FEMA: Just Kidding!

From the Bridgeton News:

Large areas of N.J. Shore to be removed from high-risk flood zone

Declaring the controversial federal flood zone maps issued in the wake of Hurricane Sandy “fundamentally flawed,” U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez (D-N.J.) said today revised maps will be released next week removing large areas from the worst at-risk zones.

Menendez said earlier versions of the maps, which aren’t yet final, “incorrectly included far too many homes” in areas at risk of major waves — sections called “V” zones.

“For residents in many of the areas affected by Superstorm Sandy, the release of these updated flood maps could be the deciding factor in whether they are able to stay in their homes or are forced to relocate,” Menendez said.

The new maps, to be released Monday, will cover Monmouth, Ocean, Hudson and Atlantic counties.

The debate over which homes fall in the dreaded “V” zone has been one of the most contentious issues for homeowners along the shore since the hurricane struck last October.

Property owners have been anxiously awaiting revised maps from the Federal Emergency Management Agency because they will dictate how many — and how high — homes or businesses have to be raised to protect from flooding. That ultimately affects flood insurance rates as well and whether homeowners will even be able to afford to rebuild.

Removing large numbers of homes from the “V” zone would be good news for those property owners who have not yet rebuilt.

“This is great news for the hundreds, if not thousands, of people who were incorrectly included in high-risk, high-cost ‘V’ zones,” George Kasimos, founder of Stop FEMA Now, a property-owners advocacy group, said in a statement.

In Brick, about 4,000 homes were slated to move to “V” zones. Mayor Stephen Acropolis said he expects 3,500 homes will move back to “A” zones when the new maps come out.

Still, there will likely be an additional 10,000 to 12,000 Ocean County residents who must now obtain flood insurance, he said.

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61 Responses to FEMA: Just Kidding!

  1. freedy says:

    It’s a do over.Leave it to Bob.

  2. grim says:

    From the WSJ:

    Refinancings Plunge as Bond Yields Rise

    A surprise spike in mortgage rates threatens to halt a refinancing boom that has delivered strong profits for U.S. banks over the past two years.

    The average rate on a 30-year mortgage rose to 4.15% last week, a 14-month high and up sharply from 3.59% in early May, according to the Mortgage Bankers Association. A separate survey released Thursday by Freddie Mac said the rate this week was at 3.98%, up from 3.35% last month.

    Refinancing applications last week were down 36% from the first week of May, before rates began climbing, according to the bankers association.

    Lenders have been predicting that refinancing would taper off, “what wasn’t anticipated was that this move in rates would happen so quickly,” said Bose George, a mortgage-finance company analyst with Keefe, Bruyette & Woods.

    While a falloff in refinancing business could cut into record profits lenders have enjoyed from the activity, a rise in short-term interest rates could see banks earning higher yields on various types of loans, from mortgages to commercial real estate.

    Some lenders and economists say that refinancing could continue despite the recent jump because many borrowers have yet to take advantage of low rates. Rising home prices and an improving economy could allow some homeowners who previously didn’t qualify to participate. Also, homeowners who have an adjustable-rate mortgage might also move now to lock in a fixed rate.

    “There’s still quite a bit of mortgage debt out there that could refinance, even at higher rates,” said Charles Himmelberg, mortgage strategist at Goldman Sachs Group Inc. “We don’t think [higher rates] kills it. We think that will slow it.”

    At a 4% mortgage rate, about 34% of all borrowers with a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage could still drop their rate by more than one percentage point, and 54% of all borrowers could drop their rate by half of a percentage point, according to estimates by analysts at Credit Suisse.

  3. Wonder how much Menendez pocketed for pulling off this move.

  4. Juice Box says:

    What happen when Hurricane Snooki comes this summer and washes
    The barrier islands off the map completely?

  5. Fabius Maximus says:

    Clot from yesterday.
    The defense of this is pretty easy. Shrub owns this bill soup to nuts. This makes this all legal. Shrub spiked the 4th. http://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_lists/roll_call_vote_cfm.cfm?congress=110&session=2&vote=00168

    While Senator O voted for it, as president he owns the reauthorization. It would have made fun times if he had said he would veto.

