No drop in asking prices

From MarketWatch:

Asking prices for houses accelerate in 40 metro areas

Home prices may be plateauing across the U.S., but the increase in asking prices for homes has accelerated in 40 of the nation’s largest 100 metro areas in October compared to last year.

New research suggests an improvement in slowing national house prices may be in the cards by the end of the year. The asking prices for homes rose 1% nationally in October over the previous month and increased 6.4% annually in October, which was still down from the 10.3% annual rise in October 2013, according to the latest data from real-estate website Trulia’s “Price Monitor.”

Although homes often sell for below and sometimes above asking prices, they’re an early leading indicator of house prices and lead final sales prices by around two months or more, says Jed Kolko, chief economist at Trulia, and adjust for the mix of listed homes. While price gains slowed in 60 metro areas and accelerated in 40 of them, the actual asking prices only fell in 9 metro areas.

This is in contrast to house price data from S&P/Case-Shiller’s 20-city composite index released last month. U.S. home prices rose by just 0.2% in August 2014 over the previous month, slower than the 0.6% rise in July, the survey found. Still, house prices increased by 5.6% in August, which was the slowest pace since November 2012 and slower than annual growth of 6.7% in July 2014.

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226 Responses to No drop in asking prices

  1. grim says:

    Rents no better, rental ask up 6.2% YOY nationally, NY Metro clocks in at a stratospheric 7.8%, with Philly not far behind at 7.7%.

  2. grim says:

    From the Trulia monitor:

    YOY change in asking prices

    Allentown, PA-NJ Up 2.2%
    Camden Down 0.1%
    Edison-New Bruswick, NJ Up 4.8%
    Fairfax County, CT Down -0.2%
    New York, NY-NJ Up 4.1%
    Newark, NY-NJ Up 1.5%
    Philadelphia, PA Up 4.0%

  3. 30 year realtor says:

    Prices are soft. Lots of dead inventory. Market looks like it will be flat for the foreseeable future.

  4. Michael says:

    Going to be flat for another 3-5 years and will start rising. After 2020-2021, a lot of buyers will enter the market and the next upswing in the real estate will take place (20 years after the last upswing in the real estate cycle). Demographics will be the biggest driver. Baby boomers will be leaving their jobs and selling their homes at the same time. Finally creating the opportunity for younger generation to get a good job and their own home instead of renting.

    30 year realtor says:
    November 6, 2014 at 7:00 am
    Prices are soft. Lots of dead inventory. Market looks like it will be flat for the foreseeable future.

  5. Fast Eddie says:

    30 year,

    There’s the data, then there’s the data. Always appreciate your input and I agree with your statement, especially the dead inventory.

  6. Liquor Luge says:

    Dead money for 50-100 years. Wandering in the desert; much gnashing of teeth. Chinese water torture.

  7. Michael says:

    4- that’s why if you want to make a lot of money in real estate….you need to buy now. When people that follow real estate (like the people on this board) are saying real estate is dead for a long time, go and buy while there is blood in the streets. It’s a buyer’s market. No one is jumping over each other to buy real estate, so buy now. When they start jumping over each other, you sell. True and tested method of buying anything, not just real estate. Gold is a perfect example. When it was hyped a few years back, not the time to buy. Now that no one wants it, wait a little longer and a buying opportunity should present itself. Then when inflation fears come back again, gold should rise and you can make some money.

  8. Grim says:

    Would have been better off buying industrial properties during the trough, price rebound on industrial has been very strong. Vacancies very low. Ironic given the perception that there is no economic activity of value in NJ.

  9. Michael says:

    Yes, data can change rather quickly just as market conditions change. You are calling real estate dead inventory. If that’s not a sign to buy, I don’t know what is. What are you going to make money buying when the market is hot? You have no vision my friend. This is why you will never make real money when it comes to investing. You buy at the wrong time.

    Fast Eddie says:
    November 6, 2014 at 7:30 am
    30 year,

    There’s the data, then there’s the data. Always appreciate your input and I agree with your statement, especially the dead inventory.

  10. anon (the good one) says:

    that’s this board perception which is not based on reality.
    plenty of economic activity of value

    Grim says:
    November 6, 2014 at 7:42 am

    Ironic given the perception that there is no economic activity of value in NJ.

  11. anon (the good one) says:

    good point

    Michael says:
    November 6, 2014 at 7:39 am
    4- that’s why if you want to make a lot of money in real estate….you need to buy now. When people that follow real estate (like the people on this board) are saying real estate is dead for a long time, go and buy while there is blood in the streets. It’s a buyer’s market. No one is jumping over each other to buy real estate, so buy now. When they start jumping over each other, you sell. True and tested method of buying anything, not just real estate. Gold is a perfect example. When it was hyped a few years back, not the time to buy. Now that no one wants it, wait a little longer and a buying opportunity should present itself. Then when inflation fears come back again, gold should rise and you can make some money.

  12. Comrade Nom Deplume, Guardian of the Realm says:

    [9] grim

    That does surprise me. I would not expect industrial or large CRE in the Northeast to do well over time. loss of traditional industrial, technology lessening the need for floor space, and outsourcing all seem to be trends that would auger against the continuation of industrial and CRE price strength.

  13. Liquor Luge says:

    Brew your own in the basement, and prepare for the end of days.

  14. Liquor Luge says:

    “It is difficult to find the motivation to write about the state of the global economy these days, if only because there is not much left to say. I feel like I am composing multiple obituaries for the same long dead corpse. Most of the Liberty Movement and I suspect a small portion of the mainstream market understand that there is no tangible or legitimate recovery, let alone a stable fiscal ladder to rest our feet upon. There is literally nothing left to the financial system but rigged statistics, false promises, and ever expanding debt. In fact, the concept of debt creation is the only thing holding our facade of an economy together.

    You and I probably find this rather strange. We come from a long forgotten school of economics, in which demand, supply, and savings actually mean something in terms of our fiscal health. I have come across many mainstream economic acolytes and cultists in recent months who disregard ALL logic and reason, forsaking the realities of demand based trade and immersing themselves in a grand delusion in which central bank generated debt and inflation are the real source of “prosperity”. I feel sorry for them in a way, because the truth is right in front of their faces, and yet, they will never see it, not until they are buried alive in it.”

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-11-05/we-have-just-witnessed-last-gasp-global-economy

  15. Fast Eddie says:

    Michael,

    I was investing when you were pissing your pants, “my” friend. I own a house, “my” friend. My net worth is higher than yours, “my” friend, so save your fifth grade sanctimonious sh1t for someone else.

  16. Essex says:

    The people have spoken!

  17. Fast Eddie says:

    Gotta love Monday morning quarterbacks.

  18. Libturd in the City says:

    “good point”

    Two simpletons giving each other hand jobs. Gold is not an investment. At best, it’s a hedge against Armageddon and even that is questionable. You can’t eat or sleep under gold. In the past forty years, there were two short windows where one could have done better than the stock market investing in gold. Good luck finding the next one. If the past is any indicator of the future, gold should be a good investment some time around 2040. So listen to Passion Fruit and start DCAing in to precious metals now.

  19. Fast Eddie says:

    Michael,

    Compare a 10k “investment” in gold in 1980 vs the same ivestment in the S&P 500 and get back to us with your findings. Let us know the score as of November, 2014.

  20. Libturd in the City says:

    “I feel sorry for them in a way, because the truth is right in front of their faces, and yet, they will never see it, not until they are buried alive in it.”

    Clot,

    I have thought deeply about the current debt driven society. I fear that one day, everyone wakes up simultaneously to this fact and the Great Depression (not recession) will be on. When you look at federal and even local debts, the numbers are simply astounding. If you could turn human feces into gold, you still wouldn’t put a dent in it. The race to the bottom is indeed on. It will suck to go out first, but will probably suck even more to be last fiat standing. In this case, perhaps gold might have some value. But who are you selling it to? Ahh, fcuk it. Let’s all think like Krugman and screw a generation that is far enough in the future that we’ll all be dead before we have to witness the results of following Krugman’s ill advised economic strategies.

  21. grim says:

    15 – That’s too nihilistic to be realistic, it’s hard to get more than halfway through it without wanting a little bit of heroin to ease through the paper cut wrist slitting.

    Replace the words “economy” and “financial” with “parents” and “mom and dad”, and you would swear an angry 14 year old girl wrote that.

  22. essex says:

    Just remember folks, it’s only money!

  23. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    [15] Clot,

    I know the statue in the article well. Appropriately, it is on Haines Point in Washington, DC.

  24. grim says:

    At this point it looks as if a federal increase in minimum wage is all but a given in the next 2 years. Anyone up for a pool? Losers (furthest from the mark) but the winners (closest to the mark) a beer. I’ll take $8.50 by Jan 1 2016.

  25. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    [12] irrelevant,

    “Gold is a perfect example. When it was hyped a few years back, not the time to buy. Now that no one wants it, wait a little longer and a buying opportunity should present itself. Then when inflation fears come back again, gold should rise and you can make some money.” Michael

    I agree but to a point. Stu’s point is also well-taken. I keep small positions as a black swan hedge, then sell them in the panicked run up. Ultimately, it doesn’t really make me money, rather it helps me to lose less.

  26. Libturd in the City says:

    Speaking of rental increases, I tend not to raise the rents much on my current tenants as I don’t want to scare them away. I typically ask them to pay just for the increase in my property taxes. I literally run my multi with an open book. They know exactly what the multi generates and they see that I sink all of the excess rental income after mortgage, hazard, taxes and miscellaneous carry costs back into the property. With that said, I love when my tenants eventually move out as that’s when I raise the rents to meet market demand. It looks like I am losing my downstairs tenants around February one. It’s a funny story with them. They bought a multi to follow the same strategy I employed which is to live cheaply in one of the units of their multi while saving up a downpayment for their own home. Then like me, would use the multi to pay for their kids college. Well, when they saw how much rent they were able to collect from the multi, they opted to rent out all of it and continue to live in my building. They are moving right in to their own single family home. So the reason I share this story is because at some point I think somethings got to give.

