Sandy changes the shore a second time

From the Record:

As shore properties are sold after Sandy, beach towns change

Superstorm Sandy sent 18 inches of water rushing in to Bob Zirkel’s Ortley Beach home, causing thousands of dollars in damage.

But bad as the storm was for Ortley Beach — one of the hardest-hit areas on the Shore — it also opened up an opportunity for Zirkel, a construction superintendent who lives in Rockaway. Just seven months after the storm, he spent $250,000 to trade up, buying a badly damaged house near the ocean. Now he’s building his family’s new beach getaway on the site, on the border of Ortley Beach and Lavallette.

“I got an incredible bargain,” Zirkel, 53, said of the property, which was assessed at more than $600,000 as recently as 2011.

Almost two years after Sandy devastated parts of the Shore, damaged properties are changing hands, as some owners decide they can’t afford to rebuild, and buyers look for a place to create their own summer memories. Many badly damaged properties have been torn down, leaving empty lots — which had been a rare commodity at the beach.

“There’s a lot going on. The market is really rebounding,” said Eric Birchler of Birchler Real Estate, which has offices in Ortley Beach and other towns on the narrow barrier island that stretches from Point Pleasant Beach to Island Beach State Park. “They’re buying the dirt and they’re knocking the house down, and they’re building their beach house.”

In Ortley Beach, prices have moved up from the bargain-basement levels seen in the year after the October 2012 storm. But they’re still down significantly — depending on whom you ask, by 20 percent or so.

“You didn’t have to be really wealthy to live here in Ortley Beach,” said Tim O’Shea, a real estate agent with Birchler, who has an Ortley Beach house that was badly damaged and is still being repaired. “A lot of homes passed down through the generations. If you scraped together $3,500 to $4,000 in taxes, you could come down on Memorial Day and stay till Labor Day.”

But many of these homeowners didn’t have flood insurance, and once the storm hit, they were faced with enormous costs to repair and, in many cases, elevate the homes. Elevating a home costs from $80,000 to $100,000, once all the expenses are factored in, said Lee Childers of Childers Sotheby’s International Realty, which has six offices in Ocean County, most on the barrier island. The federal flood insurance program reimburses a maximum of $30,000 for elevating a home.

And there’s no government disaster aid for owners of second homes.

As a result, for many owners, “there was really no way out but to sell, probably at a price below what they’d get if they’d been able to hold on,” said Peter Reinhart of the Kislak Institute for Real Estate at Monmouth University.

Childers said that property values haven’t dropped far enough, post-Sandy, to make a speculative investment worth the risk. In fact, he has built spec homes himself in the past, but he’s not tempted now.

“I would be doing it if there was money to be made,” he said.

Reinhart said the steepest real estate discounts are in the past. “The really good deals were scarfed up in the first six months after the storm,” he said.

Even farther north, in the middle-income Monmouth County towns of Highland and Union Beach, small, damaged houses can be bought for less than $100,000. Many of these listings on the Monmouth County Multiple Listing Service carry warnings like these: “Value is in the land. House is sold as-is. Home damaged by Sandy.”

“This is your opportunity to help restore the Shore,” says one listing for a storm-damaged, $99,000 Cape Cod in Highlands.

The rebuilding is likely to change the character of some towns, as affordable cottages are replaced by taller, more expensive homes.

“The fabric of the Shore is going to change, because many blue-collar families have been unable to hold onto their properties,” Reinhart said.

This entry was posted in Economics, Housing Recovery, New Development, Shore Real Estate. Bookmark the permalink.

86 Responses to Sandy changes the shore a second time

  1. Mike says:

    Good Morning New Jersey

  2. Shore is for lemmings. Also great for giant, aggressive flies and drunk guidos.

  3. Fast Eddie says:

    I agree with the shore thing being a little too much with the crowds. I like the beach and ocean but the accompanying sea of tat and muffin muppets leaves a little to be desired.

  4. Fast Eddie says:

    By the way, not that anyone really gives a sh1t but an agent stated to me in an email that this is the worst inventory she’s seen in 15 years of doing this thing. I know you guys don’t accept that answer but the truth hurts. There’s a number of factors; the biggest being that there’s a vast number of plebians up sh1ts creek due to the financial screw1ng they got during the bubble heist. By worst, she means the same things that I’ve stated: over-priced, dank, smelly, p1ss-stained dumps reaching for greater prices. Either that, or they’re well-kept but the price tag is closer to the million dollar mark. Asking $600,000 for a double-wide that has an aroma of Pabst Blue Ribbon is not acceptable and the fat, f.uck seller needs to be slapped with an open hand.