    As for your posts over the past 7 years, the seem to fall to three categories. Reposts from zero hedge, burn the Mfer down and pack a lunch.

    Are they “rioting in the streets by June” this year?

  6. anon (the good one) says:

    worst in recent history. now he’s painting dogs and cats, or is it cats and dogs.
    W what a joke, what a shame.

    @KatrinaNation: As Gore Vidal liked to say,The US of Amnesia: George W. Bush’s legacy is on the mend http://t.co/M9z0Vs08Pv

  7. JJ says:

    sections called “V” zones are nasty to flood insurance. It is the velocity zones meaning actual wave movement could shift house. FEMA had too many houses in V zone. Perhaps when Flood was cheap labeling houses V and having them pay 4x made sense. But now flood is expensive you still cant have them at 4x.

    I was down in Long Beach LI this weekend. Which has tons of section 8, old folks, young renters, irish blue collar jammed into small bungalows and even nursing homes etc. Place is still a mess. Folks dont have the money.

    Then I drove to Atlantic Beach, Lido Beach and Point Lookout where the rich folks live on same barrier island, you would not even know a storm happened. Folks just called their guys with or without insurance and said boom, just get it ready for summer.

    Paddy McGees in Island Park called it quits for goods yesterday they cant rebuild. That place back in 1990s on s Sunday was so packed for happy hour on water you would see NJ, CT plates all over lot and Huge Yachts from several states away partying like it was 1999. Used to have 1,000 people on deck, 20 Yachts pulled up and at least a few hundred high end cars in lot. Valet Parking, waitress service in your boat, huge bands and DJs water front and a huge restaurant. Amazing that thing of that size a flood took it out. Another piece of history gone. I drove there from 30 miles away when I was 19 once just to party.

  8. Comrade Nom Deplume, Halfwit dumbass says:

    [6] anon (the biased one)

    Same thing happened to Truman. He was derided by the media, the opposition, and his own party for being less than up to the task. Not elected (unlike W who, as it turned out, did win Fl on votes). Presided over an unpopular war. Slapped down by the SCOTUS for political overrreaching. Written off as dead after one term but rode a wave of hateful partisan sentiment back into office. The parallels are striking yet we, especially the left, lionize him.

    Dont believe me cuz u didnt see it on a blog? Read your history (the kind in books, and if you need help with those, let me know).

  9. Comrade Nom Deplume, Halfwit dumbass says:

    [5] Fabius,

    I don’t recall anything about packing a lunch. Making a fruity drink, yes, but lunch, no.

  10. All Hype - Mr. Oil, Mr. Gas, Mr. Coal says:

    “It would have made fun times if he had said he would veto.”

    Yes Fabius, pity us true believers that a real leader would recognize the illegality of what is being done to our constitutional freedoms and make sound and rational decisions.

    Arbeit macht frei my friend.

  11. Brian says:

    7 – I haven’t been to the jersey shore since last year. I haven’t seen the damage first hand yet. I have a deposit on a rental that I placed pre-Sandy on a duplex build in the 90′s. It’s in Seaside Park. It’s a nice place with a bayside view. The owner says they only got water on the first floor, which is all concrete block with the garage and a spare room out back. The way it was constructed, I noticed they put the AC condenser and Heat way up in the air too. We’ll see how it goes…

  12. JSMC says:

    #6

    Of course people now view W more that he’s almost 5 years removed from office…he can’t do any harm any more.

    For the record, I whole approve of his job performance in 2013: he stays in his gated community and keeps to himself, what’s not approve of?!

  13. JSMC says:

    *view W more positively

  14. JSMC says:

    Wow, tons of grammar errors in my post…must be Friday

  15. joyce says:

    You cannot “spike” a section of the Constitution by passing legislation. (Ottoman, pretty please double check me on that).

    So when person A starts to conduct unlawful activity. All who come after him are free and clear to continue similar activity with all the blame going to person A for eternity.

    Thanks, Fabius.