    In my opinion, rental rates are surely bubbling. Heck, the unit I paid $1,000 a month for in 2001 is renting for $2,400 though I could probably get $2,600 or more for it but I love my current tenants. They are the type who fix things themselves and always pay on time. Plus they are nice and neat. Look at all of the apartment/comdo construction occurring everywhere and you know it’s all destined for rental. I’m not dumb. Eventually people are going to wise up and realize that owning is significantly cheaper than renting.

    Do you think there’s a bubble in rental property ownership and if so, what do you think the impact on housing prices will be? I’m guessing that in the near term housing prices might drop a bit (especially due to the impact of boomers selling en masse), eventually causing rents to drop, but then housing will rebound again due to the influx of current renters becoming buyers. Then rents will pick up again and the equilibrium seesaw will go on in perpetuity. The big question for me though, is how far will rents drop? In the nicer towns, one must ponder if a premium will be maintained because we have so much further to drop than in the less prestigious towns. Will be fun to watch.

    It’s funny. My son is constantly asking me about colleges and which ones he could attend. I told him it’s based on whatever the multi is worth or he could become a scholarship field goal kicker if he could work on his emotions. Of all of the U9s and U10s that I have seen perform goalie kicks, no one has near the power or accuracy that he does. It’s actually funny (and admittedly a bit heart-warming) to listen to the parents of the opposing team when he nearly kicks the ball directly into the opposing teams penalty box. Albeit, he’s still playing small sided, but no other kids can even reach the center circle.

  27. grim says:

    What blood on the streets? Ya’ll missed the blood.

  28. Michael says:

    Wow, I was using gold as an example. I was not advocating to put money into it. I know it’s a headge. Why do you think I said it will rise when inflation talks heat up. I’m advocating buying real estate or stocks right now, not gold. Yes stocks are going to be on a bull run never seen before. Btw, earlier in the year when I said stocks would continue to fly I was laughed at. I said there would be a correction and it would be quick. Why, the fundamentals say the economy is in the early growth stage, not the end stage. Of course I was put down by this board with people stating this rally has gone on for too long and is over. I stated just because there has never been a bull run that has lasted this many years, doesn’t dictate that this rally should end. The fundamentals say we are just getting this party started.

  29. grim says:

    Jobless claims numbers are insanely positive, historically numbers at these levels were correlated to periods of strong economic activity.

    U.S. jobless claims decline 10,000 to 278,000
    Four-week claims average falls 2,250 to 279,000
    Monthly claims average lowest since April 2000

  30. grim says:

    Preliminary estimates on the jobs number for tomorrow look strong as well.

  31. Libturd in the City says:

    How about NJ unemployment?

  32. grim says:

    33 – http://lwd.dol.state.nj.us/labor/lpa/content/maps/lf_annmcd.pdf

    It’s a bit dated being 2013, but a useful look into the dynamics of employment across our state. I know I may overuse this argument/technique, but the fact is our state is not even remotely homogenous enough to make broad assumptions.

  33. Libturd in the City says:

    Big spike up on market futures with that news Grim. Rally on!

  34. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    [26] grim,

    I predict the GOP will float a bill that raises to $8.35 by end of 2015, $9.25 in 2016, and $10.25 before end of 2017.

    GOP wants away from this issue, and by proposing a bill, they blunt the sharpest arrow in the D quiver. But to save face with the business community, they will propose a phase-in, just as some D cities have done. Ds will be hard-pressed to complain and block it because (1) its a bill they sort of wanted and (2) they already endorsed the phase-in.

    If GOP gets it, they win because they removed the arrow from the D quiver but really didn’t give away much. First, they stood up to the Ds that want $15 now, and, second, the phase-in will give businesses a lot of cushion.

    Finally, I would not be surprised if it were attached to a reform package that includes some regulatory relief or tax relief for businesses. Again, the GOP can sell this as “look, we aren’t against the raise but unless you give on the relief questions, you are simply penalizing small business. You aren’t anti-small business, are you?”

  35. Michael says:

    I don’t deal in absolutes when I invest, rookie. Meaning, I don’t stick to one investment. I seek out opportunities based on fundamentals and human psychology. I would never just buy gold and sit on it. That is stupid. You have a small % invested as a hedge, or you make a bet when you think inflation talks will heat up in the future. No idea what the hell you are talking about.

    Fast Eddie says:
    November 6, 2014 at 8:11 am
    Michael,

    Compare a 10k “investment” in gold in 1980 vs the same ivestment in the S&P 500 and get back to us with your findings. Let us know the score as of November, 2014.

  36. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    [30] michael

    “. I was not advocating to put money into it. ”

    Hey, if you know of someone who will give you the gold, tell me, okay? Otherwise, you have to put money into it, and if the price craters enough, I will get back into it in a small way. Not a lot–my largest metal portfolio is in my ammo safe and that is the way it will stay.

  37. Xolepa says:

    Libtard,
    Don’t want to burst a different bubble, but I have seen kids in that age group who were absolutely fantastic athletes, relative to their age group, eventually become average players as they reached teenage years. The rest of the pack simply catches up. My middle one was one of those kids that could dribble around a whole team and score goals – at age 7 or 8. By 10 he lost his drive to excel and quit the game as a freshman.
    Lesson to be learned: nurture but push and above all, keep watching. Evolve along with the kid.

  38. Libturd in the City says:

    That map is telling Grim and thanks for posting it. Things look pretty bleak in NJ cities. Perhaps if we keep sending all of our income taxes there, it will turn them around? Nah, better off bringing the quality of schools in the suburbs down to make the urban schools look less bad. Send it all to Newark, Paterson, Camden and Atlantic City where it can be squandered on SACs, vice principals and larger bureaucracy.

    Bebo is crying in his grave.

  39. grim says:

    What’s the NJ unemployment rate by educational attainment for Bachelor Degree and higher? About 3%?

  40. Michael says:

    Yes, you def were investing when I was pissing in my pants. By the time I’m your age, I will not be worrying about 20,000 dollar property taxes due to my investing skills. I’m already paying 17,000 at my age and the tax price does not phase me. Btw, you have all these years on me and I am prob not too far behind you in terms of money earned off investments.

    Fast Eddie says:
    November 6, 2014 at 7:58 am
    Michael,

    I was investing when you were pissing your pants, “my” friend. I own a house, “my” friend. My net worth is higher than yours, “my” friend, so save your fifth grade sanctimonious sh1t for someone else.

  41. Michael says:

    Lib, nj is a shining example of capitalism. It’s the land of haves and have nots. You are one or the other. Nj is a perfect example of a mature advanced stage of capitalism. You do realize the only way to change places like Paterson or Camden is to have a communist economic system, right? Till then your tax money is nothing more than crumbs being sent to these people (have nots) so they continue to stay in their ghettos and not affect the other population (the haves). It’s as plain as day.

    Libturd in the City says:
    November 6, 2014 at 8:55 am
    That map is telling Grim and thanks for posting it. Things look pretty bleak in NJ cities. Perhaps if we keep sending all of our income taxes there, it will turn them around? Nah, better off bringing the quality of schools in the suburbs down to make the urban schools look less bad. Send it all to Newark, Paterson, Camden and Atlantic City where it can be squandered on SACs, vice principals and larger bureaucracy.

    Bebo is crying in his grave.

  42. Michael says:

    Inflation will take care of the debt. Mark my words.

    Libturd in the City says:
    November 6, 2014 at 8:15 am
    “I feel sorry for them in a way, because the truth is right in front of their faces, and yet, they will never see it, not until they are buried alive in it.”

    Clot,

    I have thought deeply about the current debt driven society. I fear that one day, everyone wakes up simultaneously to this fact and the Great Depression (not recession) will be on. When you look at federal and even local debts, the numbers are simply astounding. If you could turn human feces into gold, you still wouldn’t put a dent in it. The race to the bottom is indeed on. It will suck to go out first, but will probably suck even more to be last fiat standing. In this case, perhaps gold might have some value. But who are you selling it to? Ahh, fcuk it. Let’s all think like Krugman and screw a generation that is far enough in the future that we’ll all be dead before we have to witness the results of following Krugman’s ill advised economic strategies.

  43. Michael says:

    Bingo….renting is for suckers.

    “In my opinion, rental rates are surely bubbling. Heck, the unit I paid $1,000 a month for in 2001 is renting for $2,400 though I could probably get $2,600 or more for it but I love my current tenants. They are the type who fix things themselves and always pay on time. Plus they are nice and neat. Look at all of the apartment/comdo construction occurring everywhere and you know it’s all destined for rental. I’m not dumb. Eventually people are going to wise up and realize that owning is significantly cheaper than renting.”

  44. Ragnar says:

    The idea that inflation takes care of government debt is a myth. Only true if the debt was entirely incurred in the past, and there’s no ongoing need to borrow. The reason is that the biggest debtors are generally also the biggest borrowers. High inflation may reduce the value of the old stock of debt, but it will also tend to drive up the servicing cost of what floating rate debt the debtor has, while making new borrowing more expensive as well.

    If inflation were to rise, the share of interest payments as a % of the overall federal budget would also rise. It’s artificially low right now, given the stock of debt outstanding, thanks to artificially low interest rates.

  45. Michael says:

    You are just seeing the effect of people not wanting/not being able to buy real estate. I do not think we will see a 69% homeowner rate anytime soon. As long as the home ownership rate hangs around 65%, we are good. I would not worry at all. Landlording is the oldest business in the history of mankind. Not going anywhere. In a healthy housing market, renting should always be way more expensive than owning.

    “Do you think there’s a bubble in rental property ownership and if so, what do you think the impact on housing prices will be? I’m guessing that in the near term housing prices might drop a bit (especially due to the impact of boomers selling en masse), eventually causing rents to drop, but then housing will rebound again due to the influx of current renters becoming buyers. Then rents will pick up again and the equilibrium seesaw will go on in perpetuity. The big question for me though, is how far will rents drop? In the nicer towns, one must ponder if a premium will be maintained because we have so much further to drop than in the less prestigious towns. Will be fun to watch.”

