.48m dosed – 62% 1 Dose (Up from 60%)
50-64 – 2m population – 1.43m dosed – 72% 1 Dose (Up from 70%)
65-79 – 1.1m population – 1.0m dosed – 91% 1 Dose (Flat at 91%) 
80+ – 415k population – 306k dosed – 73% 1 Dose (Down from 77%) – Rounding issues?

From NorthJersey.com:

As NJ inches toward vaccination goal, don’t expect COVID-19 to disappear, experts say

A day before New Jersey launched its COVID-19 vaccination campaign in December, Gov. Phil Murphy drew an epidemiologic line in the sand.

He announced that at least 70% of adults, or about 4.7 million residents, would need to be fully vaccinated for the state to reach herd immunity — the nirvana of infection control in which a virus can no longer find enough hosts and fades away.

Seven months later, New Jersey is still inching toward that goal — more than 4.5 million were fully vaccinated as of Sunday — but the consensus now among many health experts is that herd immunity is unlikely in the foreseeable future.

Vaccine hesitancy among a significant portion of the population, the ability of the virus to mutate into more contagious variants and vaccine distribution problems across the globe are among the many reasons why the threshold for herd immunity may be much greater than the initial 70% goals set in New Jersey and the U.S.

“I think we’ve come to reckon that COVID will be around a lot longer, which means we’ll have to devise strategies to manage it,” said Jason Diaz, a professor of virology and molecular biology at LaSalle University in Philadelphia.

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305 Responses to Race to 70%

  1. dentss dunnigan says:

    First

  2. grim says:

    Of course he’s open to it, and he’ll make sure the rebate checks go out right before Election Day, with his signature on it. Real structural tax reform? Hell no.

    From the Star Ledger:

    Murphy says he’s open to boosting property tax relief with big revenue windfall

  3. Juice Box says:

    “highly profitable companies are more likely to say they are planning to make WFH a central part of their business”

    “The implications for commercial real estate could be very interesting.” Downtown office vacancies have surged across the country, and even in the optimistic scenario that 90 percent of white-collar workers return to the office three days a week, that’s still a nearly 50 percent decline in commuting and office use.”

    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2021/06/winners-losers-work-home-remote/619181/

  4. Chicago says:

    COVID case in my son’s grade. Girl unvaxxed.

    Parents took her to beach on Sunday.

    This is why we still need to be wary.

  5. Chicago says:

    To clarify. She tested positive and went out in public anyway.

  6. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Yeah…I’d say Lumber futures have gotten a serious reality check…you could almost say that the sky-high prices for this commodity were “transitory”

    https://twitter.com/thedomino/status/1404773322710261760?s=21

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    May 11, 2021 at 10:08 pm
    Pumpkins next big call…wait for it.

    The world better get used to deflationary economic theories. Inflation is going to be a short blimp on the long term map. Being very scared of deflation. Thank the fed for pumping like it is.

    Understand, the world population is peaking. Combined with extreme disruptive innovation, good luck with extreme inflation on the long term…

    Seriously…get in ARk funds. Not going to find a better hedge against this future.

  7. No One says:

    WFH is great for the Florida residential market. Good thing I acted fast in December before most people were willing to fly. Sounds like it’s tough for buyers now. Lots of demand from higher income people, with enough clout to work remotely.

  8. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Juice, from your article.

    This makes no sense. So now the human species is going to abandon cities? Yea right. How does human civilization function better without cities? Where do you put all these people? People are getting stupid with their predictions for cities and WFH.

    Want an easy prediction? Cities will continue to thrive and be the center of human society. It is Not rocket science.

    “Econ 101 tells you that the input that cannot move is what will get hit the hardest,” Bloom said. “Moving is easier for workers than for businesses. But you know what really can’t move? Skyscrapers. The implications for commercial real estate could be very interesting.” Downtown office vacancies have surged across the country, and even in the optimistic scenario that 90 percent of white-collar workers return to the office three days a week, that’s still a nearly 50 percent decline in commuting and office use.

  9. Fast Eddie says:

    I’m 100% onboard with the WFH thing. At first, I was thinking I can’t wait to get back to the office but after a year of WFH and especially seeing that productivity is at the same level or better individually and at the team level, I’m sold. Who the f.uck needs to slog on a commute and spend a small fortunate on fares, lunches, etc.? Slack works just as well as walking over to a cubicle. In fact, it’s a keystroke away from colleagues in every waking time zone. I feel for those industries that are dying because of the WFH thing but there’s no turning back now.

  10. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Lol…so we went from suburbs are dead 5 years ago to cities are dead.

    Everyone is going to live in the suburbs. All business will take place in the suburban home. LMAO.

    Now I know why the same people make money off buying low and selling high over and over.

  11. 3b says:

    Ugly May PPI number for May 0.8 up from April. Transitory?

  12. 3b says:

    Fast: Wow! Big change for you. You went from hating it to bring ok with it to embracing it.

  13. Juice Box says:

    It’s all about hot desks now no more permanently assigned workspaces to put pictures and chotskies, 50% occupancy still in NYC. The Atlantic article says 50% shrinkage in city office spaces as we go to hybrid working. JP Morgan’s CEO was a little more optimistic and says 40% reduction in his statement to shareholders. So what is it? 40%-60% shrinkage in office space? It’s happening, we will not be returning to a 5 day work week in the office. My wife went in yesterday to show face and is again home today and has been working since early this morning. She will go in for one more day this week and that will be it. Hybrid is here to stay, hot desks, reserved team spaces for a few days at a time etc. Employees were even encouraged to BYOD devices iPad, iPhone etc that can Zoom meetings from anywhere etc.

  14. 3b says:

    Juice: 3 days in the office and two at home is optimistic from what I am hearing from friends and family in various industries. It could be more like 3 at home , 2 in the office.

  15. Fast Eddie says:

    3b,

    Yeah, I’m behind the screen anyway. Zoom and Slack are just as effective. And I get to see deer occasionally walk through my property, even though the little bast@rds eat everything. Still, it beats looking at office furniture. I know we’re probably going to move to a hybrid schedule but for now, I’ll take as many WFH days as possible.

  16. Juice Box says:

    WSJ today. Subscriber comments…

    Behind pay wall so I will clip it a bit.

    Comments

    “My global media and finance firm has made that decision for their employees. They have consolidated us to 3 floors, taken our desks away to a reservation for desks system and they dont want us back in the office full time.
    They want to make the hybrid model the new normal, making it more uncomfortable for us to go back to the office.
    They made the decision for us. They dont want us back in the office.”

    “The transformation of the workforce was in motion long before Covid, it was just slow. As the author states “Habits that have been formed over the last year and a half are going to take a while to break.” Well habits have been formed over decades prior to Covid that are/were difficult to break.

    All Covid did was accelerate this transformation, and forced both employers and employees to adjust even if they were kicking and screaming doing it.

    The real economic downside of all this is, all the smaller business that rely on the foot traffic, and commercial real estate if business start to shed office space.

    Interesting times.”

    “Before Covid tech workers in Austin worked from home regularly because traffic congestion was terrible. They were very successful using that model back then. During Covid they got even more spread out across the country. Even more successful. Why would you change, as a worker, or a company?”

    “The Pandemic move to close the large offices. The closures may be permanent as it is cheaper to have some employees to work from home and not have to foot the bill for the office space. The cost of an average office space is about $10,000 per year to the company per employee. The cost of DSL or Fiber runs form $600 to $720 per year. For many employees efficiency can be easily measured. I do not know of any company that would not like to save $9000 plus a year per employee. As I said before, the home office may be the next home selling point. Companies can now employees in other states and cities, drawing from a larger talent pool. The Bean Counters will win in the end.”

    “They always do (win, the bean counters). ;)

    10K/yr/employee could turn into a lot more when you factor in COLA for less expensive locations. And the crazy thing is, the employee, even with a reasonable COLA is almost certainly better off. The 10K a year the employer saves is probably close to 10K a year ALSO saved by the employee just by virtue of not needing to commute (no extra car/train pass/work clothes/eating out/etc). Put in a 10% COLA with an average pay of 100K, and you’ve just saved the company 20K a year. Pull out a lot of the travel between offices, and all the other associated expenses, you could be close to 30K a year saved by the employer. That means for every 3 in office employees at 100K, they can have 4 WFH employees for the same price. ”

    “Because a large percentage of the jobs are in the cities? I work in New York, live in Jersey City. For the past 10 years. Transportation continues to get worse, quality going downhill non stop while ridership goes up – previous to the pandemic.
    I dread going back to the office. Over 2 hours every day being pushed around, stuck in a crowded confined space. Productivity up, the team I manage is working like a charm, why would I want to give up the best quality of life year I had? Only FOMO, but I am not sure that will be enough.”

  17. Bystander says:

    Good to have you on-board Ed.

    Jcer,

    This is so spot on, I have to post it again as probably missed. There is a 3-4 year cycle for most exec management. They come in – change hiring strategies, enforce absurd rules and take the heavy hand on spending. After a few years of showing flat spending, they get a big bonus and pat on the back. These people are smart enough to move on before the whole quality collapses. Some other bank hires them, rinse and repeat. US workers are commoditized up an until something absolutely has to be done quickly. New regs or lost business opportunities suddenly open up purse strings. There has been none of that for years in technology except CTO getting paid handsomely to show AI and robotics on a pretty powerpoint slide. Trying to implement this is laughable for majority of situations. We had a few try and they all failed.

    “The issue isn’t commoditization, the issue is by the time the problems surface the management will have moved on and realized the savings. It’s a problem of motivation, senior leadership at your biggest companies manage perception juicing profitability and cutting expenses, it doesn’t matter if it’s ultimately successful as long as it can be sold as such. What happens after the fact is ultimately irrelevant.”

  18. The Great Pumpkin says:

    And what happens after a couple years if there is a drop off in production and innovation? It will happen. Why? Working at home causes people to lose interest in their job and focus more on their home. A minority end up working more under the WFH platform, while the majority work less. Hence, why they advocate for it. Humans are selfish. Of course they are going to advocate for the platform that allows them to work less and be at home. That’s really what this is about. Eventually it’s going to show up in the numbers for these businesses that are adopting it. It’s inevitable.

    So this era will prob be known as the WFH era in history, but it won’t last. It will revert to the means in enough time.

  19. 3b says:

    Fast: Understand. I get the deers too , and they are not afraid of humans , they just look at me, and sometimes I think they are telling to f@ck
    Off!! Anyhow I hear you on WFH how it all plays out I don’t know, but at this point in my career it works for me. And it works for younger couples with children.

  20. The Great Pumpkin says:

    I ask again, how does one create a product like the IPhone in a remote setting? How?!

  21. Libturd says:

    50% is about right. There are advantages to both WFH and in office. A split is ideal for most non manual labor jobs. I never expected it to be all one or the other post Covid. Keep in mind, I brought three other members of my team home about a year before covid but require one office visit per month so people realize you still exist and are available to help them out if needed. It’s been extremely effective. So much so that my boss did the same thing. He too sees the gains. Though we both realize exposure is valuable so we both still head in about every two weeks. Those are our LEAST productive days unless you want to measure success by who can obtain the most information about people’s personal lives in an eight hour shift.

  22. The Great Pumpkin says:

    It’s weird how they all realize how they can save money by moving to a cheaper location. Yet, not one of them realizes this means globally. How blind can you be?

    Juice Box says:
    June 15, 2021 at 9:21 am
    WSJ today. Subscriber comments…

  23. Fast Eddie says:

    Hydr0xychloroquine works
    The V1rus came from a Ch1nese lab
    Hunter B1den’s laptop was real
    Lafayette Square was not cleared for a photo op
    The “Russ1an Bounties” story was fake
    We did produce vaccines before the end of 2020, in record time
    Blue state l0ckdowns didn’t work
    Schools should be opened
    Cr1tical Rac3 Theory is a disaster for our schools and our Country
    Our Southern Border secur1ty program was unprecedentedly successful

    I’ll take “Trump was right and l1berals l1ed” for $1000.

  24. Juice Box says:

    A large percentage of jobs are in cities because that used to be the only place that you could collaborate effectively and be productive with the people you needed to get those jobs done. We spent the last year proving that completely wrong, productivity is off the charts due to remote working. I am actually surprised by people who claim that “being in the office” = productivity. If you’ve ever worked in an large corporate office environment you have known plenty of people who hang around all day and accomplish literally nothing. There is an enormous amount of social baggage that comes with being in an office building filled with people. There are a handful of people you might miss being around, but the vast majority of them you really really don’t.

    That’s all changed, much like the cities had grown for work for the past 100+ years and emptied out the rural areas, the same is happening in reverse this time.

    The “need” to live in a city has been lifted, just like the “need” to live on a farm to grow enough food to live was 100+ years ago…all due to an “innovation” and technological transformation. Same as the shift that occurred the when people didn’t need to grow food anymore do to due to “innovation” by industrialization of farming.

    We will be some form of Hybrid with a 40%-60% reduction in office space for a while, perhaps in a few years until the boomers are completely pushed out of power.

  25. leftwing says:

    From the WSJ article comments….”For many employees efficiency can be easily measured. I do not know of any company that would not like to save $9000 plus a year per employee.”

    And….”The 10K a year the employer saves is probably close to 10K a year ALSO saved by the employee just by virtue of not needing to commute…Put in a 10% COLA with an average pay of 100K, and you’ve just saved the company 20K a year.”

    These two statements are entirely incompatible long term.

    Understand I am not for/against WFH….I’m simply a clean pair of eyes looking at this situation analytically…no bias, no skin in the game.

    If you believe that an employer capable of reaping $10k from moving employees remote is going to ‘split’ those savings with said employee and maintain them at $100k annually, with COLA and other benefits, I just don’t know what to say……

    Those jobs, once demonstrated capable of being performed remotely, are going to be moved to the lowest cost environment possible for the sole financial benefit of the corporation. Be it $40k in Pune, or $55k in Rochester, NY.

    WFH is a huge bait-and-switch…it will do to the white collar service sector what off-shoring our manufacturing did to blue collar industrial jobs beginning in the 1960s.

  26. grim says:

    The wildcard for WFH and Hybrid is whether or not you can replicate the productivity enhancement seen for well-gelled and performing teams sent home, on a scratch basis.

    Meaning … we sent home teams that were performing. Relationships existed. Working dynamics existed. We didn’t try to rebuild the business from scratch, we just changed where it was done. Everyone already knew their co-workers. They knew how to do their jobs well.

    That’s the crux now. Does it all fall apart once you’ve exchanged a few of the key cogs, the connectors and facilitators. Can it ever be built from scratch outside of the office? When does it begin to break down? 10% staff replaced? 25%? 50%?

    No surprise that teams seeing high productivity were also not seeing high turnover, they didn’t need to hire, onboard, train, tightly manage, etc etc.

    We’re starting to see some of the attrition benefits erode now as some of the covid-job-security-panic is beginning to recede. If this continues, we lose one of the single biggest benefits (employee retention).

  27. Juice Box says:

    re: “Those are our LEAST productive days unless you want to measure success by who can obtain the most information about people’s personal lives in an eight hour shift”

    I used to do the old hang around until the boss leaves first for years. Many times the boss did not leave until late at night. This time spent in the office after 6 PM was usually for chit chat and little work was getting done, there were many late night dinners in bars and restaurants billed to the Amex as “team building” activities. It was mostly men and women without kids. Many times Boss did not want to go home until kids were fed, homework was done etc or they just did not want to sit in traffic during the peak commuting hours. I don’t see it all returning, the Thursday night happy hour with co-workers, the late dinners etc…then again maybe the younger crowd does, but they are the ones that are glued to their screens 24 x7 and socialize that way….so maybe not…

  28. 3b says:

    Juice: Well said. I have been saying much the same for months now. Only someone who has actually worked in corporate America can appreciate and understand what you are saying.