    5.Fabius Maximus says:
    June 14, 2013 at 8:06 am
    Clot from yesterday.
    The defense of this is pretty easy. Shrub owns this bill soup to nuts. This makes this all legal. Shrub spiked the 4th. http://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_lists/roll_call_vote_cfm.cfm?congress=110&session=2&vote=00168

    While Senator O voted for it, as president he owns the reauthorization. It would have made fun times if he had said he would veto.

    As for your posts over the past 7 years, the seem to fall to three categories. Reposts from zero hedge, burn the Mfer down and pack a lunch.

    Are they “rioting in the streets by June” this year?

  16. Fabius Maximus says:

    #15 Betsy Ross

    Stare decisis.

  17. Comrade Nom Deplume, Historian says:

    One possible outcome of the lead story is that some insurers will stop writing flood insurance in New Jersey. Not sure if NJ has a rule that says if you write one insurance line in the state, you have to write them all. If so, then the insurers will simply shift flood losses to the rest of the lines. Politicians may complain but this sort of risk-shifting is redistributionist at its core, and it serves the vocal voting blocs so everyone should expect their homeowners, business interruption, etc. to go up a little more than it would have otherwise.

    After all, ATEOTD its for the children.

  18. Comrade Nom Deplume, Historian says:

    I love that we have all these budding lawyers on the board. Quite a lot I would correct but insofar as this is high discourse, far be it for me to interrupt the creative and deliberative processes.

  19. joyce says:

    (16)
    Genius,

    [I dont believe that bill was challenged, was it?] But anyway, you yourself are calling the previous administration’s actions as reprehensible and unconstitutional. So what makes the current events any less so?

    How do you not see your entire line of justification as “Well, he started it!”

    Why can you not admit that both then and now is wrong?

    Truly pathetic

  20. joyce says:

    Much of US politics, and most of the pundit reaction to the NSA stories, are summarized by this one single visual from Pew:

    The most vocal media critics of our NSA reporting, and the most vehement defenders of NSA surveillance, have been, by far, Democratic (especially Obama-loyal) pundits. As I’ve written many times, one of the most significant aspects of the Obama legacy has been the transformation of Democrats from pretend-opponents of the Bush War on Terror and National Security State into their biggest proponents: exactly what the CIA presciently and excitedly predicted in 2008 would happen with Obama’s election.

    Some Democrats have tried to distinguish 2006 from 2013 by claiming that the former involved illegal spying while the latter does not. But the claim that current NSA spying is legal is dubious in the extreme: the Obama DOJ has repeatedly thwarted efforts by the ACLU, EFF and others to obtain judicial rulings on their legality and constitutionality by invoking procedural claims of secrecy, immunity and standing. If Democrats are so sure these spying programs are legal, why has the Obama DOJ been so eager to block courts from adjudicating that question?

    More to the point, Democratic critiques of Bush’s spying were about more than just legality. I know that because I actively participated in the campaign to amplify those critiques. Indeed, by 2006, most of Bush’s spying programs – definitely his bulk collection of phone records – were already being conducted under the supervision and with the blessing of the FISA court. Moreover, leading members of Congress – including Nancy Pelosi – were repeatedly briefed on all aspects of Bush’s NSA spying program. So the distinctions Democrats are seeking to draw are mostly illusory.

    To see how that this is so, just listen to then-Senator Joe Biden in 2006 attack the NSA for collecting phone records: he does criticize the program for lacking FISA supervision, but also claims to be alarmed by just how invasive and privacy-destroying that sort of bulk record collection is. He says he “doesn’t think” that the program passes the Fourth Amendment test: how can Bush’s bulk collection program be unconstitutional while Obama’s program is? But he also rejected Bush’s defense (exactly the argument Obama is making now) – that “we’re not listening to the phone calls, we’re just looking for patterns” – by saying this:

    I don’t have to listen to your phone calls to know what you’re doing. If I know every single phone call you made, I’m able to determine every single person you talked to. I can get a pattern about your life that is very, very intrusive. . . . If it’s true that 200 million Americans’ phone calls were monitored – in terms of not listening to what they said, but to whom they spoke and who spoke to them – I don’t know, the Congress should investigative this.”