  46. Fast Eddie says:

    Btw, you have all these years on me and I am prob not too far behind you in terms of money earned off investments.

    Don’t bet on it, “rookie.”

  47. Libturd in the City says:

    X,

    I don’t push Gator Junior at all actually. Nor do I realistically think he has a chance to obtain free college (well the field goal kicker angle might have some merit). He is 100% self-motivated and simply a sports nut. When most two year olds were hooked on Baby Einstein and Sesame Street, he was watching (and understanding) woman’s beach volleyball or whatever krap ESPN put on. Though we might have to slow him down. Against my will, Gator allowed him to play travel hockey, flight one travel soccer on a Bloomfield club team, flight D for Glen Ridge travel soccer (though the team really should be placed in flight B) and then he plays on the Glen Ridge Select team which does two long weekend-tourneys a season. Gator justified this rigorous schedule as cheaper than paying the school for aftercare (we both work with long commutes) and Gator Junior abhorred after care anyway. The only problem is that he is starting to get sore from the excessive exercise. Plus, he doesn’t have an ounce of fat on his body and the kid eats like a horse. On most days, he either has 3 hours of soccer practice or 90 minutes of soccer and 90 minutes of hockey. Our weekends usually consist of 2 soccer matches and 2 hockey games. And to make matters worse, he has one of those teachers that assigns 90 minutes of useless busy homework daily. Needless to say, his Xbox gets more use from me than from him.

    I put my foot down for the Spring. He will play LAX (limited practice and games at this age) and travel soccer and will get on the ice one day a week for 10 weeks for pond hockey. I just hope he doesn’t hate us for it. :P

    I do understand the concept of the other kids catching up. I’ve c0ached multiple sports and I’ve seen it happen occur time and time again. Especially in hockey. Many of these kids have been playing year round since they’ve been three. Many take privates and do lots of extra speed, stick handling and shooting clinics plus Summer camps in Canada or Minnesota. Then some 12 year old who never laced em up catches up in two years without any extra help. This is why I don’t believe in any of that extra stuff. If Gator Junior is still good as he approaches varsity level, I would consider it. These other folks are wasting their money and time. Of course, all of them believe (none more than c0aches) their kids are future pros.

    Whenever I c0ach a team, I know that c0aching the parents is more important than c0aching the kids. I always tell them the stats. I usually start by saying that no kid they will ever have the joy of watching play will make it the pros. None from our team, none from the opposing team and more likely, none from the county nor even the state. So pipe down with the abuse of the refs as well as the abuse of their children. Kids hate nothing more than the speeches mom and dad give them on the car ride home from the game. Only positive encouragement is useful. Though this weekend, I sort of broke my own rule. My son had a very funny hockey game. He made almost no effort in his game, which is highly unusual as he is super competitive and probably the hardest worker on most of his teams, especially in practice. He finished his shifts early and wasn’t even sweating in the locker room post game. After the game (1-1 tie), I simply told him that if he doesn’t want to play, that is fine. Just don’t make me wake up at 5am to drive his lazy butt to Randolph NJ for a leisurely skate around the ice. I’d rather he just take the game off, which is truly fine with me. I think he gets it.

  48. Michael says:

    You forgot to add that as inflation kicks in the govt now has more income to cover higher interest rates. Inflation destroys debt, you are overthinking this.

    Ragnar says:
    November 6, 2014 at 9:20 am
    The idea that inflation takes care of government debt is a myth. Only true if the debt was entirely incurred in the past, and there’s no ongoing need to borrow. The reason is that the biggest debtors are generally also the biggest borrowers. High inflation may reduce the value of the old stock of debt, but it will also tend to drive up the servicing cost of what floating rate debt the debtor has, while making new borrowing more expensive as well.

    If inflation were to rise, the share of interest payments as a % of the overall federal budget would also rise. It’s artificially low right now, given the stock of debt outstanding, thanks to artificially low interest rates.

  49. Libturd in the City says:

    Grim (my 50 is in mod).

  50. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    I was preparing an RFP and researching rates for legal services (sometimes it isn’t just about throwing out a market rate number) and I came across this site, which appears defunct but its good for a laugh.

    http://www.shitlawjobs.com/

    Moose and other members of the profession will get a chuckle out of it.

  51. Fast Eddie says:

    By the time I’m your age, I will not be worrying about 20,000 dollar property taxes due to my investing skills.

    By the time you’re my age, the taxes will be $40,000. Why the f.uck am I even trying to debate you? You claim to be financially savvy yet your statements are short-sighted. Do you realize what you even say?

  52. grim says:

    Here’s the unemployment rate by County for September 2014. I’ll post 3 counties that don’t have a strong lower-income urban population for reference. All are significantly stronger than the national UE rate.

    Morris 4.6%
    Somerset 4.9%
    Bergen 5.3%
    National UE Rate 5.9%

  53. Libturd in the City says:

    JJ,

    “Impressive”

    Indeed. I can’t get my wife to go the OG more than once a year. I love the salad. The pasta on the other hand, is pretty mediocre.

  54. Michael says:

    And by that time wage inflation will have occurred to match the rise in cost.

    Fast Eddie says:
    November 6, 2014 at 9:30 am
    By the time I’m your age, I will not be worrying about 20,000 dollar property taxes due to my investing skills.

    By the time you’re my age, the taxes will be $40,000. Why the f.uck am I even trying to debate you? You claim to be financially savvy yet your statements are short-sighted. Do you realize what you even say?

  55. Essex says:

    50. Long post was long. Save it for your memoirs buddy.

  56. Fast Eddie says:

    I seek out opportunities based on fundamentals and human psychology.

    LOL! You are amusing!

  57. grim says:

    And taking a deeper dive into Morris, just Jan to September:

    Labor Force increased by 2,687
    Employment increased by 5,462
    Unemployment fell from 15,399 to 12,624
    Unemployment rate fell 1.1% points.

    Not being driven by a decline in participation rate, and a significant improvement in employment, even despite an increase in both population and labor force.

  58. Libturd in the City says:

    Essex…all quality my man. To you it was probably as interesting as I find your prepubescent rock star guitar diatribes. Feel free to ignore my longer posts. It’s no sweat off of my brow.

  59. Fast Eddie says:

    And by that time wage inflation will have occurred to match the rise in cost.

    LMAO!! And the hits just keep on coming!

  60. Libturd in the City says:

    Grim…let’s see Atlantic County, Camden County and Essex County. :P

  61. Fast Eddie says:

    What I want to see are the salary metrics over the last 15 years.

  62. Libturd in the City says:

    I swear, when I read Passion Fruit, I’ve seen all of his positions before. He’s like a mix of Warren Buffet, a progressive high school economics teacher and Suze Orman.

  63. Essex says:

    61. I know you wanna sing backup on the album.

  64. Essex says:

    Great film…speaking of adolescent rock star fantasies…

    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1798243/

  65. grim says:

    63 – I don’t understand, it’s like you are asking me to correlate frozen yogurt flavors with car prices. We’re Brazil now, what does one thing have to do with the other?

  66. Libturd in the City says:

    “61. I know you wanna sing backup on the album.”

    It’s one thing to play second fiddle. But to play second fiddle to Essex would be more like taking sloppy seconds. I think I just threw up in my mouth a little.

  67. Libturd in the City says:

    “63 – I don’t understand, it’s like you are asking me to correlate frozen yogurt flavors with car prices.”

    Forget about it. You are correct. You would only prove what I already know. I gotta get some work done today anyway. Somewhere in Bridgeton a 4 year old is playing with matches and is about to light his mattress on fire when I am paying for the free head start program that his parents refuse to take advantage of. Soon I will have to pay for the replacement of his burnt down section 8 crib too.

  68. Essex says:

    70. I will take that as a “no” then.

  69. Libturd in the City says:

    One last thing. Paid 2.59 a gallon credit in Union yesterday.

  70. grim says:

    I can’t give you 15 years, but how about 14 years instead? I want you really to look at these numbers, hard.

    NJ Count of Households by Income (1999 vs 2013) Sources are the 2000 Census and the 2013 ACS 1 Year Survey (Similar methodologies and reporting)

    Income Tier — 1999 Households — 2013 Households
    $50,000 to $74,999 — 608,244 — 513,936
    $75,000 to $99,999 — 413,928 — 398,273
    $100,000 to $149,999 — 391,123 — 530,664
    $150,000 to $199,999 — 130,492 — 260,456
    $200,000 or more — 132,837 — 307,802

    Median Household Income — 55,146 — 70,165

  71. grim says:

    Number of NJ households making above $150,000 has MORE THAN DOUBLED in the past 14 years. The number of $200k and higher households is on the verge of hitting 10% (sitting currently at 9.7%, this number was 4.3% in 1999).

    And as insane as it sounds, there are actually more families making above $200,000 than there are families making between $150,000 and $199,000, so we’re not even talking about a standard distribution where we’re rolling down at the end, it spikes up.

  72. Essex says:

    Ah income…..sweet beautiful earnings. Let it rain people. Let it rain.

  73. painhrtz - whatever says:

    Lib you weere in Aspen Ice should have shot me a message I’m 5 minutes from there. Kids are starting on skates in February, god help me.

    Though I haven’t been around much, been on the road most of last month. This has been my first time home for 3 straight days in 6 weeks.

  74. grim says:

    So again, the desire to aggregate to a single simple numerical value loses so much detail the number is worthless.

    Sure, on aggregate, incomes have been flat, and it’s the lower incomes that are the ones bearing the burden of that, not the higher incomes.

    Just last year poverty hit a 52-year high in NJ, between 2007 and 2013 the number of people living in poverty in NJ increased by nearly 300,000.

    We don’t need to joke about Brazil anymore.

  75. Liquor Luge says:

    stu (22)-

    Precisely. And, when markets go absolutely bidless- an event guaranteed to happen, through the “miracle” of HFT- it will all crater to 0 in a matter of seconds.

