Optimism is in the air

From HousingWire:

American optimism trends higher as home buying season starts

As the market enters the spring homebuying season, more homeowners are beginning to think now is a good time to sell a home, in addition to it being easier to get a mortgage, a government agency said.

According the latest Fannie Mae National Housing Survey, the share of respondents who say it is a good time to sell a home escalated to 38% in March, up from 26% for the same period a year ago.

Meanwhile, 52% of people believe it is easy to get a mortgage today, compared to 47% a year ago, matching the all-time survey high.

Americans are also beginning to feel more confident about their financial situation, with the percentage of people who expect their financial situation to worsen during the next 12 months dropping from 21% in 2013 to 12% in March.

On top of this, the share of people who say their personal financial situation improved during the past year reached an all-time survey high of 40%.

“The housing recovery continues to proceed in fits and starts. Rising mortgage rates and a lack of supply have dampened housing market momentum,” said Doug Duncan, senior vice president and chief economist at Fannie Mae.

“However, we see several positive signs going into this year’s spring home buying season, compared with last year. For example, consumers are less pessimistic about their personal finances, and more optimistic about the current selling environment and their ability to get a mortgage,” Duncan said.

In addition, the percentage of respondents who say home prices will increase in the next 12 months declined slightly to 48%, while the amount of people who say home prices will go down dropped to 5%: an all-time survey low.

This entry was posted in Demographics, Economics, Housing Recovery, National Real Estate. Bookmark the permalink.

201 Responses to Optimism is in the air

  1. grim says:

    From Fitch:

    Fitch: Harsh Winter, Higher Rates Dampen US Housing Recovery

    Harsh winter weather across the US is among several factors moderating the housing market recovery, according to Fitch Ratings. Higher rates and home prices have cut into affordability, though housing still looks attractive from a historical perspective. Various housing metrics reached a bottom for this cycle in 2011 or 2012. The pattern of recovery so far is a moderate expansion rather than a traditional v-shaped recovery. The continued shape of the recovery will reflect the pace of economic activity and the availability of private capital to support mortgage growth above the floor in volume provided by the GSEs and FHA. Stringent credit standards as well as escalating home prices and interest rates could also further moderate the pace of recovery. Fitch expects new home prices to increase between 2.5% and 3.5% this year. Existing home prices should also rise, which might precipitate more home sales activity. However, affordability is still out of range for many first time buyers dealing with excess student loans and tough lending standards. Overall mortgage affordability remains favorable relative to historic norms. Home prices are undervalued when compared to incomes and also relative to commercial property prices. The total U.S. housing market didn’t show much improvement during recent months, as reflected in some weak or worse-than-expected data reports. But monthly housing statistics can be volatile and we still believe the market will show a moderate gain for the year. Some customer segments (trade-up and luxury) are outperforming others (entry level) and while the weather overlay has been dreadful, the spring selling season will likely not set the tone for the rest of 2014.

  2. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    2nd

  3. Street Justice says:

    Comment I found at the bottom of an article regarding NJ Legislature Bill A2006, which restricts firearms magazines to a capacity of 10 rounds in NJ:

    Friday, March 28, 2014 3:56 PM
    Redacted wrote:
    We had a chance to move our manufacturing company to NJ from SC recently. We did a lot of research, background trekking, comparisons and what really turned us off to NJ was the lack of constitutionality shown by the leaders in NJ. After multiple trips and visits, including a face to face meeting with a local mayor, we just could not justify moving to NJ. People in NJ, and I am not putting fault on you personally, have been so eroded of their rights that they don’t even know what they are anymore. We see ads on TV down here, the prominent major stations also, touting NY and NJ as a place to move (or) start a business. We were interested in the tax breaks promised by the approved ads, and even researched them prior to any visit. We spoke to many, many businesses in NJ, specifically manufacturing, and the reason that NJ and NY are placing these ads are the sheer number of businesses moving out of NJ and leaving a huge void. High crime rate, high taxes, overpriced property values, and declining constitutional rights. It is very sad that the state I was born in and grew up in has turned out like this. The people of NJ have been dragged down, beaten down, and taken advantage of for so long that you can’t even see it anymore.

  4. State of NJ = SOS Barn

  5. Don’t need no stinking rights in NJ. Why pay less?

    Get back to work, drones.

  6. Street Justice says:

    Sorry was the lead article about optimism? I find it harder every day to be optimistic about living in NJ.

  7. grim says:

    4 – only we are the chickens

  8. Comrade Nom Deplume again (now that cronuts are banned). says:

    Sounds like I won’t be raining on any parades then . . .

    If you’re self employed and looking to fund, be careful. IRS is setting it’s sites on a few more branches on the money tree . . .

    http://amicuslawgroup.com/clients/amicus/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/Boom-Boom-Boom-IRS-fires-three-shots-across-the-bow-of-self-directed-IRA-investors-by-Warren-L-Baker-WSBA-Tax-Sec-Winter-2013-2014.pdf

  9. grim says:

    Here’s a story about establishing a small business in NJ.

    We initially wanted to set up shop in Paterson, met with the city, economic development, even discussed meeting with the mayor.

    Code officials basically tell us we need to set up shop in heavy industrial, essentially the worst and most dangerous section of Paterson, bunker hill. Anything else would require going before the zoning board of adjustment, which means lawyers, time, and more money than we care to invest in Paterson.

    So here we are looking to bring business to town, jobs, taxes, and even more important a potential new tourist attraction. Ideal candidate for any area undergoing economic redevelopment.

    So, Paterson is off the radar and we have two other towns interested in out business. They didn’t want to try, they didn’t want to help expedite changes, weren’t willing to change the code. If we want to set up, we gotta bring a fight to zoning.

    Perhaps I am an entitled, arrogant prick, but it expected at least a bit more welcome and effort.

  10. grim says:

    Sorry, change code was incorrect, their code specifically had no provisions to handle this type of business, so they’d made a judgement call to classify us in the most restrictive way.

  11. Street Justice says:

    In NJ, failure to seatbelt your cat while driving could result in fines and loss of your vehicle. Why would anyone ever want to pick up and move here?

    “Under New Jersey Statute 4:22-18, unrestrained pets in vehicles is an act of animal cruelty, and drivers who don’t secure their pooch in a pet seat belt will be subject to fines, ranging from $250 to $1,000 and as much as six months in jail.

    “That’s for each offense,” Col. Frank Rizzo, police superintendent for the New Jersey Society for the Prevention of Animal Cruelty, said Wednesday, according to The Bergen Record. “So, if you have more than one animal loose in your car, just do the math…””

    http://www.newjerseynewsroom.com/state/pet-freedom-takes-a-back-seat-to-new-seat-belt-laws

  12. grim says:

    Sounds like the pet seatbelt manufacturer was able to grease some palms in nj – perhaps I should have done the same.

  13. Painhrtz - Disobey! says:

    street I think we discussed that here a few years ago. I laughed because they don’t make a seat belt big enough for our German Shepherd.

    It falls in line with what you posted prior the citizens of this state have been beaten down for so long that we don’t even realize it anymore.

  14. chicagofinance says:

    for Chippy….some choppy…
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FOLYDxw0m0g

  15. grim says:

    And we were looking for no tax breaks, no discounts, only flexibility dealing with a new business type that does not fit current classification.

  16. anon (the good one) says:

    @MotherJones: There have been at least 67 mass shootings in the last three decades—and most of the killers got their guns legally http://t.co/vt6lLkP9Ya

  17. Painhrtz - Disobey! says:

    Grim it comes down to this f*ck you pay us for the privilege of operating in our sh*thole and being taxed out the wazoo.

  18. grim says:

    18 – basically yes, that’s the impression we got.

    Municipalities are run like fiefdoms where the public servants have crowned themselves kings.

  19. 1987 Condo says:

    #16..30 years in healthcare ops and Benefits admin outsourcing, I would never consider setting up a small business (with employees) in NJ!!! ACA,COBRA, FMLA, the list goes on….nightmare

  20. anon (the good one) says:

    good to be back in NJ.

    congrats to UConn

  21. chicagofinance says:

    grim un mod

  22. anon (the good one) says:

    need to come up with a sound investment strategy, good portfolio diversification, buy low/sell high and everything will be OK

  23. Street Justice says:

    The trouble with the gun issue is that both sides are so far apart, they can never come to an agreement. Your “tweet” would seem to suggest that we ban guns. Most people who truly understand the constitution know the 2nd amendment to be an individual right to bear arms.

    There are lessons to be learned from the Fort Hood shooting, for instance, we could allow more soldiers to carry side arms on base. Also, the Feds and the state of TX could report more mental health data to the NICS systems.

    But as long as one side suggests gun ownership has no place in society, the other will not listen and the people in the middle lose.

    anon (the good one) says:
    April 8, 2014 at 9:06 am
    @MotherJones: There have been at least 67 mass shootings in the last three decades—and most of the killers got their guns legally http://t.co/vt6lLkP9Ya

  24. grim says:

    Best part was the code official who told us on site storage if any alcohol would require us to be in a hazardous occupancy scenario – which is the most restrictive level ( think hazardous chemical manufacturing plant).

    Even after we explained that out MAQs would not exceed the lowest levels, which means standard occupancy, they wouldn’t budge. Any alcohol would require hazardous occupancy.

    Really?

    So how can a liquor store maintains a standard commercial occupant despite having thousands of gallons of flammable alcohol present? Since we would we storing less alcohol than a typical liquor store, why were we held to more stringent standards? He’ll, we even had sprinklers.