  5. Fast Eddie says:

    “The fabric of the Shore is going to change, because many blue-collar families have been unable to hold onto their properties,” Reinhart said.

    Why is it relegated to the shore? The whole state is becoming unaffordable. And what the f.uck does blue collar mean anymore? You’re either a food handler or a therapist charging $125 per hour.

  6. Essex says:

    there there eddie.

  7. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    Whenever possible, I try to go to an original and complete internet source, rather than a summary or synopsis from what is likely a biased source. This is one of those times.

    CNBC covered this interview and cherrypicked it. Not itself objectionable, but if you read the CNBC version, it makes the president sound extremely anti-business and hypocritical. The complete interview gives you a better picture of all of the nuance.

    http://www.economist.com/blogs/democracyinamerica/2014/08/barack-obama-talks-economist

    That said, my contempt for Obama’s governing style remains unchanged, and his comments on the Ex-Im Bank are absolutely laughable. He, not Congress, has been showing the anti-globalization tendency and he has done nearly nothing (in fact, I am aware of nothing) to fight for reauthorization of Ex-Im Bank. In fact, for the life of me, I don’t know why he would since it goes against everything his administration is about.

  8. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    [3,4] Clot and Eddie,

    We never go to the Jersey Shore anymore. Our regular venue is OC-MD. Not that the southern part looks any different than Jersey but the crowds aren’t made up of bennies, the tats and muffin tops are fewer and concentrated in the southern end, and you don’t pay for the privilege of walking onto the sand.

  9. Michael says:

    I’ll take lbi any day over oc Maryland. That’s more like seaside.

    Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:
    August 4, 2014 at 8:16 am
    [3,4] Clot and Eddie,

    We never go to the Jersey Shore anymore. Our regular venue is OC-MD. Not that the southern part looks any different than Jersey but the crowds aren’t made up of bennies, the tats and muffin tops are fewer and concentrated in the southern end, and you don’t pay for the privilege of walking onto the sand.

  10. anon (the good one) says:

    rapacious fat cats crying about not being able to be more rapacious.

    regulations not allowing GM to sell faulty cars

    @CNBC: President Obama didn’t hold back in remarks aimed at CEOs:

    “If you look at what’s happened over the last four or five years, the folks who don’t have a right to complain are the folks at the top,” Obama said in an interview conducted last week and posted on the magazine’s website late on Saturday.

    “”I would take the complaints of the corporate community with a grain of salt,” Obama said, arguing that his policies have been friendly to business. “They always complain about regulation. That’s their job.”

  11. anon (the good one) says:

    this is Ragnar

    @nypost: Donald Trump says Ebola-stricken doctors “are great, but must suffer the consequences” and stay overseas

  12. I don’t have a problem with regulation. I do have a problem with using my tax $$$ to violate BK law in order to bail out a shit company that builds deathtrap cars no one wants.

  13. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    [11] anon

    Taking credit for this recovery is like taking credit for sunlight.

    On a day when your own bonfires are obscuring the sun.

    Imagine where we’d be at this point under a different president. Not even Carter cast as much of a wet blanket on the economy as the Community Organizer in Chief.

  14. grim says:

    Asking $600,000 for a double-wide that has an aroma of Pabst Blue Ribbon is not acceptable and the fat, f.uck seller needs to be slapped with an open hand.

    Maybe this is the hipster equivalent of making apple pie or chocolate chip cookies before an open house? Spill some PBR on the rugs and sofa?

  15. Fast Eddie says:

    LBI is over-rated, just like Hoboken and the gold coast. It’s all mass marketing bullsh1t and hype. Speaking of… I was in Manhattan yesterday and even though it was my playground and backyard growing up, I’m still mesmerized by the energy and passion of Manhattan. There is no place like it.

    We went to a number of stops from Central Park and around the Upper East Side. For anyone that thinks Hoboken or the mold coast is justified in price, I have a bridge to sell you. If you can’t afford Manhattan, you can’t afford Manhattan and any purchase in Hudson County is DOA.

  16. There is no economy anymore. Just the fascimile of one, with a bunch of death cult cavemen worshiping its f#tishes and lies.

  17. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    Interesting quote. Not that these very sentiments weren’t expressed in this forum years ago.

    “I think we’re a country in civil war,” **** replied in agreement. “I just think we’re in a cold civil war. Shooting hasn’t started, but somebody stupid is going to do something stupid and it will escalate — unless we talk to each other.”

    . . .“You read the comments, you read them on the Huffington Post or you read them on TheBlaze or CNN or Fox — it doesn’t matter. They’re all the same, left and right. We’re calling each other horrible things . . .”