    “I have thought deeply about the current debt driven society. I fear that one day, everyone wakes up simultaneously to this fact and the Great Depression (not recession) will be on.”

  76. 1987 Condo says:

    #73..I have been told that is anecdotal..

  77. Liquor Luge says:

    grim (23)-

    The article itself may be nihilistic, but what comes after the collapse will be a much saner, better and sustainable economy.

  78. Libturd in the City says:

    Aspen Ice runs an excellent program. I was impressed by the c0aches who were working the clock next to me while I was manning the away penalty box. They shared a lot of my c0aching philosophy and were not ultra-competitive assholes, which is usually what I run into. Sorry I missed you.

  79. Bystander says:

    Grim,

    The problem is those income growths were probably cops, fireman, teachers, school admins, govt admins, NJ transit workers, NJT toll takers. Private sector has been much less generous.

  80. Liquor Luge says:

    turdblossom (44)-

    Yeah. Look how well that’s working out in Japan and Urrp.

    “Inflation will take care of the debt. Mark my words.”

  81. Liquor Luge says:

    turdblossom’s economic model could take an eensy hit when the Saudis tamp oil prices down under $50/bbl.

    Anyone who thinks this won’t happen is living in a dream world. $50/bbl and under would force all North Amerikan producers into a loss leader position.

  82. Liquor Luge says:

    Also, cheap oil is Saudi’s way of thanking us for blowing Syria to smithereens. Then, they can lay their pipeline across Syria to Turkey.

  83. essex says:

    Clot for Secretary of State….

  84. essex says:

    Lena Dunham’s sister puts pebbles on eBay.

  85. Liquor Luge says:

    grim (55)-

    Can’t post UE rates without accompanying participation rates.

    We are well and truly fuct when those are taken into account.

  86. Xolepa says:

    Lib,
    Exceeding in high school athletics still rules as the best way to get into the better (and best!) colleges in the country. My daughter was not the brightest in her class, but her volleyball prowess got here into a NESCAC school. Actually, she is the first graduate from her high school ever to attend that school. Many have been rejected.

    The Ivies recruit heavily the accomplished athletes. They are Level 1 schools and must recruit to stay there. Ask me what I know that happens behind the scenes.

  87. Liquor Luge says:

    OK, thanks for the labor force numbers in those counties, grim. However, would have to say your sample counties are extreme outliers vs. the entire US (or even NJ).

    We are Brazil, but then, we have to acknowledge that our baked frontline UE stats are nothing more than window-dressing.

  88. grim says:

    The problem is those income growths were probably cops, fireman, teachers, school admins, govt admins, NJ transit workers, NJT toll takers. Private sector has been much less generous.

    Show me the numbers. I’m looking at the numbers, and I don’t see anything to support this.

  89. Anon E. Moose says:

    MIchael [37];

    Definite off your meds.

    I don’t deal in absolutes when I invest, rookie. Meaning, I don’t stick to one investment. I seek out opportunities based on fundamentals and human psychology. I would never just buy gold and sit on it. That is stupid. You have a small % invested as a hedge, or you make a bet when you think inflation talks will heat up in the future. No idea what the hell you are talking about.

    Derp -> English translation — I make all this snit up as I go along.

    Example: Wow, I was using gold as an example. I was not advocating to put money into it.

    Sure sounds to me like you were advocating gold. Gold is a perfect example.

  90. Fast Eddie says:

    Per capita and household income are like comparing faucet washers to apple danish. Because I can tell you, as an investor, my income is up. And what’s the median number of earners per household now as compared to 1999? Does that include the boomerang kids in the basement chipping in and Rajesh and his brother’s family sharing the same house? I was asking about median salaries over the last 15 years.

  91. Liquor Luge says:

    sx (88)-

    They’re spiked with LSD.

    “Lena Dunham’s sister puts pebbles on eBay.”

  92. Liquor Luge says:

    What business in its right mind- that pays real salaries and benefits to educated/trained professionals- opens or moves to NJ?

    Look at grim’s struggles to build his distillery. This state has no interest in anything other than stripping us suckers until the buzzards don’t even have morsels to pick off our dry, crumbling bones.

  93. painhrtz - whatever says:

    Lib they also run a spring over 40 league at night. trying to get in shape to play in it 2015.

  94. Liquor Luge says:

    I spend a lot of time in NY state. Their policies toward business are atrocious (despite Guvnor Thug’s non-stop TV campaign to the contrary), yet NY is still light years ahead of NJ in being business-friendly.

    And PA? They have been bleeding NJ dry since Rendell’s first term.

  95. grim says:

    Per Capita Income? For what? I think you are confusing what Per Capita Income means…

    Per capita income, also known as income per person, is the mean income of the people in an economic unit such as a country or city. It is calculated by taking a measure of all sources of income in the aggregate (such as GDP or Gross national income) and dividing it by the total population.

    Meaningless estimate of income would be a better descriptor, or maybe militant socialist ideal income.

  96. grim says:

    Besides..

    Average NJ household size in the 2013 ACS was 2.74
    Average NJ household size in the 2000 Census was 2.68

    Your argument is invalid. Raj’s brother and his kids would be categorized as a separate household by the census, despite the fact that they share the same address.

  97. 1987 Condo says:

    #74…you could think that reflects NJ households “moving up the ladder”, but while that may be some of it, I think that parts of NJ attract folks that are earning more, just as Manhattan attracts high earning professionals from around the country and perhaps world. Can we say bifurcation.

  98. Fast Eddie says:

    Look at this link. It’s per capita, median, etc.

    http://www.deptofnumbers.com/income/new-jersey/

  99. Fast Eddie says:

    The current median household income for New Jersey is $70,165. Real median household income peaked in 2008 at $76,142 and is now $5,977 (7.85%) lower.

  100. Fast Eddie says:

    I have a conference call in 10 minutes. But please feel free to tell me:

    a) How wrong I am
    b) Why the data is invalid
    c) Why it’s different here
    d) The number of wealthy unicorns has increased yet skittle pollution is down

  101. grim says:

    a) You aren’t wrong, your numbers are correct.
    b) It’s not invalid, but your interpretation of the data is.

    Real median household income peaked in 2008 at $76,142 and is now $5,977 (7.85%) lower.

    You are reading this statistic as saying everyone, every family, every household, every person as making less money in 2013 than they did in 2008. Which is incorrect. On aggregate, this is correct, but the devil is in the details.

    c) Look at the numbers:

    $100,000 to $149,999 — 139,541 more households
    $150,000 to $199,999 — 129,964 more households
    $200,000 or more — 174,965 more households

    How can you argue that the massive increase in wealthier households in the last 14 years is irrelevant?

  102. Libturd in the City says:

    QCOM has to be the worst managed company in the world. Why I keep giving them a shot is beyond me. Their technology is in every god damned smart phone in the world and management can’t figure out how to extort decent margins from this.

  103. grim says:

    And, by the way, what’s invalid about looking at the actual number of households by the amount of money that household makes, and comparing those numbers?

    If your theory is correct, shouldn’t we have seen a significant decrease in the top end numbers? Or at least the tiers maintain status quo?

    Instead, we are seeing significant growth at the top end since 2000.

  104. Essex says:

    Legalize Peyote: Campaign 2016

  105. Essex says:

    107. “why I keep giving them a shot”….my gawd the hubris.

  106. Essex says:

    vinegar + Water = Stu

  107. Libturd in the City says:

    I think the reason people are having problems with the very revealing data you share is that they are no seeing it themselves. This type of bias is understandable and expected. Not that I have any reasonable method to prove causation, but if I were to guess why the trend for income improvement is so dramatic at the top, it’s because those at the top have more to invest and our tax laws favor investors grossly. Though 1999 to 2013 may be one of the worst 14 year periods you could have ever picked for the stock market. It barely gained 30% over this entire time period. Inflation too kills those with lower income as it eats up all of their discretionary dollars where the wealthier end up with even more to invest. The increase in Food Stamps really proves that things are incredibly different at the bottom.

  108. HouseWhineWine says:

    This might have been asked by a previous poster today but does anyone know if the “househould income” includes all wage earners living at that address? If there is a family of three, meaning husband and wife, and adult child residing with us is the adult child’s income lumped in with ours?

  109. Libturd in the City says:

    Oil and water Essex? Never heard of vinegar and water.

  110. grim says:

    A household includes all the persons who occupy a housing unit. A housing unit is a house, an apartment, a mobile home, a group of rooms, or a single room that is occupied (or if vacant, is intended for occupancy) as separate living quarters. Separate living quarters are those in which the occupants live and eat separately from any other persons in the building and which have direct access from the outside of the building or through a common hall. The occupants may be a single family, one person living alone, two or more families living together, or any other group of related or unrelated persons who share living arrangements. (People not living in households are classified as living in group quarters.)

  111. grim says:

    By the way, Raj, his wife, and his kids have a beautiful home in Bridgewater and are doing very well for themselves. Raj just picked up the phone and asked me to say, “f*ck you”, for insinuating that he’s living in his brother’s basement. His brother just opened his 6th retail store and his distribution business is flourishing, he pulls in nearly $400k a year now, I talked with him last week and he’s going partners on redeveloping a 30 unit apartment building in Passaic.

  112. Liquor Luge says:

    stu (112)-

    Like everything else in our broken necronomy, income distribution has become the classic graphic barbell. None of grim’s stats are in and of themselves striking. When taken as a whole, however, they are the harbingers of final doom.

  113. Liquor Luge says:

    grim (117)-

    Call Raj back and tell him to plant a shrub or two out front and tell his kids to quit drawing on the wall with crayons. Might want to invest in a new hood filter for the stove, too; the whole goddam block smells like cumin (not that there’s anything wrong with that).

    -tongue in cheek racist rant over-

  114. Liquor Luge says:

    I should go back and count how many Curry Ranches (that’s Realtor lingo for a house owned by Indians) in Bridgewater I sold during my spectacular career in used houses.