    Is collecting everyone’s phone records not “very intrusive” when Democrats are doing it? Just listen to that short segment to see how every defense Obama defenders are making now were the ones Bush defenders made back then. Again, leading members of Congress and the FISA court were both briefed on and participants in the Bush telephone record collection program as well, yet Joe Biden and most Democrats found those programs very alarming and “very intrusive” back then.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/jun/14/nsa-partisanship-propaganda-prism

    gosh darn right-wing nut job that is Glenn Greenwald

  21. yome says:

    I always thought that flood insurance is subsidized and written for the Fed.Maybe I am wrong.If Iam correct, why will writing a policy be a problem for the insurance company,if they dont cover flood.They are merely a middleman.

  22. Anon E. Moose says:

    Fabu [4];

    Shrub spiked the 4th.

    No wonder you’re OK with Pres. HopenChange. You think executive dictat should overrule the Constitution. Hope you enjoy the serfdom you and your ilk have conscripted this country into.

  23. joyce says:

    I don’t mean this in an antagonistic way, but your post reminds of a quip I once heard. It goes something like this:

    ‘What does the law have to do with being a lawyer?’ or ‘Go to law school to learn the law, go to a law firm and they’ll teach you how to be a lawyer’

    Ok, so I’m pretty sure I butchered it twice… but perhaps you’ve heard something like that?

    18.Comrade Nom Deplume, Historian says:
    June 14, 2013 at 10:18 am
    I love that we have all these budding lawyers on the board. Quite a lot I would correct but insofar as this is high discourse, far be it for me to interrupt the creative and deliberative processes.

  24. JJ says:

    No US insurance companies write flood insurance. It is all covered by NFIP/FEMA which is a govt entity and the max coverage is 250K house/100K contents even if you have a one million dollar home. Lloyds of London writes Excess flood if you want to buy more. That is expensive and odds you have more than 350K damage is rare as even a two million dollar oceanfront home the home itself might be only worth 500K and land 1.5 million and FEMA/NFIP does not give you replacement or actual value only fair market value. So your 12 year old kitchen 20 year old bath you are getting chump change.

    Metlife and State Farm for instance does not write any homeowner policies in a flood zone. Irregardless of fact they dont cover anything flood related. Some homeowners will only write if you purchase flood for same amount even if not required to have flood.

    My homeowners insurance company stopped writing all of Long Island new business around 2002. Oddly they let existing homeowners add policy so I added my beach house to my current policy. The agents down there were kinda shocked. But really if they stopped writing in 2002 between bubble and re crash their risk was greatly lowered by 2012 when Sandy hit. Meanwhile State Farm who also stopped writing also drops 5% of existing policies a year and drops you after a claim on top of run off. They have hardly any policies.

    yome says:
    June 14, 2013 at 11:36 am

    I always thought that flood insurance is subsidized and written for the Fed.Maybe I am wrong.If Iam correct, why will writing a policy be a problem for the insurance company,if they dont cover flood.They are merely a middleman.

  25. Ragnar says:

    I’ve got real estate topics! From my town.
    This flying elephant is up for sale again! Feels like a cruise ship on top of a mountain, just up the hill from me. Scrapple – do you know the backstory on this one? Now down to $2.2mn ask.
    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/5-Caruso-Ct-NJ-08807/39865374_zpid/

    Realtors shouldn’t take photos with a fish-eye lens! check the photos.
    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/59-Blazier-Rd-Bridgewater-Twp-NJ-08807/2112364246_zpid/

  26. anon (the good one) says:

    24.
    a true lawyer doesnt pay their tuition. parasites always seeking tax loopholes. that’s a true lawyer

  27. Jill says:

    #26: Realtors shouldn’t take their own photos at all. I can’t believe the kind of terrible photos I see in NJ real estate listings, and how realtors have no idea how to tell their clients to PUT THE CLUTTER AWAY. My sister hires a pro to take photos of every property she lists. No one wants to see your family photos, your dog, your kid’s Pop Warner trophy, or your hand laundry in the bathroom.

  28. chicagofinance says:

    This looks like the home of Tony Montana…..ew…ew…ew..ew..ew….