  29. Juice Box says:

    left – It does not matter, it all can be done remotely and has been for a long time here or overseas…

    The bean counters at the big four and the outsourcers already have their power points published for years now on any tech job or back office. It client facing that cannot be outsourced easily in finance etc. Many other businesses who knows? I hang up on the cold callers from overseas. I would think most of us do.

  30. leftwing says:

    “The wildcard for WFH and Hybrid is whether or not you can replicate the productivity enhancement seen for well-gelled and performing teams sent home, on a scratch basis.”

    ^^^Absolutely.

    This is the great experiment. If it works, it will not be to the benefit of those participating…..

  31. Trick says:

    I’m currently working a 3-2 split with my new job. Current work space has 3 desks in the office for 8 employee’s. Once I’m more familiar with the work/facility I plan to only be in once a week.

  32. 3b says:

    Left: you may be right, time will tell. If you are right, then one can argue it’s all over for the US economy including high priced real estate.

  33. TheBigOrangeBossNeedsPickerUpper says:

    Eddie, Eddie;

    About your 9:35am post.

    What are you doing spreading my precious orange horse poo here?. I told you to spread it on hole 3 & 4. Get back to work you jersey trash, and no you can’t use the bathroom. Use the Porta Potty like the Secret Service.

    PS. Is your Mississippi relative still making some of that home grown m3th? I need a pick’er upper.

  34. Juice Box says:

    Again NYC has massive issues for the next mayor. I don’t see the next one being another Rudy Giuliani type who would clean things up, just another perhaps Dinkins who will allow the city to stagnate.

    NYC crime is rampant, homeless are really everywhere, everything from the subways to the streets are dirty, actually really filthy and you can’t go a block without breathing in the stench of marijuana because it’s legal now under the new law to smoke weed will on sidewalks in the city and wherever cigarette smoking is allowed.

    Who in their right mind wants to go back to NYC after a long unproductive commute if you can work as productively from home. The pushback is going to be massive…

  35. TheGreatOrangeBossHasADream says:

    From The Atlantic article ” Riots were prologue”.

    “At least from where I sit, the most important and most relevant truth of the riot is that it was not the culmination of the insurrection, but its prologue. If the Republican Party, as currently constituted, takes back the House and Senate next year (an outcome that is not only plausible but, history tells us, likely), and if a Democrat wins the presidency in 2024, it doesn’t seem likely that Congress will certify the victory. And then the four horsemen will most certainly ride.”

    A Q&A With George Packer

    Jeff: You’ve written entire books on this general subject, but try to answer this question in a couple of lines: What causes you to worry the most about America’s future as a unified, coherent country?

    George: We Americans don’t just disagree with one another. We don’t just have different values, narratives, and perceptions of truth. We actually see one another as moral threats, incompatible with all that we consider good, and we fantasize about a country in which the threats are no longer around. Not to be melodramatic, but you can recognize this kind of thinking in countries that fall into civil war.

    Jeff: You think we’re actually heading to civil war?

    George: Not likely, not with violence on a large scale. More like a cold civil war that continues to erode democracy, make every election seem existential, and prevent us from solving our major problems, with long-term decline.

    Jeff: Are there, in your mind, credible, discernible off-ramps?

    George: I see three ways this could change. One is separation (not actual secession, but red and blue areas having more and more political autonomy). Another is conquest (one side wins a decisive majority). Neither of these seems very tenable. The third off-ramp is more complex but more feasible: government-led improvements in people’s lives, a reversal of the inequality that’s at the root of much of our disunion, along with socially binding ideas like universal national service and better K–12 education (civics!).

    Jeff: Reversing “the inequality that’s at the root of our disunion” seems like a pretty big damn thing. But put that aside: How do you convince people that (a) selfless national service and (b) a universal civics agenda could, or should, be done?

    George: Becoming more equal as Americans is a huge thing. What matters is that we start moving in the right direction—and I think in recent months we’ve begun. As for national service and universal civics (though not a national curriculum, which would probably self-destruct), they would take some explaining, some persuading. But I don’t think they’re impossible. Majorities of both Democrats and Republicans rate civic education as the single best way to strengthen American identity, and there’s a bipartisan bill in Congress to spend $1 billion on U.S. history and civics. Maybe Americans are beginning to grasp that a Thirty Years’ War between the red and the blue is not the best way to remain a strong democracy. Maybe there’s an untapped, even unconscious desire, especially among younger people, to be asked to do something larger than themselves. We’ll never know until we try.

  36. leftwing says:

    “…the outsourcers already have their power points published for years now on any tech job or back office…Many other businesses who knows?”

    Agree Juice, but these other businesses are the employees we are talking about. Not the ones already dragged out back and shot. The employees that until COVID occupied the trains and the 40 stories of office buildings.

    My assertion, if you are currently in one of those seats and your role goes remote/WFH it is not a good thing…you are the future JCer/ByS on some forum screaming into a hurricane that the setup is not working and no one in corporate (or politics or society) is giving a flying fcuk.

    You will best case be dealing with – and worst case competing against – the lowest common denominator from every single geography. Welcome to your new, better remote future.

    It ain’t $100k with COLA, bennies, and a ‘sharing’ of WFH savings with the corporate…..lol

  37. Bystander says:

    Gee, if only Trump had not rallied of a group of red hat nuts jobs to violently attack our Capital, resulting in 6 deaths..what a presidency it could have been. Now he is worse than Carter.

  38. The Great Pumpkin says:

    That is what blows my mind. That people are blind to what is coming. So blind that they are advocating for their own misery. Good luck competing with someone that will always do it cheaper. Your job won’t pay you enough to live in America. Ask the manufacturer Union jobs how opening up foreign competition worked out for them.

    “You will best case be dealing with – and worst case competing against – the lowest common denominator from every single geography. Welcome to your new, better remote future.

    It ain’t $100k with COLA, bennies, and a ‘sharing’ of WFH savings with the corporate…..lol”

  39. Fast Eddie says:

    We didn’t try to rebuild the business from scratch, we just changed where it was done. Everyone already knew their co-workers. They knew how to do their jobs well.

    It was and has been flawless. The productivity levels across the board actually went up because, quite honestly, the work hours increased but the work/life balance seemed to be much better. I don’t mind logging on at 7 AM because I know I can take a break on my own couch. If I need to have a brief call at 5 PM, who cares, because as soon as the calls end, I’m home! For anyone looking to make a move, one of the first questions on an interview is going to be the WFH policy and candidates will not hesitate to ask. And as that article above illustrates, think of the money saved per employee when the employee is footing the bill for resources while the employer can reduce facility costs across the board. Do I care if I need to provide internet service and even my own laptop in exchange for WFH? F.uck no.

  40. 3b says:

    Left: So much can go remote now, from the ops clerk to the finance guy, to the banker, and attorney. It will be very interesting to see how it all plays out.

  41. Juice Box says:

    left – Friend of mine left company last summer to go work for the Big Four, client facing job and it’s 100% remote from Ft Lauderdale. Sold NJ house at the recent peak, kids grown and out etc. Last hurrah at the end of her career before retirement, laughing all the way to the bank. It’s client facing, so who knows if will remain 100% remote, but then again the bean counters and outsourcers have to practice what they are preaching to their clients at the Fortune 500.

    What remains of the white collar office jobs will be spun every which way they can to cut costs, that is all the bean counters after all know how to do. That includes some blood letting in places that Covid has now shown can be done effectively for less remotely.

  42. 3b says:

    Fast: I can do 7 to 7 and not have an issue as like you said already at home. Instead of leaving at 7:00 and spending an hour and a half commuting into the city, assuming no problems. Yes people may end up working more , but it’s a better balance for many.

  43. leftwing says:

    3b, agree.

    We’re old and it will take a while for the full implications to play out….Make sure your guys get on a track that can’t be easily remotely commoditized…

  44. The Great Pumpkin says:

    You claim to care about the younger generation, but here you are advocating their future away because you get to work from home for the last working years of your career. It’s not your job that will be shipped, you will be retired. Cool story, brah!

    3b says:
    June 15, 2021 at 10:25 am
    Fast: I can do 7 to 7 and not have an issue as like you said already at home. Instead of leaving at 7:00 and spending an hour and a half commuting into the city, assuming no problems. Yes people may end up working more , but it’s a better balance for many.

  45. Nomad says:

    How long until salaries start to erode due to WFH?

    Will corporations reduce income because employees no longer use cars as much and don’t need as extensive of a wardrobe? No more lunch to buy either. 100 jobs now done by flyover based employees vs Coastals?

    AI making big push into white collar jobs. Look at what it can do for legal research. Compliance will be automated amongst other things. What happens in US when 100k white collar jobs go away, 1mm, …

    Still trying to figure out if inflation is transitory. Eggs dropped from $1.79 to $1.49 where I shop the other day. Retail sales slowing. Maybe a clearer picture in next 90 days or so.

  46. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Nomad,

    We are at war with deflation, not inflation. The FED knows it.

    Look at your entire passage..all deflationary signals.

    It scares the living sh/t out of me. That’s all I know. It will bring out the animals hidden inside people. What do you do in a world where prices are falling, wages dropping, and massive debt? You are dead. The economy is over.

  47. Nomad says:

    Pumpkin,

    I know and if it happens, you are right, game over literally. 10 @ 1.502

  48. Chicago says:

    Wow the Cicadas in Princeton are LOUD.

    Sounds like a constant whirring of truck tires on hot asphalt.

  49. No One says:

    WFH works or doesn’t depending on the work and work processes people are using. In my company, every important discussion and decision for over a decade had to be typed and deposited into a database. That was a work process decision that was made for many reasons, mostly because we wanted clarity in communication, the ability of everyone in the group to see the communication, the ability to archive and retrieve all meaningful discussions and debates in our database, and it made it easier for people working out on a business trip to see what discussions/debates/decisions were happening. Also, performance is graded against objective data for everyone. So promotions and comp has always been about performance, not about getting face time with important people.

    The result at my office was that nearly all meaningful work was done by typing on a keyboard. Eventually we added another office in another country, so beginning about 5 years ago all of our rare large presentation meetings were also put on video and archived. So when covid hit, at my department, there was no change in work processes. They actually improved slightly, because now in presentations and meetings, I have access to my databases right in front of me, rather than a wooden podium or a table. Plus my home offices have much better ergonomics and lighting than my office building. The only thing I miss is the 90 minute lunch breaks out of the office with colleagues I like, complaining about the colleagues who are doing the wrong things.

    But a lot of companies structure their work processes around constant “huddles” and meetings, and spoken word and brownnosing. They probably had a tougher time adjusting.

  50. 3b says:

    Nomad: Salary erosion started before WFH with geographically agnostic job locations. So multiple people on one team in different offices, WFH will accelerate this , and in turn drive down real estate prices in the NYC metro area.

  51. JCer says:

    I’d rather commute than do the “work” from 7 to 7 which involves mind numbing phone calls with India first thing in the morning at least with a commute you can be unavailable first thing in the morning. Eddie productivity is up because hours are way up, people are working more that simply won’t last as things are reopening. Yes largely what’s left is the client facing, if you aren’t talking to the customer or the end users for tech folks in a bank you are dead meat now and were dead man walking before. As for salary reduction because of WFH it’s already here, they are setting the salary targets 15-20% lower. Personally I like the hybrid as I’ve always worked 1-2 days a week from home when it was possible, i.e no meetings with clients, the truth is some things are done better face to face.

    Now onto Grim’s question, teams are built through interaction it is not the same over zoom. I had remote teams for years and they always felt disconnected, it was settling for management to come meet with them, actually knowing folks in an analog sense makes for better team, we are still dealing with people here. Seriously today no one has any loyalty to their employer but they do have loyalty to people, in a remote operation people don’t give a fcuk.

    Also the situation this past year has been unique, people had more time because the world was shut and frankly at least early on people were fearful about money/the economy/etc. I already see the fatigue setting in and know that employees will start to coast

  52. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Talk about missing the forest for the trees. You have no idea how bad this is for the economy, but of course you cheer it on like a Homer Simpson.

    3b says:
    June 15, 2021 at 11:09 am
    Nomad: Salary erosion started before WFH with geographically agnostic job locations. So multiple people on one team in different offices, WFH will accelerate this , and in turn drive down real estate prices in the NYC metro area.

  53. The Great Pumpkin says:

    3b,

    Read this article and understand it.

    “Terminal Deflation Is Coming
    Central banks’ interventions in the pandemic economy are unprecedentedly vast—and not nearly enough.”

    https://foreignpolicy.com/2020/04/29/federal-reserve-global-economy-coronavirus-pandemic-inflation-terminal-deflation-is-coming/

  54. BidenIsTheGOAT says:

    I’m still under one the one year bet for Biden. His mind is nearly gone. Relatively young as well.

  55. Phoenix says:

    With all of this WFH why are there so many cars on the highway? Are some WFCs?

  56. The Great Pumpkin says:

    That inflation has been at the center of the education and professional practice of central bankers since the 1970s doesn’t lessen the dangers posed by deflation. Deflation depresses demand by encouraging consumers to delay their spending, especially on infrequent big-ticket purchases like cars and appliances. In a deflationary environment, consumers expect prices to fall, so they wait on their purchases. That, in turn, creates a dangerous feedback loop: When consumers don’t buy, producers are likely to lower their prices, which confirms consumers’ expectations, so they wait longer, which drives down prices further, and so on, all while nobody buys anything. Sales dry up, so profits dry up, and businesses go under.

    Deflation also makes the burden of debt heavier, as the same fixed dollar amount of a loan (the “nominal” amount) stays the same, but wages and prices fall, so the “nominal value” gets relatively bigger in “real” terms. In 2019, U.S. household debt hit a 14-year high. Deflation would increase the relative cost of every mortgage, every student loan, every credit card debt, every car loan, and every medical debt. Deflation also encourages businesses not to invest, both because borrowing to do so incurs these same costs, and because the expected future revenue from investments fall over time and thus they will never be worth the high cost.

    All of these problems accentuate each other. Businesses do not sell enough to make profits, so they fire people and do not hire new ones. People lose their jobs, so they don’t have money to spend, or they fear losing their jobs, so they save for an uncertain future instead of spending now. Businesses and households spend more servicing old debts than on new consumption. Prices fall as people don’t buy things, and people don’t buy things as prices fall. The result is a feedback loop of economic paralysis.

    The Great Depression was the most significant historical example of this vicious downward spiral. Prices in the United States fell by about one-third from 1929 to 1933. Prices in the United States fell by about one-third from 1929 to 1933. The German price level fell by about one quarter from 1928 to 1932. It was this deflation in Germany, in part deliberately caused by the austerity policies of the Heinrich Brüning government, that brought the Nazis to power, not the 1923 hyperinflation. Agricultural prices collapsed, trade collapsed, wages collapsed, and thousands of banks failed.

  57. Yo! says:

    WFH-

    Big dilemma at my firm. All workers except execs want to stay WFH 3+ days a week because they now realize how much better life is away from nagging bosses and time consuming, annoying commutes to Manhattan. Plus, child care is a big issue. Laid off nannies aren’t returning.

    Execs and HR have decreed so many back-into-office dates,, only to to backpedal, it is ridiculous. They realize many people will say, “FU! Take this job and shove it,” then quit when WFH is eliminated.

    Let’s see how this plays out.

  58. The Great Pumpkin says:

    I don’t know, it doesn’t make much sense.

    Phoenix says:
    June 15, 2021 at 11:19 am
    With all of this WFH why are there so many cars on the highway? Are some WFCs?

  59. Libturd says:

    Phoenix,

    Pent up demand to go places. This will eventually taper back to where we were before.