    He couldn’t answer that one.

  25. Comrade Nom Deplume again (now that cronuts are banned). says:

    [12] street

    This comment speaks volumes

    “So let me get this straight. if I’m pulled over and my Kid is not in a seat belt the fine is $46.00 but if my dog is not seat belted $250.00 – $1000 + poss. jail time.”

  26. chi (15)-

    Were you one of the producers of SOS Barn?

  27. grim says:

    Damn autocorrect

  28. chicagofinance says:

    lazy moderator cant be bothered geez….

    chicagofinance says:
    Your comment is awaiting moderation.
    April 8, 2014 at 9:10 am
    The End Is Nigh (JJ Eldercare Edition):
    The elderly residents of a Long Island nursing home saw their shuffleboards replaced by washboard abs when they were subjected to a low-rent Ch!pp5ndale’s str!pt5ase in the facility’s rec room, a new lawsuit claims.

    The son of one resident, 85-year-old Bernice Youngblood, was shocked when he showed up for a visit and found a picture of his mom stuffing dollar bills — which are supposed to be locked away in her commissary account — into a dancer’s briefs.
    The image also showed several of Youngblood’s fellow residents at the East Neck Nursing Center in West Babylon looking on with a mix of shock and delight as the dancers bumped and ground for their amusement.

    Youngblood’s family immediately expressed their outrage to the staff — but were ignored, according to the suit.

    “Plaintiff Bernice Youngblood was placed in apprehension of imminent, offensive, physical harm, as she was confused and bewildered as to why a muscular, almost n^de man, was approaching her and placing his body and limbs, over [her],” the suit states.
    Her family attorneys, John Ray and Vesselin Mitev, state in the complaint that her son, Franklin Youngblood, found the offensive photograph among her belongings during a January visit.

    The irate son confronted a nurse, but the staffer lunged at him and tried to snatch the picture away, the suit states.

    A nurse later told another of the victim’s sons that the strip show was an “entertainment event” for the patients and was done in “good faith,” according to the suit.

    “Hiring male st!ppers to perform for the defendant’s nursing-home patients was a serial occurrence,” the suit claims.

    “Bernice Youngblood has lived 85 years as a traditional Baptist, hard-working, lady . . . And now she has been def!led,” Ray said.

    Youngblood’s family also asked why his mother was holding dollar bills in her hand when her cash was supposed to be kept under lock and key in a commissary account — but were again blown off, the papers state.

    The “vile” incident was done “all for the perverse pleasure and enjoyment of the Defendant’s staff,” the suit claims.

    Youngblood’s attorneys argue she “lacks the mental and physical capacity” to protect herself.

    The facility did not immediately return a call for comment.

  29. grim, one of the happiest days of my life was when I finally woke up to the fact that being a small business owner in NJ means nothing more than making yourself a target for every thieving gubmint lackey in your town.

    There is no recognition on the town level here that a small business is any more than a new mark to be soaked for fees, taxes, niggling fines and (omg!) bribes.

    Let the AQ-filled Paterson rot and go to hell. When it gets bad enough, ring fence it with concertina wire and let the junk!es and Islam!c extremists fight it out to the death.

  30. Comrade Nom Deplume again (now that cronuts are banned). says:

    [25] grim,

    He was answering. You just didn’t notice the slightly extended hand and the first three fingers being rubbed together in that classic gesture that says “oh, I think something can be worked out . . .”

  31. Michael says:

    Fast eddie, I hope you read the lead article and realize your window of opportunity is almost shut.

  32. NJCoast says:

    Grim, my daughter and SIL are looking to set up their brewery in the Hudson Valley area. Entered into contract near Germantown and went to the town officials for zoning changes. They couldn’t have been more accomodative, the towns people even thanked them for bringing a new thriving business to the area at the planning board meeting. Unfortunately the water sample came back extremely high in sodium. Back to square one.

  33. nwnj says:

    There’s no excuse for the local shakedowns, but i’m not sure I’d want a distillery in the midst of a retail or residential area. Big difference between a brewery. KABOOM.

  34. Street Justice says:

    Newton considers zoning law change for micro-breweries

    Posted: Jan 14, 2014 11:03 PM EST
    Updated: Jan 18, 2014 1:00 AM EST

    By BRUCE A. SCRUTON

    bscruton@njherald.com

    NEWTON — The Newton Town Council has agreed to allow the town planner to present changes to the town’s zoning ordinance that would make it easier and cheaper for a micro-brewery to come to town.

    Without naming the prospective developer — but noting it is the only existing micro-brewery in the county — the council discussed the idea with planner Jessica Caldwell and Assistant Town Manager Debra Millikin, who is the town’s economic development coordinator, during its regular meeting.

    As the zoning laws are currently written, any food or beverage production, no matter the size, needs a special use variance to build or develop within the town.

    That option can be rather time-consuming and cost-prohibitive because of the studies and professional reports needed before such a variance can be granted.

    Under the proposal brought to the council, proposals for a brewery in certain commercial zones would need only an environmental study, which, Caldwell noted, would “raise any red flags about things like odors, discharges and traffic issues.”

    Bob Fuchs, the owner of Krogh’s Restaurant and Brew Pub in Sparta, the only micro-brewery in the county, confirmed Tuesday he is looking to expand his operation into Newton.

    While he has a place in mind, he said there are no signed agreements with the owner and he would rather not make the location public until he is ready to move ahead with town approval.

    Fuchs said he has run out of space to expand the existing brewery in Sparta and is excited about the Newton expansion where a wider variety of beers can be brewed. While the brewery would have limited hours open to the public, he said there would be special events, such as the tapping of a new variety, and customers would be able to purchase beverages at the facility.

    He said production would be increased so Krogh’s beer could also be sold at other restaurants and through licensed retail

    outlets.

    Millikin told the council the proposed brewery would not include an eating establishment, which would require a state liquor license. Instead, the operation should fall under the same law that allows wineries to have tasting rooms and retail sales of their products.

    The two did not say where the developer is looking, but Mayor Joseph Ricciardo said, “Spring Street would be ideal,” and noted he has seen similar businesses in other parts of the state doing well.

    Fuchs did say the location is not on Spring Street. “We simply cannot afford the retail rates and with this operation don’t need to be in the main business district.”

    Caldwell said any changes to the town’s zoning ordinance would have to come to the council for introduction, then forwarded to the town’s Planning Board for a discussion and recommendation. The ordinance would return to the council for a public hearing and final vote.

    On another ordinance pending before the council, Town Attorney Ursula Leo was asked to include definitions of items such as dog breeder and fostering into an ordinance before the council vote on the ordinance. The ordinance seeks to limit the number of dogs permitted for any property

    In late December, several people appeared before the council to note a blanket limit of four animals for up to one acre would create a hardship for people who temporarily shelter animals on behalf of a not-for-profit corporation or are raising puppies as show animals.

    Leo said there are state laws covering breeders, which mostly require a kennel license, and also the fostering of animals, such as happened after Hurricane Sandy, until the legal owner can reclaim the animal.

    Leo said there appears to be some gray area in the state regulations, which also include a classification of “hobby breeder,” but the definitions can be made clearer in the local ordinance.

    While there has already been a public hearing on the ordinance, any substantial changes would require a new public hearing before a final vote.

    Town Clerk Lorraine Read said a meeting is set for Thursday among her, Leo and several of the people who spoke at the Dec. 23 hearing to discuss how to incorporate the state law and its definitions into the proposed Newton ordinance.

    The council will also hold public budget hearings at 9 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 8, and at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 12.

  35. Comrade Nom Deplume, Guardian of the Realm says:

    [33] coast

    Breweries and brewpubs sprouting like weeds here in ChesCo. I’m guessing they like the water just fine and the politics even more so.

  36. Comrade Nom Deplume, Guardian of the Realm says:

    PA is putting out a lot of decent beer as of late. Victory and Yards doing quite well and could even reach Sam Adams levels. There are a lot of wineries in my area as well and they are pretty decent (not Cali decent but the beat the hell of that Tomasello crap from Jersey).

    Now if we could just do something about the asinine liquor laws in this state. Good thing I live so close to Delaware.

  37. Comrade Nom Deplume, Guardian of the Realm says:

    Grim, on my last visit to Mass recently, I saw a distillery in Belmont, MA. Right in the middle of a commercial block. That is one of the last places I’d ever expect to see a distillery so apparently local politics weren’t a concern. Belmont is just about the last place the sort of graft you see in NJ could ever gain a foothold. They were limited as to their signage but that was about it.

  38. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    IMO, unrestrained pets in vehicles is a sign of delusion that the laws of physics don’t apply to the contents of your vehicle. Every time I see a loose large animal in the car I see a projectile, not a pet. I doubt there’s many engineers that would drive with a loose large dog AND kids in the same car. Imagine being yourself saved by the drivers airbag while your rearward facing infant was just killed by an air-born German Shepherd. How about someone else’s dog flying through your windshield or passenger window?

    “Under New Jersey Statute 4:22-18, unrestrained pets in vehicles is an act of animal cruelty,

  39. Painhrtz - Disobey! says:

    expat seriously has nothing to do with physics dog gets in the back of the truck we go to park repeat to go home. We go on a long trip he is in the back of the Element behind the back seat, thanks for your concern.

  40. Ben says:

    So how can a liquor store maintains a standard commercial occupant despite having thousands of gallons of flammable alcohol present? Since we would we storing less alcohol than a typical liquor store, why were we held to more stringent standards? He’ll, we even had sprinklers.