    Ragnar says:
    June 14, 2013 at 12:45 pm
    I’ve got real estate topics! From my town.
    This flying elephant is up for sale again! Feels like a cruise ship on top of a mountain, just up the hill from me. Scrapple – do you know the backstory on this one? Now down to $2.2mn ask.
    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/5-Caruso-Ct-NJ-08807/39865374_zpid/

  29. grim says:

    Holy christ that house is terrible. Anyone want to shoot a remake of the original Wall Street? I think we’ve got a perfect set.

    Too bad you can’t set a soundtrack on Zillow – Naive Melody (this must be the place) by the Talking Heads would be perfect for those photos (apologies to Byrne).

  30. grim says:

    The most excellent Miles Fisher remake/mashup (Son of Dallas Fed President Richard Fisher):

    http://youtu.be/G29d6RDSK1c

  31. Comrade Nom Deplume, Bostonian says:

    [27] anon,

    Wrong as usual. A true lawyer pays his or her tuition. A truly talented lawyer figures out how to deduct it on his or her taxes.

    As for parasites, look up the definition. I submit that the “takers” and not the “makers” fit that definition. And I take you for a “taker” lover, so you might want to rethink your choice of sobriquets.

    If you are going to look for an insulting term, I suggest “hired gun” or “vulture”. Both are more apropos than parasite.

  32. Comrade Nom Deplume, Bostonian says:

    [24] joyce,

    That’s absolutely correct. It is the quintessential difference btwn theory and practice.

  33. Comrade Nom Deplume, Bostonian says:

    [29] chi fi,

    Oh, I so have that beat. This beauty overlooks the Brandywine and historic Creek Road. I drive by it all the time. And I still look at it and go WTF????

    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1245-S-Creek-Rd-West-Chester-PA-19382/2115596032_zpid/

  34. joyce says:

    33
    Difference between theory and practice, yes absolutely. I also cynically take it to reference the contortion of / changing the definition of words from the written law to the administration thereof.

  35. Ottoman says:

    Joyce – “You cannot “spike” a section of the Constitution by passing legislation. (Ottoman, pretty please double check me on that).”

    Well, you can pack the courts with people who agree with your interpretation of the Constitution. Eventually a few of them will filter up to SCOTUS. It doesn’t take much to realize that “constitutional” and “legal” are not absolute terms. See also the Federalist Society.

    Speaking of which –

    Anon – “No wonder you’re OK with Pres. HopenChange. You think executive dictat should overrule the Constitution. Hope you enjoy the serfdom you and your ilk have conscripted this country into.”

    It ain’t liberals taking your freedoms away…unless you want black people out of your neighborhood. All 5 SCOTUS justices who just said Americans have no case against the secret warrantless wiretapping program unless they can prove they’ve been harmed were Federalist Society members.

    From 2006: “Judge Alito’s confirmation is also the culmination of a disciplined campaign begun by the Reagan administration to seed the lower federal judiciary with like-minded jurists who could reorient the federal courts toward a view of the Constitution much closer to its 18th-century authors’ intent, including a much less expansive view of its application to individual rights and federal power. It was a philosophy promulgated by Edwin Meese III, attorney general in the Reagan administration, that became the gospel of the Federalist Society and the nascent conservative legal movement.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2006/01/30/politics/politicsspecial1/30alito.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

  36. Ottoman says:

    Comrade is a lawyer? LOL, of course all the judges who said separate but equal was constitutional were also lawyers. So is Clarence Thomas.

    By takers, I’m sure you mean takers of the home mortgage deduction, lower capital gains rate, oil subsidies, wall street bailout, shall I go on? You know, the 1%.

  37. Juice Box says:

    re # 34 – If I ever get into the copper recycling “business” I know where to start first.

    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1245-S-Creek-Rd-West-Chester-PA-19382/2115596032_zpid/#hdp-photo-lightbox

  38. Anon E. Moose says:

    Nom [34];

    There are a handful of contemporary houses in my neighborhood (not quite that ‘contemporary’!). It must have been one of the builder options, and it would have been about its height of popularity about when the neighborhood was built out. I kind of like them, but the fact is they are not as popular as a CHC, and are a tougher sell. So you get the house for a discount, but you have to give that discount up when you sell.