    Juice, I heard you on being the last guy home each day. I used to be that guy. Would work 80 hours many weeks with nothing to show for it since my manager, the owner of the small company I worked for, was such a failure at finance. So as I grew my division and profit four-fold, she kept adding non-necessities. Very little of my gains made it to my salary. My big compensation jump occurred when I moved to my current employ. I literally drew a line in the sand that I knew I was worth and would not take a penny below it. Eventually, my value became obvious to my supervisors and I was remunerated for it. Until outsourcing. Though, I would never trade my current autonomy and work schedule flexibility for a higher salary. Happiness and the absence of stress is invaluable to me. Watching my kids grow up simply has too much value in my life. I was always frugal, a major saver and a savvy investor. At the end of the day, another 40 or 60K in salary is nice, but honestly, not necessary and probably not worth the backbreaking required for me to earn it.

    Life is good.

  60. Phoenix says:

    ‘If you can go out to eat, you can come back to work’: Morgan Stanley CEO wants NYC staff back in the office full time by Labor Day and anyone who doesn’t could face a salary cut.

    Current headline at the DM.

    Guess we will see..

  61. The Great Pumpkin says:

    That’s why they like WFH…they are out and about while on the clock.

    Libturd says:
    June 15, 2021 at 11:41 am
    Phoenix,

    Pent up demand to go places. This will eventually taper back to where we were before.

  62. grim says:

    With all of this WFH why are there so many cars on the highway? Are some WFCs?

    Nobody wants to use mass transit. Yes, fewer people in the workplace, but nearly all of them are driving. Also – many WFH folks moved out of the urban areas for the suburbs – so likely more commuters now as we transition.

  63. JCer says:

    Oh and I’ll let you in on a little secret, offshoring literally saves $0 for technology builds. As bystander alluded the defect rates go way up, the headcount increases exponentially. Technology is funny like that who would think hiring better engineers would end up cheaper, it’s like hiring better lawyers. There are lots of lawyers but a good one saves you or makes you money where a bad one brings nothing but pain. There are actually many ways to skin a cat, the devil is in knowing which way to do it.

    For example I literally had a task we asked our offshore developers to do, they told us it would take them 3 weeks, I can build what’s needed in less than 3 hours and it likely works correctly right off the bat, theirs almost certainly will not work correctly initially. I don’t dare step in and do this or even publicly mention this because the fallout from India would be bad and I need these teams to deliver for me and if I embarrass them I won’t be able to get anything from them.

    Back when I worked at a bank I at one point had a good relationship with an MD, at one point we had a money manager complain about our portfolio modeling/analytics/trading capabilities and he threatened to leave and take his billions in assets with him, the team that owned the system wanted 6 months to make some relatively small enhancements. MD calls me to his office and asks me what I can do for him, carte blanche build a team you can borrow any resource in my domain, hire any consultant you need, etc how long will it take you to build the bare minimum this manger is asking for. I think about it and tell him we can have it in QA’s hands in 8 weeks with a team of 8 people, this included UI work, database changes, setting up MQ messaging queues with legacy CICS mainframe apps. We did it, it was much cheaper than doing it the way they do things and the damn system is still in use a decade later(mind you it’s 20+ years old to begin with) and some users are so resistant to change they are still using it and the bank doesn’t dare shut down something some of these revenue producers love even though they bought a superior vendor solution 6 years ago. Meanwhile new builds they spent 40m on at the same time are now being retired because the users hate it, ops hates it, and it is costing the firm a fortune to run. Do you want to drive a Lada or a Porsche, the difference is in the engineering. Software is tough many times the design flaws don’t become apparent until something needs to change, the business evolves, etc and the systems literally cannot be extended to meet the business needs and it winds up being more cost effective to scrap the system.

    There is a reason these tech companies are always looking for the “rock star” developer, it’s not an order of magnitude more productivity they are easily 4x or more productive and are often the difference between the success and failure of a build.

  64. Libturd says:

    “while on the clock.”

    For nearly all public workers, this is your only standard of measurement. So pathetic, but it’s all that matters. Once you punch that clock, what you do all day is irrelevant. But don’t you dare forget to punch that clock!

  65. JCer says:

    Lib that is my sentiment exactly, I have a flexible job that’s why I took it. I have a guaranteed salary as opposed to the banks with their bonuses. I have total flexibility where I work from and I was remote for months early on in my tenure vs. at the bank where I literally need to physically be at a desk when trading started, it was a struggle to WFH at all. My wife is the one with career aspirations yet she doesn’t really make too much more money and puts in an extra 30 hours a week, she’s also much better about not calling her MD an idiot to his face or starting a mutiny among the developers over the cr@p products and policies they put in place. Unfortunately being given a vehicle to make MD that includes successfully implementing AI without the right folks or budget for use cases which don’t make too much sense isn’t too bright of a future, I’ve told her to let it fail because they don’t want to commit to what is necessary but she’s still hanging on 80-100 hrs a week trying to make it work, her MD’s have already jumped ship and passed it off like a hot potato. I’ve told her to go get a retirement job we don’t need the extra money, go be a manger somewhere delegate the work put in an honest 40-50 hour week for 200k.

  66. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Yea, if it was your business, you know damn well you would only pay them for the time they were at work. If they get the job done early, they are getting paid too much.

    Check this tweet. This is why people like WFH, most never worked a straight 8 hrs at the office. Now that they have 3-4 hrs of work completed, they don’t have to waste it trying to look busy.

    “It’s a WFH week so I have the luxury of time to cook for lunch.”

    https://twitter.com/tontolakwatsero/status/1404285957059325956?s=21

    Libturd says:
    June 15, 2021 at 1:21 pm
    “while on the clock.”

    For nearly all public workers, this is your only standard of measurement. So pathetic, but it’s all that matters. Once you punch that clock, what you do all day is irrelevant. But don’t you dare forget to punch that clock!

  67. The Great Pumpkin says:

    But the corporations will catch on…and pay will be adjusted.

  68. Libturd says:

    And Gary,

    That was some exoneration Trump received for gassing protestors. I hope when I am judged for my actions, I too get to appoint the judge.

    More lies. What’s new?

  69. Libturd says:

    The Clueless Pumpkin.

  70. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Where does this “luxury of time” come from that he speaks of? How does one gain more time at home?

  71. 3b says:

    Lib: Clock punching is an art form you know. Not just anyone can do it.

  72. chicagofinance says:

    I first read this as “7 & 7”

    3b says:
    June 15, 2021 at 10:25 am
    Fast: I can do 7 to 7 and not have an issue as like you said already at home.

  73. chicagofinance says:

    Stu: You are the resident East Brunswick expert around here…… was driving back on Route 18 and saw a shared sign for two businesses.

    “China & Asia Travel”
    “Rent-A-Wreck”

    I was wondering whether there was any operational or strategic synergies that you could envision?

  74. 3b says:

    Phoenix: Very simplistic comment on Gormans part about MS employees. It will be a battle, but WFH is not going away. There are some who think if we could just go back to pre Covid, and get all these dirty slackers back in the office, then all would be fine, but that’s not going to happen.

  75. Libturd says:

    Look at MDC go!

    Very funny Chi.

  76. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Listen to 3b, he’s been wrong over and over the last decade.

  77. 3b says:

    Chgo Good one! Do people even drink those any more?

  78. chicagofinance says:

    Pant up

    Libturd says:
    June 15, 2021 at 11:41 am
    Phoenix,

    Pent up demand to go places. This will eventually taper back to where we were before.

  79. The Great Pumpkin says:

    I miss those days of 3b saying the city is the future and suburbs are dead. Then him calling me an idiot for saying otherwise. That I only cared about my real estate. Hey, Homer!!

  80. Fast Eddie says:

    Yea, if it was your business, you know damn well you would only pay them for the time they were at work. If they get the job done early, they are getting paid too much.

    Based on how much you post here, you should be paying your employer, the taxpayer.

  81. Fast Eddie says:

    Libturd,

    Let’s be honest, Trump achieved more than two Oblammy terms and two Bush terms combined. The left hates him and hates him even more for actually doing what liberals could never do; producing tangible results. More lies? The left invented the term. Just open the Contrived News Network at anytime and read for yourself.

  82. leftwing says:

    No One, which sector were you in, generally? If you’d share.

  83. Libturd says:

    Gary,

    I’ll be the first to admit there is bias in the news reporting. But it takes a special kind of asshole to CHOOSE the church bible photo op (of course you know he never belonged to a church) directly after protestors were gassed and pepper shot by three different authorities who failed to warn them that they were going to install a fence.

    Any amount of accomplishment (much of which I still find questionable) gets tarnished by his continuous buffoonery and bullying. Now he is claiming he is going to be reinstated. At what point do you put down your bias blinders and see him for the moron he was.

    About the only thing he was good at was being the class clown. It continues to show in nearly every single sentence that comes out of his mouth.

    As for the border, it’s only common sense that the numbers would go up after 4 years of scapegoating and bullying.

    We are all still waiting for Trump’s Health Care reform too. At least Obama gave us something. All Trump did was reverse everything Obama did. But then, there was the insurrection, the supposed riots, the good people of the clan rallies. We can go on and talk about his failed tax plan that further enriched the rich through borrowing during the greatest economy ever. And then there was the endless pardoning of his criminal friends and appointees. Show me one pardon Obama made of a friend. You can’t.

    Obama may not have been Bill Clinton, but he was far from Carter. Trump will go down in history as the worst president ever. You need not agree with me. You need only to wait. As the Red team continues down the path of stupidity. He will only be responsible for the loss of more and more ground. If populism could not gain a stranglehold with Trump as POTUS. It’s dead in the water as a circus sideshow.

  84. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Lol

    “If you want to get paid New York rates, you work in New York. None of this, ‘I’m in Colorado and work in New York and am getting paid like I’m sitting in New York City,’” Gorman barked.

    “Sorry, that doesn’t work.”

    A similar move has been adopted by Facebook, which told employees if they want to keep working outside of San Francisco or New York, they’ll have to take a paycut.

    https://apple.news/AhzLg5vOGRXSiKS62bydWYA

  85. Libturd says:

    Grim,

    My company is one that required any employees to notify HR if they planned to move out of commuting distance.

    You have been spot on with your WFH observations.

  86. notapumpsupporter says:

    Pumps is spot on again on WFH… Just like he was on roaring 20s.. The rest of the folks arguing against have nothing to back them up based on their history.. They were ALL wrong and get worked up and make wrong decisions..

    WFH is not for all people.. Wake up. just check what Morgan Stanley CEO’s strategy on WFH..

    So if you bought a house in boonies thinking you were a genius, just wait for that one email from HR to come back or lose your job.. COVID definitely increased WFH significantly, but some will stay that way but for majority, get on a train ASAP>>

    So the Suburbs which are commuter towns are the Next big thing.. Just wait..

  87. 3b says:

    And like clock work! Very disturbing.

  88. 3b says:

    Lib: Mine too. As of now, it looks like we will be 3 at home and 2 in the office, or offices I should say. We are all in different geographic locations to begin with, so when we need to get together it will still be Zoom. NYC will never be the same.

  89. notapumpsupporter says:

    NYC is a disaster
    NYC is completely done
    NYC is a mess
    NYC will collapse soon
    NYC is abandoned


    Now NYC will never be the same…

    The same argument was done for Housing is dead, house prices will collapse.. Crash…

    Guess what happened.. LOL

  90. Anon says:

    As was posted before, workers indicated they would sacrifice something like $30k per year to not have to commute into a physical office every day. For a middling NYC/Bay Area salary (say $150k), that would be a 20% haircut.

    So it may turn out that workers, executives, and bean counters are on the same page.

    That said, I’d be very hesitant to move out to flyover country since you’d lose the option to negotiate salary based on geographic location altogether.

  91. Anon says:

    Also, I think lower rates for office space may ultimately be healthy for the NYC economy mid-to-long term as it becomes possible for second tier industries and firms to gain a toehold in the metro NY market.

  92. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “Many com­pa­nies ex­pect the pace of re­turn to ac­cel­er­ate in Sep­tember when many schools re­open in full, and the sum­mer travel sea­son comes to an end. A sur­vey of em­ploy­ers by the Part­ner-ship for New York City, a busi­ness group, found that 62% pro­jected their em­ploy­ees would be back in of­fices in Sep­tember, up from 45% in March.”

    “Law firm Sills Cum­mis & Gross, which has of­fices in New York and Newark, N.J., started bring­ing back em­ploy­ees this month, man­ag­ing part­ner Max Crane said. He said the plan was com­pli­cated by fi­nances, pol­i­tics, health and hu­man na­ture.

    “You have to re­spect the psy­cho­log­i­cal and emo­tional pieces of it,” he said.”

    “Texas cities have led the pack partly be­cause they are less dense, and work­ers are less re­liant on pub­lic trans­porta­tion. Those dis­par­i­ties have widened even more in re­cent weeks, as the coun­try has re­opened. In Austin, Dal­las and Hous­ton the re­turn rate is in the high-40% range, more than dou­ble that in San Fran­cisco and New York, ac­cord­ing to Kas­tle.

    Tech firm Lenovo Group plans to start bring­ing back nonessen­tial work­ers in North Amer­ica this sum­mer, though the pace is likely to vary be­cause of vac­ci­na­tion rates, said Kirk Skau­gen, an ex­ec­u­tive vice pres­i­dent.

    Leno­vo’s sprawl­ing Mor­risville, N.C., cam­pus is in a state that dropped its mask man­date in mid-May. Leno­vo’s Canada of­fices may open later be­cause the vac­ci­na­tion rate has been slower in that coun­try.

    Sills Cum­mis started open­ing its New Jer­sey of­fice this month but will wait un­til July to open in New York be­cause of dif­fer­ences in den­sity and worker re­liance on mass tran­sit. “The build­ings in the city are higher. The el­e­va­tors tend to be more crowded. There’s more like­li­hood of be­ing in close quar­ters,” Mr. Crane said.”

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/people-are-returning-to-restaurants-stores-and-hotels-but-not-yet-the-office-11623749401?st=zpbl9u4fyniq5r0&reflink=article_copyURL_share

  93. The Great Pumpkin says:

    As soon as liabilities are out the door, these companies will snap the whip.

  94. leftwing says:

    Yet again, why anyone would openly welcome a policy that leads to a massive influx of lower cost competition for their job is beyond me….

    As I’ve said previously, unless you are ‘exceptional’ status then even with a Stanford/MIT degree there are people from Univ of Illinois and GIT sitting in the Midwest and Georgia who would gladly take the job you do ‘competently’ at the geographic discount….which for them would be a nice raise and provide an incredible lifestyle……

    Great for them…lose/lose for the NYer……

  95. 3b says:

    Left: True but that’s the way it’s going and started before the pandemic. I have been saying this for over a year. Geographically agnostic is the term and FB s Zuckerberg has said he wants to attract people who have no desire to relocate to east or west coast. My own company has been doing it for the last few years as well
    As others. I have also said that this will force NYC going forward to become more competitive.

  96. 3b says:

    Anon: Exactly long term this could be a positive for NYC area. It has become fat and bloated over the years. It needs to become competitive again.

  97. 3b says:

    Left/Anon: It’s nice to be able to debate this back and forth, and see how it all
    Plays out. I think almost all of us agree things won’t be the same. The difference is we are having an intelligent conversation and we are all in the corporate sector so
    we have some reference points to say the least.

  98. 3b says:

    Just FYI I am off this week, not abusing WFH.

  99. Fabius Maximus says:

    Juice,

    You forgot that free car service usually starts after 9PM.

    One other point to consider is the view from the C suite. Back when Deepwater Horizon happened, we had a discussion in here on a company “Doing the right thing”. How could a company like BP take such a monumental risk? It all comes back to producing Shareholder Value and Fiduciary Duty. If the Actuaries at BP sign off on the risk of a Gulf clean up against the expected revenue from the Well, then Flipper the dolphin and the rest of the Gulf gets a bath in Dawn to clean off the crude.