    Liquor licenses in NJ have always functioned to eliminate any potential competition.

  41. joyce says:

    39
    Tounge in cheek?

    Have there been a number of car accidents resulting in animal projectiles recently? For that matter, was there a number of car accidents resulting in human projectiles before the mandatory seat belt law was put into place?

    Or was it yet another thing they found to fine everyone for to raise money. Seat belt road blocks, etc

  42. joyce says:

    Pet seat belt road blocks next

  43. 1987 Condo says:

    Micro breweries/Craft Beers….bubble?

  44. 1987 Condo says:

    ..ignore me…I like Bud Lite Lime!

  45. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    [42] joyce – Not tongue in cheek at all. 80 pounds of unrestrained anything easily kill a car occupant in a collision. Anyone who doesn’t understand that probably also thinks if you are caught in a free-falling elevator you can save yourself by jumping in the air just before impact.

  46. Xolepa says:

    (39) So, do we put seat belts on all unsecured items in the car? A cell phone is a missile when oing from 40 to 0 in 2 seconds. I knew a girl who was killed by an object that broke through her glove compartment and hit her on the head when she impacted suddenly.

    How far does this go?

  47. Comrade Nom Deplume again (now that cronuts are banned). says:

    See what you find when you go down the rabbit hole? This is for Joyce and clot, or ottoman and anon. Take your pick.

    http://www.examiner.com/article/insider-warns-that-more-banker-assassinations-are-coming

    Well, back to the salt mine.

  48. emotujkjk says:

    NeuQs4 dbcpsjfclggz, [url=http://osshpwzfhqhh.com/]osshpwzfhqhh[/url], [link=http://gosrdulmbmqf.com/]gosrdulmbmqf[/link], http://oarauqqougnd.com/

  49. Street Justice says:

    Expat, no legislator who wrote that law cared about the lives of the human occupants. The law was designed to protect animals and punish people who don’t buy special seat belts. They think that anyone who acts otherwise is guilty of animal cruelty. I used to sell metal cage dividers that were custom built to fit in your car or SUV that would separate your pet in the rear of the SUV or station wagon for that purpose and they sold plenty of them without any silly laws.

  50. joyce says:

    We don’t need more b.s. revenue raising legislation that is passed under the guise of protecting people from themselves.

    The Original NJ ExPat says:
    April 8, 2014 at 10:31 am
    [42] joyce – Not tongue in cheek at all. 80 pounds of unrestrained anything easily kill a car occupant in a collision. Anyone who doesn’t understand that probably also thinks if you are caught in a free-falling elevator you can save yourself by jumping in the air just before impact.

  51. Fast Eddie says:

    Michael [32],

    What window of opportunity? You mean buy now or be priced out forever? Or, I could just put a price 20% above recent comps on my place and have someone fund my next move. It just takes one, right?

  52. Libtard in Union says:

    I heard that the law is unenforceable, shortly before it came out. I don’t remember the exact reason why. I bought the doggy seatbealt. My 40 pound doodle refuses to be confined. Without it, he lays on the floor. With it on he goes ballistic. The people the law should concern, and I’ve seen this way too often, are the dumb kickdog owners who allow their pooches to sit on their laps while driving. The moment that airbag goes off, that dog will get splattered all over the owner. I only drive my dog to the vet and kennel anyhow. I’m not one of those foofy pet owners. Hell, the last time the dog got into the dark chocolate, I told Gator Jr. to give his dog a big hug since I was ready to let the dog croak for being such a douchbag of a pet. The only reason I induced vomiting was that the friend Gator had over who left the 2 pounds of shredded dark chocolate on the counter where our dog could get it was completely freaking about it.

  53. Fast Eddie says:

    Xolepa,

    There was no need for you to apologize for yesterday’s post. :) It’s all good. :)

  54. Comrade Nom Deplume again (now that cronuts are banned). says:

    Had to come back with this. Guaranteed to fry anon/ottoman/michael’s onions.

    http://money.cnn.com/2014/04/08/news/economy/freeports-art-luxury/index.html?hpt=hp_t3

  55. Libtard in Union says:

    The pooch seatbelt law never passed anyway. From what I’ve read, the pet seatbelts create much worse damage to the dogs than had they not been secured, though they do protect the passengers from flying pet missiles. Don’t give that toddler of yours an iPad though. That’s like a discus in an accident.

  56. Street Justice says:

    Steve Sweeney ‏@NJSenatePres
    Wear RED on Equal Pay Day to symbolize how far women and minorities are “in the red” with their pay!
    http://www.pay-equity.org/day.html #equalpayday2014

    Steve Sweeney
    ‏@NJSenatePres
    Great op-ed by Laurel Brennan in today’s @TimesofTrenton @NJAFLCIO http://www.nj.com/opinion/index.ssf/2014/04/opinion_equal_pay_day_in_nj_-_pay_gap_exists_across_all_demographic_lines.html

    Redacted ‏@redacted 2m
    @NJSenatePres Question: why don’t businesses hire all women and minorities to save money on labor costs if this is true?

  57. Street Justice says:

    SL Op ED:

    There are two tracks to closing the wage gap. First, the state could finally enact legislation to require equal pay for equal work – putting the power of law behind what already seems to be common sense.

    Two such measures are already moving ahead in the Statehouse. Senate Majority Leader Loretta Weinberg, one of the Legislature’s most passionate voices for women’s equality, is sponsoring the Unfair Wage Recovery Act (S783) with Assemblywoman Pamela Lampitt that would make it a crime each and every time a woman is found to have been paid less simply because she is a woman. The Wage Transparency Act (S1038), also sponsored by Sen. Weinberg, would require every public contract to be clear about the pay of every individual to be hired, putting in writing their set wages.

    The second is what women can do directly. Plain and simple: Join a union. Nothing has been proven to close the wage gap quicker and more definitively than a union contract. For union women, wages have averaged more than 25 percent higher than those made by their non-union peers – and among Hispanic women, it’s more than one-third.

  58. Libtard in Union says:

    Nom,

    How about we use the death penalty on any repeat offenders and use all of the empty prisons as freeports?

  59. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    [47] Prepare as you see fit. You can break many laws in your lifetime, but not the laws of physics. The general population has little understanding for these laws so they don’t prepare adequately. When I was younger, friends of mine could never understand how I could drive my convertible through a GSP toll at a relatively high rate of speed while getting the quarter (or later, token) into the toll basket by throwing the coin backwards (towards the rear of the car), across my body with my right hand and over my left shoulder, and get it in most times, even though I threw it backwards while the toll was still in front of me.

    How far does this go?

  60. Street Justice says:

    NJ Statute 4:22-18 is already law. It might be different than the recently proposed seatbelt law.

    http://www.state.nj.us/mvc/PressReleases/archives/2012/053012.htm

    The law was not designed to protect people in any way. It is a statute designed to protect animals from cruelty.

  61. joyce says:

    The law was not designed to protect people in any way. It is a statute designed to …. fine people.

    Brian,
    Unless you think the gun laws were designed to protect people too?

  62. Street Justice says:

    Joyce,

    You give them too much credit. Lawmakers don’t give me any reason to believe they are that clever.

  63. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    [50] SJ – I live in MA and don’t have dog in this fight, so to speak. I don’t support the law and favor people taking whatever precautions or risks they care to. I’ve driven with large Collie/Shepherd-mixed dogs head out the window enjoying life, no big deal to me. Large dog unrestrained with kids in the car – I would only do that with one of those sturdy caged off back areas like you mentioned. I would rather see spot-ticketing for stupid stuff like dogs on lap, big dogs unrestrained with kids as passengers, etc. In fact dogs on lap or backing up on the shoulder of the highway because you missed your exit should be immediate loss of license.

    Expat, no legislator who wrote that law cared about the lives of the human occupants. The law was designed to protect animals and punish people who don’t buy special seat belts. They think that anyone who acts otherwise is guilty of animal cruelty. I used to sell metal cage dividers that were custom built to fit in your car or SUV that would separate your pet in the rear of the SUV or station wagon for that purpose and they sold plenty of them without any silly laws.

  64. joyce says:

    What do you mean? Everything they pass is all about fines & collecting money. They will go out of their way to have these laws enforced. But actual crimes, their own corruption… no time to enforce those rules.

    Street Justice says:
    April 8, 2014 at 11:24 am
    Joyce,

    You give them too much credit. Lawmakers don’t give me any reason to believe they are that clever.

  65. Libtard in Union says:

    I’m sure there has not nor will there ever be a single ticket written for this pet belt law. Imagine the officer walking over to the car to issue the summons as the 50 pound pit is barking his head off unrestrained and leaving slobber marks on the glass.

  66. Painhrtz - Disobey! says:

    Lib your heartless but I did LOL when I read this

    I’m not one of those foofy pet owners. Hell, the last time the dog got into the dark chocolate, I told Gator Jr. to give his dog a big hug since I was ready to let the dog croak for being such a douchbag of a pet.

    My 130 GSD does not like being restrained nor does he fit in the front seat or any of the spaces leading to the front compartment so it is kind of a moot point

  67. pjajlm says:

    tfyKiN bdlbqhpcaxwf, [url=http://gipgottkqcqm.com/]gipgottkqcqm[/url], [link=http://ksstibinnfkz.com/]ksstibinnfkz[/link], http://onzbwynytkxo.com/

  68. Libtard in Union says:

    Pain…it’s all true. Ask Gator.

  69. joyce says:

    Since every cop is a sociopath as well as a terrified pansy (whichever suits the moment), the cop might just blow the dog away and claim he feared for his safety.