    Reminds me of the story among pilots about getting a free plane. All you have to do is take the job of chief pilot for some drug-runners. The catch is you have give the plane to the guy who replaces you in order to get out of the job.

  39. Ragnar says:

    Comrade, your house is more freakish than mine, but mine has less taste. Your house looks like it should contain a tomb and a Francis Bacon painting, mine looks like it should contain 2 pole dancers and coke.

    I don’t understand the photo showing off how many water pipes the house has.

    I have difficulty imagining that either of these two houses ever again sell for the cost to build them. Wait, on second thought, I think the house in my town is perfect for JJ. He just needs to walk in and schooze the owner with an all cash offer and bring down the price 50%.

  40. joyce says:

    36
    “It ain’t liberals taking your freedoms away”
    No, it’s not. It’s all of them. That is my main and only fcuking point. No one in power is on the side of the individual people in this country.

    37
    “comrade is a lawyer”
    If you haven’t figured that out after reading like 3 of his posts, seek help.

  41. Comrade Nom Deplume, Halfwit dumbass says:

    [37] ottoman, a.k.a Billy Madison.

    Check your math. You have to pay taxes to use a deduction.

    And MMQing Plessy using today’s reasoning hardly qualifies as, . . ., well, not really sure if there was a point to your ramblings. Not a rational or intelligent one anyway.

  42. Comrade Nom Deplume, Halfwit dumbass says:

    [40]. Ragnar

    The West chester house wouldn’t look out of place in Silicon Valley, the Hamptons or on Foxhall Rd in upper N.W. as a consulate. But in its present location, it looks ridiculous.

  43. Comrade Nom Deplume, Halfwit dumbass says:

    [38] juice,

    I know, right? That picture was strange even by that listings standards. FWIW, that place has been for sale forever.

  44. Hughesrep says:

    44

    Most likely showing off how many independant zones there are for the heating system as well as the recirculating lines for hot water to all of the fixtures.

    Has to be at least 15K worth of just circulating pumps there.

  45. chicagofinance says:

    The End Is Nigh (JJ Literary Tour Edition):

    He’s nuts!!! Poet ‘selling testicles to fund trip to Europe’

    A poet has declared he is selling his testicles to fund a holiday.

    Madcap Raffael Medina Brochero claims he is flogging his male parts for £12,800 so he can tour Europe with his poetry.

    He told a radio host in his home of Magdalena, Colombia, that he will give his private parts to the first person to pay his price.

    Brochero said his decision came after a 2012 South America tour left him broke. And he wants to avoid a repeat of his money woes in Europe.

    The Colombian poet has published 11 books during his 35-year career.

  46. chicagofinance says:

    That belong in a Stanley Kubrick movie…..
    Juice Box says:

    June 14, 2013 at 2:42 pm

    re # 34 – If I ever get into the copper recycling “business” I know where to start first.

    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1245-S-Creek-Rd-West-Chester-PA-19382/2115596032_zpid/#hdp-photo-lightbox

  47. JJ says:

    Big deal, a few months ago I guy cut off his dick and balls in Japan and served them up to guests who ate them. He even cooked his own dick and some crazy Jap Businessmen ate it in front of him.

    chicagofinance says:
    June 14, 2013 at 3:23 pm

    The End Is Nigh (JJ Literary Tour Edition):

    He’s nuts!!! Poet ‘selling testicles to fund trip to Europe’

  48. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    Here’s some prime real estate that was in gary’s price range. Too bad the new owner isn’t likely to sell now:

    http://dealbreaker.com/2013/06/boston-woman-drops-560k-to-quiet-insatiable-appetite-for-parking-spaces/

  49. chicagofinance says:

    “The Fourth Amendment restricts unreasonable searches on individuals but imposes few limits on collection and analysis, and technologies have no privacy rights. The NSA is screening the data system in general for conduct that threatens the security of the system, not targeting any particular individual or group using the system. The right comparison is a cop on a beat who patrols public spaces. He’s not investigating a crime or enforcing a law; he’s watching for suspicious behavior.”