  115. Liquor Luge says:

    Raj better have some heat if he’s gonna be in Passaic after sundown.

  116. Liquor Luge says:

    Have.

    Have Not.

    The Thin Line that Represents the Barbell.

    When that Thin Line get broken and goes away completely, it all turns to shit.

  117. Liquor Luge says:

    Again, what company in its right mind opens or moves a business to NJ? It’s the equivalent of moving to Mississippi for the educated workforce.

  118. DuckVader says:

    ” On most days, he either has 3 hours of soccer practice or 90 minutes of soccer and 90 minutes of hockey. ”

    OK, I need some time management advice here. My daughter has 1 1/2 hours of swim practice 4x a week and I already struggle. On the other hand, I don’t carpool, so maybe that’s the difference.

    And just so that I hopefully contribute something do the discussion, was reading up on this (insofar as it pertains to swimming):

    Only 1/4 of age group (10-11 yrs old roughly, 12 maybe) swimmers who are ranked competitively, are still ranked competitively at the same level when they reach 16, 17.

    Of those who quit competitive swimming, 75% quit at the age of 12.

    My problem is that to get good at swimming you have to put in the time (or for the club to field you in events). And putting in the time means at some point pushing her, and I’m a bit worried about that at this age of 11.

    When did swimming become such a competitive sport? Seems to be in the same league as tennis, ballet, and gymnastics… no such thing as a casual sport at the age of 11….

  119. Liquor Luge says:

    If you really think it matters which political party controls the U.S. Senate, please answer these questions. Don’t worry, they’re not that difficult:

    http://charleshughsmith.blogspot.com/2014/11/if-you-really-think-it-matters-which.html

  120. Liquor Luge says:

    duck (124)-

    Talent has nothing to do with kids’ sports. It’s all over by the age of 14 or 15.

    The ones who make it to that next level? It’s all about love of the sport and capacity for hard work and practice. Talent is way, way down the list…and you just can’t inject love of the sport or capacity for hard work into a kid.

  121. Libturd in the City says:

    I agree with Clot. All you can do is explain how hard work in practice is where the skills are gained. Not in games. The games are only the reward for the hard work.

    And yes, we carpool like mfers.

  122. Michael says:

    Grim, thank you. Again, thank you for taking time out of your day to gather data so people like fast eddie can realize that wealthy areas are not full of muppets. Muppets are in the ghettos. Stop using national avg data to dictate that nj homes are overpriced. Northen nj is nothing like the avg in the U.S., it is one of the wealthiest locations in the country and world. Open up your eyes dude. That’s why cops get paid 100,000 in jersey, the location dictates it. If 100,000 is a lot, go live Alabama. If 20,000 a year in taxes is too much for you in northern nj, go live in Alabama. Other option is go live in Paterson or newark, but we all know you would never do that. So go live with the white trash in Alabama where the wages and property taxes will be more up your alley. The cop will make 50,000 a year and your taxes will be a 1,000 a year. You will be in heaven.

  123. Michael says:

    50- thanks, I enjoyed the read.

  124. Michael says:

    You are telling me taxes will rise but wages won’t? So if wages don’t rise, that means prices won’t rise. So what justification would there be to raise taxes by local and state govt? Taxes rise with an increase in the value of a home. The values of homes are driven by wages. Just sayin

    Fast Eddie says:
    November 6, 2014 at 9:30 am
    By the time I’m your age, I will not be worrying about 20,000 dollar property taxes due to my investing skills.

    By the time you’re my age, the taxes will be $40,000. Why the f.uck am I even trying to debate you? You claim to be financially savvy yet your statements are short-sighted. Do you realize what you even say?

  125. jj says:

    200K income is now average income for a newlwed couple.In 1999 it was the average income for a big shot executive

    grim says:
    November 6, 2014 at 10:03 am

    Number of NJ households making above $150,000 has MORE THAN DOUBLED in the past 14 years. The number of $200k and higher households is on the verge of hitting 10% (sitting currently at 9.7%, this number was 4.3% in 1999).

    And as insane as it sounds, there are actually more families making above $200,000 than there are families making between $150,000 and $199,000, so we’re not even talking about a standard distribution where we’re rolling down at the end, it spikes up.

  126. Michael says:

    So are you. Lol

    Fast Eddie says:
    November 6, 2014 at 9:37 am
    I seek out opportunities based on fundamentals and human psychology.

    LOL! You are amusing!

  127. chicagofinance says:

    c0ach…puts you in mod….hilarious….

    Libturd in the City says:

    November 6, 2014 at 9:27 am

    Grim (my 50 is in mod).

  128. chicagofinance says:

    Everyone talk about……..POP MUZIK

    Libturd in the City says:
    November 6, 2014 at 9:39 am
    Grim…let’s see Atlantic County, Camden County and Essex County. :P

  129. chicagofinance says:

    Do you know how depressing it is to log on, see 125 posts and then realize that it is a REAL 125 posts, and not just anon/Michael (ebola projectile) diarrhea that can be skimmed over?

  130. grim says:

    I’m not as nihilistic as Clot, but this is the new status quo.

    If your only skill is lifting things, and you aren’t even particularly good at that, you are not employable. If you bring no value at all to the table, you are not employable. Low skill labor will never come back to the US.

    What Michael doesn’t realize is that wage inflation can’t remedy the situation, because low skill labor can not see wage inflation without jobs being moved off-shore.

    Increase the minimum wage to $15? I will be the beneficiary as scores of US companies move to offshore jobs. Low wage workers will not benefit, they will be unemployed.

    The best hope for the US lower classes is a rapidly increasing standard of living and wages outside of the US, particularly in Asia, which would eliminate the arbitrage benefits of offshoring. We are already seeing this, but it is not fast enough, and there are still significantly more geographies that can be leveraged in the near future.

  131. 1987 Condo says:

    In a 2010 Star Ledger report, median police pay in NJ was $90,000…assume $100,000 today. 2nd Year State Police salary is $70,000

  132. grim says:

    IMHO – The easiest political approach to improve poverty and incomes in the US is to fight for legislation to ban or heavily tariff imports from countries that don’t provide a baseline standard of living and social support for citizens.

  133. chicagofinance says:

    That is the least expensive bl0w j0b I’ve ever heard of…..it couldn’t have been good quality…..

    Libturd in the City says:
    November 6, 2014 at 9:54 am
    One last thing. Paid 2.59 a gallon credit in Union yesterday.

  134. Libturd in the City says:

    For that price, I’d take the teeth marks.

  135. Michael says:

    Exactly!!

    grim says:
    November 6, 2014 at 9:45 am
    63 – I don’t understand, it’s like you are asking me to correlate frozen yogurt flavors with car prices. We’re Brazil now, what does one thing have to do with the other?

  136. chicagofinance says:

    Chip companies are always at the mercy of someone else….so that sux….but the Chinese govt is fcuking with these guys, so they are a bit screwed…..they are lucky that Chinese companies cannot produce anything better than warmed over sh!t, so at the end the day the govt can only yank their chain so much…they need QCOM

    Libturd in the City says:
    November 6, 2014 at 11:20 am
    QCOM has to be the worst managed company in the world. Why I keep giving them a shot is beyond me. Their technology is in every god damned smart phone in the world and management can’t figure out how to extort decent margins from this.

  137. chicagofinance says:

    KFC + blowdryer + bourbon = essex

  138. Libturd in the City says:

    Thanks Chi. It’s kind of the reason I don’t invest in Chinese companies, but with technology, you end up investing there anyway. I must have been in and out of QCOM five times since the 90s. Every time, it’s the same old story. Let me see what I got in at this time. 63. Thank the lord it pays a dividend. Made a whopping 7% since may of last year plus about a 3.25% dividend. Could have done worse, but yesterday she was a clear winner. Today she’s just another geisha girl.

  139. Libturd in the City says:

    blowdryer? Only if it accidentally falls into his bathtub.

  140. jj says:

    M

    chicagofinance says:

    November 6, 2014 at 12:34 pm

    Everyone talk about……..POP MUZIK

    Libturd in the City says:
    November 6, 2014 at 9:39 am
    Grim…let’s see Atlantic County, Camden County and Essex County. :P

  141. Michael says:

    Great assessment.

    Libturd in the City says:
    November 6, 2014 at 11:38 am
    I think the reason people are having problems with the very revealing data you share is that they are no seeing it themselves. This type of bias is understandable and expected. Not that I have any reasonable method to prove causation, but if I were to guess why the trend for income improvement is so dramatic at the top, it’s because those at the top have more to invest and our tax laws favor investors grossly. Though 1999 to 2013 may be one of the worst 14 year periods you could have ever picked for the stock market. It barely gained 30% over this entire time period. Inflation too kills those with lower income as it eats up all of their discretionary dollars where the wealthier end up with even more to invest. The increase in Food Stamps really proves that things are incredibly different at the bottom

  142. chicagofinance says:

    It appears that FlabMax took some much need vacation is Europe recently….good for him…..

    BERLIN—German investigators appealed for clues following the theft of a historic wrought-iron gate from the former Dachau concentration camp near Munich.

    The gate, emblazoned with the infamous Nazi motto “Arbeit Macht Frei” or “Work Sets You Free,” went missing in the early hours of Sunday, police said.

    The local criminal-investigation department in the town of Fürstenfeldbruck appealed for witnesses who might have noticed a suspicious vehicle or persons to come forward, saying the thief or thieves must have scaled a fence at the site’s main entrance to steal the 6-foot gate before fleeing by road.

    The authorities suspect the crime could have a right-wing extremist motive, although investigators are also assessing whether a “maniac collector” is behind it, said Jürgen Weigert, spokesman for regional police headquarters in Ingolstadt.

    A Polish court sentenced Swedish citizen Anders Högström to almost three years in jail in 2010 for ordering five Poles to steal the “Arbeit Macht Frei” sign at the former Nazi concentration camp Auschwitz-Birkenau in late 2009. Polish police recovered the sign, cut into pieces, days after the theft.