    A company can only do the right thing, only “in defense of the brand”. Tim Cook would quite happily build IPhones in Sweat Shops if he didn’t have to consider the impact to the brand. Most other retailers are not that fussy, they will accept the hit.

    So your IBs are not worried about WFH, it was already outsourcing anything that is not nailed down. Pass the risk on to someone and take the service hit in the transition. It will find its own level eventually and you get to shout at and blame the provider. AWS, Azure and GCP allowed them to open the Floodgates. Where are you going to find AI, ML and Blockchain expertise. There will be a white paper and a YAML file already waiting for you.

    The safest place is to be, is somewhere where people are outsourcing to you.

  100. Ez says:

    Nicole Dufault, the New Jersey teacher who admitted to sexually abusing teenagers at Columbia High School and blamed her appalling behavior on brain surgery, has been accused by three more former students alleging abuse. Hahahahaha hahaha

  101. leftwing says:

    “Left: True but that’s the way it’s going and started before the pandemic.”

    Agree. Mentioned before my oldest took a software development job in flyover country right out of university…exceptional company, at about a 20% discount of what the FAANG were offering for NY/BOS/SF…

    He researched it, good mobility at market rates if he decides to exit but for now he’s unique among his peers in terms of lifestyle…in a location that regularly hits the short list for GenZ destinations he has his own new and modern 1BR apartment, in the city center, with a brand new jeep. And he’s a 20 minute drive from his office. Can’t touch that here even with 25% higher gross comp…

    Wouldn’t surprise me when one of the majors gets truly serious about the space his company occupies they open a satellite in that city….shooting fish in a barrel for hiring….

  102. SmallGovConservative says:

    Anyone else surprised at how rapidly masks have disappeared? The only place I see them now is on NJ Transit — zero mask wearing at the gym, virtually zero at food stores over the past couple of days (some employees), none in restaurants. Went to the doctor today and even he said he’ll put up with the mask “nonsense” for another week or two and then be done with it. Are they still worn anywhere other than mass transit in large numbers?

  103. Ez says:

    2:14 Trump ran his mouth for four years &
    Didn’t do shit.

  104. Fabius Maximus says:

    “notify HR if they planned to move out of commuting distance.”

    I had a chat with HR on this last week. At this point they don’t care where you are. You are taxed where your job is. So if your job is in Jersey and you have been living in your cabin in Lake George the onus is on you to report your income to NY state as you have “worked” in NY over the 16 day limit. If you are in Florida, you are still paying NJ income tax as if you lived there.

  105. Anon says:

    3B agree.

    Leftwing, how long has it been since you worked a corporate gig? Just curious since the only other poster with such a dour outlook on remote work is a teacher. Even the folks whose careers have already been punished by outsourcing don’t fear it as much as you do. This should tell you something.

    If you are so convinced in your thinking, rather than try to convince us (in a very condescending tone, I might add) why don’t you do what you do best and trade on it?

  106. Grim says:

    26 years in the outsourcing business…

    When the economy is bad, it’s good.

    When the economy is good, it’s good.

  107. leftwing says:

    Sorry, Anon, did not want to appear condescending…I was actually enjoying the discussion with 3b, et. al…..

    I’ve been out of large corporate employ several years, still work with them closely however in current role. And as I mentioned to contrast on the other side of the spectrum have my own small business (seven figure top line, c. 20 employees). Services. Different sector, not finance/IB.

    I don’t profess to know the answers here…in fact, I think I’ve asked as much of posters here as I have asserted. It’s part of what I like when this forum functions well, diversity of thought and experience.

    I also provided the caveat upfront that by industry circumstances are going to differ. I can tell you that for my alleyway I was first person in the room for two decades on hirings, promotions, comp, and firings in all market conditions as I progressed through the ranks. I can speak to the SD side of tech at the most junior level having two children hired in that space over the last three years.

    Take it for what it’s worth from an anonymous internet poster. But don’t take offense.

  108. Juice Box says:

    Back from a nice 16 mile bike ride, was just riding around and listing to some tunes… I can tell you by biking around that the middle class and the well off white collar workers are not yet back in the office, driveways are full of expensive vehicles so it isn’t the nanny and housekeeper filling up the driveways. I cruised by a golf course and the tee boxes were stacked up with golf carts filled with younger golfers, that should not really be the case for a Tuesday afternoon.

    Here are the numbers folks even though NYC is open and CEOs are hollering, not much has changed. Remember Subway was over 5 million rides a day..

    NYC Subway
    Monday, 6/14/21 2,222,614 -59.3% pre-pandemic

    NYC Bus

    Monday, 6/14/21 1,102,031 -49% pre-pandemic

    LIRR

    Monday, 6/14/21 115,300 -60% pre-pandemic

    Metro-North Railroad

    Monday, 6/14/21 91,100 -66% pre-pandemic

    I did ride by the train station Lot looks to have about 70 cars now. Still Way Way down…pre-pandemic

  109. joyce says:

    Fabius,
    I agree with your entire post but choosing Apple was an interesting example, Foxconn hasn’t exactly had the most gleaming stories written about its working conditions.

    Fabius Maximus says:
    June 15, 2021 at 6:00 pm

    A company can only do the right thing, only “in defense of the brand”. Tim Cook would quite happily build IPhones in Sweat Shops if he didn’t have to consider the impact to the brand. Most other retailers are not that fussy, they will accept the hit.

  110. Juice Box says:

    The chief people officer is a great new title don’t ya think?

    They brand themselves as compassionate, self-aware, and supposedly have the ability to skillfully manage the emotions of the “people” aka employees. We are not hearing from them folks…..other than a few corporate memos that have leaked about return to work deadlines etc.

    When you see CEOs on TV screaming get back to the office, if you can eat out at a restaurant etc, it’s tone deaf.. totally tone deaf and were probably told by their chief people officer the person with the emotional IQ etc that might not be the best approach. Free fancy meals at work in exchange for three hours a day commuting? No thanks I have been on a diet for the last year…..and would rather make my own kale salad at home.

    Gonna be rough adjustment for the next few months and honestly looking out of my corner office at home is much more appealing than being a sardine in an “open office”.

  111. Juice Box says:

    Joyce – They have always used child labor when nobody is looking. Compliance rarely visits the 800 or so factories involved in the manufacturing, and when they do there is wink wink advance notice. The fact is there aren’t any alternative manufacturers for the low low cost that can easily pick up the slack, so they never cut ties and delay product. New suppliers can take years to cultivate so as long as it does not make the press here it’s ok. There will never be an iPhone release delay. Who do you think created their entire JIT supply chain to begin with? It was Tim Cook all along since the late 1990s. He was the one that closed all of Apples own factories, and replaced them with the cheap Chinese labor and look the other way when it comes to sweat shops…..

  112. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Juice,

    They are not opening up NYC till sept/oct. The companies were always waiting till the litigation so that they can’t be sued.

    My wife still hasn’t gone full time, and she works in Jersey.

    By the fall, most people will be back in the office adjusting to life away from WFH. It was good while it lasted, but the same reason the teachers have to come back, so do the office workers.

  113. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Can we stop disrespecting teachers. Enough already.

    “other poster with such a dour outlook on remote work is a teacher.”

  114. Ez says:

    Here’s one teacher feeling extra good today!
    Summer is here. WFH means my wife will be around and that is paradise.

  115. Ez says:

    Love the prospect of a month off. No lie.
    Makes the average pay seem almost kick-ass.

  116. Anon says:

    Leftwing,

    Thanks. You typically come across a bit more measured analytically speaking and so your sort of binary thinking on this seems like an anomaly.

    I’ve adapted the “capital goes where it is treated best”mantra to “labor goes where it is treated best”, and I think brain drain is a real risk for companies that choose too hard of a line. I can’t count the number of people who were against any type of telecommuting before the pandemic who (like Fast Eddie) have come around. There is life beyond the corporate grind, and they can’t make people forget it.

    I posit that most people that come to work in NYC from other parts of the country do so because they thrive in competitive environments. Yes, an employer could trade NY priced employees for lower cost ones. But remote arrangements work both ways. Personally speaking, there are a ton of interesting opportunities in the DC area. I’d never want to live there but if the expectation was that I’d only need to show face a couple times a month, I’d definitely consider it. Ditto goes for some outfits I’ve worked with in places like Austin and Ann Arbor. I’d never want to live there either but in those cases WFH makes it just as likely that I’d take someone else’s job than the other way around. Relative tax burdens not withstanding, national salary parity wouldn’t be the worst thing in the world.

    Lastly, people talk about the exogenous health costs associated with otherwise healthy being locked down due to Covid. Just wait until folks have to start eating the stressful commutes back up. It will be easy to measure via the increase in heart attacks, strokes, and workplace violence.

  117. BRT says:

    Lastly, people talk about the exogenous health costs associated with otherwise healthy being locked down due to Covid. Just wait until folks have to start eating the stressful commutes back up. It will be easy to measure via the increase in heart attacks, strokes, and workplace violence.

    I’m not buying this one. Lockdowns closed parks, gyms, and other things that people would regularly use to keep themselves in shape. The lack of commute did not lead to better health outcomes at all. You will get more heart attacks because the average Covid weight gain is astonishing. But, the fact is, people were in better shape while commuting with gyms/parks open.

  118. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Watch the last 30 seconds of the video. Long on offices…why? Common sense.

    https://apple.news/A-BYa4YKcQhKUcrrfAQpNpg

  119. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Fast Eddie got lazy…wake up!! Surgery makes him want to stay at home.

    Anon says:
    June 15, 2021 at 9:22 pm
    Leftwing,

    Thanks. You typically come across a bit more measured analytically speaking and so your sort of binary thinking on this seems like an anomaly.

    I’ve adapted the “capital goes where it is treated best”mantra to “labor goes where it is treated best”, and I think brain drain is a real risk for companies that choose too hard of a line. I can’t count the number of people who were against any type of telecommuting before the pandemic who (like Fast Eddie) have come around. There is life beyond the corporate grind, and they can’t make people forget it.

  120. The Great Pumpkin says:

    If you hate the grind, move to a simple life. Why are you in NYC metro? This area is for grindin!!

  121. grim says:

    I too think September will be very telling, as it simplifies childcare arrangements dramatically.

  122. grim says:

    Talked to a CEO yesterday, his position is that he wants people back, but he isn’t willing to be the first to stick his neck out. He’s going to push, but he’s going to wait for others to push first, and pull the trigger based on that.

    Could be a potential tidal wave of companies that don’t necessarily care to be part of the reopening publicity.

    Also – talked to one other who started to test the waters. They hired for new positions with the clear communication that it was an on-site job, not remote. They are 10 for 10 in terms of Day 1 no shows.

  123. Fast Eddie says:

    I can’t count the number of people who were against any type of telecommuting before the pandemic who (like Fast Eddie) have come around. There is life beyond the corporate grind, and they can’t make people forget it.

    Also remember, I am closer to retirement than not. I’m not 25 and in the early stages of my career. I will probably be working even beyond the point where I’m forced to take 401K withdrawals and/or S.S. That’s if, the almighty above keeps me around. ;) Who knows, maybe I’ll change my mind and start driving cross-country. But, for the present, WFH suits me well. If I get the call to return to the office, then I’ll obviously comply.

  124. Chicago says:

    Dedicated to WFH and Wometco Home Theater back in the day
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=pg2iKxbeucQ

  125. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Go Jersey!!

    “A new survey from WalletHub has ranked New Jersey as the best state to live in.
    New York came in third, behind Massachusetts.
    The score was based on affordability, economy, education and health, quality of life and safety.”

    https://wallethub.com/edu/best-states-to-live-in/62617

  126. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Grim,

    Thanks for the share.

  127. BRT says:

    Go Jersey!!

    “A new survey from WalletHub has ranked New Jersey as the best state to live in.
    New York came in third, behind Massachusetts.
    The score was based on affordability, economy, education and health, quality of life and safety.”

    https://wallethub.com/edu/best-states-to-live-in/62617

    Because that makes sense. Highest taxes, longest lockdowns/restrictions, among the bottom in opening up schools, and worst death COVID death toll in the world.

  128. The Great Pumpkin says:

    BRT,

    I guess education, health, safety, and quality of life matter. We just all take it for granted, but jersey is a great place to raise your family. It really is.

  129. grim says:

    Lol, clickbait survey nonsense.

  130. The Great Pumpkin says:

    In China, the rat race begins almost the minute you are born – from getting into a good school to getting that prestigious job. But millions now want to break free of this cycle, with two words shedding a light on the frustration felt by the younger generation.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-57328508

  131. Bystander says:

    Grim.

    “They are 10 for 10 in terms of Day 1 no shows.”

    Not surprised at all. People should share their job hunt stories. The non-commitment on employer front is laughable. “It is remove for now but you will have to be in Pennington NJ after COVID”. Why do recruiters even bother reaching out to NYC workers with that sh&t? Go hit up people in Philly area on LinkedIn. Even better – “it is $65/hr contract in Charlotte NC and you will have to be on-site after Covid”. First question to them – “sure, are you paying for my moving costs?” In other words, “we really need cheap labor person remote as someone quit but we don’t care attract someone long term” This job market still acting like everyone in desperation mode. Many are not, particularly skilled people. I can only surmise that most employers really don’t care to hire people long term, want tons of skills upfront, not interested true knowledge gain or value to company, and only care about cost.

  132. Juice Box says:

    No bites yet on the $900,000 flip on the busy road across from the cemetery. You can have it all including a view of grandma and grandpa in their final resting place.

    Check out this picture……

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/217-Oak-Hill-Rd-Middletown-NJ-07748/2070470728_zpid/?mmlb=g,8

  133. Phoenix says:

    ” I can only surmise that most employers really don’t care to hire people long term, want tons of skills upfront, not interested true knowledge gain or value to company, and only care about cost.”

    My vote for partial post of the day.

    You are just a commodity to be bought, traded, sold and used as needed.

    It’s the American way. No ethics, just money.

  134. Phoenix says:

    WalletHub

    Haha.

    Just watched a short on CNET trying to explain how a 700 dollar Chromebook is a great deal.

    Yeah, okay.

  135. Fast Times Eddie says:

    They hired for new positions with the clear communication that it was an on-site job, not remote. They are 10 for 10 in terms of Day 1 no shows.

    I must be missing something here. Are these people being hired within commuting distance of the job or are they a time zone away?

  136. 3b says:

    Juice: At that price no deck/ patio?

  137. Juice Box says:

    or Garage….. Most homes around here have two or three….

  138. The Great Pumpkin says:

    U.S. Housing Market Needs 5.5 Million More Units, Says New Report

    Construction of new homes in the last two decades lagged behind historical levels, contributing to a recent surge in home prices

    https://apple.news/ACM-hk6W9Thi8ZtmawC3sOg

  139. Bystander says:

    Honestly if my IB says back to office, I will wait it out, play every game in the book. It took over a year to get rid of an employee recently. One of the true benefits of being perm employee is the absolute fear of discrimination lawsuits when they let people go.

  140. Juice Box says:

    Pumps – read the comments on the WSJ article as it affects you as a landlord. If the eviction moratorium was removed there would be about 2 million units for rent nationwide and no shortage of affordable housing.

    The push to remove local zoning is on……We cannot get a high density project approved in your town, BLA, BLA, BLA….

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/u-s-housing-market-needs-5-5-million-more-units-says-new-report-11623835800?mod=hp_lead_pos2#comments_sector

  141. Fast Eddie says:

    One of the true benefits of being perm employee is the absolute fear of discrimination lawsuits when they let people go.

    I thought of this as well. I identify as ______. Therefore, you are discriminating against me. Or, I have such and such affliction or condition warranting me to WFH.