    Libtard in Union says:
    April 8, 2014 at 11:29 am
    I’m sure there has not nor will there ever be a single ticket written for this pet belt law. Imagine the officer walking over to the car to issue the summons as the 50 pound pit is barking his head off unrestrained and leaving slobber marks on the glass.

  70. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    [68] Sounds like some parents I know. The world is expected to adapt to what their kids like or don’t like. I guess we know who is the alpha dog.

    My 130 GSD does not like being restrained nor does he fit in the front seat or any of the spaces leading to the front compartment so it is kind of a moot point

  71. anon (the good one) says:

    @CNBC: Automakers push to eliminate side view mirrors: http://t.co/7sXQmtzXJy

  72. Ragnar says:

    I like my dog, but it’s only going to live 12 to 15 years anyway, and is replaceable.
    The problem with my dog is that it gets nervous and sometimes carsick in a car.
    She will not be buckled up, and we already gave away our baby carrier.
    I guess it’s against the law to put your hound in the back of a truck.
    I remember as a kid taking long trips in the closed back of a GMC Suburban with my dad’s hound named “Redneck”.

  73. Painhrtz - Disobey! says:

    ex he is a very well behaved broad chested large dog they do not make a restraint for him. Even if they did I would not put him in one he is in the back of the car. He does not ride in seats with my kids nor any other passengers. In fact the car he spends 95% of his time in is my truck. The rides are no more than a mile except when he is going to the vet. Hell out hunting dogs when I was a kid rode in the back of a pick up unrestrained or on the hood if I was out racoon hunting with my dad. they all lived long and happy lives.

    But hey if you want to continue to determine how I should conduct myself, sometimes I ride an atv without a helmet, I occasionally smoke, my kids get to watch an hour of TV before bed, probably eat to much sugar, play hockey without a cup, I climb into my tree stand without my harness attached and least of all have done home improvements without the consent of the local government.

    Life is about making risk decisions, I can make my own without someone fining me to correct behavior they find reprehensible.

  74. 1987 Condo says:

    I keep my dog crated but would love to find a safe and more convenient way to transport my mini schnauzer

  75. Juice Box says:

    Grim were you planning on infusing your spirits with the magical waters from the Great Falls?

    It looks like Libby’s is available, prime tourist area. Think of all of the foot traffic!

    https://www.google.com/maps/place/Dave's+Architectural+Iron+Works/@40.914767,-74.181558,3a,75y,133.77h,90t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1sqYUZ6EJddkye5b01MZKtBw!2e0!4m2!3m1!1s0x0:0x183b49b0a830ccf1!6m1!1e1

  76. Michael says:

    You are older than me. Therefore you know that real estate runs in cycles. There are good times to buy and bad times to buy. The past 3 years have been great times to buy in north jersey.

    Fast Eddie says:
    April 8, 2014 at 10:50 am
    Michael [32],

    What window of opportunity? You mean buy now or be priced out forever? Or, I could just put a price 20% above recent comps on my place and have someone fund my next move. It just takes one, right?

  77. Juice Box says:

    re” dogs riding in cars or people riding in cars with no seatbelt also known as the backseat bullet.

    Here is my favorite UK road safety advert

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mKHY69AFstE

  78. chicagofinance says:

    clot: inspirational!

    A North Korean official has reportedly been executed by flamethrower, as part of an apparent purge against supporters of Kim Jong-un’s uncle.

    Jang Song-tank was killed by the regime in December after it accused him of corruption and disloyalty. Since then as many as 11 senior party officials have been killed or sent to prison camps, the UK Telegraph said.

    The Telegraph cited a report in South Korea’s Chosun Ilbo newspaper saying that O Sang-hon, a deputy minister at the Ministry of Public Security, was “executed by flamethrower.”

    The paper said the shocking punishment was handed down after the official helped Jang turn the ministry into a personal security division to help safeguard his business interests.

    Although the report has not been independently verified, North Korea has a track record for cruel and bizarre punishments.

    In 2012, a high-ranking army official accused of drunkenness during the official mourning period after the death of Kim Jong-il, Kim Jong-un’s father, was blown up with a mortar round after Kim Jong-un gave orders to leave “no trace of him behind, down to his hair,” the Telegraph reported.

  79. Anon E. Moose says:

    ’87 Condo [45];

    I like Bud Lite Lime!

    My BIL sez if I ever see him drinking a Bud light Lime, its a signal that he’s been kidnapped and to send help.

    http://www.someecards.com/usercards/viewcard/355d6805bf0f6bade4dba0c0b8cf44c3

  80. Ottoman says:

    Wonder how many of the bright lights criticizing NJ for its onerous regulations would mind a couple of double wides being trucked in on either side of their properties as permanent residences Or their neighbors opening up their land to fracking or building an apartment complex. Libertarians always seem to be okay with laws when they protect their own interests.

  81. Street Justice says:

    I actually live in a double wide and would gladly sell my mineral rights to the first fracker who came for them.

    Given that my oil tank was found to be leaky by the NJDEP and I live in a house covered in asbestos, the fracking chemicals might actually improve water quality.

  82. Michael says:

    Well said. It’s a proven fact that we can’t have a society with no govt regulations. We tried that already, and it didn’t work. We had children who were 5 years old being put into the mines. We had workers that were treated worst in the north than the slaves in the south. We had pollution run wild. These are the rich barrons (the 1%) that you guys claim do so much for society. I don’t trust them for a second. I see what they did. I see how they took advantage of a generation of people. Just go look up the gilded age. Anyone that takes advantage of children can’t be trusted.

    Ottoman says:
    April 8, 2014 at 1:04 pm
    Wonder how many of the bright lights criticizing NJ for its onerous regulations would mind a couple of double wides being trucked in on either side of their properties as permanent residences Or their neighbors opening up their land to fracking or building an apartment complex. Libertarians always seem to be okay with laws when they protect their own interests.

  83. Ragnar says:

    There go the teachers unions.
    “Anyone that takes advantage of children can’t be trusted. “

  84. Fast Eddie says:

    Michael,

    The past 3 years have been great times to buy in north jersey.

    No it’s not. It’s been absolutely horrible. We’re in the 10th year of one of the most unaffordable periods to buy a home in North Jersey while attempting to maintain a breathable standard of living. A sea of unqualified sellers struggles to survive amidst a FED rate at 0%. The corpse is on a respirator.

  85. Painhrtz - Disobey! says:

    your land your right to use it anyway you choose. If your neighbor pollutes your ground water there is the new fangled thing called the court system. you don’t like your neighbors move simple.

    Mikey your comment reminds me of a farmer whose 450 acre working farm I used to hunt on. Well a bunch of well to do NYers move in around his farm in early spring nothing unusual. Well summer comes around and they happen to be downwind of his pigs and cattle and don’t think much of the smell. Knock on said farmers door and asks if he could do something about the smell as it is obnoxious and ruining the enjoyment of the idyllic setting in which they purchased the house. Secondly, all the gunfire that happens on weekends was a bit disconcerting as they did not want to get shot (we were killing groundhogs so the live stock do not incur an injury and crows to protect crops) no where near their homes mind you. Last but not least if he could only run his equipment on weekdays during normal business hours so they could enjoy a quiet weekend since they had long commutes into the city for work and their wives and children could not sleep well enough since they began at 5am.

    The farmers response was thus,

    I would be happy to fix the pig and cattle problem if you are willing to pay fair market value at today’s rates for the amount of livestock that I have. That is about 100,000 dollars for an additional 20K I’ll even have them wrapped in a manner of your grocery store of preference. Unfortunately, once I have sold my livestock I will have to buy more since the crops alone do not provide me with sufficient income at which point your problem will return. To solve this you can offer me 5 million for the land which has been in my family for 5 generation since the 1860s and that is the current market value. truth be told though, I’m kind of attached and my sons would like to take over the business some day because it is what they love. So that is out of the question. The pigs and cows have been here as long as I can remember and you have only been here 3 months so I guess we are at an impasse

    Regarding the shooting, those boys along with my sons are performing pest control to protect my aforementioned livestock and crops. They are all licensed and passed safety courses by the state of NJ and are fine examples of what happens when you raise children correctly to respect the property and rights of others. The shooting will continue unless you can find another way to rid me of groundhogs and crows. Little tip scarecrows only work in movies.

    And to your last point while I can say I know nothing of your job, know that mine is 7 days a week 365 days out of the year. I have to take care of livestock and fields. While you may have some glorified view of farming realize that those machines make my life much easier than the toil my grandfather and father had to perform for the same amount of work.

    Now since this discussion is done and I have taken the time to consider you points and you have heard mine can I interest you in some flowers or eggs? If not get the f*ck of my land.

    I was on the porch for that discussion, rest in peace mister S. It taught me the best lesson in what it means to be an individual and respect their rights whether you agree with them or not.

  86. Street Justice says:

    Origins of Progressive Regulation
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=62rI8OYFzGg

    BTW, enjoy reading this post and watching this video on your computer/tablet/phone made in China. I hear they treat their workers very well and even do them the service of installing suicide nets. China’s low carbon footprint is a model for the world too eh?

    86.Michael says:
    April 8, 2014 at 1:37 pm
    Well said. It’s a proven fact that we can’t have a society with no govt regulations. We tried that already, and it didn’t work.

