Cue bailout attempt #74

From HousingWire:

NY Fed economists urge coordinated mortgage, unemployment aid

Two economists at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York said states can design successful programs to help unemployed borrowers with monthly mortgage payments only if they are tailored to specific state needs.

The New York Fed economists James Orr and Joseph Tracy highlighted Pennsylvania Homeowner’s Emergency Mortgage Assistance Program, which began in 1983. At the time roughly 4% of the state’s labor force spent more than 26 weeks without a job, twice the national average. Delinquencies and foreclosures began to spike.

Through July 2011, the state received more than 183,000 HEMAP applications for bridge loans, designed specifically to provide up to two years of mortgage assistance at a total cap of $60,000. The success of the program, Orr and Tracy found is that program administrators carefully sifted through who should get funding.

Slightly more than 43,000 applicants received a loan. To date, 80% of them were able to stay in the homes and repay the loan in full.

“Lending to a carefully screened group of unemployed borrowers could be a successful strategy for states to assist distressed homeowners, reduce economically inefficient foreclosures, and help stabilize house prices for the benefit of the public at large. This approach avoids the complexity of working with servicers to change mortgage terms,” Orr and Tracy said in a note about their research Tuesday.

“The program design would have to balance the expected benefits to the homeowner, and the wider community, of providing assistance against the expected costs to taxpayers from default on the loan,” Orr and Tracy said.

“The logic here is simple: If the problem is the mortgage, fix the mortgage; but if the problem is temporary unemployment, fix the cash flow. Of course, if the problem is both, then tackle each in a coordinated manner,” Orr and Tracy said.

This entry was posted in Economics, Foreclosures, Mortgages, National Real Estate. Bookmark the permalink.

108 Responses to Cue bailout attempt #74

  1. Waiting in Jersey says:

    Am I number one?

  2. grim says:

    Why not just bulldoze them?

  3. Mike says:

    Good Morning New Jersey

  4. grim says:

    From Bloomberg:

    Obama Said to Plan $300 Billion Jobs Package With Tax Cuts, Aid for States

    President Barack Obama plans to propose sparking job growth by injecting more than $300 billion into the economy next year, mostly through tax cuts, infrastructure spending and direct aid to state and local governments.

    Obama will call on Congress to offset the cost of the short-term jobs measures by raising tax revenue in later years. This would be part of a long-term deficit reduction package, including spending and entitlement cuts as well as revenue increases, that he will present next week to the congressional panel charged with finding ways to reduce the nation’s debt.

    Almost half the stimulus would come from tax cuts, which include an extension of a two-percentage-point reduction in the payroll tax paid by workers due to expire Dec. 31 and a new decrease in the portion of the tax paid by employers.

    Obama is set to lay out his plans in an address to Congress tomorrow as unemployment remains at 9.1 percent more than two years after the official end of the worst recession since the Great Depression. Payroll growth stalled last month.

  5. Not Grim says:

    Happy Birthday Grim!

  6. grim says:

    From the Washington Post:

    Fed considers buying more long-term Treasury bonds to lower rates

    The Federal Reserve is moving toward new steps aimed at lowering interest rates on mortgages and other kinds of long-term loans, without making another massive infusion of money into the economy.

    When Fed officials hold a pivotal meeting in two weeks, they will strongly consider buying more long-term Treasury bonds, which should lead to lower interest rates for those bonds and other long-term investments. This would ultimately make it cheaper for businesses to borrow money for investments and push more dollars into the stock market, in addition to reducing rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

    To pay for the bond purchases, the Fed would sell off some of the shorter-term bonds it already owns rather than printing new money.

    At their last meeting, Fed officials discussed whether to revive their earlier program of massive bond purchases, using newly printed money to buy hundreds of billions of dollars in securities as a way of pumping money into the economy. This discussion prompted wide speculation that the Fed might do it again.

  7. Xroads says:

    Happy birthday!

  8. Xroads says:

    Are interest rates not at record lows and doing nothing?

    ” This would ultimately make it cheaper for businesses to borrow money for investments and push more dollars into the stock market, in addition to reducing rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.”

  9. still_looking says:

    Happy birthday! I’d sing it but I don’t want to hear hounds howling along with me…

    :)

    sl

  10. Mike says:

    No. 4 President BO send some of that 300 billion this way and put the NJ unemployed to work cleaning up after Irene. Oh that’s right there’s FEMA. Find Every Mexican Available

  11. grim (6)-

    This is it: Operation Twist. The Fed goes out the yield curve, while simultaneously allowing our foreign creditors to sell their shorter maturities at the top.

    It is stealth QE…and it will also be the signal that the Fed has completely lost control of the balance sheet.

    Smoke ’em if you got ’em, boys. It’s about to go from gray to black.

  12. Welcome to the death of money.

  13. freedy says:

    No problem Bojangles is going to give us some hope and new change tomorrow night .

  14. Essex says:

    So, chifi posted his “cork sniffing” alumni gathering as some sort of bait. Some attempt to entice and prove that hmmmmm the rich really ‘are’ different….but what he doesn’t realize is that I’d rather have my eyes gouged out with a fork that inhabit a room of ivy league pud handlers and their witty repartee. On the other hand I also believe that the company of complete imbeciles is offensive. But there is a middle ground.

    There are plenty of amazing people who went to fine colleges who are a blast to be around. They are down to earth. Work hard every day in a variety of jobs and they make life livable. Thanks chifi. You prove my point every day that you take oxygen through your upturned, cork sniffing nose.

  15. jamil says:

    “President Barack Obama plans to propose sparking job growth by injecting more than $300 billion into the economy next year, mostly through tax cuts, infrastructure spending and direct aid to state and local governments.”

    Let me guess. Some temporary gimmicky cuts (and funding for public sector unions) that would give him some street cred but do nothing to help confidence of job creators. If you believe tax cuts help, make them permanent and get the government he11 out of the way!

  16. Shore Guy says:

    SL,

    What do you think?

    http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2011/sep/2/im-exactly-whats-wrong-with-barack-obamas-america/

    Dr. Milton R. Wolf

    My father used to tell me that if I worked hard, it would pay off in the long run. How could he have been so blind? Laziness pays off now!

    We all know that the power to tax is the power to destroy. So too is the power to regulate. Equally powerful is the reality that rewarded behavior is repeated. After applying these inescapable truths to the analysis of Obamanomics, a collection of policies designed to reward or deter (or even outright banish) certain behaviors – to ordain winners and losers – it’s all clear to me now. The reason Obamanomics has been such a miserable failure is that I failed to follow its cues. I hope America will forgive me.