  142. Bystander says:

    Juice,

    I’ve applied Google, FB, Apple, Amazon many time. Nothing comes back. My wife would be beyond ecstatic. She grew up in LA and her family is there. I really do like California and would consider it. I had a few opportunities in past. I had a great interview with PIMCO back in 2008 in Huntington Beach but they collapsed obviously. I had another with Wells Fargo IT about 5 years ago but their pay was below what I wanted. Not moving for lower lifestyle. My bro-in-law works compliance for BoA in CA and does not get paid great. He is thinking of moving to BoA office in TX.

  143. Juice Box says:

    Eddie, it won’t work.

    This might.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6pJC0FLA3Sk

  144. grim says:

    I must be missing something here. Are these people being hired within commuting distance of the job or are they a time zone away?

    Commuting distance.

  145. grim says:

    These were people that accepted jobs, had a start date, and didn’t bother showing up for training.

  146. Fast Eddie says:

    Juice,

    Oh yeah, that’s the ticket! ;) lol.

  147. Fast Eddie says:

    grim,

    10 for 10? Why would you interview, accept a job and not show up?

  148. 3b says:

    Juice: Major multi family development all over Bergen Co . Park Ridge is finishing the 200 plus units built in the center of town. Looks like it’s right out of JC/ Harrison. 150
    More bring built on Kindergarten in Emerson, and Hackensack multi family building every where; developers want it to be Hoboken north.

  149. Bystander says:

    “Juice: At that price no deck/ patio?”

    They should make a slanted deck. Roll you right into the 6 foot hole when you get latest tax bill. If there a sign of housing bubble, this is it. 900K for Poltergeist replay? God, I hope it does not rain hard there.

  150. Juice Box says:

    3B – I was up in Bergen County last week. I don’t miss it one bit…old run down homes crumbling infrastructure, very crowded roads. This was Friday around 5PM. Every restaurant parking lot was full and the malls were packed. As soon as I could I got the hell out of there I did and sat in loads and loads of Parkway Traffic headed back down the shore!!!

    Anecdotal my poor brother got into a fender bender on Teaneck road traffic heading back to the Turnpike. Some kid bobbing and weaving in Teaneck traffic caused it so he says…. New car might be totaled..

  151. grim says:

    10 for 10? Why would you interview, accept a job and not show up?

    Change of heart, countered by existing employer, not willing to give up current employment situation (WFH), childcare situations, etc.

    The last one is interesting, starting to hear lots of grumbling from working parents trying to flexible child care arrangements to fit hybrid work schedules (variable days, etc). Apparently this is not possible, as many places are looking for full-time kids only (not sure, never used day care).

    Was actually curious about this, made a number of phone calls yesterday. There doesn’t seem to be a ton of child-care availability with my local providers. Played the ‘can you take my kid 2 or 3 days a week’, and even those with availability gave me flat out no. Childcare doesn’t at all appear to be geared up to support flex arrangements. Suspect many of these places are still running with reduced capacity. Suspect this will be a major driver in the near term.

  152. Juice Box says:

    #B – re: Park Ridge

    All those nice high paying white collar jobs from companies on those leafy campuses in Bergen Country and Passaic county are leaving…. For example many now leaving Park Ridge and Montvale etc. What is left up there? Mercedes is gone to Atlanta, Hertz left for Florida, my sister inlaw’s company is ditching their building too.

    Convert all that commercial office space into 5 story condos complexes with retail on the first floor?

  153. Juice Box says:

    Day care usually does not have to be full time. But it is expensive in New Jersey. $1200 a month or so. I would say with WFH you can save that $1200 a month…. You need to earn about $10 an hour extra to pay for it….

  154. Libturd says:

    Not where we live. It’s closer to $1,600 now. We paid $1,200 at a middle of the scale daycare center back in 2005.

  155. 3b says:

    Juice: My wife is in Montvale, they tore down the old Mercedes building and are building condos there. Lots of other empty office space as well. The old farm/ nursery was torn down a few years ago, and replaced by condos and retail, including a Wegmans. Park Ridge looks totally different now with the apartments right in the heart of town, much more urban feel. I have been in BC for a long time, in spite of all the development over the years, it’s getting real shabby looking . Lots of these Mc Mansions looking crappy now with warped faded siding. I have a friend of mine retired engineer does side jobs, he told me the quality and construction of these houses are awful. He is doing repairs all the time. Heating, cooling , windows installed incorrectly along with all sorts of repairs. Monmouth is like a different world, I can certainly understand why you prefer it over Bergen Co.

  156. JCer says:

    bystander, you are likely perceived as too old for those companies, everyone wants 20s and 30s less so 40’s and 50’s. That and you have the stink of finance on you, the perception from those tech companies is that the banks are technically incompetent baring MS and GS. You also are not a technical person, they view the IT processes in place at the banks as horrendous they do not operate in the same kind of regulatory environment and view your “experience”as not relevant to their business.

    You are very right about being able to coast, the policies these banks have put in do not align with maximizing employee performance. Even if you are literally the worst employee they have made it so hard to replace someone no manager in the world will want to get rid of you if you are at all useful and not disuptive. Head counts are so thin in bank IT at the moment and the policies most banks have in place if they get rid of you they need to justify why they need a replacement(and why the replacement needs to be in the US), no managers have time to deal with it and the pains of hiring an employee. Only thing you have to worry about is mandated thinning of the herd which given the headcounts and attrition rate it’s not something most people in the banks have to worry about, the bigger worry is job relocation and salary reductions.

  157. chicagofinance says:

    You forgot down the street and in earshot of an at-grade railroad crossing on North Jersey Coast line where train must sound off as they approach.

    Juice Box says:
    June 16, 2021 at 9:40 am
    No bites yet on the $900,000 flip on the busy road across from the cemetery. You can have it all including a view of grandma and grandpa in their final resting place.

    Check out this picture……

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/217-Oak-Hill-Rd-Middletown-NJ-07748/2070470728_zpid/?mmlb=g,8

  158. JCer says:

    lib, literally everything is more expensive here in Essex, I think because we pay the stupid high property taxes there is a perception we will pay more for everything.

    3b, JB almost all new construction in NJ is cr@p and most McMansions look like they are falling apart shortly after being built only the high end custom homes built for discerning buyers in places like Short Hills, Rumson, Alpine, Franklin Lakes, etc are built to any kind of standards. Monmouth doesn’t have the density of Bergen or Essex county so it fares a bit better in than regard and has nice access to the ocean etc at the expense of proximity, yes you have the ferry but it is crazy expensive. Most of the housing built in places like Manalapan and fair number of other Monmouth county tows is literally cr@p if built in the last 25 years. Even some really expensive homes are often built cheaply, they’ll use better siding and finishes but as they age you can find where corners were cut. They don’t build them like they used to, so much so that Chubb insurance has me carrying over 3 million in just construction coverage on my 1920’s home literally double what my sister has on her 2000’s built home of a similar size. Even compared to the 1970’s and 80’s a lot of these new homes are bad.

  159. JCer says:

    Chi it’s going to take a real sucker to buy that house at 900k. I particularly like the genuine “cedar-look vinyl siding that is only on the front, very cheaply done all the materials look like they came from Home Depot or Lowes, the off the shelf stuff not special order. Add no garage, no deck or patio, and a location across from a giant cemetery, close enough to hear rt 35 and a train all for nearly a million dollars certainly a bad value.

  160. 3b says:

    Jcer: Not a fan of Marlboro/Manalapan, both appear to me as crowded and congested. As for the Mc Mansions and quality, my friend tells me the quality of the hearing/ cooling equipment, bathroom/ kitchen fixtures is all crap. Many of the houses don’t even have space for a small deck or patio, just cheap sliding doors out to a small
    landing.

  161. 3b says:

    Jcer: Someone in this environment will eventually buy it. It’s crazy but they will.

  162. JCer says:

    Just looking at zillow I don’t know how the flip competes with something like this where the ask is 50k less it has a better location, lot, curb appael, and the finishes while older and not on trend appear to be of a higher quality.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/65-Hillyer-Cir-Middletown-NJ-07748/53358382_zpid/

  163. chicagofinance says:

    Does not fit narrative……. must suppress….
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sSfejgwbDQ8

  164. chicagofinance says:

    I used to live 5 minutes further down the road toward the Parkway…… at least the train station is super close and also having a Whole Foods so close you can use it as a convenience store is really nice. Not an excuse for the price, but there are some benefits to the location. Easy Uber to Red Bank too.

    JCer says:
    June 16, 2021 at 11:34 am
    Chi it’s going to take a real sucker to buy that house at 900k. I particularly like the genuine “cedar-look vinyl siding that is only on the front, very cheaply done all the materials look like they came from Home Depot or Lowes, the off the shelf stuff not special order. Add no garage, no deck or patio, and a location across from a giant cemetery, close enough to hear rt 35 and a train all for nearly a million dollars certainly a bad value.

  165. Juice Box says:

    re: “yes you have the ferry but it is crazy expensive”

    Not really about $70 a month more from down here in Monmouth if you don’t need to take the Subway. Most people do when they land via train at Penn Station, and Ferry is faster….

    NY Waterway monthly to Wall St, Pier 11, WFC, Paulus Hook & Midtown: $642.50
    Monthly Train is $445.00 to NY Penn + $ $127 monthly NYC subway = $572.00

  166. Libtard says:

    Remember my Red Bank Friends who refinanced so many times that they owed more on their 15 year old home than they paid for it. Well, one of their sets of parents passed and they got a nice inheritance and bought a home on that same road. A beautiful $800K place in early 2020. Funny, even with the inheritance, they put next to nothing down. They’ve been jetsetting around the world ever since the inheritance. Renewed vows and another miniwedding in Disneyworld. Mother just went to Vegas and flew directly to Hilton Head to reunite with some college friends. I give them three years before they are refinancing again. If you look up the mortgages/deeds under either of their names in Monmouth County, it is now 8 pages long.

  167. Libturd says:

    “Ferry is faster….”

    And no man ass in your face for 90 minutes.

  168. Bystander says:

    Jcer,

    Hah, I would not hire me either. No question about the dinosaur perception. I am not a developer but expecting that simply have a skill on team means you can deliver is among biggest fallacies of my area. You have to question and motive people all the time. Honestly, I don’t have a first clue on exec mgt mindset. They instituted a hiring freeze for three months, which crippled us to start year. We are now in mid-year panic about what we can do now that some hiring has been approved (but only low cost locations). Management is all over us to still deliver. In mean time, we are losing Pune folks in droves and candidates taking 8 months to on-board then decline a few weeks before joining as getting better offers. It is not discussed, not mentioned, not acknowledged..just beating us over head to deliver. If I hear ‘fewer and better”, I will vomit. Think you are getting SDET or full stack at 2-3 year pay level..pure insanity. They are coming in at highest rate plus 25% premium for niche skills. Take it or leave it.

  169. chicagofinance says:

    I have seen a seven figure client pass away and the kids have already spent the money, so it was sending two checks to melt like a block of ice in boiling water…..

    Libtard says:
    June 16, 2021 at 12:02 pm
    Remember my Red Bank Friends who refinanced so many times that they owed more on their 15 year old home than they paid for it. Well, one of their sets of parents passed and they got a nice inheritance and bought a home on that same road. A beautiful $800K place in early 2020. Funny, even with the inheritance, they put next to nothing down. They’ve been jetsetting around the world ever since the inheritance. Renewed vows and another miniwedding in Disneyworld. Mother just went to Vegas and flew directly to Hilton Head to reunite with some college friends. I give them three years before they are refinancing again. If you look up the mortgages/deeds under either of their names in Monmouth County, it is now 8 pages long.

  170. Juice Box says:

    We have had a spate of pandemic sales that drove prices way up. and sales have cooled down a bit.

    This house was about $700k 8 years ago when I was shopping around here.. They were built in the 1980s..Not bad if you like the permanent 24 x 7 woosh of the parkway nearby for $900k.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1-Terry-Ln-Middletown-NJ-07748/53358481_zpid/

  171. Fast Eddie says:

    Fights breaking out between Russian and US press, O’Biden nodding at nothing, the Russian military 300 miles off the coast of Hawaii… I guess O’Biden is viewed exactly as we had thought; that of a weak, flimsy, carboard cut-out of a president.

    https://www.yahoo.com/news/biden-putin-met-press-chaos-140235080.html

  172. Libturd says:

    Any news in there to report Gary? Or is conjecture what passes for news in the populist party.

  173. Libturd says:

    Most of the time when Trump spoke, much of the press was not invited. Heck of a president that Trump was.

  174. Juice Box says:

    News is they met for 2.5 hours instead of the planned 5 hours, to me when someone leaves the party early they did so because they did not like what was said. There should be a call now in congress to subpoena the notes of the president’s interpreters or perhaps the interpreters themselves. I am waiting for the hit piece from the NY Times to drop. Should I wait long?

  175. joyce says:

    Wonder how many other times this happened before body cameras in the cop’s 18 years on the job. And to think, he was just two years shy of being eligible to retire at the age of 46. Still a long ways away from conviction.

    https://www.nj.com/passaic-county/2021/06/paterson-cop-charged-with-attack-on-handcuffed-man-ordered-released-from-jail.html

  176. No One says:

    Fun fact, Lina Khan, new 32 year old antitrust czar, wunderkind, has never worked for a real business, only academia, think tanks, and government. Antitrust law has always been arbitrary, but it will become even more so. Khan says she wants to base actions on “values,” presumably her own, which more or less gives her open reign to go after any company that her feelings object to. Of course she will make up a lot of fancy legal theory to justify going where her feelings go. The funny thing is that her targets (big internet companies) are those both Tucker Carlson and Elizabeth Warren want to attack. But having the ability to attack any company those in power don’t like is going to make companies even more the lapdogs of government, who will be going out of their way to please their masters.

  177. Bystander says:

    Ed,

    You need to check yourself sometimes. Name the president who was in office:

    “A Russian fighter aircraft approached a US Navy aircraft over the Mediterranean Sea Sunday, both governments confirmed while offering different accounts of the incident.”

    “For days, news reports have noted the presence of a Russian naval ship lurking in international waters off the East Coast of the United States”

  178. No One says:

    For those higher up, you could be working remotely from my area in a house like this. This house is unusual in that they don’t have a pool in their screened lanai, just a hot tub. Play tennis in the morning before work at the club just 4 minutes away.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/3476-Mistletoe-Ln-Longboat-Key-FL-34228/47464875_zpid/

  179. TheGreatOrangeHorsePooperTheBossIsPutin says:

    Eddie, Eddie;

    Did you get that picker upper that I ask for from your Mississippi half-brother first cousing? I needed badly. I need to get up full of energy for my restoration as POTUS.

    Yeah Biden is a weakling. I’m going to kick his behind when I reinstated in a few weeks. If I had been there with Boss Putin, it would have been great. Boss would have brought certain girls that I like and he would give me the things I got say and do and voila – back to normal.

  180. JCer says:

    JB ferry is approx $650 per month and that “ferry bus” is a bag of suck at Rush Hour(when it gets really hot taking the PATH/Subway from Jersey City is not desirable, the ferry is much more comfortable), NJT train from suburban essex or bergen is like $250. Those of us in NNJ who work downtown take the PATH from Harrison, path is like $100 per month, parking used to be cheap not so much anymore. I’ve never spent $500 month to get to work, I’m cheap at worst I had to pay for a metrocard and the PATH and even that was only when the weather was bad enough it made sense to take the subway. I can get parking in either JSQ or harrison for $200 or less and the wife and I can commute together plus $100 each for PATH no tolls etc, it’s $400 for 2 commuters we did this for quite a while, $1300 is quite a bit more. From Monmouth it is the most palatable option by far, NJT is a bag of suck for 30 minutes, I cannot imagine over an hour plus all of their BS with never being on-time. My commute prior to COVID was close $0 probably $5 a day in Turnpike tolls and even that I’d avoid it pretty often, a little gas and free parking at a client site. Commute costs and time were one of my factors when I decided to come back to a job in NJ.