  87. Libtard in Union says:

    The best time to buy in NJ in recent years was the late 90s or even the early 2000s. Buying my multi in a private sale in 2004 was the biggest boneheaded purchase I have ever made. If you’re gonna screw up, might as well screw up when the purchase is in the 6 digits, right? Meanwhile, as we looked through the MLS at the house on the right (bought for less than our 20% downpayment) just ten years earlier and the house across the street purchased in the 70s for $69,000. And I was buying a POS house for $480,000 since everything else was going for $525,000 to $600,000. Man did I find a bargain. Two years later, my 480K assessed for $610,000. Two years after that for 350K. Now I’m almost back to where I bought it, but I’ve sunk well over 100K into maintenance and improvements.

    Wish I bought like my neighbors did at 80% off. THAT was the best time to buy. Even during the valley of home values during the crash, they still tripled their money in 10 to 15 years. I’m in for 10 years and I’m still down almost 15% when you factor in maintenance.

    Be mindful of the generalizations you spout Michael.

  88. Michael says:

    “A sea of unqualified sellers struggles to survive amidst a FED rate at 0%. The corpse is on a respirator.”

    Exactly why it has been the time to buy the past 3 years. You think you are going to get a deal when there are loads of buyers? When the fundamentals turn positive, that means its too late to get a deal that you build wealth on. When the fundamentals turn positive, it’s time to sell, and wait for the next low cycle to buy again. This is how you make money on market cycles.

    Fast Eddie says:
    April 8, 2014 at 1:46 pm
    Michael,

    The past 3 years have been great times to buy in north jersey.

    No it’s not. It’s been absolutely horrible. We’re in the 10th year of one of the most unaffordable periods to buy a home in North Jersey while attempting to maintain a breathable standard of living. A sea of unqualified sellers struggles to survive amidst a FED rate at 0%. The corpse is on a respirator.

  89. Fast Eddie says:

    Here’s your affordablity. A sh1t bilevel in a mid tier town. After you put the required $106,000 down, not including moving and closing costs, you get to pay over $3000 per month just to put the key in the front door. Food? Insurance? Maintenance? Car Payment? Commuting cost? What? You have 2 kids? What amount are we up to now? My sentiments.

    And this is based on two incomes because you know Daddy can’t do this alone. You saving 10% pretax for retirement, too? This house is 20% over-priced. Easy! Just about every listing needs another 10% to 15% chop.

    http://www.njmls.com/listings/index.cfm?action=dsp.info&mlsnum=1411664&dayssince=&countysearch=false

  90. Michael says:

    Fast eddie, if you would have bought in any haughty town back in 2011, you can now sell for a profit. Tell me I’m wrong. You could have bought in glen ridge in 2011 for prices you claimed to be a rip-off and sold 3 years later for a nice profit. You don’t realize it, but you are missing the boat on cheap money and low housing prices, because you are being stubborn. A double dip is not coming anytime soon, esp on the back of no gains for over 10 years. Keep waiting.

  91. Fast Eddie says:

    Michael,

    When the fundamentals turn positive…

    So, you’re admitting that it’s a horrible time to buy. I have nothing further, your Honor.

  92. Fast Eddie says:

    Michael,

    Fast eddie, if you would have bought in any haughty town back in 2011, you can now sell for a profit.

    Subtract every other cost associated with buying, selling and maintaining and get back to me on that one.

  93. Michael says:

    I get what you are saying, but you are looking at it wrong. You can’t use wage earnings to judge housing prices. Only 62% of the population owns property. Of that % maybe 12% live in your white trash trailer park home, meaning about 12% live in crappy under $100,000 homes. The % of the population that can buy houses, can afford it. The haughty towns where you are looking are RICH! Less than 3% of those towns are close to losing their homes, the rest are swimming in money. You need to understand this before you judge housing prices.

    Fast Eddie says:
    April 8, 2014 at 2:14 pm
    Here’s your affordablity. A sh1t bilevel in a mid tier town. After you put the required $106,000 down, not including moving and closing costs, you get to pay over $3000 per month just to put the key in the front door. Food? Insurance? Maintenance? Car Payment? Commuting cost? What? You have 2 kids? What amount are we up to now? My sentiments.

    And this is based on two incomes because you know Daddy can’t do this alone. You saving 10% pretax for retirement, too? This house is 20% over-priced. Easy! Just about every listing needs another 10% to 15% chop.

    http://www.njmls.com/listings/index.cfm?action=dsp.info&mlsnum=1411664&dayssince=&countysearch=false

  94. Michael says:

    I was just making a point that you could have bought in a so called terrible market and made a small profit in 3 years. My advice would be to hold till 2024 or 2025 and KILL IT!!!!!

    Fast Eddie says:
    April 8, 2014 at 2:24 pm
    Michael,

    Fast eddie, if you would have bought in any haughty town back in 2011, you can now sell for a profit.

    Subtract every other cost associated with buying, selling and maintaining and get back to me on that one.

  95. JJ says:

    What is the name of the nursing home that allows strippers on Long Island I want to go there when I get old

    Michael years ago I worked in the Controllers dept and we always compared returns vs other investments of equal risk and the risk free rate as well as carrying costs.

    Buying a house January 2011 in New Jersey vs. Buying plain old Muni bonds, Corporate bonds, Junk Bonds or S&P 500 funds was not a good deal as the RE investment plain old sucks. There are huge carrying costs a house and trying up yor money is huge lost opportunity costs.

    Last time housing was a 100% slam dunk was Fall 1999 to Summer 2001. Why you had low priced real estate vs extremely over priced bubble stocks and interest rates and stocks about to head straight down and housing straight up.

    Housing was also a pretty good bet in the second half of 2013 as by then you had an unsustainable rise in stocks over five years and RE has not kept up.

    Best timing of anyone I know PERIOD in buying a house is this guy I used to work with. He went to this BS company from a middle management dead end job for mainly stock options in late 1998. It was called AnswerThink. It shot up quickly and all the options he got was in the money bigtime. He went house shopping and found a huge dream house that needed work for 650K. Called his stock option folk Feb 2000 and said sell enough so after taxes so I get 650K, and buys house cash. Stocks crashed March 2000 but his wife was renovating so they kept selling the Bearing Point Stocks and Options till house was completely remodeled and was finished by August 2001. Then 9/11 came and Bearing Point shortly afterwards went bankrupt and he got his old job back with a raise as they needed him.

    In Spring 2013 I bought my invesment property and you know what it was a lousy investment. I missed another 20% rise in stocks and property has no risen in value.

    Meanwhile I bought my current house December 1999 and Closed late Feb 2000 which turned out to be a good investment. Pretty much the house sucked all my money up and come a few weeks later when market was crashing I had very little funds and to top it off wife took a 401k loan in Feb 2000 that she paid back at a discount!!! Pure luck.
    79.Michael says:
    April 8, 2014 at 12:32 pm
    You are older than me. Therefore you know that real estate runs in cycles. There are good times to buy and bad times to buy. The past 3 years have been great times to buy in north jersey.

    Fast Eddie says:
    April 8, 2014 at 10:50 am
    Michael [32],

    What window of opportunity? You mean buy now or be priced out forever? Or, I could just put a price 20% above recent comps on my place and have someone fund my next move. It just takes one, right?

  96. Libtard in Union says:

    Though regardless of the multi error, I still locked in my two 15-year mortgages at the lowest possible rate ever offered to anyone to the best day (lowest rate) ever. Which is nice, as one usually does not refinance a 15-year into anything else and we are talking a lion’s share of debt.

  97. Michael says:

    JJ, if you are making money, it’s a good thing, no matter what investment it it. Like stocks and re, investing is all about timing. Buy at the wrong time, and you get killed. Buy at the right time, and become a millionaire. There is a lot of luck involved in investing, whether people acknowledge it or not. Of course you have to make your own luck, but luck def does help.

  98. Fast Eddie says:

    You can’t use wage earnings to judge housing prices.

    Which is the very reason why you have a sea of endless m0rons that are vastly underwater.

  99. Xolepa says:

    (96) Subtract every other cost associated with buying, selling and maintaining and get back to me on that one.

    That’s gonna occur no matter what house you live in and whether you’re on the down or up side. It’s a failed argument.

    Meanwhile, the clock goes tick, tick, tick….

  100. Fast Eddie says:

    I was just making a point that you could have bought in a so called terrible market and made a small profit in 3 years.

    Once again, you’re wrong. Any so-called rise in price would have been gone with all other associated costs. And you’re specualting using past performance as a measurement. You’re a gambler, not an investor.

  101. Fast Eddie says:

    Xolepa,

    From 2011 until now, it’s not a failed argument. Over ten years, it might be a different story.

  102. Michael says:

    104- investing is gambling, when was it ever not?

    If people were not holding out for prices to return to the level that they paid during the bubble, you would be seeing a full on housing recovery right now. Too bad they are holding out, leaving the market with no inventory in north jersey

  103. ccb223 says:

    You need to take into account taxes. Huge tax breaks which incentivize home ownership (mortgage interest deduction, property tax deductions and no taxes on first $500K of gains (if married)).

    http://www.bankrate.com/finance/real-estate/capital-gains-home-sale-tax-break-a-boon-for-owners-1.aspx

    Not saying that closes the gap fully but it is a mitigating point arguing in favor of real estate as an asset class.

  104. Fast Eddie says:

    investing is gambling, when was it ever not?

    Wrong again. Investing is based on measured risk; gambling is using voodoo hoping to win the lottery.

  105. Bystander says:

    The optim

  106. Bystander says:

    Oops..the optimisms turns to reality, here in CT. Just read that underwater borrowers had an uptick in final qtr of 2013. Three houses which listed last month for “big” spring market, now have dropped their prices including the guy who would not come down 1% from his 530k ask last fall. He is now at 515k. Keep telling me I missed it, Mike. There a loads of reductions and relistings. I smell desperation but not from buyers. People want out from NY area and harsh winters.