    First, despite so many communities lacking a village organizer, I chose instead to serve mine. At the time, the practice of medicine seemed like a noble calling, but little did I realize what a threat physicians pose to communities. Surgeons, President Obama warned, will run around lopping off patients’ feet or yanking out children’s tonsils just to pocket a quick buck. I realize that many of you parents who have unsuccessfully pleaded to your child’s pediatrician for a tonsillectomy will disagree, but who are you to judge? The president doesn’t trust you or your doctor to decide such things. Why else would he appoint as the head of Medicare a man who declared that the doctor-patient relationship is “no longer tenable”?

    What’s worse – at least in Obamaworld – is that I, like most physicians, have two jobs: I’m also responsible for a business that creates jobs and employs some great Americans. This despite our government’s burdensome taxes, regulations and licenses, which already have created formidable obstacles to entrepreneurial success.

    snip

    Embarrassingly, I must confess that I balance my own budget, both personal and professional. I realize that’s anathema to Obamanomics, but I just can’t escape my vice of fiscal sanity. What’s more, even though there’s “shovel-ready” money to be had from “Obama’s stash,” I stubbornly insist on paying my own bills. This sometimes leads to difficult choices: I’m the only doctor in America, for example, who drives a car officially declared a “clunker” by his own cousin-in-chief, but I’m from the branch of the family that doesn’t believe in spending money you don’t have – plus, I love my SUV. Still, the undeniable reality is that according to the Obama way of thinking, I obviously sabotaged our economy when I undercut the stimulus and its related gimmicks like “Cash for Clunkers” by refusing to participate in the giveaways.

    Worst of all, however, I have become the single greatest impediment to Americans’ prosperity in Obamaworld: a high-wage earner. That I clawed my way toward the American dream with humbling jobs since the age of 12, volunteered for a grinding decade of medical training and lived more of my adult years deep in the bottom rungs of incomes than the top, I know now, is no excuse. Obamanomics is about spreading the wealth, not creating it. In my defense, wildly increased taxes, stifling malpractice insurance and even steep medical school loans have worked wonders to erase the gains. Still, Mr. Obama claims that families earning more than $250,000 a year are “millionaires and billionaires.” Who knew? Those tax-free corporate jets can’t be far behind.

    Of course, I’m not alone. Tens of millions of Americans are frustrating the socialist aspirations of this president simply by getting up each morning and going to work. You know who you are. You’re not just suckers, you’re saboteurs. Barack Obama would prefer we all be wards of the state rather than active producers. How else can you explain the incentives he champions: endless jobless benefits, cradle-to-grave welfare handouts, “tax cuts” for non-taxpayers, and on and on. Thus proclaims the president who himself raked in a cool $7.2 million over the past two years, “I do think at a certain point you’ve made enough money.” The key word there is “you.”

    snip

    Dr. Milton R. Wolf, a Washington Times columnist, is a cousin of President Obama‘s. He blogs at MiltonWolf.com

  17. yo'me says:

    What is the complain about taxes by the top earners.Taxes have been the lowest since 1945 when the top earner pays 90% of its earnings

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/49/Chart_1.png

  18. chicagofinance says:

    ? I figured we were done. You had a full night’s sleep and still have the need to spout off? Thsese events are pretty laid back….you go get free food and drink and then you learn something…..the venues are nice.

    Essex says:
    September 7, 2011 at 8:03 am
    So, chifi posted his “cork sniffing” alumni gathering as some sort of bait. Some attempt to entice and prove that hmmmmm the rich really ‘are’ different….

  19. JJ says:

    It is quite sad that anyone would be jealous of an ivy leaguer. Since I never studied in High School and had zero money I never even considered an Ivy league school. Even if one called me up and asked me to go for free since I had no plans on studying in college nor had bus fare or train fare to get there I would not have gone. Now come grad school since I never studied in college let alone even read a GMAT prep book and company only paid first 7.5k of tuition I once again never considered an IVY nor would have gone if asked. I don’t like to get in debt, don’t like busy work nor like to give up partying for studying. Meanwhile one class I took my roomate and I had same exact textbook, my teacher taught us course, we had a midterm and a final. He had group projects, weekly answer questions in back of book a paper on top of the midterm and final, all busy work. I guess to make up for the double tuition. I have had people from Harvard, NYU and Columbia work for me, but funny they all had a chip on their shoulder. I love the Harvard guy who I asked to type something for me and he said I have a degree from Harvard I don’t type!!! I said wow your parents paid 200K for college and you don’t even know how to type, you should get your money back.

    Essex says:
    September 7, 2011 at 8:03 am
    So, chifi posted his “cork sniffing” alumni gathering as some sort of bait. Some attempt to entice and prove that hmmmmm the rich really ‘are’ different….but what he doesn’t realize is that I’d rather have my eyes gouged out with a fork that inhabit a room of ivy league pud handlers and their witty repartee. On the other hand I also believe that the company of complete imbeciles is offensive. But there is a middle ground.

    There are plenty of amazing people who went to fine colleges who are a blast to be around. They are down to earth. Work hard every day in a variety of jobs and they make life livable. Thanks chifi. You prove my point every day that you take oxygen through your upturned, cork sniffing nose.

  20. Anon E. Moose says:

    Yo’me [17];

    I’ll wait for Nom to speak definitively on this, but as the opening act, I’ll tell you that you’re citing marginal rates, not effective rates. No one ever paid 90% of their income in taxes. Scads of tax exemptions and shelters existed, some of which were eliminated in the Reagan tax reforms.

    Plus, what’s also changed since the 50’s is the top-heaviness of revenues: the rich are paying a historically larger portion of the burden, and greater proportions relative to their share of total income (i.e., the taxes are more ‘progressive’ than they had been).

  21. Just Toast says:

    Always interesting to see people hide behind their credentials. If they really are superior (some are), they should welcome the opportunity to demonstrate their capabilities while feeding their egos and whipping their opponents backside on whatever competitive field they wish to play. Part of the problem in this country is that we tend to shy away from competition and competence which drives all of us to be our best. We flock, unfortunately to the blame game of why it’s someone else’s fault. Instead of learning the tricks of the trade, better to learn the trade.

    Regarding the Milton Wolf article – you want to motivate people, just take the food out of their stomach and tell them to show up at 6:30 am for gov’t sponsored employment.

  22. Libtard in the City says:

    “the rich are paying a historically larger portion of the burden, and greater proportions relative to their share of total income (i.e., the taxes are more ‘progressive’ than they had been).”