  181. No One says:

    It’s just so funny that the left and the journalists were constantly agitating to unilaterally disarm against the Russian threat, forever pushing for “détente” with them, encouraging cultural exchanges and listening tours, and generally promoting being soft on Russia as long as it was the USSR. After all that time of loving Russia while it was explicitly targeting the US for destruction, suddenly they started hating it as soon as Cankles blamed the Russians for her humiliating defeat at the hands of one of the world’s dumbest politicians. Lefties are obsessed with Russia in the same way that Trumpies are obsessed with vote count conspiracies. There’s nothing Russia does that China doesn’t do much worse.

  182. leftwing says:

    “Relative tax burdens not withstanding, national salary parity wouldn’t be the worst thing in the world.”

    Nice writeup Anon. Very interesting concept above….

    “They hired for new positions with the clear communication that it was an on-site job, not remote. They are 10 for 10 in terms of Day 1 no shows.”

    Grim, any ability to bookend the type of job….generic level, approximate comp, general location (urban/suburban)? TY

  183. Faster Eddie says:

    Most of the time when Trump spoke, much of the press was not invited. Heck of a president that Trump was.

    He gave impromptu Q&A sessions a few times per week, sometimes spending 90 minutes or better answering everything and anything. There were no scripts, no hidden bunkers, no murmuring and speculating and no 30 second really, awkward muddled gaps inflicting the scarecrow currently in charge. This administration is a dumpster fire. Enjoy your $4/gallon gas and $9/hamburger meat as O’Biden gets banged by global leaders like a prost1tute on fentany1.

  184. No One says:

    TheGreatOrangeHorsePooperTheBossIsPutin,
    You are a weird person and nobody likes you and your dumb pseudonyms only arouse yourself. You are proof that Trumpists don’t have all the under-90 IQ political trolls. In tennis terms you are a “pusher” – you’ve got no offensive shots of your own so you run around the court dinking back Fast Eddies’ balls. Kind of pathetic.

  185. Fast Eddie says:

    Listen to this drugged up, in outer space, stumbling, muttering half-wit. It’s humiliating. His own wife needs to be smacked for elder abuse:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d18fa34_IWc

  186. Fast Eddie says:

    This is sad… omg, what a mess:

    https://youtu.be/gYULDxLuYzY

  187. TheGreatOrangeSpeakingLikeStewieAfterPickerUpper says:

    No One,

    Issue is Russia and China both are using the whole bag of dirty tricks that were used by the USSR communist during the last century.

    The US was never going to go far left as USSR commies wanted. But the US can go far right as Putin wants as its history. The deep south was for all intent and purposes a fascist state, if you were not one of those connected upper class families like post made here about the family that were prosecutors for decades aka – Good Ole Boys and their kid got “hit”; if you were poor – it was bad, if you were not white and poor – it was hell.

    The goal of Putin is to break up the USA like the USSR was broken up. Putin outlook is roughly what Aleksandr Dugin wrote in the ” Foundation of Geopolitics – The Geopolitical future of Russia”. In short no USA talking democracy, civil rights and liberty – Russia is the European Rooster.

    China is the same goal. Theirs is based in that they think that their century of humiliation is over and they are going to be the Rooster of the World with the Commie in charge forever and the world should kow tow to them.

  188. TheGreatOrangePooMakingMacaroniPictures says:

    OMG, I’m crying. No One does not like me……

    Eddie, get back to putting my great orange poo in hole 5. I got another worker to help you out. His name is No One and he thinks we are in kindergarten…

    Eddie, that stuff from your half brother first cousin was great…Another shot now… Yeah baby…

  189. Bystander says:

    Good thing we already dumped the guy responsible for the trillions in bailout that led to this moment.

    “Enjoy your $4/gallon gas and $9/hamburger “

  190. tripstar385 says:

    Fast – Has this been edited? I am kind of hoping that it has been. Not that any of these politicians have any real power, the money’d players and corporations run the show. But geez that clip is pretty unsettling.

    I saw one where Biden was walking around under some tent and a reporter shouted out a question, which POTUS recognized and started to answer, only to be interuppted by his wife and walked back to the table like a lost child.

    USA!! USA!! Game show hosts and dementia patients. Can we finally get a Libertarian to get some traction against the decrepit GOP and DNC?

  191. Fast Eddie says:

    I saw one where Biden was walking around under some tent and a reporter shouted out a question, which POTUS recognized and started to answer, only to be interrupted by his wife and walked back to the table like a lost child.

    Yup, like he was a four year old who just woke from a nap.

  192. Fast Eddie says:

    “Joe, how was your meeting with Putin?”

    “Yum! Butterscotch pudding is my favorite!!”

  193. JCer says:

    Yes Biden looks really feeble, this is bad, if not for basement campaigning he would have lost badly even to an unpopular Trump. When the Canadian PM is saying you won’t be the president in 2022 it means something serious is up. The dems really put us in quite the predicament, he arguably was the weakest candidate from either party. He won because Trump says stupid things without thinking and we were in a pandemic, arguably he lost a ton of votes because of his callousness regarding the pandemic. Could they not have found someone qualified you was maybe below retirement age(65 perhaps)? Very scary we are going to get taken to the cleaners by our adversaries.

  194. leftwing says:

    “Even some really expensive homes are often built cheaply, they’ll use better siding and finishes but as they age you can find where corners were cut.”

    Personal pique, zero clearance fireplaces on $2m+ homes…..really? Drives me nuts.

  195. leftwing says:

    “Most of the time when Trump spoke, much of the press was not invited. Heck of a president that Trump was.”

    C’mon Lib…..

    I’m on my third presser of the day….Putin had his puppet press but also took some very pointed US press questions….Powell getting grilled for an hour now by anyone and everyone on the Zoom screen…

    Biden? “uhm, they give me a sheet of paper with the names I’m supposed to ask for questions…”. Pulls a sheet of paper out of his pocket.

    AP, NYT, Reuters, and RFE.

    And on the way out a couple reporters barked real questions at him, before his handlers could hustle him out he got all old person irritated…”if you don’t know that I can’t help!”

    Honesty or balance, don’t toss both of them out of the window with your opinion…..

  196. leftwing says:

    And the only reason there was these ridiculous ‘stacked’ separate news conferences rather than the always customary both leaders at podiums answering questions together is because Joe cannot be trusted under any circumstance in ad-hoc public exchanges…..

    Although, in all seriousness, I would have paid substantial sums for him at some point on camera to have looked at Putin and said “you’re a dog faced pony soldier!”.

  197. 3b says:

    Powell talking out of both sides of his mouth.

  198. 3b says:

    Biden ok with pipeline from Russia to Europe, but not cancels one from Canada to USA.

  199. leftwing says:

    “TheGreatOrangeHorsePooperTheBossIsPutin, You are a weird person and…Kind of pathetic.”

    TY. And not funny. At all.

    Just stop.

  200. Libturd says:

    I don’t like Joe and you all know he was my 19th of the 20 candidates running. The only one worse was that Williamson chick. Yet somehow old Joe beat your guy. Don’t forget that. On the bright side, Joe is not like Trump in any way, so if and when his faculties become detrimental to his ability to play President, he will step aside. And Pelosi is going to single-handedly run the show, much like Mitch played cleanup boy for Trump. Now I’m not a big fan of Pelosi either or any of these establishment Democrats. But I feel a lot safer with her and the Schumer types pulling the strings than I did with President Grab them by the puzzy and schmoozer with Kim-Yong-Un. Pelosi is ruthless much like Mitch. But I align with much of her social platform.

    What Fast reported as news was less than nothing. And to say that somehow Biden had something to do with the behavior of the press was asinine. But this is the sh1t that fools the masses of stupid looking for anything and everything to find fault where little exists besides a hatred of the other side’s political alignment.

    Which returns us once again to the foolishness in proceeding down the path that Trump carved. For the harder the right pushes populism and continues to fabricate news, the more it empowers the left. Again, Great Grandpa Biden didn’t even campaign and brought out the vote in droves. This nonsense about midterm victories for the right are pure poppyc0ck. For the right actually believes the only reason the Dems dominated was due to mail in ballots. How stupid are they going to feel when they lose even more ground at the voting machine. Of course, they will claim fraud their too. Because making sh1t up is all they got left to go on.

  201. Libturd says:

    Yes 3B, complete hypocrisy on the pipelines. But we all know that the XL Pipeline will be completed the moment the right gains any significant power which appears will be never.

  202. leftwing says:

    CNBC saying 30 year mortgage moved from 3.03 on Friday to 3.30 for tomorrow’s quote…

    Don’t know if any of our RE guys have anything better or more specific…

  203. leftwing says:

    “…if and when his faculties become detrimental to his ability…”

    I can’t stand either Joe or DJT but, factually, it seems we are likely beyond that hypothetical….

    And if you don’t agree I challenge you to a pushup competition!!

  204. TheGreatestPushUpDoerEverWithOrangeHair says:

    Leftwing too, you are hired. Now go to work with No One and Eddie.

    You guys will be know as “My 3 Stooges” hit team, making sure my great orange horse poo is spread as often, as far, and as long as possible….

    PS. Leftwing how are you going to do push up? I saw a picture of you, you used to work as a body double to Christie for his security appearances, and your hands still way smaller then mines.

  205. Libturd says:

    Only if I can use my belly as a springboard.

  206. Libturd says:

    Thailand and Taiwan. Not the same?

  207. 3b says:

    Lib: I would not be so sure about the right never getting power again. If they dump Trump, they might attract moderates. Interestingly, I know a few big Biden supporters who are less then impressed with Biden. As one said we went from a lunatic to a guy who appears to be totally out of it.

  208. Anon says:

    BRT,

    Sorry if I wasn’t clear – you are making my point. Increased BMI + back to rush hour driving/parking + relying on unreliable train/subway + having to deal with homeless/junkies/crazies + less tolerance for crowds + less opportunity for quality sleep/time to decompress + disdain for being forced to a disruptive open office environment after a year plus being remote = recipe for employee sickness, turnover, or both.

    Going to be an interesting September.

    I’m not buying this one. Lockdowns closed parks, gyms, and other things that people would regularly use to keep themselves in shape. The lack of commute did not lead to better health outcomes at all. You will get more heart attacks because the average Covid weight gain is astonishing. But, the fact is, people were in better shape while commuting with gyms/parks open.

  209. Phoenix says:

    3b,
    I agree.
    Pendulums tend to swing.
    Especially in America.

    What comes next?
    You’ve been freed
    Do you know how hard it is to lead?
    You’re on your own
    Awesome, wow!
    Do you have a clue what happens now?

    Oceans rise
    Empires fall
    It’s much harder when it’s all your call
    All alone, across the sea
    When your people say they hate you
    Don’t come crawling back to me

  210. Phoenix says:

    Anon,

    It’s already ticked up. The crazy is increasing, the summer heat will crank it up a bit.

    Job security for me. Now remember, don’t pull out the knife.

    For some other tips, search this guy.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oiJNIbT_nls

  211. Juice Box says:

    Phoenix – I like that Doc. Reminds me of a Doc friend of mine from my Manhattan days, he lived with a bunch of other wild and crazy Docs who all did their residency at Mount Sinai Beth Israel. We partied hard at their place in the village. Roof top parties with rock bands etc. He is now living in Hawaii and still does Emergency Medicine after all these years. He had it with NYC about a decade ago…Nice portable skill….being a doctor.

  212. tripstar385 says:

    Is CNN supposed to be saying this part out-loud? I found this clip interesting considering the debate comparing the pressers of POTUS’s.

    Some of you guys still equate any criticism of Biden with love for Trump. Here’s a secret for you – If you view any criticism of Biden as right-wing Trump nut-job speech, then you are just as brainwashed as the right.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e32x5mKyYAU

  213. Bystander says:

    Trip,

    Biden sucks. Who the hell wanted the guy? No one I know but those pulling for Trump after the failed leadership, dumb statements, conspiracy Q nonsense, and inflammatory racist crap have a screw loose. Find a sane person. They still won’t let it go even after he showed really scary, deranged side that led to riot and deaths. It backed exactly what sane people were saying for years. Mentally ill, authoritarian with narcissism rage disorder.

  214. chicagofinance says:

    1/2 of it was The Ten and the other half was spread. Is that surprising given that the June rally was probably short covering anyway? We belong up here….. even if the pricing bond steadies, I’m sure the spread might tighten anyway….

    leftwing says:
    June 16, 2021 at 3:57 pm
    CNBC saying 30 year mortgage moved from 3.03 on Friday to 3.30 for tomorrow’s quote…

    Don’t know if any of our RE guys have anything better or more specific…

  215. BRT says:

    Anon,

    that I will agree

  216. tripstar385 says:

    Bystander – Of course and I agree. Trump was an absolute psycho but the staunch support of Biden, with the primary driver of the support being “He’s not Trump” doesn’t square with me.

    Biden is a total disaster. Trump was a total disaster. Supporting one bc you despise the other is 5 year old level thinking. Hold our elected officials accountable, in all cases. Biden 100% displaying signs of dementia, not just cognitive decline, full on dementia. The silent pauses, the outbursts of anger and rage when confused, the light schedule especially in the afternoon. It is 100% in-line with symptoms of dementia.

    Go ahead and ignore it if you like, but more people see it than not. I have no solution to this, so I am part of the problem too. What’s the answer? Get him to step down? Maybe? I am no fan of Harris but she is better than the Biden in his current form.

  217. grim says:

    Mark my words, we’re going to regret China’s widespread global vaccine distribution.

  218. Fast Eddie says:

    Mark my words, we’re going to regret China’s widespread global vaccine distribution.

    China has a global vaccination plan? Where did I miss this one?

  219. 3b says:

    Grim:Why?

  220. Juice Box says:

    China is vaccinating 20 million people every day but even with that pace they will not get up into the 60% range until the end of this year. We can and will make allot of effective vaccine before then, that can be exported to our partners around the world.

  221. grim says:

    Because it doesn’t work to curb transmission, is only marginally effective, and will require a second global vaccination effort to correct. Keeps the door wide open to endemic covid and creation of new variants.

  222. Juice Box says:

    They are already attempting to clone the Moderna/Pfizer vaccine, with the help of US venture capital.

    https://www.fiercebiotech.com/biotech/china-s-stemirna-raises-188m-to-fund-mrna-covid-19-vaccine

  223. Juice Box says:

    Speaking of crappy vaccines.

    German biopharmaceutical CureVac tanked last night.

    After Hours: Last | 8:35 AM EDT
    52.85 down-41.94 (-44.25%)

    https://www.cnbc.com/quotes/CVAC?qsearchterm=cure

  224. BidenIsTheGOAT says:

    CNN viewers continue to drop. I guess they are butt hurt that Biden isn’t giving them anything.

    It shouldn’t be a surprise to anyone. Biden his in basement for a year and now they are hiding him in plain sight.

  225. Juice Box says:

    There is already a massive global vaccination effort being run with US money.

    Pfizer has now up their vaccine production target to 3 Billion doses a year they have finished building additional manufacturing and filling lines in Puurs, Belgium. They have supply agreements in place with 122 countries, and the plan is to deliver their vaccines along with others manufacturers approx two billion doses this year.

    Moderna is lagging but has production estimates now of 1 Billion doses this year. Additional lines are running now at Lonza’s plants in Switzerland and Rovi’s plants in Spain.

    Then there is the work being done by the vaccine alliance with COVAX. We are paying for that too.

    https://www.gavi.org/

    I am not so sure the Chinese can beat us to vaccinate the world..

  226. The Great Pumpkin says:

    That’s all they are good at…stealing.