    Gabriele Hammermann, the director of Dachau Concentration Camp Memorial, called the theft a “deliberate, reprehensible attempt to deny and obliterate the memory of the crimes committed in this place.”

    Although the memorial is fenced off and patrolled at night by a security firm, there are deliberately no video cameras installed at the former concentration camp. In light of the site’s history, the state-funded memorial wants to avoid visitors feeling monitored there, said Andrea Riedle, the deputy director.

    “We wouldn’t like the place to become high-security again,” Ms. Riedle said, although she added the memorial will reassess its security in the wake of the theft and a recent increase in vandalism that she said was often driven by right-wing extremism.

    Visitors to Dachau number 800,000 a year, and some “try to take things with them…as a kind of souvenir,” Ms. Riedle said. She added that light switches, plug sockets and stones from the roll-call area have gone missing.

    Dachau was the first of the Nazi concentration camps to open, in 1933, the year Adolf Hitler became chancellor. The camp initially housed political opponents of the new regime. Prisoners passed through the “Arbeit Macht Frei” gate on arrival at the camp, and were sent to carry out forced labor each day. The gate’s lettering was created by Communist inmate Karl Röder on the orders of Hitler’s SS unit.

    Tens of thousands of Jews, Jehovah’s Witnesses, homosexuals and other groups persecuted by the Nazis were murdered at the camp, or perished through forced labor, starvation and disease, during its 12-year existence.

    Jewish representatives in Germany condemned the latest theft. Dieter Graumann, president of the Central Council of Jews in Germany, told the Bild-Zeitung newspaper that “whoever does something like this is either sick or malicious, probably both.”

    Max Mannheimer, vice president of the International Dachau Committee, which represents Holocaust survivors, expressed horror at the desecration, saying “I would not have thought destruction of this quality to be possible any longer.”

    —Martin M. Sobczyk contributed to this article.

  143. chicagofinance says:

    Stu…do you like EOG?

  144. Michael says:

    Perfect example, not perfect investment. Show me where I stated to take your money and purchase gold as an investment. I don’t even own gold right now, so why would I be advocating to buy it?

    “Sure sounds to me like you were advocating gold. Gold is a perfect example.”

  145. Libturd in the City says:

    I know a lot of clubs do, but I’m not high on the energy sector like everyone else is. I’m sticking with AHGP for the club portfolio and none in my personal. Who doesn’t like Coalplay? Honestly shale is driving the oil pricing and at current oil prices, anyone with exposure to it might be in for an ass whippin’. Actually, I think all of the utilities (high dividend payers) might be in for a pull back. But that’s just my psychic prediction. I think there are better sectors to be in for the coming few months.

  146. Michael says:

    Something has to give. Can’t keep going down this road without people becoming restless. But who knows, maybe they will have lost all hope and just accept their fate.

    grim says:
    November 6, 2014 at 12:38 pm
    I’m not as nihilistic as Clot, but this is the new status quo.

    If your only skill is lifting things, and you aren’t even particularly good at that, you are not employable. If you bring no value at all to the table, you are not employable. Low skill labor will never come back to the US.

    What Michael doesn’t realize is that wage inflation can’t remedy the situation, because low skill labor can not see wage inflation without jobs being moved off-shore.

    Increase the minimum wage to $15? I will be the beneficiary as scores of US companies move to offshore jobs. Low wage workers will not benefit, they will be unemployed.

    The best hope for the US lower classes is a rapidly increasing standard of living and wages outside of the US, particularly in Asia, which would eliminate the arbitrage benefits of offshoring. We are already seeing this, but it is not fast enough, and there are still significantly more geographies that can be leveraged in the near future.

  147. grim says:

    153 – We can always give them a one way ticket to another country where lifting things is a more desirable skill. I suspect though, that they would be deported upon arrival.

  148. Libturd in the City says:

    PF,

    Nothing is about to give as long as our government legislates to the highest bidder. And the Democrats crumbs are really nothing more than a thank you, vote for me again. Minimum wage increases, SNAP programs, Section 8 housing etc., are all dirt cheap. Unfortunately, they don’t incentivize the burger flipper or the car wash attendant to learn how to do anything more than pick things up and put them down (as Grim likes to say). Someone mentioned it here yesterday and it’s been dangled around forever, though infrequently implemented even though when put into practice it has been incredibly successful. The concept is to pay welfare recipients to work. If they find a job, the government will continue to pay some welfare so that the unskilled worker does better than minimum wage. Each step up, welfare continues to be paid though the amount is reduced as the salary increases to fairer levels. Right now, nearly every social net promotes laziness. This is a big problem. No one is heartless on this issue. But if the argument is that if you don’t pay the lazy a decent living, you’ll have to pay for their incarceration. Well that’s no incentive at all.

  149. grim says:

    By the way, all the folks who were previously lifters, and are now unemployed, can also thank OSHA for making lifting things illegal. Sure does seem like our government is going out of it’s way to ensure an entire class of the citizenry is skilled to do nothing other than collect social support.

  150. chicagofinance says:

    That band is completely overrated……

    Libturd in the City says:
    November 6, 2014 at 1:27 pm
    Who doesn’t like Coalplay?

  151. essex says:

    144. Repression + angst + desperate social climber = chiFi.

  152. essex says:

    God Bless Big Pharma

  153. Libturd in the City says:

    But man is their krap catchy. Especially Yellow. Glad you caught it. What’s your take on Gentex? My club bought it and it’s going bonkers, but we have a tiny position. Do we add more?

  154. Libturd in the City says:

    God Bless Big Pharma and Chicken Parma!

  155. Libturd in the City says:

    Judging by the movement in the shippers (partially juiced by lower fuel prices), it’s gonna be a green Xmas.

  156. Michael says:

    I agree, giving something for nothing breeds laziness. I’m figuring the govt knows they can’t help these people. So like you said they throw cheap crumbs. I’m actually starting to think the govt gives welfare for nothing for that exact reason, to keep them lazy. You don’t want highly motivated smart people at the bottom. Never mind that they will be pissed off at the system, but they will be able to do something about it. I think the elite like it just the way it is. This is why there will not be a revolution….they are too lazy to start one. Honestly, this makes a lot of sense.

    Libturd in the City says:
    November 6, 2014 at 1:42 pm
    PF,

    Nothing is about to give as long as our government legislates to the highest bidder. And the Democrats crumbs are really nothing more than a thank you, vote for me again. Minimum wage increases, SNAP programs, Section 8 housing etc., are all dirt cheap. Unfortunately, they don’t incentivize the burger flipper or the car wash attendant to learn how to do anything more than pick things up and put them down (as Grim likes to say). Someone mentioned it here yesterday and it’s been dangled around forever, though infrequently implemented even though when put into practice it has been incredibly successful. The concept is to pay welfare recipients to work. If they find a job, the government will continue to pay some welfare so that the unskilled worker does better than minimum wage. Each step up, welfare continues to be paid though the amount is reduced as the salary increases to fairer levels. Right now, nearly every social net promotes laziness. This is a big problem. No one is heartless on this issue. But if the argument is that if you don’t pay the lazy a decent living, you’ll have to pay for their incarceration. Well that’s no incentive at all.

  157. Ragnar says:

    You know those tv ads for pills that make people’s wieners hard, and how they caution you that if it lasts longer than 6 hours to call your doctor?
    I’m pretty sure Lena Dunham could cure that.

    One time I had that Girls tv show on for 10 minutes, it had some whiny tattooed cow getting talked into being rear-ended by a greasy hipster guy, who then didn’t “love” her afterwards. Symbol of an aimless generation. What a turn off.

  158. Essex says:

    162. Currently eye-balling a house near Calandras….so yeah. That makes perfect sense.

  159. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    [99] clot

    “And PA? They have been bleeding NJ dry since Rendell’s first term.”

    Not so much, and with a new Dem governor who advocates new taxes, I look for Rick Perry to come up and do a little recruiting.

  160. Ragnar says:

    Now that music is now added to the topic list, I’ll point out some music that I’ve been listening to recently.
    Classical – I think Rachmaninoff’s works are all good, but beyond his famous Piano Concertos #2 & 3#, virtually all of his solo piano works are excellent, with his Preludes, Etudes, and Sonotas being especially good.
    Chopin and Tchaikovsky are excellent, and easier to warm up to than Rachmaninoff.

    Non-Classical: I’ve been buying up almost all of the prog rock reissues from original masters that Steven Wilson has been producing and remixing. He’s done the first 6 King Crimson albums, and “In the Court of the Crimson King” is really good and was pretty important as a breakthrough in that genre. “The Yes Album” also was remixed and released lately. Jethro Tull’s “Thick as a Brick” got this treatment last year.

    Anyone even heard of these bands?

  161. Ragnar says:

    Libturd,
    In regard to retail, rail intermodal volume growth and truckload volume growth should be leading indicators.
    Cass truckload volume index, growth was decelerating a bit in Sept.
    http://www.cassinfo.com/en/Transportation-Expense-Management/Supply-Chain-Analysis/Transportation-Indexes/Cass-Freight-Index.aspx

    Rail intermodal is growing pretty well still. See this tool or go to AAR dot org.
    http://railfax.transmatch.com/

    Rather than get into soccer, you might steer your young’un toward railroading:

    The freight Rail Industy is Hiring
    America’s freight railroads expect to hire more than 12,000 people in 2014 for jobs ranging from engineering and dispatching, to law enforcement, information technology, industrial development, and more. Today’s freight rail employees are highly skilled professionals who are among the highest paid workers in the nation. Freight rail employee compensation, including benefits, averages $109,700 per year. With high wages and benefits, technical training, and professional growth opportunities, freight rail employees tend to stay in the industry for the entirety of their career and often have family railroad legacies that stretch back through generations.

  162. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    [166] redux

    In fact, it was Rendell who tried to seek truces with McCreepy and Delaware to end poaching. PA was not likely a net gainer in this game because SoJo and DE were continually and successfully poaching from Philly, as were the surrounding counties.