    This is probably due more to the widening income gap, than any tax policy changes. The fact that the top continues to increase their net worth as the middle class falls further and further behind (since 1980) points to a need to balance the playing field. Whether it be getting control of exorbitant executive compensation or changing tax laws, something has gotta break. We already know who the government represents (just look at the handling of our financial crisis and the moral hazard in awarding the street for their bad behavior), so the only change will have to come through Clot-styled revolution. Anyone who thinks that Bachman or a Romney will affect change, is as dumb as a 2008 Obama voter or a 2004 Bush voter. I know it sounds extreme, but if you don’t vote with a bullet, then you will continue to see things change for the worse. Unless of course, you are in that top 1.5%.

    Get the barbed wire ready, because the 2nd world is where we are heading fast. I see examples of this nearly every day. Quite honestly, Gator is sick of hearing it from me. The latest example was heading over to the Home Depot to return some wood blinds that looked like they were cut with a child safe scissor. When I got there, no one was there to assist me, although the flooring expert and the kitchen specialist were sitting behind their desks twiddling their thumbs. Two pages to the window treatment rep and still, no reply. So I went and grabbed the sample book from the desk drawer. Tough stuff for the flooring and kitchen guy for sure. I’ll just call in the order myself today to their online service where they seem to have half a clue.

  23. Soccer Dad says:

    Re:19 The only reason to have an Ivy League degree is to be unaffected by all those who have achieved financial success w/o one. Once you have money in the US, then you want class and status. As a poor kid who went to Yale from a self educated and well educated working class family ( which no longer exists in the US as they are far too busy following NASCAR), I used to get a kick out of the family sending their kids to see Yale in their family limo w/o a hope of getting in because Grayson was too stupid. Of course, if they were from a super rich or prestigous family, even if Grayson was stupid, he got in. Witness GWB.

    While we’re on the topic, the US has one of the most screwed up undergraduate systems in the world. In most of the world, you take a test after high school. If you score really well, you got the top national Universities, usually while living at home. You actually go to school primarily to study w/o going into extraordinary debt. Here, studying is only part of the overall Gestalt of partying, playing sports and living on your own. My kids got full rides to expensive universities for playing sports,. How crazy is that? I only put them in sports to keep them from getting off track during adolescence. But sports in the US is not a casual thing, it’s serious business.

  24. Anon E. Moose says:

    Lib [22];

    This is probably due more to the widening income gap, than any tax policy changes.

    But as I said, the rich are also paying more relative to their proportion of income. That wouldn’t happen just from the widening income gap. If it was just a widening income gap, the proportion paid relative to income would stay the same, no?

  25. Libtard in the City says:

    Moose,

    Of the share of total income, is the top 1.5% share growing? If it is, then the fact they are paying more would make total sense. No? Kind of tired to think today. Was out late last night setting up the pumps to drain the mighty Glen Ridge River.

  26. 3b says:

    #23 Alot of truth to what you say. I am the product of working class immigrant parents went to college and grad schools, and horrors of horrors lived at home, like all the other working class kids in NYC in the 80’s who went to college. And I actually went to class most of the time, and had a part time job and partied was involved etc.

    However the primary goal was an education and doing it in 4 years there was none of this 5 year, 6 year and longer nonsense just to get a BA.

    The problem today is everyone wants to go away, and somehow you are a freak if you don’t. The kids get to play at being adults and more than a few are not there for an education but just to party and goof off.

    College tuition is really not all that expensive, it is the room and board etc that really makes the cost rise.

    I told my kids you can go away, but if you mess up your home, and if you get your head out of your butt, than you can enroll in a local college and commute.

  27. JJ - AKA Two Hands says:

    If you tax me at 90% over a certain limit I would just stop working. Back in college you had to file a tax return once you hit $5,250 or more in income. I always stopped working at around $5,200 or so on the books. I I earned even $5,251 the entire $5,251 counted as income, if I earned $5, 249 for financial aid purposes I earned zero income.

    Back in the day of 90% tax above a certain income level, Doctors all played Golf every Wed. Doctors were only open 32 hours a week, Monday and Tuesday and Thursday and Friday. Mainly cause that fifth day of work was taxed at 90% so why bother. Doctors wives all had dress stores that lost money but tons of expenses were run through it as well as wifes car. People worked less, wrote off more and lost money on investments called tax shelters on purpose all to keep reported income just below 90% tax rate.

  28. 3b says:

    Oh and one other point regardless of the debate Ivy League, good, bad, or indifferent, there is no such thing as almost Ivy league.

    For what it is worth, I have a good friend of mine the Valedictorian from my undergraduate days, who went to Harvard Law School, she has always maintained that it is difficult to get into, but not all that difficult once you are in. And many of her courses in law school were taught by TA”s.

  29. yo'me says:

    Top 20% top earners hold 93% of the wealth in the US.Bottom 80% holds 7% of the wealth.Who is suppose to pay more?

    http://sociology.ucsc.edu/whorulesamerica/power/wealth.html

    From the graph I posted if 90% in 1945 is marginal rates,the graph will have 35% marginal rates today

    Due to growing population,the numer of top earners in 1945 will be less than the top earners in 2010.
    If you gave the bottom 80% good paying jobs,they can pay their share of the burden.With unemployment and decreasing wages the top earners will always complain about carrying the burden for everybody.

  30. JJ - AKA Two Hands says:

    The flaw in your chart is assuming the rich of yesterday is rich of today. The majority of friends I have parents were poor. The majority of friends I have are rich. Meanwhile I know plenty of kids with rich parents, who busted in the Internet Meltdown, Madoff, Stock Market Melt down or RE meltdown who are now not so rich.

    yo’me says:
    September 7, 2011 at 10:47 am

    Top 20% top earners hold 93% of the wealth in the US.Bottom 80% holds 7% of the wealth.Who is suppose to pay more?

    http://sociology.ucsc.edu/whorulesamerica/power/wealth.html

    From the graph I posted if 90% in 1945 is marginal rates,the graph will have 35% marginal rates today

    Due to growing population,the numer of top earners in 1945 will be less than the top earners in 2010.
    If you gave the bottom 80% good paying jobs,they can pay their share of the burden.With unemployment and decreasing wages the top earners will always complain about carrying the burden for everybody.

  31. yo'me says:

    #27 Those were the great days of America!When the total population is productive.This is when everybody had time to enjoy not to worry about making so much wealth.