    Juice Box says:
    June 17, 2021 at 8:30 am
    They are already attempting to clone the Moderna/Pfizer vaccine, with the help of US venture capital.

    https://www.fiercebiotech.com/biotech/china-s-stemirna-raises-188m-to-fund-mrna-covid-19-vaccine

  227. BidenIsTheGOAT says:

    Tell that to the people who had almost no risk from covid and now have complications from the vaccine.

    “the guy is a complete piece of shit”

  228. Juice Box says:

    Death and taxes are the only guarantees in life. Let’s wait for the trials to be completed. Children make up 14% of the covid positive cases, so they are a source of transmission. What is surprising and not yet understood is why they don’t get severely sick like other respiratory viruses and why this virus mortality rises so steeply after the age of 60..

  229. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Guy gets killed over grass clippings. Flyover country has cheap housing though.

    https://youtu.be/dcU5DGCS3gI

  230. Juice Box says:

    One can imagine the USA where we did not develop and administer these effective vaccines. I wonder where we would be now if we didn’t? How many people over 60 would have died by now etc, and continued lockdowns indefinitely would cause massive protests and unrest.

    India is still the country to watch, They have only vaccinated about 3.5% of their population. Thursday 67,208 new COVID-19 infections over the past 24 hours and thousands of deaths a day reported 2,330. Those are the official numbers and who knows if they are even close to reality.

  231. Juice Bxo says:

    Pumps just a short ride down Hamburg Turnpike there have been over 50 shootings and many murders this year, and hey expensive housing to boot!

  232. BidenIsTheGOAT says:

    Also, Trump spent 4 years fending off paces, conspiracies and constant fake news. I don’t fault the guy for being paranoid.

  233. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Most densely populated state, yet, it’s ranked 4th safest in this rankings list. We all take it for granted, but we live in a safe place.

    4. New Jersey
    Population: 8.88 million

    Low violent crime rank: 5

    Low property crime rank: 5

    Learn more about New Jersey.

    https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/slideshows/10-safest-states-in-america?slide=8

    Juice Bxo says:
    June 17, 2021 at 9:24 am
    Pumps just a short ride down Hamburg Turnpike there have been over 50 shootings and many murders this year, and hey expensive housing to boot!

  234. Libturd says:

    “Tell that to the people who had almost no risk from covid and now have complications from the vaccine.”

    600,000 deaths annually is better than 5,200 incidences of vaccine related deaths (most, likely due to underlying issues). Don’t forget, without the vaccine, Covid 19 doesn’t go away.

    And now you understand how completely fukced up the logic of the mind of a Trump supporter is. Like the puzzy grabber, political power is more important than American lives. And yes, Cuomo and Murphy are no better.

    “5,208 reports of death (0.0017%) among people who received a COVID-19 vaccine. FDA requires healthcare providers to report any death after COVID-19 vaccination to VAERS, even if it’s unclear whether the vaccine was the cause.”

  235. Fast Eddie says:

    And now you understand how completely fukced up the logic of the mind of a Trump supporter is.

    Is it the person or his policies that doesn’t make sense to you?

  236. No One says:

    Anyone want to relocate to Sarasota and buy a house with an income-producing 7-slip boat marina attached to it? This house will need a very specific type of buyer.
    “Income producing Marina is a great way to live the dream and have your own business in your backyard, 7 boat slips with water & electric make over 2k a month!”
    As long as you don’t mind the sounds of boat motors starting up at the crack of dawn.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/145-Holly-Ave_Sarasota_FL_34243_M68425-57304?ex=fl2924565147&identityID=6060e3b0f7e44a00ddbbf22d&MID=2021_03_Popular_Homes&RID=25148827582&cid=eml_promo_Marketing_PRSL_PopularHomes202103_cons.12552482_2021_03_Popular_Homes-popularhomesCTA-BUY

  237. Libturd says:

    “Is it the person or his policies that doesn’t make sense to you?”

    A lot the person, plus some of his policies.

    You see, Biden might be a sucky, do little, president. But what he won’t do is make HAYUGE changes, brag about how affective they are and how great he is and then ignore the negative results of those changes (like Trump’s tax cuts for the wealthy). Sure, he is a bumbling old man and at times embarrassing to watch due to his speech disorder combined with his old age. I’ll give you that. But he won’t make fun of the disabled by joking about the Special Olympics. And he won’t tell people to shoot themselves up with bleach to avoid Covid. He won’t ask an infomercial bed linen hawker to cure Covid. What’s Trump’s excuse? Simple. He was never qualified to lead. Heck, he wasn’t even a good developer, having to be on television to make a buck (perhaps). As for policies, I think the Left is going overboard with their identity politics, but at the end of the day, it really doesn’t hurt anyone. Trump’s hatred of immigration (except when he hired them instead of union workers on his developments), disregard for the environment and general cluelessness in dealing with China (that fake tariff agreement) did a lot of real damage. Sorry if letting gays get married negatively impacted your manhood.

  238. No One says:

    Biden-GOAT,
    I’m curious who are the median viewers and the key differentiating characteristics of the different TV news channels.
    Fox News is the biggest channel, I think viewership skews older, definitely conservative, but I wonder how wide the spread of their popularity ranges. I bet a lot of the people Dems used to call “Joe Sixpack” watch Fox News if they watch news.
    Then there are hardcore right wing people watching fringe channels like Blaze TV or NEWSMAX. As far as I can tell, some of the nuttiest people vowed they would never watch Fox News again after deciding to accept the idea that Joe B. had won the election.

    CNN – who watches that now? People in airport terminals who have no choice. People who were hot for Wolf Blitzer 30 years ago. People in Atlanta wanting to tune in to see friends or family on TV. Cuomosexuals. Who else?

    MSNBC – Hard left poli-sci majors and professors of sociology. LGBTQRS+ activists. Elliot Page. Does the MSNBC audience skew whiter than CNN? What are the key differentiating features between MSNBC and CNN and their audiences?

    I wonder which channel old-school libertarians watch. I guess Fox Business where a couple of their commentators/contributors are actual libertarians. Like Kennedy or Kat Timms or John Stossel. But I got bored of the all-opinion, low-news formats.

  239. 3b says:

    Left: I agree with the exception of your comment on the left and identity politics not hurting anyone. I think it is tearing the county apart. And forcing people to go along or get along. Cancel culture, censorship, it’s definitely a problem. And at the end of the day accomplishes nothing.

  240. No One says:

    Libturd,
    I agree that a do-very-little Biden administration would be better than more exhausting time with Trump. Unfortunately we live in an administrative state and the alphabet agencies can more or less write laws and regulations themselves. So more is being done than you might think, and a lot of it for the worse.

    As for identity politics not hurting anyone, there I strongly disagree, as least when it comes to the new Critical Race Theory movement of identity politics. This philosophy is extremely racist, collectivist, subjectivist and will absolutely cripple minds with race-based hatred – across all races. And it effectively shuts the door on the principle of individual rights, or of individuals as such, while beckoning elevated racial-collective conflicts.

  241. Libturd says:

    The critical race theory is a mess. It makes for a good talking point, but I don’t see any real policy change whatsoever from it’s move to the forefront (which I blame the right for, btw). Can you identify any change? The whole BLM movement did next to nothing to help their cause. Sadly, unless there is REAL violence, like the Kent State shootings, nothing ever changes.

    I still feel a lot more should be done to help the blacks in this country. IMO, they have been moving backwards since MLK was shot by a white guy. Might as well have been a cop.

  242. 3b says:

    Lib: More should be done to help Black Americans as well as Native Americans. But honest conversations must take place and taboo subjects have to be addressed, such as Black on Black violence, the breakdown of Black American families. Everything should be on the table.

  243. Phoenix says:

    Cancel culture was started by women. It was a way to circumvent the legal system when women were raped, or just plain dumped by their boyfriends and wanted a way to get even yet did not want to go through the hassle of a trial.

    They found they could use “victimhood” at every turn. It’s profitable, and it gets results quicker than anything in a courtroom. They aced Al Franken in a weekend, and he was even a supporter of women.

    The court system, judges, police, attorneys- it’s become the joke and laughing stock of America as no one respects them anymore, and with good reason. They have an agenda that has nothing to do with truth or justice, but instead with money, power, control, career advancement…

    The genie is out of the bottle now. You can thank the cameras and the recordings that are proving just how messed up America really is. You can’t hide your pathology from the world, and no amount of “bee kind” signs in an elementary school are going to work when your teachers are like Pumpy. Kids aren’t as dumb as you think.

  244. No One says:

    CRT is leading to change for sure. Just wait till you or your kids get pulled into a struggle session with the new Red Guard or get sent into re-education. CRT had been underground in academia for decades, but they’ve finally consolidated their managerial/intellectual grip on most of academia and now are marching on the media, government, and corporate HR departments. This is how ideological revolutions work – first they take over the take over the education system, then they change perceptions of “common sense” and then they change governments/systems/laws.

    The best thing that could have been done for blacks (and poor whites) is to have deleted the welfare state constructed during the New Deal and Great Society measures. As Thomas Sowell has pointed out for decades, these welfare systems have bred dependence and self-destructive habits for multiple generations.
    https://www.pennlive.com/opinion/2015/05/poor_blacks_looking_for_someon.html

  245. Phoenix says:

    Nice video on Taiwan and it’s chip manufacturing. It’s a strong look into American business practice and how, in order to profit, put no redundancy into the system, just like they did with the mask manufacturing.

    Only one place in the whole world makes these chips due to profit margins.

    Follow the money, it’s all that matters, until things heat up and there is hostile action taken.

    https://youtu.be/SUfjtKtkS2U

  246. 3b says:

    Biden provides a list of 16 areas that are off limits to Russian hacking; that seems to be weak and pathetic on our part.

  247. 3b says:

    Phoenix: Money it’s all that matters until it all breaks down at some point.

  248. Bystander says:

    Modern cancel culture started with canceling civil rights by murdering every black leader, burning Beatles albums (because bigger than Jesus), banning books in school like Catcher in Rye/Gatsby/Brave New world because mentioned s#x or challenged Jesus and of course war-mongering Nixon who instituted draft and labeled kids traitors for dodging it (unless connected like Clinton, Trump, Bush). Look up 1970 articles from Kent State. You think the main press was generally saddened like how we see it today? No, they were traitor hippies who got what they deserved. The right is this country has not moved anywhere with this line of thinking.

  249. Fast Eddie says:

    Biden provides a list of 16 areas that are off limits to Russian hacking..

    How nice of this administration to summarize the most vital areas for our enemies to attack. Perhaps we can give them user ids and passwords, too!

  250. Phoenix says:

    Sadly, unless there is REAL violence, like the Kent State shootings, nothing ever changes.

    What has that changed? Boomers are still happy to send our children (I call them that because the same boomers think 18 are too immature to drink ) to war and are fine with messing up their lives as long as they profit themselves.

    I applaud the youth for calling out these boomer ingrates on their greed, racism, and outright hypocrisy.

  251. Phoenix says:

    Eddie,
    Are you familiar with this? To the world, this is what Biden looked like.

    https://youtu.be/AkC7MCELjlE?t=108s

  252. Phoenix says:

    Eddie,
    Minus the passion and ethics. This guy actually has a heart and cares about something other than money. As dopey as he sounds, I find him more likeable than Biden- by a longshot.

  253. Phoenix says:

    3b,
    That’s right. It’s why you are seeing increased violence. George Carlin called it years ago.

    There has been a pattern emerging and it’s going to get way worse. Even Pumpy might get car jacked.

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  255. Phoenix says:

    Good video on recycling. Showed the true colors of American business tactics. It all works until it comes crashing down.

    America’s chickens are coming home to roost. Good job, boomers.

    You had every chance to set good examples and be a positive influence on the world and instead greed filled your core.

    Now it’s off to the races.

  256. Phoenix says:

    Recycling video. Shows what a scam it was way back to the sixties.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KXRtNwUju5g

  257. Phoenix says:

    “The local community felt Paul was receiving special treatment in the boating death case due to his family’s power and legal expertise.”

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9696819/Family-son-mom-legal-dynasty-shot-dead-reveal-receiving-threats.html

  258. chicagofinance says:

    I’m with No One on this…. I disagree with your assertion. So many young people are being duped. They do not understand the core of what is happening, and how things are interrelated. In NYC, the fair-weather people are just waking up to the fact that DeBlasio is a complete clown. However, I am sure many who voted for him and are unhappy do not really understand what has happened. There are now many layers of nonsense. I’m sure COVID, the Police, and whites with money are the usual suspects.

    The idea that Maya Wiley is gaining traction in the NYC Mayor’s race is prima facie evidence of the damage.

    Libturd says:
    June 17, 2021 at 10:37 am
    As for policies, I think the Left is going overboard with their identity politics, but at the end of the day, it really doesn’t hurt anyone.

  259. chicagofinance says:

    No One says:
    June 17, 2021 at 10:37 am

    Fox News is the biggest channel, I think viewership skews older, definitely conservative, but I wonder how wide the spread of their popularity ranges.

    FOX NEWS = best ratings, but demographics are not attractive. Less wealth = less advertising dollars

    CNN = until Trump, they had no audience…. went scorched earth for ratings, will reinstate if circumstances dictate.

    MSNBC – low ratings until Trump, but the people that watch are extremely coveted by advertisers, hence there is critical leverage.

  260. 3b says:

    Bystander: I think that’s a big stretch on your part, regarding cancel culture.

  261. BRT says:

    Modern cancel culture started with canceling civil rights by murdering every black leader, burning Beatles albums (because bigger than Jesus), banning books in school like Catcher in Rye/Gatsby/Brave New world because mentioned s#x or challenged Jesus and of course war-mongering Nixon who instituted draft and

    But we were supposed to look back and not repeat our same errors. Instead, they said, let’s scale up two orders of magnitude.

  262. BRT says:

    Lib,

    I disagree, modern day identity politics and wokeness is making every workplace and school in America a much less desirable place than it was.

  263. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Divide and conquer. It just added more reasons to hate your fellow citizens. I don’t know how people buy into this crap, but they do.

    When Trump was President, somehow, all whites were racist and privileged; now that is dangerous. Hypocrisy at its best. The color of this guy’s skin makes him racist and privileged. Wow.

    chicagofinance says:
    June 17, 2021 at 11:52 am
    I’m with No One on this…. I disagree with your assertion. So many young people are being duped. They do not understand the core of what is happening, and how things are interrelated. In NYC, the fair-weather people are just waking up to the fact that DeBlasio is a complete clown. However, I am sure many who voted for him and are unhappy do not really understand what has happened. There are now many layers of nonsense. I’m sure COVID, the Police, and whites with money are the usual suspects.

    The idea that Maya Wiley is gaining traction in the NYC Mayor’s race is prima facie evidence of the damage.

    Libturd says:
    June 17, 2021 at 10:37 am
    As for policies, I think the Left is going overboard with their identity politics, but at the end of the day, it really doesn’t hurt anyone

  264. 3b says:

    BRT: I guess we did not learn from Mc Carthyism. Now if you don’t agree one hundred percent with all that the left says, then you are suspect.

  265. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Next time you’re stuck in Garden State Parkway traffic that makes you slam your head on the steering wheel and wonder why on earth you chose New Jersey as home, rest assured you made a sound decision: New Jersey is the best state in America to live in, says a recent analysis by the personal finance website WalletHub.

    The report evaluated states based on five equally weighted categories — affordability, economy, education and health, quality of life and safety.