  107. Ben says:

    I bought my house in October and it already rose $15k in value!

  108. Theo says:

    The way I delude myself into not feeling too bad about my decision to buy is as follows. My total taxes paid as a renter in Federal and State Taxes is approximately the same as my total Federal State and Property taxes paid annually as a home owner. The mortgage payment on my 3 or 4 br house, after taking into account that some of the interest is deductible, is roughly equal to the rent I paid for my 1+ br apartment in Hackensack (I was definitely overpaying). The big difference is maintenance which was included in my rent, but an additional cost of owning and heat/ac, which were included with rent but an additional cost of owning. Also, the monthly nut is larger because property taxes are included with my mortgage. When I rented, I just cut a huge check to the Feds and NJ at tax time.

  109. JJ says:

    I own two properties and get no tax write off. Property taxes deduction get eaten up by AMT. And my income level does not let me write off depreciation on the investment property and I have no mortgage.

    Tax wise back when that nut Merith Whitney was blabbing about the Muni bond crisis in December 2010 and January 2011 you could buy 30 year investment grade munis 100% tax fee with a 7% yield. Most likely tax wise and risk wise that was deal of the decade. For a more risky bet Puerto Rico Munis in December 2013 during that panic hit 12% yields tax free!!!

    I do admit the up to 500K in gains is a good advantage but that is only on primary residence. My house is worth peanuts but I will use it when I sell as I have almost no basis in the house.

    My wife tells me we should buy a big house to get a big tax write off on the mortgage. Untill I explain to her that someone with a $3,000 a month mortgage in the 40% tax bracket on day one pays $3,000 to get back $1,200 on taxes. And as mortgage ages or you have less income the value falls.

    One thing I dont like about RE is there is no dollar cost averaging. You buought a huge trade up home in March 1999 you hit a home run, if March 2007 you made a massive mistake and are going broke. With stocks or bond funds you dollar cost average in which limits buying at peaks or bottoms.

    107.ccb223 says:
    April 8, 2014 at 3:16 pm
    You need to take into account taxes. Huge tax breaks which incentivize home ownership (mortgage interest deduction, property tax deductions and no taxes on first $500K of gains (if married)).

    http://www.bankrate.com/finance/real-estate/capital-gains-home-sale-tax-break-a-boon-for-owners-1.aspx

    Not saying that closes the gap fully but it is a mitigating point arguing in favor of real estate as an asset class.

  110. JJ says:

    Property taxes, flood insurance and homeowners insurance combined on my primary house costs me 11K a year. What the heck could I rent for 11k a year a shed? In that sense as long as you dont over pay or get a house with sky high taxes owning your own home means you will never be homeless.

    112.Theo says:
    April 8, 2014 at 4:21 pm
    The way I delude myself into not feeling too bad about my decision to buy is as follows. My total taxes paid as a renter in Federal and State Taxes is approximately the same as my total Federal State and Property taxes paid annually as a home owner. The mortgage payment on my 3 or 4 br house, after taking into account that some of the interest is deductible, is roughly equal to the rent I paid for my 1+ br apartment in Hackensack (I was definitely overpaying). The big difference is maintenance which was included in my rent, but an additional cost of owning and heat/ac, which were included with rent but an additional cost of owning. Also, the monthly nut is larger because property taxes are included with my mortgage. When I rented, I just cut a huge check to the Feds and NJ at tax time.

  111. joyce says:

    When the Government does it – When anyone else does it

    No knock raids : Breaking and entering
    Property forfeiture : Armed Robbery
    Conscription : Slavery
    Quantitative easing : Counterfeiting
    Income tax : Mafia tribute
    Property tax : Mafia tribute
    Permits : Mafia tribute
    Airport putdowns : Sexual assault
    Social Security : Ponzi scheme
    Welfare checks : Distribution of stolen property
    Bailouts : Distribution of stolen property
    Subsidies : Distribution of stolen property
    Foreign aid : Distribution of stolen property
    Raising the debt ceiling : Spending on kid’s credit
    Patriot Act : Felony wiretapping
    War : Terrorism
    Regime change : Terrorism
    Collateral damage : Murder
    Enhanced interrogation : Torture
    Indefinite detention : Holding hostages
    Thin blue line : Gang loyalty

  112. Ben says:

    I bought my house in October and it already rose $15k in value!

    No one took the bait… I hope to christ it did. By the end of the year, I’ll probably have sunk 20k into this thing.

  113. Michael says:

    113- jj, that’s the thing with real estate, you can’t be sitting on properties with no mortgages. You are making a huge mistake IMO. You have to constantly upgrade your investment properties to higher values once you are close to paying it off. Once you hit a certain # of properties (like 4 or 5), you have to incorporate it. Then you really get to play dirty with the irs. Real estate rules, if you know how to play. There are so many ways to play the tax game in the field of RE. Have an entire book on it.

  114. Michael says:

    Investing is gambling. Measured risk? How do you measure risk on the premise that anything can happen? It’s all a gamble, just diff risk levels. Yes, risk, because any investment can be worthless in a blink of an eye under the right circumstance. If you can lose the money you put in, it’s called gambling.

    “Fast Eddie says:
    April 8, 2014 at 3:29 pm
    investing is gambling, when was it ever not?

    Wrong again. Investing is based on measured risk; gambling is using voodoo hoping to win the lottery.”

  115. Michael says:

    Thanks for the share. Never heard of this guy before, but he makes a damn good argument. In that video, I feel like he is describing the healthcare system dead on.

    Street Justice says:
    April 8, 2014 at 2:11 pm
    Origins of Progressive Regulation
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=62rI8OYFzGg

    BTW, enjoy reading this post and watching this video on your computer/tablet/phone made in China. I hear they treat their workers very well and even do them the service of installing suicide nets. China’s low carbon footprint is a model for the world too eh?

    86.Michael says:
    April 8, 2014 at 1:37 pm
    Well said. It’s a proven fact that we can’t have a society with no govt regulations. We tried that already, and it didn’t work.

  116. Michael says:

    119- honestly, this video reinforces my hate towards the 1%. These guys…..Always scheming.

  117. Michael says:

    115- Joyce, too funny! Sounds about right

  118. Michael says:

    You are talking about the people with unrealistic pricing. You know, the one’s trying to get back the money they payed for it or trying to find a sucker. If your house is priced right, it’s gone in this market.

    Bystander says:
    April 8, 2014 at 4:10 pm
    Oops..the optimisms turns to reality, here in CT. Just read that underwater borrowers had an uptick in final qtr of 2013. Three houses which listed last month for “big” spring market, now have dropped their prices including the guy who would not come down 1% from his 530k ask last fall. He is now at 515k. Keep telling me I missed it, Mike. There a loads of reductions and relistings. I smell desperation but not from buyers. People want out from NY area and harsh winters.

  119. anon (the good one) says:

    what a joke. you think that inhibits rapacious behavior?

    @WSJ: Breaking: GM penalized $28,000 by NHTSA for failure to respond to questions. http://t.co/hhgv59s7RF

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  124. Juice Box says:

    Re: 99 – UK the cruise ships are the place to be as long as you get an implant and can sweet talk a silver haired lady.

  125. Juice Box says:

    Re: 28- Meant to say JJ – either way getting old sucks, we just buried grandma she lived about a month in assisted living at 102 yrs old. I would rather get a sailboat and take my chances with the deep.

  126. Comrade Nom Deplume again (now that cronuts are banned). says:

    So why aren’t some PBC realtors all over this?

    http://www.cnbc.com/id/101561812

  127. Comrade Nom Deplume again (now that cronuts are banned). says:

    So why aren’t some PBC realtors all over this?

    http://www.cnbc.com/id/101561812

  128. Comrade Nom Deplume again (now that cronuts are banned). says:
  129. JJ says:

    Juicebox you are very lucky your grandma lived that long, I know you will miss her but that is a life celebrated.

    BTW I know you are just as cheap as me, but really burying your own grandma, jesus christ pay for a funeral.

    129.Juice Box says:
    April 8, 2014 at 8:50 pm
    Re: 28- Meant to say JJ – either way getting old sucks, we just buried grandma she lived about a month in assisted living at 102 yrs old. I would rather get a sailboat and take my chances with the deep.

  130. JJ says:

    Only other properties I may but are I am watching two potenial foreclosures in my condo place that are upper units. I would buy both cash also if bank gives it to me cheap otherwise mortgage. Unless cheap no way. We also have two lowers about to go BK but they are worthless. Those units I would like to get association to get for free take them off tax rolls and make them storage or a party room.

    117.Michael says:
    April 8, 2014 at 5:48 pm
    113- jj, that’s the thing with real estate, you can’t be sitting on properties with no mortgages. You are making a huge mistake IMO. You have to constantly upgrade your investment properties to higher values once you are close to paying it off. Once you hit a certain # of properties (like 4 or 5), you have to incorporate it. Then you really get to play dirty with the irs. Real estate rules, if you know how to play. There are so many ways to play the tax game in the field of RE. Have an entire book on it.

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  132. Comrade Nom Deplume, Guardian of the Realm says:

    [120] michael

    Surely, you don’t think that regulation came about simply because oligarchs wanted it?