    “Back in the day of 90% tax above a certain income level, Doctors all played Golf every Wed. Doctors were only open 32 hours a week, Monday and Tuesday and Thursday and Friday. Mainly cause that fifth day of work was taxed at 90% so why bother. Doctors wives all had dress stores that lost money but tons of expenses were run through it as well as wifes car. People worked less, wrote off more and lost money on investments called tax shelters on purpose all to keep reported income just below 90% tax rate”

  32. chicagofinance says:

    Appreciate the post. I am willing to listen to all the carping around here, because a good amount of it is justified. But at a certain point a line has to be drawn.

    Sometimes people are just intelligent, bust their ass, and don’t have an attitude. You don’t see them around, because they generally socialize less and work a lot. The warped perception relates to the fact that we have Wall Street in NYC, and it is very visible in this community.

    Soccer Dad says:
    September 7, 2011 at 10:28 am
    Re:19 The only reason to have an Ivy League degree is to be unaffected by all those who have achieved financial success w/o one. Once you have money in the US, then you want class and status.

  33. JJ says:

    Hey ChiFi am I invited to sniif some hot harvard girls cork?

  34. yo'me says:

    Maybe,that is the answer to our unemployment problems.People holds 2-3 jobs,works 90 hours a week.Not giving a chance for the rest to get employed.Job sharing might be the answer!!Cut the hours work to give employment to the rest of the country.It will give more time for people to smell the outside

  35. JJ says:

    There is no unemployment problem. ZERO!! Back in 1970s 10% Unemployment for married men with kids. Basically, no married women with kids work. That means of 100 people men and women only 45 had jobs. In 2011, 10% unemployment where 80% of married women with kids work means out of 100 people 81 people have jobs. Therefore almost 100% increase in employment in just 35 years.

  36. 3b says:

    And on a happier note the Rugby World Cup starts on Friday!!!!

  37. Juice Box says:

    JJ- where I live the longer term unemployed men are all starting to look like that dude Zach Galifianakis from the Hangover, basically lazy, fat and bearded. I have watched them lumber around in flip flops, shorts with a kid or two in tow sipping lattes all summer as the Mrs. is off to work in a short skirt and high heels. Pretty soon the Mrs. will be looking to trade up if fatso does not shape up soon and put on a tie and get to work.

  38. Comrade Nom Deplume says:

    (20) moose,

    That said it succinctly enough.

    FWIW, sniffing a cork is the mark of an uninformed lowbrow. When the waiter puts it down, its so you can see that the end is wet (JJ, jump in here if u like).

  39. Essex says:

    I’ve never felt a pang of jealousy since the 11th grade and my buddy got a new z28. I’m close to my cousin a Havard Law grad. I simply like to harass chiFi. Any questions’

  40. Shore Guy says:

    “But sports in the US is not a casual thing, it’s serious business.”

    And how. I was luck enough to get a college degree paid for by a college in one of the major sports leagues. I often wear my bowl and letterman’s rings. So, I am not by any stretch a sports hater. Far from it; however, sports are out of control in this country. I just saw the financials for my college’s athletic department and the HUGE sums that are going to be spent to replace an awsome weight room just because other schools have built even more awsome weight rooms and we cannot compete in recruiting high school students without the same facilities. We are, apparently, going to tear out seating and build a special recruiting lounge, yadda, yadda. All of this to assist in recruiting, because everyone else is doing it too.

    It is like all the schools are lemmings running to the sea, spending all along the way.

  41. Comrade Nom Deplume says:

    The hardest thing about law school was getting in. And they don’t teach different law at HLS. In fact, judging from some I’ve met, they teach very little law.

  42. 3b says:

    #40 Shore: Education is secondary in many colleges now. It is sports and mall like dining halls etc. All fluff.

  43. Shore Guy says:

    “Why not just bulldoze them?”

    Naw, create a CCC-type program and give the unemployed hand tools and let them pull apart the buildings by hand. I did this once during acollege break to make extra money. Granted, the dust from wacking horsehair plaster with sledge hammers is nasty but…. Somehow we have gotten away from the idea of the dignity of work and now, it seems, too many jobs are beneath the dignity of many.

  44. Shore Guy says:

    “It is sports and mall like dining halls etc”

    I hear administrators say, “Students demand it.” The other thing that happens is that professors who demand accountability from students get hammered on Rate My Professor and similar sites.

  45. chicagofinance says:

    My 4 year old son watches so much sports on TV, he has started to slide backward, put both hands on his right leg and scream “WE ARE!”….
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bd8ppk0UCx8

    Shore Guy says:
    September 7, 2011 at 11:46 am
    Far from it; however, sports are out of control in this country.

  46. 3b says:

    #44 Students demand it.”

    I suspect in many cases parents demand it. A lot of this is bragging rights for parents, and the car sticker. I cannot tell you how many so called affluent parents I know who have had there kids take out massive student loans to pay for these “almost Ivy League Schools”, as well as state schools etc.You would (wrongly however) assume that the parents would just write the check. Now manyof these kids are graduating, no jobs, and many are now off to grad school and more debt to hide out for another couple of years.

    Oh and I just found out recently that parents have to co-sign these student loans; the parents are ultimately on the hook to pay them back!!!!

  47. freedy says:

    what happens when the parent dies? then what

  48. chicagofinance says:

    I would NEVER recommend insurance for someone college age, but when a kid has $100,000+ on their head, no job, no GTL through employer, and parents co-signed loans…you need protection…for a pittance…sick really….

    3b says:
    September 7, 2011 at 12:18 pm
    #44 Students demand it.”
    Oh and I just found out recently that parents have to co-sign these student loans; the parents are ultimately on the hook to pay them back!!!!

  49. Libtard in the City says:

    ChiFi:

    Little Gator is an absolute sports nut. He wakes up and puts on Sportscenter. He hardly ever watches kid shows at all. And of all of the cartoons out there, my son has to be gaga over the Family Guy, but I don’t let him watch it. He just loves the talking dog Brian. His love of sports is pretty insane and his patience is unreal. He can sit through any entire sporting event and we essentially have to drag him away from sporting events in the 4th quarter kicking and screaming to avoid traffic. He’ll also watch any sport, regardless how legitimate it is. He’ll watch beach soccer, little league world series games, he has probably watched the last decade of Stanley Cup playoff games (thanks NHL Network) five times each.

    He’s like a sports sponge this kid. We were watching some Premier League soccer and out of the blue he asks me how Messi could play both for Argentina and FC Barcelona. Praise the lord for Wikipedia. The only Messi I know ends with er.

    And it’s not only TV sports with him. After coming home from day camp, he would practice kicking the soccer ball into our practice goal for about 4 hours. He even made me put a target on the goal. The strangest thing is that I really don’t push him. I simply expose him to it and he does the rest. I can only hope he’ll remain half as enthusiastic about his schoolwork as he is about the game of sports. I dropped him at before-care this morning and it takes place in his school gym. Before his rain coat or back pack were even removed, he began shooting hoops. It’s crazy I tell ya.