    Of all 50 states, New Jersey placed number one in safety, fifth in the “Education and Health” category, and seventh for quality of life. The state did not rank as high in the other two categories: it took 32nd place for its economy and came in second-to-last for affordability.

    https://www.northjersey.com/story/news/new-jersey/2021/06/15/nj-the-best-state-to-live-in-wallethub/7710404002/

  266. Bystander says:

    How 3b? It is an overreaction to real historical injustices, spurred by with social media phenomonom then flamed by big media circus who follows the clicks. That is how you get .001 percent of population telling you to call them Kendall now, not Ken and my bank puts on up at top of home page. It is still rooted in the injustices and that points back to very recent past. We are not generations removed from violence against women , discrimination against gays, and duplicitious justice system for blacks. It is still here and people feel empowered. I don’t agree with alot of the focus but it is lip service noise mostly. Get of social media and you may never hear it.

  267. JCer says:

    I’m all for vaxing anyone over the age of 16 within reason. First and foremost we should not be vaccinating anyone who has been infected their existing immune response is a problem for the vaccine and likely many adverse reactions are from the previously infected. Second Juice their is no mystery as to why children are less effected it is fundamentally how the virus infects, using ACE2 receptors, children have far less ACE2 in their lungs which makes it much harder for the virus to take hold and then when it does it limits the viral load, I also suspect the immunoresponse in children is more moderated so they do not have the massive problems with immune response older folks have.

    Like everything else in old people their immune systems get weaker, COVID triggers a massive immune response and in the elderly it cannot keep up so the immune system goes into overdrive which ultimately kills the patient.

    It’s not so straight forward, public health agencies are lying and misrepresenting things again. I understand why but the mistrust we are seeing from some people is because they are being dishonest. They desire to bury anything counter the narrative is suppressed, funny the attitude was totally opposite for HCQ or any other repurposed drug proven safe for long term use over the last 30 years.

    Honest science would certainly help and in all honesty it would be better to take the vaccines they want to use on children and send them to the third world, crowded third world conditions complete with poor sanitation are the perfect breeding ground for more infectious variants. We should focus on reducing transmission globally in order to end this pandemic.

    As for China’s vax program, good luck so far what they’ve sent out isn’t promising, it looks like their vaccine isn’t terribly effective.

  268. 3b says:

    Bystander: the topic is not suitable for blog discussion, too complex. Some of what you address was a function of society changing their views and it existed all over the world, and in many parts of the world still exists. Women could not vote at one time in this country, they couldn’t even have an opinion. That is no longer the case in much of the world. Violence and discrimination against the those who are LGBT still goes on but in the west much progress has made. However, not the case in much of the rest of the world. However, in this country I can tell you for a fact that there is a lot of hostility in Black and Hispanic communities against LGBT. A topic the left won’t address.

    My problem with the WOKE and radical left is the false narratives they are creating and their insistence that history be taught the way they say it should be even if it’s false. Also
    the fact that because one is white they are racist and or privileged by virtue of being white. Is this the crap we want taught to our children? We are a huge diverse country and in spite of the issues we have we are still the most successful diverse country in the world. That is not right wing BS but a fact. The WOKE radical left crowd want to slice us and dice us down to warring tribes.

  269. Libturd says:

    Warring tribes or allied tribes?

  270. 3b says:

    Lib: Warring tribes, because when they are finished reimagining society in their view , and the evil white racist is banished, then they will turn on each other.

  271. Fast Eddie says:

    …then they will turn on each other.

    Who else will the left blame for their failed utopia when those who built classic America no longer exist?

  272. SmallGovConservative says:

    This blog was depressing enough with the drone of the regular Dem apologists, but I think it’s even worse reading the comments of the milquetoasts — the guys that for some reason feel obligated to take a swipe at T every time they point out the shortcomings of SlowJoe or some other Dem. How about just admitting that the modern Dem party is literally insane and completely incapable of good governance. The Biden presidency is a farce — empowered by a sham election, the prez himself mentally incompetent, the veep incompetent across the board, and run by a cadre of radical, woke dingbats. Look further at the roster of Dem leaders and it’s the same story — third-world governance and sheer craziness. Congressional Dems infested with antisemites, Chicago’s racist Dem mayor refusing to speak with white journalists, all the while ignoring the murder and mayhem engulfing the city, DeBlasio allowing NYC to rot while hooking up his wife with no-show jobs, Baltimore businesses refusing to pay taxes due to a breakdown in city services, Cuomo, Maxine Waters, Nadler, Pelosi, Booker, Menendez, etc…This (Dem governance) is third-world stuff folks.

  273. Libturd says:

    Yeah, the party of Capital Building insurrections, Lauren Boebert, Qanon and Mr. Pillow is speaking. Step away from Newsmax for five minutes. It will do you good.

  274. Ez says:

    Trump seems to finally admit “they lost”.
    Putin he ain’t.

  275. JCer says:

    3b that is the issue entirely, this idea that whiteness is somehow the problem ignores history. Did the English not abuse the Irish, was there not severe discrimination against Italians, Jews, Germans, and Eastern Europeans when they immigrated in the 19th and early 20th century? Even up through the 70’s and 80’s there was discrimination and bias against many of these groups, there is a reason people largely stuck to their own groups in the past and still seem to prefer to live among their own group.

    Tribalism is an evolutionary response, we are more apt to trust someone who looks like us(or more aptly our parents that is what we’ve imprinted), it is innate and something we evolved as animals. What’s really messed up is that we continue to focus on the slavery that ended 156 years ago in the US while ignoring the actually slavery that is going on today, most ignore the slave labor camps in China and the African/Muslim slavery that still exists in Africa, just because it’s black on black or chinese on chinese doesn’t make it better, it’s abhorrent and happening in the 21st century. It’s similar to black on black crime, if a white cop does something to a black person it is a very big deal but if some black kid shoots another black kid in Chicago it’s just another day, the net effect is the same regardless of the motives and one happens far more frequently. Lets ignore current real problems and discuss historical grievances, things that happened at least 30-40 years ago or fringe racist events which are unusual occurrences. All while ignoring bigotry and racism in minority communities, I’m sorry every person is capable of racism and other forms of bias.

    My closing point and argument against white privilege, I’d rather be a tall, good looking in shape man of any race rather than a short obese ugly white guy. Short fat and ugly people are very discriminated against more so today than any races is. People naturally fear what is different it is thousands of years of evolution, understanding differences and logically that people are not a threat is how we stop bigotry.

  276. JCer says:

    lib the republicans are horrible but they are largely a creation of the dem insanity, it’s tit for tat. How many nice republicans like Mitt Romney and John McCain were vanquished by bat sh*t crazy liberal dems, playing a dirty game, both of those men were more honest and honorable than Obama, dirty play wins hence the Trump.

    What we are witnessing is a radicalization of the american political system, the dems have killed off the old clinton style democrats, even Hillary was further left than Bill who was very centrist while in office. While Clinton cut welfare, balanced budgets, repealed capital gains taxes which greatly aided the US economy all the dems want to do now is spend and raise taxes, Bill Clinton today would be considered a republican.

    All that considered the democrats don’t have a good track record in governance and when policies fail they seem to double down on them. I’d venture to say the republicans are marginally better because they generally oppose government expansion. Both sides are hopelessly corrupt at this point, I don’t know how anyone can get behind the dems agenda, however you may feel about the republican party agenda the fact remains it is far less dangerous.

  277. No One says:

    JCer,
    That’s what my wife told me about why she voted for Trump. She said, look at how the Democrats and media savaged Mitt Romney, a perfect gentleman and family man, politically and personallyclean, moderate, etc. And he was absolutely demonized and the media made up lies to defend their guy. In the end, Romney was apologizing for himself. So she thought the only way to counter that is to be a total A-hole who never apologizes for anything.
    The problem with Trump was that he really had few ideas, and most of them were bad. His one key idea, which he borrowed from newspaper headlines in the 80s, was to blame foreigners and his political opponents for everything. In the 80s it was Japan, and then he just updated the enemies when it became too obvious that Japan was no longer the big problem. Mostly, Trump is a performer who attacks people.

  278. 3b says:

    Macy Gray has an opinion piece in Market watch. She wants a new flag, it does not represent all Americans blah blah. To demonstrate how ignorant those on the left can be she noted Puerto Rico and DC are not included on the flag, and goes on to lecture on how both have repeatedly campaigned for statehood only to be denied. That’s simply not true. She is clueless, and ignorant, but gets to publish an opinion piece.

  279. Fabius Maximus says:

    “the new Critical Race Theory”
    CRT is not new and who here would have been able to articulate what it was this time last year. It has been out there for decades. We are hearing about it now, because the GQP used it to get out the base with their 1776 project. Thankfully that has been killed off.

    “taboo subjects have to be addressed, such as Black on Black violence, the breakdown of Black American families.” “there is a lot of hostility in Black and Hispanic communities against LGBT”
    While these are issues in their own right, they are not relevant to the discussion that there is a big problem with systemic rac1sm in this country.

    “Kent State shootings, nothing ever changes” That should be the discussion. Fifty years later, the same issues exist. Redlining, gerrymandering, voter suppression etc etc etc. The only real difference is that the klan took the hood off and put on a black and white polo or a Punisher badge. The Secretary of the Navy came out a few days ago and said that he was not pandering to the left, there is a racism problem in the Armed Forces.

    We had the discussion a few months back and it was pointed out that a lot of people here do not acknowledge that there is a real race issue in this country that has not and is not being addressed.

    “the republicans are horrible but they are largely a creation of the dem insanity,”
    No, the current version of the GOP is the fault of the GOP. They should have cut the Tea Party off at the knees back in 2008, but they ran with it and it morphed the party into what it is today. Don’t blame the Dems for Trump. He made it though the GOP primary. Look there and tell me why they let him go forward. I understand why a lot of Republicans are upset. You lost your party. Don’t complain that Joe does not represent you. As I said before the election, its not the Dems responsibly to change their platform to appease you. Stop complaining and go claim your party back.

    “Is it the person or his policies” It is both. First off is the GQP side of the fence. They are so Cray Cray its shocking. Is there any conspiracy theory they wont buy into? It make the Elvis is not dead people look sane. They will grasp onto anything if justifies not accepting a hard reality.
    Second is the constant Republican hypocrisy. Individual rights, but not for the gays. I’m should not be forced to wear a mask, but I’ll quite happily take the wand to women’s reproductive rights. Fiscal conservatism, but throw another Tax Cut on the Deficit.

  280. 3b says:

    Fab: I don’t believe this country suffers from systemic racism. Are there racists of course there always will be; that will never change. And all races have racists that’s a fact. I have cousins with Black and Hispanic spouses and they don’t believe the USA is systematically racist. That narrative of systemic racism is going to destroy this country. So much for MLK s dream.

  281. Fabius Maximus says:

    “Corporations are people my friend” and the dog on the roof where Romneys downfall. Hard to claim to be for the small guy, when Bain killed so many businesses.

    McCain (aside from Sister Sarah), threw his Maverick credibly under the bus and went Super Hawk, to try and hold the base.

    But if we are comparing character attacks. Any comments on Swiftboating and “He’s a Musl1m!”?

  282. leftwing says:

    Hey Fabs, what color is the sky in your world?

    Poke your head out the window, look up, and let me know what you see…..

  283. 3b says:

    Supreme Court votes 9 to 0 to side regarding a case with Catholic Church/Philadelphia Foster Care. Whatever ones opinion on this, the court voted unanimously. Is it hopelessly divided by ideology, or did the Supreme Court justices do what they are supposed to do.

  284. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Comedy hour…they want it all.

    ‘Social Security doesn’t even cover my entire rent.’ How retirees say Congress should change benefits

    https://apple.news/Apo4_y6bMQqqLZYLY5OC4uA

  285. ComedyHour says:

    ‘Most public servants, including teachers, take less money than they could otherwise earn working in other industries.’

    proooove it

  286. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Yea, they are all losers!! Leaches!!

    ComedyHour says:
    June 17, 2021 at 7:20 pm
    ‘Most public servants, including teachers, take less money than they could otherwise earn working in other industries.’

    proooove it

  287. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Evidence to support that the free market is not fair…it is efficient in the long run.

    “in the span of 12 months, Nick Foles got…

    a $88M deal with Jacksonville &
    a $24M deal with Chicago

    he was benched both places…

    …then outplayed by both Mitch Trubisky & Gardner Minshew

    and is now buried as QB3 on the depth chart”

  288. Fabius Maximus says:

    3b

    If you cant see it personally does that mean it can’t be true.

    By the way, while that judgement was unanimous it was not 9-0 , three judges sat out.

    If we are discussing SCOTUS what about the ACA decision. Can the GOP finally give up and accept it?

  289. Fabius Maximus says:

    Left

    It’s purple. I have to view this country through rose colored glasses at times. There is a dark side to the US that is not acknowledged.

  290. 3b says:

    Fab: 3 sat it out , but they did not vote no. As for Obama I agree on that. I have seen racism. Systemic racism means exactly that. Can you see it?

  291. 3b says:

    Fab: One could say all countries have a dark side. Can you point to one that does not? A lot of countries with a much darker side than the USA. We are the most successful multiracial country in the world, contrary to the naysayers.

  292. Phoenix says:

    Romney lost me @ Romneycare and taking away Medicare with his idiotic voucher program.

    He doesn’t even deserve an ounce of Vaseline.

  293. Ez says:

    7:20 really? Just being in sales for a firm that gives stock options and you are looking at infinitely better compensation.

  294. The Great Pumpkin says:

    The housing market is as good a lens as any to view a metropolis’s health. I spoke with Curbed real-estate reporter Kim Velsey about what real estate can tell us about the future of New York City, and how much (or how little) the pandemic changed our idea of urban living.
    Ben: At the beginning of the pandemic, it looked like New York City would be in major financial trouble for a long time to come. A year and change later, the city has its share of problems, but no one is forecasting a dire economic short-term future. City and state budgets weren’t hit as badly as many worried they would be, and the cessation of COVID and huge amounts of federal aid money flowing to NYC have helped enormously, too.

    https://apple.news/AgKokNBfYSl24lQj5irCkeg

  295. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Kim: I think what we’ve seen with the housing sector, which is stabilizing on the rental side and really heating up on the sales side, is that the fears — or hopes, depending on how you felt about the wealthy fleeing New York at the beginning of the pandemic — of the housing market changing drastically for the long term were really overblown. At least right now, it’s looking a lot like what happened after the recession, where you had this temporary period of relief when it came to rents and then everything went right back to the way it was. I guess, for better or worse, it doesn’t feel like New York is going to change in any radical way, but there do seem to be some fleeting opportunities.
    Ben: So, basically, once a pandemic is over, the appeal of dense urban living goes right back to being where it was? It at one point seemed intuitive that the rise of remote work that the pandemic rapidly accelerated — for white-collar workers, anyway — would result in people realizing that they could do their job pretty well from anywhere, and without the hassles and high prices of the city. And that this would result in at least a small permanent change in the fabric of New York. Why do you think that didn’t really happen?

  296. Fabius Maximus says:

    3b,

    Why are you introducing Obama into the disucssion. I didnt bring him in. But I do see him brought in as an “there cant be systematic racism, we elected him”. Again a distraction from the core issue.

  297. JCer says:

    Fab, just wave your hand about the issues facing Americas poor of all races and blab on about “systemic racism”. It’s not productive, your side has been ” trying to help” black people for 60 years now and thanks to what theyve focused on they actually have created negative progress. Thomas Sowell does nail so many things regarding the disaster called the war on poverty. He very articulately identifies data points which clearly display the negative progress that has been made even as discrimination was being reduced. What you call “big problem” isn’t even top ten among issues facing minority groups. You need to come to grips with the fact that this is a scam designed to ensure the black voting block stays with the dems because they are losing Hispanics. They have zero desire to help these people. We have adequate laws to fight systemic racism it simply isn’t a significant enough problem that it warrants all this attention, fix the serious issues plaguing the black community first.

    As for the dark side of the US just try to consider that despite racism and all the problems within black communities American black folks are the richest black people on the world. A better argument against systemic racism is the economic success of immigrants of color.

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