    My favorite was when Lincoln Financial moved its C-suite out of Philly down the Main Line to Radnor. So the execs, who didn’t live in Philly, were no longer taxed in Philly.

  163. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    I saw that Styx has an upcoming date in the Peoples Republic of Montklair.

    The band members used to be notorious for being politically conservative. Wonder if the commisars in Montklair know this?

  164. Essex says:

    171. you are really reaching.

  165. Fast Eddie says:

    Meanwhile, three hours later…

    grim [74],

    Ok, so the bottom line is the gap between the haves and the have nots is growing. So, what are we to conclude?

  166. Ragnar says:

    Comrade,
    I had the “Kilroy was Here” tape from Styx, listened to it when I was 12 or 13.

    Now, they are too much pop, too little prog for my tastes.

  167. grim says:

    Ok, so the bottom line is the gap between the haves and the have nots is growing. So, what are we to conclude?

    That you gotta fight like hell

  168. grim says:

    Floyd and Yes are more prog to me than Tull, although I do love Thick as a Brick. I never did get into King Crimson though. Didn’t care much for ELP though, but I know by brother did. Big big Floyd fan, and only recently have been getting into Rush.

  169. Ragnar says:

    Eddie,
    Global labor arbitrage at the low end of labor.
    At the high end of labor – greater scale over which to apply the greatest talent. Michael Jordan makes money on 5 continents now. 50 years ago he might have had a local Ford dealer sponsorship.
    In addition, Fed Reserve asset fluffing, and government bail-outs which favor the wealthy asset owners.

  170. grim says:

    This always made me laugh out loud…

    What is Prog Rock?

    1. Progressive rock is categorized by a sacking of traditional song structure, complex rhythms, odd time signatures and a sense of inherent superiority over other rock genres

    2. Because of this, it’s pretty much never been popular

    3. It is the only rock genre in which the term “flute solo” has any meaning

  171. Essex says:

    Progressive rock is generally performed by over-competent musicians. It’s complex, often lyrically sophisticated, and doesn’t end at the 3 minute mark.

  172. Essex says:

    Styx has never been a prog rock act.

  173. grim says:

    Nearly pissed myself.

    http://badprog.blogspot.com/2009/03/kings-of-cock-prog-styx-and-triumph-of.html

    Enter Styx. From their first records, the Prog elements of the band were fully on display, including bloated song structures, pitiful lyrics, meretricious insight into the human condition, annoying synthesizers with pitch-bending technology, heroically preposterous album covers, hausfrau-romance-novel storylines, laser beams, and a general level of awfulness not available to more straightforward and less ambitious bands. But Styx also managed to be as dumb as Foghat while faux-rocking to the cockish extent of Molly Hatchet. Thus carving out their own niche, Styx sang about lizards and wizards and such and peppered their music with ample annoyances of keyboards, but were still rocking enough that no one knew the entire front row at their concerts was watching Tommy Shaw’s package with the intensity of a Green Beret sniper. The sheer absurdity of the band grew through a series of amazingly bad records through the Seventies, but it was only with Kilroy Was Here that the overwhelming anti-talent of singer and demiurge Dennis DeYoung found full flowering and stench.

  174. essex says:

    Geezus they nailed that: faux prog. ?

  175. 1987 Condo says:

    #173….be part of the haves…

  176. grim says:

    Need to be careful, I think some of those Styx guys live in NJ.

  177. essex says:

    I owned “Pieces of Eight” on vinyl so I am safe.

  178. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    [172] SX

    ommmmmm

  179. painhrtz - whatever says:

    Jeez prog rock Rag, I would rather kill myself though i do love Rush. Listening to King Crimson is f*cking torture. I can appreciate the musicianship but god I want to enjoy something when I listen to it, not break it down like a science experiment. For the record I did go through a prog metal stage. the only thing more pretentious that prog rock.

  180. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    [174] ragnar,

    I can honestly say I haven’t listened to Styx since the 70’s. I don’t think I recall anything off “Kilroy” and I would know that as I dated one of Kilroy’s descendants (yeah, he was a real person and the legend is actually rather boring).

  181. essex says:

    I got back into Pink Floyd this year – nothing post 1985 though – Roger Waters made that band listenable –

  182. Ragnar says:

    Comrade,
    Killroy was Here was the Styx album with that “Domo Arigato Mr Roboto” song.
    I’m still willing to listen to Rush, Duran Duran, and Devo from my youth, but no Styx.

    painhrtz,
    Within prog, Yes and Jethro Tull are a lot easier to listen to than King Crimson. But after repeated listening it starts making more sense. Getting to that point is the challenge. Eventually, I even got used to the “Lizard” album, particularly after the re-mix.
    Kind of the same way that Chopin and Tchaikovsky are fairly easy listens, while some Rachmaninoff requires many listenings to sort out, because as critics complained it “has too many notes”.

  183. Ragnar says:

    There is a really high quality SACD release of Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon. I’d call that prog-lite, but still very good obviously. But that’s the only album of theirs that made its way into my repeated playlist.

  184. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    [190] rags,

    I was pretty much out of Styx by then. And all the bands from H.S.

    Styx was the first rock concert I ever attended. I was 15 and on my way to get tix for a Boston date when I got hit by a car and flipped over the hood (senile old man at wheel). No serious injuries but I was limping around and everyone knew why, which gave me some stunt man cred for awhile. But the concert sold out and I had no tix.

    A reasonably hot girl in my class, who I never spoke to and who I figured would have never given me the time of day, approached me. Turns out she was a huge Styx fan, heard what happened to me, and offered up an extra ticket she had. So I went.

  185. Essex says:

    Dark Side is easily the most interesting album to revisit as a middle aged man. The lyrics are haunting and resonate more now than as a youngster.

  186. Ragnar says:

    Pain,
    I listened to a lot of Rush when I was a teen. I did buy the remastered 2112 DVD last year, which was fun.
    I like all Rush music before Power Windows, and I like nothing in the second half of that album or anything they ever did after that. I guess they changed their instruments or something, kind of converted from rockers to whiners.

  187. Ragnar says:

    Comrade,
    That’s awesome, and a 15 year old’s dream come true. Except I’m guessing the relationship based on a common interest in Styx failed to blossom in the way you may have hoped.

  188. Ragnar says:

    grim,
    Of course I have to listen to prog rock and classical because both connect to my contrarianism, disdain for majoritarian tastes, and elitist attitudes.

    On the other hand, I hate “modern” classical music and modern art, which based on the above, I’d be expected to like.

  189. Fast Eddie says:

    DS of the M is the best rock album ever made, IMO. I saw Waters in concert a few years ago and Styx when they did the Paradise Theater tour. Great shows, both.

  190. Essex says:

    Too bad about Floyd. After Roger left they released something called the “Division Bell” where most of the songs were written by David Gilmour’s wife…..and it completely sucks…..some of the lyrics on the new “floyd” album are also written by the same woman. Roger was probably a pain to work with, but man he can write lyrics. Perhaps the best rock writer of the entire genre.

  191. NJT says:

    [192] CND,

    Similar experience back in HS.

    Got in a fight with a football player (don’t ask me over what, don’t remember but probably because I was editor of the literary magazine). Took a beating but (much to everyone’s surprise…including the VP) gave one, too.

    Upon returning from a two day out of school suspension every chick – including those that before wouldn’t even acknowledge my existence except to submit corny love poems for publication (Like they would have a chance of being included! HAH!) – went out of their way to say “hi”.

    The crème de la crème though was THE prettiest cheerleader asking me to the prom!
    I hadn’t even planned on going! Thought about it and…declined.

    Twenty years later I hired an attorney for a malpractice suit. It was her brother (who was the same age and on the football team at the time).

    He remembered me (and looked totally different).

    After we both realized who we were dealing with he said:

    “D—-, if you had taken M— —- to the prom you’d have definitely got laid. She couldn’t believe you turned her down! Never saw her so frustrated”.

    I replied: Yeah, I thought so but before school was out you guys would have ganged up on me and…

    Him: You’re right.

    To this day one of my buddies still says I should have gone with her even if it entailed another beating. Maybe he’s right. I would have impressive photos to show off but then, I could be in a wheelchair, now. Nah, I made the right decision. Whew.

    BTW – I always found Darkside of the Moon depressing and still do. Now the Clash…they were cool (circa 1980-83?). Yeah, yeah they ‘sold 0ut’ to the ‘system’ (some say) but hey… Ah, the 80s.

  192. Grim says:

    DSOTM is by far the best Floyd album, but Echoes, not off that album, is their best song.

  193. Happy Renter says:

    You can’t make this stuff up:

    Salon Writer Condemns Arithmetic As Racist
    http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2014/11/salon-writer-condemns-arithmetic-as-racist.html

    “The Tribune cited CNN exit polls to illustrate the landslide, saying Abbott ‘beat Davis by lopsided margins with white voters (72-27), men (65-34) and women (52-47). Davis beat Abbott among Latinos (57-42) and African-Americans (93-7).’ Last time I checked, though, there were thousands upon thousands of women in Texas considered Latina and African-American — what about their votes?

    As RH Reality Check’s Andrea Grimes reports, their votes were solidly in Davis’ favor: 94 percent of black women and 61 percent of Latinas voted for her. Only 32 percent of white women did. That’s certainly not enough women to say that Abbott won the whole gender.”

  194. Grim says:

    Rag – you ever listen to Steve Reich? I’m a big fan of Music for 18 Musicians.

  195. Juice Box says:

    It’s hunting season.

    Went out last night with the garbage and heard a calamity in my neighbors yard, scared me pretty good since it was pitch black. Turned on my spot lights and it turns out a buck got stuck in my neighbors fence and was kicking like mad to get loose.

    Fuzzy Pic below. Hind leg was pretty stuck and bleeding heavily.

    http://tinyurl.com/lknu7ky

    Called the neighbor and he and I tried to free it with a long 2 x 4 I had in my garage but could not. Well the PD were called and two female POs show up. They were raring to blast the poor buck with a shotgun. My neighbor was not too happy about it, they said no matter what leg was broken and they were going to have to blast him anyway even if we freed it.