    Nom can vouch for his early soccer prowess. He has quite a leg.

  50. House Whine says:

    For a country so interested in sports, why are at least 2/3’s of us overweight/obese? Time to stop being spectators and get our bodies moving. You don’t burn many calories sitting at the college football stadium watching other guys running around. I don’t remember the exact numbers, but my son is attending state univ. for a science degree. He figured out what % of our $$ is going to the sports program and it was too much. He is going to get an education, not to watch sports.

  51. Comrade Nom Deplume says:

    (49) lib

    That little jets fan is never getting one by me again! ;-)

  52. Libtard in the City says:

    Ha ha. If you thought he was good last year, this year you have to seriously watch your cajones when he shoots on you. He’s doing team ice hockey in October and he’s very aggressive (translation: he’s smart enough to cherry pick), so it will be fun to watch how he does with kids who have been playing since they were in diapers. At some point though, I’m going to have to teach him how to ride a bike!

  53. Painhrtz - Salmon of Doubt says:

    bike smike Lib teach him how to properly use his butt end ont he hockey stick he’ll never need a bike. In hockey related news KHL plane went down killing all on board save 1. Lots of familiar former NHL names on board, plus one Devil’s prospect

  54. 3b says:

    #50 Nothing was so disgusting to me when my son was a kid and played Pee-Wee football. Fathers who had nor seen their toes in 20 years used to yell at the kids and tell them how bad they were etc.; meanwhile these guys could barely move.

  55. JJ says:

    Sports are stupid waste of time for HS and College kids, very few become professional athletes and most non player jobs in sports are low playing. Also there is a very good chance of getting injured. Now I am not particularly good at sports, but I played sports in HS and in College with intramurals. My lack of training, desire not to made a fool of and size is a dangerous combination. First time I played football ever was in a live game where I got talked into playing. Mind you I never even watched a full football game. But I was told goal was to knock down QB, if ball comes to me don’t touch it, just knock down QB and ring his bell good, I recall, a few plays in the QB who was a starter in HS was going back to throw and I got loose, as he was getting ready to throw I shoved my forearm as hard as I could into his chest between his pads, then left my elbow under his jaw to slam it up and then fell on him with all my weight and sack danced around him. Wind was knocked out of him and his jaw hurt, guy sucked whole rest of game. Problem with sports is stupid athletes who are actually good do pickup games, play scrimage games, play inturmural games and there are guys like me out there. My dumb nephew had a full ride in the bag for lacross, but he scored two goals on a inner city urban team senior year, one two many cause one of the kids intentional smacked his wrist above pad and broke it. Most likely someone like me. Sports coaches are just as bad. I told that stupid story how I was offer a full lacross scholorship to college, yea they wanted me to smack people in the middle and never touch ball. Every team needs one or two. Coach told me six foot two inch, 190 pound, you used to run track and you like to hit people now that is scholorship material!

    My Mom told me you do know the other guy is hitting you back and you will most likely get severly hurt and then dropped from team. Then what. I said no thanks, hopefully the next biggest guy did not get brain damage.

    I do sometimes feel sorry for little squirts, they practice since they are five year old and then get into some game and some big knuckle head takes them out. I mean my cousin who did get a pac ten scholor ship was playing at six four four inch 290 pounds in tenth grade, he was hitting 15 year olds at full speed. Ouch.

  56. NJCoast says:

    Libtard-
    Can Lil Gator sail, water ski, kite board, surf, paddle board, boogie board, body surf, or swim? These are the sports that count down the shore.

  57. Libtard in the City says:

    Lil G can’t even swim. And it’s from no lack of effort on our part. Whenever we go to the beach, all he wants to do is play ball. He’s had countless lessons too. He sinks like a rock. He can doggy paddle a bit and knows how to tread water at least. He just doesn’t stay afloat in the forward crawl (or whatever it’s called these days). He also loves Gatorade, but he only gets it after he’s been physically active.

  58. scribe says:

    Time for another GTG!

    2011 NJ ZOMBIE WALK AND UNDEAD FESTIVAL

    Friday, October 21 at 5:00pm – October 23 at 6:00pm

    Asbury Park Convention Hall

    Asbury Park Zombie Walk

    The “World’s Largest Gathering of Zombies” is now also a 3-DAY EVENT called THE UNDEAD FESTIVAL! We’re pulling out all the stops developing a full-scale horrorfest for you featuring vendors, special guests, musical acts, performances, special presentations, film screenings AND MUCH MUCH MORE! You’re not going to want to miss a single moment of it!

  59. JJ says:

    Lil Gator needs to learn to swim. My Dads technique works well just thow him in the deep end and see what happens. Thats how I learned. Dad like to get swiming lessons over quick, he throw you in and you either learn to swim or drown, either way no more swimming lessons needed.

    Libtard in the City says:
    September 7, 2011 at 1:17 pm
    Lil G can’t even swim. And it’s from no lack of effort on our part. Whenever we go to the beach, all he wants to do is play ball. He’s had countless lessons too. He sinks like a rock. He can doggy paddle a bit and knows how to tread water at least. He just doesn’t stay afloat in the forward crawl (or whatever it’s called these days). He also loves Gatorade, but he only gets it after he’s been physically active.

  60. Painhrtz - Salmon of Doubt says:

    Scribe so they are frog marching the CEO’s of most banks through Asbury?

  61. Shore Guy says:

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424053111904233404576460020958393028.html?mod=WSJ_article_forsub

    Debt Hobbles Older Americans

    BY E.S. BROWNING
    More Americans are reaching their 60s with so much debt they can’t afford to retire.

    Most people used to pay off their debts before retiring. But as wages have barely kept up with rising prices over the past 35 years Americans have pushed debt higher, living beyond their means. Now, people are postponing retirement, cutting living standards or both.

    All kinds of debt held by this age group have risen, but the big problem is mortgages. Thirty-nine percent of households with heads aged 60 through 64 had primary mortgages in 2010 and 20% had secondary mortgages, including home-equity lines

    snip

  62. Painhrtz - Salmon of Doubt says:

    Shore let the irresponsible boomers eat tender vittles. Am I suposed to feel sorry for their pi*s poor decision making

  63. JCer says:

    JJ that explains a lot.

  64. Libtard in the City says:

    JJ (59):

    That’s essentially how I learned. For real!

  65. CliffJumper says:

    The mortgage company is requesting a septic certificate.