    Businesses use barriers to entry as a bulwark against competition, this is true. But you posit a chicken and egg argument. Businesses calling for regulation is also an outgrowth of existing regulation, not always the source of it. And this is industry-specific; we know that food regulation came about in part due to Sinclair’s book, The Jungle. We know that workplace safety came about as a result of the Triangle fire. These weren’t oligarchs pressing for impositions on themselves for their own benefit; this was the public clamoring from protection. Now, businesses today use these very same regulations, which weren’t pressed by them, for their own protection as cost barriers, or in the case of import restrictions, actual barriers to entry. If I’m a chicken processor in Lancaster County, PA, that makes nuggets and tenders and the like, I sure want regulation that discloses sourcing so I can better compete with chinese processed chicken. And I want them to be subject to the same cost standards that I am, and if they aren’t, keep them out.

    And this plays out in an odd way where businesses purport to be the people on an issue. An issue I was involved in some years back concerned taxation of telecoms and cable operators. Their business models have been converging but they are taxed differently. Needless to say, both sides saw that it inured to the benefit of one side, but, predictably, their responses were different and that is playing out in state capitols across the country, and on the airwaves as one “citizens” group argues for reform while another “citizens” group argues against.

    Finally, businesses often argue for regulation because they are trying to get in front of an issue. Regulation is coming and they want it to be as friendly as possible, so they advocate for certain regulation in order to “clean up” their business. The idea is to get lawmakers to take half a loaf rather than fight tooth and nail for the whole loaf and risk collateral damage or outright failure. Naturally, any regulation promulgated would tend to favor the existing actors or group pushing the regulation, and may operate to the detriment of competitors with different models. You think banks would be against regulation of check cashers or payday lending because they are in the same business? Hell, no!

  133. Comrade Nom Deplume, Guardian of the Realm says:

    Sportsism: another issue that is likely to fry Michael’s onions

    http://www.cnn.com/2014/04/09/sport/garrett-billings-lacrosse-toronto-rock/index.html?hpt=hp_t2

  134. Comrade Nom Deplume, Guardian of the Realm says:

    Michael, Joyce, you have been taking lead on this. Seems like it screams for investigation and reform. I mean, how can one doc do 21 million worth of medicare work in a year?

    http://www.cnbc.com/id/101566992

  135. Painhrtz - Disobey! says:

    nom there are some interesting fights going on between city taxi commissions and uber/lyft

    Not to mention the hotel declared holy war on airbnb.

    they provide perfect examples of regulation acting in the benefit of the protected class against upstart businesses.

  136. joyce says:

    Special Ed. Student Records Audio Proof of Bullying, Threatened With Charges of Warrentless Wiretapping, Convicted of Disorderly Conduct

    http://benswann.com/exclusive-special-ed-student-records-audio-proof-of-bullying-threatened-with-charges-of-warrentless-wiretapping/#ixzz2yOXHvbil

  137. joyce says:

    WASHINGTON (AP) – At the prodding of business organizations, House Republicans quietly secured a recent change in President Barack Obama’s health law to expand coverage choices, a striking, one-of-a-kind departure from dozens of high-decibel attempts to repeal or dismember it.

    http://apnews.myway.com/article/20140406/DAD0NOP00.html

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  139. 1987 Condo says:

    Trip without the Kids in June…Key West or Vegas?

  140. Xolepa says:

    (141) Chi, The college app process is now standardized. All you have to do is add the school, pay a little extra, maybe write an extra essay or so and boom. Hit the button. The same app gets sent out to all schools in the list. So, what big deal is it to add a reach school to your list?

  141. ccb223 says:

    1987 – can’t go wrong with either one. If you love to gamble I would go to Vegas…if you love outdoor day drinking/live bar music I would go to KW (Irish Kevin’s is my favorite). If you love both I say split the trip up and go to both. YOLO.

  142. Comrade Nom Deplume, Guardian of the Realm says:

    [139] pain

    Absolutely. Only the latest examples. And lets not forget Tesla.

  143. Comrade Nom Deplume, Guardian of the Realm says:

    [142] joyce,

    If you can’t kill it outright, poison it. Obamacare is relatively calibrated to start the process of changing healthcare but many features are unpopular. By ameliorating some of the unpopular features, that essentially disrupts the efficiency of Obamacare (don’t take efficiency too literally), and makes it less likely to meet its objectives.

  144. 1987 Condo says:

    #146..thx, don’t like to gamble but would like to see a bunch of shows….

  145. yome says:

    FORTUNE — Happy Tax Season! In honor of our annual spring ritual, let me show you how utterly bizarre the American tax system can be, using a recent deal between two well-known outfits to illustrate my point. The deal involves Don Graham’s Graham Holdings (GHC) (formerly the Washington Post Co.) and Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway (BRKA), which are doing what’s known in the tax biz as a cash-rich split-off. It’s a way that companies can dispose of holdings on which they have big gains and emerge with cash without technically selling anything, thus incurring no tax bill. Doesn’t that sound like fun?

    Why am I amused by this, rather than enraged, the way I am by companies like Apple (AAPL), which call themselves American but invent repellent (albeit not illegal) ways to artificially suck earnings out of the U.S. via offshore subsidiaries that don’t have to pay any tax anywhere? Because cash-rich split-offs are specifically allowed by the Internal Revenue Code. Graham and Berkshire aren’t pushing boundaries; they’re using something that Congress has specifically allowed. It’s absurd, but it’s permissible under the tax code provisions that govern corporate spinoffs, such as the imminent non-game-playing separation of my employer, Time Inc., from Time Warner (TWX).

    MORE: The proof is in the data – time to raise the U.S. minimum wage

    Graham and Berkshire, which both declined to talk to me, stand to save a total of about $675 million in federal and state income taxes by going the cash-rich split-off route. Graham is trading cash, Berkshire stock that it owns, and a TV station for most of Berkshire’s 23% stake in Graham. (Disclosure alert: I own shares in both companies, and am a pensioner of Graham.)

    Cash-rich split-offs have become increasingly popular since 2003, when the Janus mutual fund management company did the first one, with DST Systems (DST), a data-processing company in which it owned a big stake. Letting companies split into separate parts, tax-free, is a long-standing, rational practice. But now some spinoffs have become tax-avoidance vehicles, in which a business is included merely to make the deal tax-free. For example, in 2006, Time Warner traded cash plus the Atlanta Braves baseball team to famously taxophobic Liberty Media (LMCA) for Time Warner stock that Liberty owned. The deal was tax-free for both firms.

    Here’s how a cash-rich split-off works. Company A puts cash or other “investment assets” plus a business into a subsidiary that it then swaps tax-free to Company B in return for B’s holding of A’s stock. Graham is ponying up $400,282,183 worth of Berkshire stock that it owns, plus $327,717,817 in cash, for a total of $728 million. It’s also tossing in WPLG, a Miami TV station that the deal values at $364 million — exactly one-third of the $1.092 billion that Graham will give Berkshire. (You’ll see in a bit why I’m being so precise.)

    MORE: The leisure revolution that never came

    In return, Graham will get 1,625,747 Graham shares that Berkshire owns. As of March 7, the date Berkshire used in an SEC filing, that stock was worth about $1.144 billion.

    Had Berkshire sold those Graham shares, which cost it about $10 million 40 years ago, for $1.092 billion, it would owe about $425 million in federal and state capital gains taxes. Had Graham sold the Berkshire stock (estimated cost: $130 million) for $400 million, and the TV station (purchased in 1969 for around $15 million) for $364 million, it would owe about $250 million in taxes. Call the total tax savings $675 million. Plus Graham receives a bonus typical of deals like this and gets back shares worth about $50 million more than the assets it’s shelling out.

    Tax expert Bob Willens of Robert Willens LLC says that Berkshire had best get Graham to reduce its cash payment by $1 when the deal closes. That’s because the tax code says the operating business has to be “somewhat more than a third” of the total price, not the exact third indicated in the Berkshire filing. Willens, with a chuckle, says he won’t bill anyone for the advice. And that will do it. Many happy returns to you and yours.

  146. Comrade Nom Deplume, Guardian of the Realm says:

    [140] joyce,

    Ah, a nice, quiet, lucrative settlement can be had here.

    PA is a two party state for purposes of recording conversations. But the facts state that the recording was done of a classroom. There is no expectation of privacy in a room full of people, even if it is a school. To hold otherwise means that every person recorded on a monitor in the building, or on a school bus, would have to give consent. I’m pretty sure that doesn’t happen.

    The threat of wiretapping charges will always be a small price to pay for ultimate justice of a larger crime. I advise that it may be useful even if illegal. I disclose that fact and posit that I cannot advise breaking the law but know that there is value in the evidence gained.

    In a similar vein, a few months back, CNN posted an op-ed about a mom who encouraged her college-bound son to get proof of consent for sex, such as an email or text message. The idea was to guard against false r@pe allegations. If it were me, I would actually leave the record function on my phone on and get everything. In a two-party state, that is a violation, but I’d rather be convicted of wiretapping than convicted of r@pe. And there’s always the threat of publicity to make even that charge go away.

  147. Comrade Nom Deplume, Guardian of the Realm says:

    Back to the salt mines. Here was what I was going to leave you with, a little something to brighten Clot’s day.

    http://news.yahoo.com/photos/when-politicians-brawl-and-not-just-in-the-ukraine-1396988030-slideshow/

    Too bad we can’t see some of this inside the beltway

  148. Street Justice says:

    Mass stabbing reported at a high school in PA. 20 reported injured.

  149. Comrade Nom DePlume on the road says:

    [153] street

    Expecting a tweet soon? I’m not.