    3rd PO male shows up pulls out a large bolt cutter and proceed to free the buck by cutting the fence. Buck takes 10 steps then collapses. Cops say they are going to have to blast em. Buck then gets up takes off and jumps the rear fence.

    I guess no venison for us this week….Not that I am a fan….and no shotgun blast waking up the neighborhood either.

  196. Comrade Nom Deplume, Guardian of the Realm says:

    [195] rags,

    You guess correctly. Nothing came of it and nothing was going to.

  197. chicagofinance says:

    One Night Stand (clot Edition):

    A Welsh man went full-blown Hannibal Lector when allegedly found eating half of a woman’s face and an eyeball before police Tasered him, according to local reports.

    Both Matthew Williams, 34, and his 22-year-old victim were pronounced dead moments after the savage attack inside of the Sirhowy Arms Hotel in Argoed, South Wales early Thursday, the Mirror reported.

    Williams was Tasered by responding officers and successfully arrested before becoming “unresponsive” and dying at the scene, said Gwent police.

    His unidentified victim — whom witnesses said had just met Williams and had gone to his room for a drink — also died from her injuries at the scene, said police.

    Williams had reportedly just served half of a five-year prison sentence for another violent attack when Thursday morning’s took place just after 1 a.m.

    “He went Hannibal Lecter on the woman, he gouged her eyeball out, ate them and ate half her face,” Lyn Beasley, who lives close to the hotel, told the Mirror.

    Beasley said Williams was just released from prison and was “high on coke” when he attacked.

    A murder investigation is underway into the woman’s death, said police.

  198. Juice Box says:

    re # 175 – So let’s close the gap. Bernie Sanders has been on talk radio last two days. He knows what I know, there is room in the deficit now for a spending spree. He talked about O’s mention of the Keystone pipeline and mentioned that it really won’t create too many jobs anyway perhaps 2,000 temp construction jobs and 50 full time jobs. He then mentioned a trillion in new spending or Fiscal Stimulus that could create 13 million jobs rebuilding America’s infrastructure, yes there is room in the Deficit.

    Anyone here want to join me in emailing and calling and cajoling our Senators and congress people? Let them know we want more jobs from this magical trillion dollars in new government spending to rebuild aging infrastructure starting next year?

    I myself haven’t done much lately like I have done in the past, I did not even vote this time first time in decades. It might be time to wrap ourselves in the flag and rebuild Fortress America…

  199. Juice Box says:

    Essex it ain’t legal here yet…

  200. chicagofinance says:

    chicagofinance says:
    Your comment is awaiting moderation.

    November 6, 2014 at 7:36 pm

    Ragnar: Here is a little known lip sync-ed performance by Devo on Solid Gold. I was 14 years old when this aired and I was in awe………brutally imbecilic genius…..

    The inspiration for this song was a critic’s sc^thing review of New Traditionalists, calling these guys a bunch of “fascist clowns”. They were inspired and thought…..well, what kind of music would fascist clowns make?

    Note, the clown is the break dancer known as Spazz Attack…and he has appeared in some of their other work….
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9xx4gzWbGf8

  201. Juice Box says:

    re# 124 – sounds like an omen for me. My five year old loves swimming. We do lessons every weekend. My wife was a competitive swimmer in high school and college, she thrives around the smell of chlorine.

    I only like the smell of the ocean….I used to race Jet Skis and jump the waves. Been a long time since 7 Presidents allowed Jets skis, gasoline containers, beer.

    Kids today have no idea.

  202. Michael says:

    Good story. Thanks for the share.

    Juice Box says:
    November 6, 2014 at 6:54 pm
    It’s hunting season.

    Went out last night with the garbage and heard a calamity in my neighbors yard, scared me pretty good since it was pitch black. Turned on my spot lights and it turns out a buck got stuck in my neighbors fence and was kicking like mad to get loose.

    Fuzzy Pic below. Hind leg was pretty stuck and bleeding heavily.

    http://tinyurl.com/lknu7ky

    Called the neighbor and he and I tried to free it with a long 2 x 4 I had in my garage but could not. Well the PD were called and two female POs show up. They were raring to blast the poor buck with a shotgun. My neighbor was not too happy about it, they said no matter what leg was broken and they were going to have to blast him anyway even if we freed it.

    3rd PO male shows up pulls out a large bolt cutter and proceed to free the buck by cutting the fence. Buck takes 10 steps then collapses. Cops say they are going to have to blast em. Buck then gets up takes off and jumps the rear fence.

    I guess no venison for us this week….Not that I am a fan….and no shotgun blast waking up the neighborhood either.

  203. NJT says:

    Not only was I not a Floyd fan but a suicidal sorta kinda girlfriend/’hosemonster’ (“enough, I’m so sore I don’t wanna pee” I had to tell her) and then bi-polar rich widow infatuated with the ‘music’ completely turned me off to anything related to the band.

    Then there was ‘The Wall’ movie. Had sit through it with my West Point buddy (I didn’t go there) his girlfriend and a blind date for me…

    No more ‘Pinky’, ever.

    BTW – Lost a great deal on a two family. Someone got in there, somehow and made an offer that was taken. DAMN! Don’t wanna know what price it’s going to close at (it’s better that way).

    Maybe they couldn’t get in… NO WAY, no matter how cheap, for me.

  204. Grim says:

    Cut the fence? That’s crazy talk.

  205. Grim says:

    Wall movie is terrible. I don’t even care much for that album.

  206. not ragnar says:

    Rags, hope you caught King Crimson on the recent tour, who knows when they’ll appear again.
    I saw this show: http://www.setlist.fm/setlist/king-crimson/2014/best-buy-theater-new-york-ny-1bcfc9d0.html
    Very solid set, mostly older stuff plus something called Hell Hounds of Grim, uh, I mean, Krim…
    It is strange but good to go to a rock show where the crowd is quiet like they are at the US Open.

  207. Juice Box says:

    Re#213 – I told the neighbor I would split it, the cost of a fence section, since he was numb when the cops asked if he wanted lead with his venison. Let’s see if he holds me too it, he ain’t poor he just put in a new Generac.

  208. Juice Box says:

    Re: wall – saw the pig again a few years back a t the live earth concert at the meadowlands.
    Last time for sure.That generation is well old.
    , O&A did a show on their harmonizing and we’ll lypsynching…What channel on XM even plays Floyd?

  209. Ragnar says:

    Not me,
    I thought about going to the concert, but had other things going on that weekend, and don’t know anyone else who would be interested in going. I hear they may make a disk next year of the tour performances, so may buy that.

  210. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    Turdburglar telling 30 year how it really is and what’s coming. That made me laugh so hard. I’m now convinced that the PrussianFruit is at least two generations dumb.

    Michael says:
    November 6, 2014 at 7:29 am
    Going to be flat for another 3-5 years and will start rising. After 2020-2021, a lot of buyers will enter the market and the next upswing in the real estate will take place (20 years after the last upswing in the real estate cycle). Demographics will be the biggest driver. Baby boomers will be leaving their jobs and selling their homes at the same time. Finally creating the opportunity for younger generation to get a good job and their own home instead of renting.

    30 year realtor says:
    November 6, 2014 at 7:00 am
    Prices are soft. Lots of dead inventory. Market looks like it will be flat for the foreseeable future.

  211. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    Thought for the Day, courtesy of a friend who said it came from someone calling in to Rush Limbaugh’s show:

    “If voters wanted Congress to work with Obama to get things done, they would have elected Democrats!”

    Hmmmm, he has a point.

  212. Michael says:

    dont worry, I will be laughing just as hard at you if I’m right. I hope this blog still exists and you are still around.

    The Original NJ ExPat says:
    November 6, 2014 at 10:24 pm
    Turdburglar telling 30 year how it really is and what’s coming. That made me laugh so hard. I’m now convinced that the PrussianFruit is at least two generations dumb.

    Michael says:
    November 6, 2014 at 7:29 am
    Going to be flat for another 3-5 years and will start rising. After 2020-2021, a lot of buyers will enter the market and the next upswing in the real estate will take place (20 years after the last upswing in the real estate cycle). Demographics will be the biggest driver. Baby boomers will be leaving their jobs and selling their homes at the same time. Finally creating the opportunity for younger generation to get a good job and their own home instead of renting.

    30 year realtor says:
    November 6, 2014 at 7:00 am
    Prices are soft. Lots of dead inventory. Market looks like it will be flat for the foreseeable future.

  213. Comrade Nom Deplume, at Peace With The Trolls says:
  214. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    Lib – Wait until you see the difference at U11 playing 8v8, especially in the higher divisions. It’s pretty amazing to watch them really gel as a team. Slightly bigger pitch does not outweigh the extra players, so you really see the team develop as opposed to outstanding individual players dominating. That’s when the wheat and chaff start to separate.

    It’s funny. My son is constantly asking me about colleges and which ones he could attend. I told him it’s based on whatever the multi is worth or he could become a scholarship field goal kicker if he could work on his emotions. Of all of the U9s and U10s that I have seen perform goalie kicks, no one has near the power or accuracy that he does. It’s actually funny (and admittedly a bit heart-warming) to listen to the parents of the opposing team when he nearly kicks the ball directly into the opposing teams penalty box. Albeit, he’s still playing small sided, but no other kids can even reach the center circle.

  215. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    [223] And big goalie kicks are replaced by mixed kicks, rollouts, and tosses, with the goalkeeper really reading the positioning. Everything I know about soccer I learned in the last 3 years from watching my daughter play year round, but I’m trying to come up to speed fast. I really watched the WC for the first time this Summer. I had no idea only 3 subs! Wow!

  216. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    Michael – Maybe change your name to 15YearNaNaTitinMyMouth so we can all be mindful of your professional experience.

  217. Liquor Luge says:

    expat (224)-

    See if you can find the 2nd half of last week’s Barca/RM game on YouTube. Sick stuff. Modric had about 75 touches without making a mistake.

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