    Could someone please respond with a reference for a septic inspector?

  66. Nurburgringer says:

    44. Shore
    I hear administrators say, “Students demand it.” The other thing that happens is that professors who demand accountability from students get hammered on Rate My Professor and similar sites.

    Had to run my dad’s name through that site to see what the curious, eager young students at TSC, I mean TCNJ, had to say about him.

    “He teaches his class like a graduate class. Gives tons of unnecessary work. His quizzes are on random material on readings, not on the main ideas. Very unclear and often contradicts himself. I would avoid his class, take [another prof] instead same class much better professor”

    “gives out way too much work, he thinks that is the only class you have.do not take him”

    “The class is interesting, but the work is ridiculous. Two big papers of 7 pages (single spaced), with strict guidelines and one presentation to go with one of the papers. There are a number of reading quizzes he gives out, which require you to re-read the book and take many notes. If you do the work, you should end up with an okay grade though.”

    “Knew his stuff. Quizzes were a little difficult but were based on main ideas. OVerall, good teacher.”

    LOL 2 “Big” papers AND a presentation?! OMG! WTF?! FFS!
    Impressed there was at least one positive rating. He’s got a tough shell but deep down is a softy who never gives out less than a B if you show any spark of curiosity at all.
    Proud that the old man’s been there for almost 40 years and still loves the work.

  67. Shore Guy says:

    “Two big papers of 7 pages (single spaced)”

    “Big”? Big?! Since when is 7 pages big? That is an extended essay, at most.

  68. Shore Guy says:

    “There are a number of reading quizzes he gives out, which require you to re-read the book and take many notes”

    People must read the book? And take notes? Gasp! Is this cat thinking that people are actually in class to learn?

  69. Libtard in the City says:

    septic inspector?

    Now that’s a sh1tty job.

  70. nj escapee says:

    Looks like Tropical Storm MARIA might stop by for a visit on the East Coast next week.

  71. NJGator says:

    Shore 67 – My ex-brother in law took an extra 2 whole years to earn his Masters in Publishing from the University of Cincinnati because he needed the time to write his “thesis”. Turns out the thesis was a 4 page paper. If he had to write 7 whole pages, he still might be without that degree today.

    On an unrelated note, it seems like the new Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf in NYC won’t even let their cashiers attempt to do math of any kind. I ordered a coffee that cost $2.13 after tax was added. I originally handed the cashier a $5, but then discovered that I had the 13 cents in change in my wallet. I tried to give it to her to get an even $3 back and was told that she was required to give me the exact change as displayed on the cash register.

  72. Nurburgringer says:

    Shore – no kidding..
    And this from students in “a highly selective institution that has earned national recognition for its commitment to excellence.” accd to TCNJ’s website.
    God forbid they try taking some engineering classes…

  73. Nicholas says:

    Yeah there were quite a few people in my classes in college that would complain about the “length” requirements of papers. I rarely if ever paid attention to the length requirements of papers that professors would hand out and just submit what I had.

    In general, don’t pad out your idea with garbage just to reach the required length or try to squeeze a complex idea into fewer words just to reach some arbitrary length requirement from a professor. I remember turning in four pages for a seven page paper and getting an A. I spoke to the proffessor when turning in the paper and explained that I felt that I was able to reach the crux of the argument in fewer words then he/she required and if he would like me to write another article on something else I would be more than happy to but I wouldn’t throw around useless words to pad out to the required length. Likewise, going over the length not such a big deal either, just be sure it is interesting since if you bore the prof with pointless arguments then he will just slam you.

    I just finished writing a 40 page manual for work and I’m nearing completion on another 40+ page manual. I get paid good money to explain how to get things done on paper. Tell all those students who complain about long writing assignments that the job application at your local fast-food restaurant is only one page and fill in the blank.

  74. Anon E. Moose says:

    Shore [67];

    “Big”? Big?! Since when is 7 pages big? That is an extended essay, at most.

    Once upon a time I asked my wife to proofread one of my first writting assignments, called the “short” memo; 15 pages. “Interesting definition of ‘short’ you’ve got there…”

  75. JJ says:

    Those long papers before the internet were a pain in the butt. Before the internet you actually had to type them. Even if you plagerized them you had to retype them. Damm dot matrix copiers back them you could not copy them, profs used to mark them up every page to beat you. I avoided term paper classes. When you are taking 19 credits, working 20 hours a week, have a girl friend, want to go out with boys two nights a week and have a social life typing a paper for nights on end is not that fun. Term papers are just to make the professor feel important. Now they are useless, students email the stuff to helocopter parents who write it and email it back.

  76. Essex says:

    My single greatest motivation in life was (and is) getting laid. If sports, academics, or hot cars make that happen…then so be it!!!

  77. chicagofinance says:

    TRUTHS & WISDOM
    OF THE GAME

    ~BY THE EXPERTS~

    Gentlemen, it is better to have died a small boy……..than to
    fumble THIS football”
    John Heisman

    “Show me a good and gracious loser…….and I’ll show you a failure.”

    Knute Rockne /Notre Dame

    “I make my practices real hard ……..because if a player is a
    quitter…..I want him to quit in practice, not in a game.”
    Bear Bryant / Alabama

    “It isn’t necessary to see a good tackle…..You can hear it!

    Knute Rockne / Notre Dame

    “At Georgia Southern, we don’t cheat…….That costs money and we
    don’t have any.”

    Erk Russell / Georgia Southern.

    “Football is only a game. Spiritual things are eternal. Nevertheless,
    Beat Texas .”

    Seen on a church sign in Arkansas prior to the 1969 game.

    “After you retire, there’s only one big event left….and I ain’t
    ready for that.”

    Bobby Bowden / Florida State

    “The man who complains about the way the ball bounces is likely to be
    the one who dropped it.”

    Lou Holtz / Arkansas – Norte Dame

    “When you win, nothing hurts.”

    Joe Namath / Alabama

    “Motivation is simple. You eliminate those who are not motivated.”

    Lou Holtz / Arkansas – Norte Dame

    “If you want to walk the heavenly streets of gold…….you gotta know
    the password, “Roll, tide, roll!”

    Bear Bryant / Alabama

    “A school without football is in danger of deteriorating into a
    medieval study hall.”

    Frank Leahy / Notre Dame

    “There’s nothing that cleanses your soul like getting
    the hell kicked out of you.”

    Woody Hayes / Ohio State

    “I don’t expect to win enough games to be put on
    NCAA probation. I just want to win enough to warrant
    an investigation.”

    Bob Devaney / Nebraska

    “In Alabama , an atheist is………someone who doesn’t believe in
    Bear Bryant.”