    “Certainly data-mining could be abused, though leaker Edward Snowden has offered no such evidence, unlike the politicized IRS. But the risks of abuse must be measured in proportion to the damage they might prevent.”

    “If the law’s controls on the use of surveillance information are abused, then the answer is to punish the abuser. This is another way that a proper IRS probe, complete with punishment for transgressors, would enhance public trust in NSA surveillance.”

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323495604578539411953903502.html?mod=WSJ_Opinion_LEADTop

  50. Libtard at home says:

    Grim,

    Ghetto Honda says corporate will ship the car from 55 to 85 days from now. Check back in at the end of August.

  51. Anon E. Moose says:

    Rags [26];

    You use a fish-eye lens to make a 1BR Manhattan walk-up look like a liveable space. It boggles the mind in a property with 5000 sf. Plus, $1 MM, no pool?

  52. ragnar (26)-

    That’s Tony Montana’s home from Scarface.

  53. Between anon and gluteus, we have a downright festival of idiocy here.

  54. joyce says:

    (50)
    A few comments:

    Even if I concede that “the safety of citizens is the first—and in our view, the principal—obligation of government,” the Constitution doesn’t subordinate our rights to that obligation. Nowhere is it written that our leaders can excuse violations of the Bill of Rights by declaring “safety” concerns.

    People throughout the past have warned us about these types of people – Their excuses and justifications is ALWAYS security security security. “It’s in your best interest, and your safety.” Slowly they chip away, nibbling at our liberties. Eventually it will get to a point where we cannot turn back, and government has too much power over our privacy, the right loopholes, or ambiguous/vague verbiage within the laws allowing government to do whatever it wants.

    “The Fourth Amendment restricts unreasonable searches on individuals but imposes few limits on collection and analysis”
    - Really? Talk about mental gymnastics. Plus, they just completely leave out the portion of the 4th amendment that involves ‘searches and SEIZURES’ which is the same as collection.

    “The right comparison is a cop on a beat who patrols public spaces”
    -The analogy is specious at best. That cop on the beat is not asking everyone on the street who they are talking to or sending mail to or receiving mail from, or where they’re shopping, etc etc. And, that cop is still restricted from wandering into someone’s home/purse/papers/effects uninvited and rummaging around without a warrant.

    “A government that cannot ensure peace also cannot protect individual rights.”
    - Wake me up when peace is ensured… my guess is it will be a while.

    Also, we still do not know the full extent of what the NSA, et al, is doing. What we know now, in my opinion, is already abhorrent. However, it could be worse. Yet, the experts at most of these media outlets are already proclaiming it’s safe, it’s necessary, it’s working, and it won’t be abused. We might never know cause they won’t tell us… unless we have more whistleblowers.

    If the government is doing nothing wrong, then it has nothing to hide (surveillance programs, secret courts issuing secret decisions for secret warrants).

    Since the NSA has been doing this for years and if it’s working so well, and it is essential to our protection, then why wasn’t the Boston bombing prevented just recently? These terrorists were in communication with those outside of the US.

    We should NEVER blindly trust the government and give them the power to infringe on our privacy. I don’t care about the party in power. Mankind’s history is full of despots and tyrants who would use all kinds of information to eliminate or silence critics. To believe that it would never happen here is completely naive.

    “It should also be some comfort that two Presidents as distant in temperament and philosophy as George W. Bush and Barack Obama both endorsed the NSA programs.”
    - This is me speechless

  55. Anon E. Moose says:

    Lib [51];

    Curious if they’ll try to jack you up on “ADM” fees.

  56. Libtard at home says:

    Moose,

    There’s a forum where many of the 350 or so current owners have been comparing experiences including dealer fees. I’ll be watching closely. For most, total TTD was between $500 and $800. I could always refuse to pay them :P

  57. Juice Box says:

    Downtown Red Bank is jumping tonight, every restaurant is packed.

  58. Comrade Nom Deplume, Halfwit dumbass says:

    WSJ reports Aetna will pull out of California individual health insurance market.

    Methinks they won’t be the last.