  150. chicagofinance says:

    very embittered that clot blew this one off…..especially the army general obliterated by a mortar round…..

    chicagofinance says:

    April 8, 2014 at 12:35 pm

    clot: inspirational!

    A North Korean official has reportedly been executed by flamethrower, as part of an apparent purge against supporters of Kim Jong-un’s uncle.

    Jang Song-tank was killed by the regime in December after it accused him of corruption and disloyalty. Since then as many as 11 senior party officials have been killed or sent to prison camps, the UK Telegraph said.

    The Telegraph cited a report in South Korea’s Chosun Ilbo newspaper saying that O Sang-hon, a deputy minister at the Ministry of Public Security, was “executed by flamethrower.”

    The paper said the shocking punishment was handed down after the official helped Jang turn the ministry into a personal security division to help safeguard his business interests.

    Although the report has not been independently verified, North Korea has a track record for cruel and bizarre punishments.

    In 2012, a high-ranking army official accused of drunkenness during the official mourning period after the death of Kim Jong-il, Kim Jong-un’s father, was blown up with a mortar round after Kim Jong-un gave orders to leave “no trace of him behind, down to his hair,” the Telegraph reported.

  151. Libturd in the City says:

    Obviously, what is needed in Pennsylvania are stricter knife laws. And more bike paths.

  152. Libturd in the City says:

    Condo,

    Just booked a trip to Vegas Memorial weekend with the family. Will be Gator Jr’s first trip to sin city. We have rooms at Mandalay Bay, Caesars Augustus Tower and Green Valley Ranch. Have $500 comp at Caesars, $300 at MB and two free buffets at Green Valley Ranch, but will be playing in a tournament where I hope to score some free play. This is not a gambling trip by any stretch of the imagination. Maybe I’ll play an hour or two each night after the kids go to bed if I’m lucky. BTW, I only had to pay for one airfare. Everything else besides the rental car is free. Even have a limo to and from the airport. Viva Las Vegas.

  153. chicagofinance says:

    The airport is 5 mins…..who needs a limo?….if you had real stones you could get a comp at the airport slot machines…..

  154. Libturd in the City says:

    There are no comps at the airport slot machines. There used to be a full pay deuces wild machine at the airport across from the starbucks. One could never get on it. Until 9-11. Then you needed a plane ticket to get to the area where it was located. About two years ago, they reduced it to Airport Deuces. Now I don’t drop a dime in that airport.

    As for the limo, it will make for a fun ride for Junior. He’s never been in one. And yes, the airport is close to the strip. I might even let the wife and kids go in the limo, while I schlepp over to the rental car facility on a bus. :P

  155. chicagofinance says:

    Dude….just f-ing with you…relax…..

  156. chicagofinance says:

    Won’t drop a dime at the airport, but how about a deuce?

  157. chicagofinance says:

    For ol’s Sen Menendez, sunlight is the best disinfectant….
    http://www.cnbc.com/id/101568919

  158. joyce says:

    Look behind you, Comrade. The b.s. meter is ringing loudly. They are all the same.

    Comrade Nom Deplume, Guardian of the Realm says:
    April 9, 2014 at 10:36 am
    [142] joyce,

    If you can’t kill it outright, poison it. Obamacare is relatively calibrated to start the process of changing healthcare but many features are unpopular. By ameliorating some of the unpopular features, that essentially disrupts the efficiency of Obamacare (don’t take efficiency too literally), and makes it less likely to meet its objectives.

  159. joyce says:

    Oh, and they had ample opportunities to kill it. Not a penny can be spent with the red team in the house saying so. Oh, they put on a show and cave… well done. You’ve always said you enjoy the theatre that is politics (probably the one thing you and Fabmax have in common).

    I find it disgusting.

  160. joyce says:

    Whether it’s a small or large sum, I’m sure you already know my problem will be that no one loses their job (cop, principal) or go to jail. I think a case can be made quite easily for official corruption or coercion by a public authority figure (yes, I’m just making up vague name of what I think would be similar to what PA statutes are called… but if the PA code is anything like NJ, there will be plenty to choose from). Yet, none will be chosen. Municipality/Insurance comany… get your checkbook ready. Everyone else… go about your business like nothing happened.

    Comrade Nom Deplume, Guardian of the Realm says:
    April 9, 2014 at 10:47 am
    [140] joyce,

    Ah, a nice, quiet, lucrative settlement can be had here.

    PA is a two party state for purposes of recording conversations. But the facts state that the recording was done of a classroom. There is no expectation of privacy in a room full of people, even if it is a school. To hold otherwise means that every person recorded on a monitor in the building, or on a school bus, would have to give consent. I’m pretty sure that doesn’t happen.

  161. Libturd in the City says:

    I was at Codey Arena last night for Gator Jr’s hockey tryouts. There is one spot by the entrance to the lobby where if you rotate 360 degrees in place, you can see Joey double-dipper D’s name seven times.

  162. joyce says:

    Grim,
    Would you know any kind of estimate for putting in a ductless HVAC system in a 2-story house about 1600 sqft that currently has no central air and electric baseboard heat? Are we talking $10,000, double that, half that… anything you can tell me would be helpful. -Thanks

  163. Xolepa says:

    (168) Joyce, it can be done definitely under $10k. Using mini-splits, you can install heat/cool units where each room has a separate blower/thermostat but feeds from 1 outdoor box. The great thing is you can install them yourself up to the point of having the freon locked in. The expertise needed to finish that off will run several hundred at most and you should definitely get bids.
    BTW, NJ gives rebates on these guys, based upon efficiency levels. Start shopping on the internet.

  164. joyce says:

    Xolepa,

    Thanks for the tips.

  165. Libturd in the City says:

    Joyce,

    As someone who has done the research, outside of comfort and aesthetics, it’s always cheaper to use window units. Way, way, way, cheaper. None-the less, most people are too lazy to put them in and out each year which kills them. My worst monthly electric bill ever (and I’m of the chunky variety, so I like it cold) was about $170. AC units last a solid 7 to 10 years if you take care of them and cost about $300 each for good efficient ones. You also get to only cool the rooms you desire to cool. Plus, the neighbors love the look of those ugly boxes sticking out your front windows. As for cost to do central air, it really depends on the install. I was quoted about 10K the last time I thought about doing it. Then I went and bought a 14,000 BTU window unit for the downstairs which is about 1,000 square feet. If your house is insulated well and you measure the proper sized window unit for the space, they can be incredibly efficient. Especially considering that they usually only run about 1/4 of every hour. I figure my downstairs unit costs about $80 per month to run full time. We have little guys (5,000 and 4,000 BTU’s) in the bedrooms. As long as the doors are closed, they barely run at all. Plus the hum, helps me sleep. :P

  166. joyce says:

    Thanks, Libtard.
    I was just thinking of the cost/feasibility to do zoned Heat & Air using the ductless solution… not just air. Still have a ton of research to do.

  167. chi (81)-

    You never fail to disappoint. BTW, the Peoples Republik of Ithaka sends you a chilly, 43 degree, hash smoke-heavy hello.

    “A North Korean official has reportedly been executed by flamethrower, as part of an apparent purge against supporters of Kim Jong-un’s uncle.

    Jang Song-tank was killed by the regime in December after it accused him of corruption and disloyalty. Since then as many as 11 senior party officials have been killed or sent to prison camps, the UK Telegraph said.

    The Telegraph cited a report in South Korea’s Chosun Ilbo newspaper saying that O Sang-hon, a deputy minister at the Ministry of Public Security, was “executed by flamethrower.”

  168. 1987 (76)-

    Step one involves a flamethrower.

    “I keep my dog crated but would love to find a safe and more convenient way to transport my mini schnauzer”

  169. anon (the good one) says:

    those 20 injured could had been 20 dead. can’t effectively mass murder without guns

    Libturd in the City says:
    April 9, 2014 at 12:21 pm
    Obviously, what is needed in Pennsylvania are stricter knife laws. And more bike paths.

  170. 1987 Condo says:

    #177..I’ll pray for what’s left of your soul….

  171. joyce says:

    mass murder without guns = fire, explosions, airplanes… and much much more

  172. Comrade Nom DePlume on the road says:

    [176] anon

    I thought we wouldn’t hear from you because no guns were involved.

    I stand corrected. But it was worth it as I got a good laugh just now

  173. Comrade Nom DePlume on the road says:

    [164-166] Joyce,

    Really not sure how to respond to any of that.

  174. One can only wish that everyone in anon’s workplace comes to work tomorrow with a knife in each hand and a beef with him.

  175. joyce says:

    If everyone who has displayed or would have displayed the confederate battle flag (the most popular of all confederate flags, and the one in article) instead switched to flying the actual confederate flag (seen here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:CSA_Flag_21.5.1861-2.7.1861.svg), how long do you think it would take all the elites who know better than us to figure it out?

    Comrade Nom DePlume on the road says:
    April 9, 2014 at 10:01 pm
    This is funny.

    http://downtrend.com/james/student-suspended-for-confederate-flag-on-truck/?utm_source=Outbrain

  176. joyce says:

    Comrade,
    My first two of the three posts were saying the republicans are a joke and your defense of their latest move with Obamacare is misplaced as you still harbor the delusion that there is a difference between the two parties.
    My last post of the three was agreeing with you about the settlement, yet the individuals responsible wont pay (the town will) and no one responsible will be fired or go to jail…. so with no punishment, comes no deterent, and back to business as usual.

    Comrade Nom DePlume on the road says:
    April 9, 2014 at 9:39 pm
    [164-166] Joyce,

    Really not sure how to respond to any of that.

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