    Wally Butts / Georgia

    “I never graduated from Iowa , but I was only there
    for two terms – Truman’s and Eisenhower’s.”

    Alex Karras / Iowa

    “My advice to defensive players: Take the shortest
    route to the ball and arrive in a bad humor.”

    Bowden Wyatt / Tennessee

    “I could have been a Rhodes Scholar…….except for my grades.”

    Duffy Daugherty / Michigan State

    “Always remember …..Goliath was a 40 point favorite over David.”

    Shug Jordan / Auburn

    “They cut us up like boarding house pie…….And that’s real small pieces.”

    Darrell Royal / Texas

    “They whipped us like a tied up goat.”

    Spike Dykes / Texas Tech

    “I asked Darrell Royal, the coach of the Texas
    Longhorns, why he didn’t recruit me and he said:
    “Well, Walt, we took a look at you and you weren’t
    any good.”

    Walt Garrison / Oklahoma State

    “Son, you’ve got a good engine, but your hands
    aren’t on the steering wheel.”

    Bobby Bowden / Florida State

    “Football is NOT a contact sport – it is a collision sport.
    Dancing IS a contact sport.”

    Duffy Daugherty / Michigan State

    After USC lost 51-0 to Notre Dame, his post game
    message to his team: “All those who need showers…
    take them.”

    John McKay / USC

    “If lessons are learned in defeat………….our team is getting a
    great education.”

    Murray Warmath / Minnesota

    “The only qualifications for a lineman are to be big
    and dumb. To be a back, you only have to be dumb.”

    Knute Rockne / Notre Dame

    “Oh, we played about like three tons of buzzard
    puke this afternoon.”

    Spike Dykes / Texas Tech

    “We live one day at a time and scratch where it itches.”

    Darrell Royal / Texas

    “We didn’t tackle well today but we made up for it by
    not blocking.”

    John McKay / USC

    “Three things can happen when you throw the ball,
    and two of them are bad .”

    Darrell Royal / University of Texas

    “I’ve found that prayers work best ……..when you have big players.”

    Knute Rockne / Notre Dame

  78. 3b says:

    #72 The highly selective label is a joke for many of these institutions!!!

  79. Essex says:

    Bear Bryant was a Sigma Nu and so am I….nuff said.

  80. JJ says:

    I would say hot cars, sports yes, academics gets you a wife. My shortest car story is 1994 Weeknight Beach Bar Hampton Bays NY. Ask local townie girl to dance, half way through song ask if she lived nearby, she said yes I walked here, then asks how I got here, I said I drove my mercedes convert over to meet friends, she said I have never been in a mercedes cont, I go before song is over, lets go to parking lot, she gets in I drive her to back of lot, ask have you every done it in a benz, goes not yet, she takes care of business, I drive her 50 feet back, park go back in and she goes back to her friends. My buddy goes I thought you left with that girl, I go I did but when you have a benz and a townie dates don’t last longer than three or four minutes, other weird thing with car is I had a 1ns with a girl who I dropped off in morning in my car, she lived at home, walk her to door and dad is staring not at me or his daughter wearing same clothes as night before but my car. I ask girl in private what is the matter is my car tire flat, she goes he likes those cars and always wanted to drive one. So what the heck, it had new paint and looked good, but it really was old with 120K miles, so guy gets in my car with me for a little drive, I drop him off and he thanks me. What a white trash highlight blue ribbon day, not only did Dad get to drive a Benz Convt but his daughter go to bang the guy who owned the Benz convt. Actually another weird one is I briefly dated a bimbo who played Paul Castelanos mistress in some cheesy movie or something. She was very very very impressed I never locked it or put top up as if I was so rich what did it matter, meanwhile tranny and head gasket were on the way out I was hoping someone would steal it!

    Actually pulled it out of garage first time in years this weekend and got it running. Washed it checked fluids and drove it around town and got a few looks from some 40 something chicks. Reminded me of time I parked in front of ladies house and she came out to talk to me, I was like 30 she was like 45, she said it brought back great memories as you always remember your first time in a Mercedes, I was about to go all Mrs. Robinson and her kids started yelling and she ran back inside.

    My car was almost used in Celeberty Close Calls, the one coming up where Parker Stevenson almost dies when he has a accident in a 450sl. However the flip would have messed up car even though it was only on sand and they were only going to pay me $1,500 for rental and I thought the damage would be more than payment.

    Essex says:
    September 7, 2011 at 3:51 pm
    My single greatest motivation in life was (and is) getting laid. If sports, academics, or hot cars make that happen…then so be it!!!

  81. Essex says:

    My dad gave me an old Porsche in grad school. It had a targa roof and was fun. It was a complete magnet in terms of girls. But it also attracted a lot of really tedious conversations from people who could not see past the brand. They assumed it was expensive when in fact it was worth about as much as a used Honda. If that.

  82. Essex says:

    The real head turner though was a buddy of mine who had a developer for a dad who gave him a 930 turbo — that was the car to show up at a club in. You got front row parking and lots of looks from skanks hoping to score a sugar daddy. Hilarious.

  83. Essex says:

    When you grow up in the country and have rich relatives in the city you really get an interesting world view. For example I used to meet all of the milquetoast city people who never got laid or married the first girl who gave them a hand job. I’d pick up the Hamptons types and bang em, but they never ever compared to the country girls that I was used to.

  84. Essex says:

    JJ my single greatest skill, believe it or not, is the ability to read a room and communicate. I also can be somewhat charming and tell a decent story now and again. That skill was not something they teach you in school. I moved to 6 different states in my life before settling here in this paradise. I was blessed with halfway decent looks and the ability to actually relate to people. I’m the guy that gets the deals that drive the business that pays the eggheads to sit around and make whatever it is that the deliverable turns out to be. Without the sales guy, there is no company.

  85. scribe says:

    Chi,

    Love your football quotes.

  86. Essex says:

    85. Google is pretty neat, eh?

  87. Juice Box says:

    Essex – re: “I’m the guy that gets the deals that drive the business”

    You aren’t this guy. –> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y-AXTx4PcKI

  88. Essex says:

    BTW that Knute Rockne quote was weird as hell. Maybe he was born with a two inch dick.

  89. JJ says:

    My greatest two business skills in my 20s were speed reading and the ability to read upside down. On interviews or when I am called into bosses office I can quickly read what is on desk and think up answer. Skill was obtained from last minute studying, reading assignments in five minutes before class and cheating. Learn to read other test answers any old way. I took a speed reading class as part of mgt training program at a company and was reading 6,000 words a minute with good comprehension. Can’t do it anymore. But in my hey day a glance a bosses desk I only needed a second to read whole page. Drove rest of people nuts as well as speed reading teacher who could not read as fast as me.

    Essex says:
    September 7, 2011 at 4:45 pm
    JJ my single greatest skill, believe it or not, is the ability to read a room and communicate. I also can be somewhat charming and tell a decent story now and again. That skill was not something they teach you in school. I moved to 6 different states in my life before settling here in this paradise. I was blessed with halfway decent looks and the ability to actually relate to people. I’m the guy that gets the deals that drive the business that pays the eggheads to sit around and make whatever it is that the deliverable turns out to be. Without the sales guy, there is no company.

  90. Essex says:

    87. That was a great film. Amazing right? Kind of a cautionary tale. Sales is an interesting gig. I was on a ride along with some dumbass once who was coming with me to meet a customer (Lucent) and asked me who I thought was more important in the whole process the sales guy or the engineers in the firm who were busy working on the project for Lu. Knowing he was the Head of the Consulting Side which previously was nothing until we starting winning them some business, I said, well you know everyone along the chain is key….but in the back of my mind I was thinking you wouldn’t even be here if we hadn’t gotten you the business.

  91. Essex says:

    Like I say, I was in the wars long enough to have some great stories. In 2003 I made a career change and went to a much less volatile position. I like what I do, but sometimes miss the adrenaline of the sell. Either way, it’s a great skill to have and was honed in the bars and nightclubs that I frequented as a young man trying to score!

  92. chicagofinance says:

    Actually it is good to hear you say that. I tell guys in their late teens who are asking for advice about careers. It is hard to give them something concrete that is usable, so I speak to that…sell yourself…..try to pick up girls. Be shameless. Fail and come back for more. If you sharpen your skills there when you are motivated, it helps so much. Even beyond sales…to be effective you have to sell ideas, and to be able to bullshit on your feet is a seriously important skill.

    Essex says:
    September 7, 2011 at 5:35 pm
    Either way, it’s a great skill to have and was honed in the bars and nightclubs that I frequented as a young man trying to score!

  93. Essex says:

    92. I noticed early on that every ugly dudes could score with babes if they had confidence and could weave a tale or two. Takes a little time to refine that skill but once you have it there you are. I left a pitch meeting with the head of Starwood once who looked at me and said, “Where are you from??” To which I answered “Kentucky” and he looked genuinely baffled. Kind of funny as he tried to poach half the team by the time we were done. Anyhow. I was never a gifted student, though I tested well. My heroes were always musicians not sports guys, so that kind of put me in peril from the get-go.

    But whatever the case, you have to be able to articulate ideas and simplify complicated ideas for people. That single element has been helpful over the past couple of decades. I am not sure what the future holds but perhaps I’ll inherit something and open my own company. That’d be my preference. After a certain point in time you just become unfit to work for other people.

  94. grim says:

    to be able to bullshit on your feet is a seriously important skill.

    Undoubtedly the most important thing I learned as a Psych undergrad.

  95. Behindthefence says:

    Al – Regarding HELLIX… any upside targets in mind? I picked up a few shares back @ 0.55 and appears to have the makings for an interesting speculative pick.

    Regards

    Al Mossberg says:
    September 2, 2011 at 3:52 pm

    HELLIX VENTURES

    Keep an eye on this little guy. Some news coming out in September and the insiders are buying.

    Volume: 273,356
    Avg Vol (3m): 83,806

  96. SysAdmin says:

    Another thought to spur the economy…

    How about a monetery policy which allows tax deduction on all expenses so long it does not exceed your income. The policy can be reviewed periodically to see when the economy is gaining momentum and gradually reduce deduction by percent of income in a given year and finally be eleminated in favour of a stable tax table.

    If the economy picks up momentum, the govt can trim govt employees, who can then easily find employment in the private sector. In the interim the govt can spend the amount which would be used for QEs otherwise to sustain the govt expenditure.

  97. Juice Box says:

    “to be able to bullshit on your feet is a seriously important skill.”

    “Undoubtedly the most important thing I learned as a Psych undergrad.”

    As long as you don’t lay it on too thick.

  98. Essex says:

    Anyone catch the debate tonight? Lot’s a quick thinking and interesting rhetoric on display. These guys are interesting. Wonder what the outcome will be. Perhaps a bump for Huntsman and Romney? Perry sounded pretty good as well.

  99. Prof. McDullard says:

    Oh, well, whole US Open Tennis session rained out, got a parking ticket when I stopped to find a place to pee in Flushing (they should stop calling it Flushing because it seems not much flushing happens there anyway). Saw the cop giving the ticket, talked to him, and he basically made me say that I was being too cheap contesting 35 bucks… You wouldn’t believe it, but it was overall a very nice experience!

  100. chicagofinance says:

    The officers at the 109th Precinct were always good guys. They always made sure the white kids never got any flack from the Chinese and Latino gangs. They didn’t touch us because the cops would hunt them down. My friends didn’t have it as easy…..

    Prof. McDullard says:
    September 7, 2011 at 10:38 pm
    Oh, well, whole US Open Tennis session rained out, got a parking ticket when I stopped to find a place to pee in Flushing (they should stop calling it Flushing because it seems not much flushing happens there anyway). Saw the cop giving the ticket, talked to him, and he basically made me say that I was being too cheap contesting 35 bucks… You wouldn’t believe it, but it was overall a very nice experience!

  101. soccer dad (23)-

    Boy, are you ever right. My daughter has lucked out with the whole sports thing. She has managed to parlay the ability to play lacrosse into going to a school way above her HS academic level that actually works at teaching kids how to think.

    It is a pleasure (and a relief) to hear her talking about looking forward to classes and how much she likes the library. She doesn’t really know what’s going on there yet, but she sure has some idea there is a real education to be had…if she works for it.

  102. yo (34)-

    The real solution is that we get ourselves into a shooting war that kills off 200mm or so…of the youngest generation.

    ‘Cause we all know Boomers are gonna live forever.

  103. box (37)-

    Those fat douches are the US equivalent of Japanese girly men.

  104. scribe (58)-

    Will there be a station where they separate the zombies from the junkies?

  105. Shore Guy says:

    “The real solution is that we get ourselves into a shooting war that kills off 200mm or so”

    You used to be a singer with Up With People, right?

  106. shore (105)-

    I played cowbell for Up Peoples’ Arses. Then, I was a roadie for the Dead Kennedys.

  107. Annaliese says:

    hello there, wonderful article, and a very good understand! 1 for my bookmarking.

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