    I agree that dialogue won’t start until after there’s a tragedy. With luck, it will involve anon. Then he will have contributed something useful, kind of Danilov at the 1:55 mark

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=93tR96egox4

  18. Fast Eddie says:

    Maybe this is the hipster equivalent of making apple pie or chocolate chip cookies before an open house? Spill some PBR on the rugs and sofa?

    Throw in the aroma of a half-burnt cigarette and painted wall paper and the price goes up another 10%.

  19. Manhattan is an open-air shopping mall and colony of the uber-rich.

  20. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    [9] michael

    You have to go north, up near Fenwick Island, to get away from the Seaside aspect.

    On second thought, don’t. Stay at LBI.

  21. grim says:

    I’ll take lbi any day over oc Maryland. That’s more like seaside.

    Yep, absolutely.

  22. When the necronomy takes its next downward turn, New Jersey will revert to what it looked like in 1935.

    A sixer of Rheingold and some boiled cabbage will be a luxury then.

  23. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    [13] redux,

    The economy under this president reminds me of DC under Marion Barry and his proteges. The surrounding MD and VA cities were growing so fast it wasn’t funny but DC remained in a funk with bombed out lots and neighborhoods everywhere.

    The voters tossed out the last of the Barry machine while I was working down there. Almost overnight, new investment started coming into the District. I go back 10 years later and I don’t recognize it anymore.

  24. Fast Eddie says:

    Manhattan is the only place on the planet where I will never question the price of real estate. And paying the fare to go through the tunnel is the entrance way to the greatest amusement park on earth.

  25. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    [21] grim,

    I’ve no problem with NJ/NY residents staying on the Shore. Bad enough that we get so many Baltimorons in OC. As long as they stay attracted to the UV light that is southern OC, I’m okay with that.

  26. grim says:

    Shore riff-raff is correlated with hotels/motels, cheap rentals, pizza joints, cheese steak, and public parking.

    Why do you think that the high-end shore towns go out of their way to limit public beach access? They hide behind “ecological” arguments, but really it’s straight up class warfare with an intent to keep property values high.

  27. Fast Eddie says:

    A sixer of Rheingold and some boiled cabbage will be a luxury then.

    Ahhh… the aroma of the $629,000 sh1t box!

  28. grim says:

    I’ve only stayed in Rehoboth for any appreciable length of time, we had an office out there and I would always be out there for a few weeks early and late in the season, Lewes is nice as well.

  29. JJ says:

    The cheap real estate after Sandy by Shore and Long Beach created an interesting dynamic.

    The buyers near me have been A. Flippers, B Landlords C. Wall Street Types.

    The Wall Street types bought bungalows in West End for like 175K cash after Sandy. Gutted them and renovated them for like 50K and did not lift or do any storm mitigation. Most did not even bother with flood insurance.

    As a non primary residence and they all have attics next storm they just take out or shove anything of value in attic when storm comes.

    It was the families jammed into little bunglows with life belongings as a primary residence that caused problem in Sandy. There is less of that now.

  30. Ben says:

    Why do you think that the high-end shore towns go out of their way to limit public beach access? They hide behind “ecological” arguments, but really it’s straight up class warfare with an intent to keep property values high.

    Belmar went on a crusade a few years back to try to terrorize every twenty something out of the town hoping it would increase values. I couldn’t even walk the boardwalk after 11 p.m. without getting harassed by a rent-a-cop. They even had a municipal ordinance that outlawed “use of foul language”.

  31. Libturd in the City says:

    I find LBI 180 degrees different than almost any other shore community in NJ or on the sound. And I’ve been to most of them. What makes LBI different, IMO, is the fact that virtually nothing has changed since I went there as a kid nearly four decades ago. Same mini-golf, same custard shops and same higher-end (said with tongue in cheek) restaurants. There’s no boardwalk (a huge plus) and the beaches are never overcrowded. Each community from Barnegat down to Holgate have completely different feels to them as the median value and size of the homes tend to cling together. Hence, there are sailing schools in Loveladies/Harvey Cedars and Wawa’s and Rite Aids in Ship Bottom/Surf City. But what I really love about the island is that you can really let your young teenagers out without supervision. The whole island always seems to be flooded with 10 to 16 year kids on bicycles and skateboards. But they are not the tattooed, show-off type. Many are blue collar kids. Plus, the benny issue doesn’t exist on LBI since almost no one lives there all year round. There are no parking issues, almost no one day-trips there and there are plenty of live bands and bars to frequent. My only knocks are, the lack of Indian, Thai and Chinese food. The lack of a legitimate supermarket on the island (that Acme blows) and the lack of a movie theater for rainy days. The overpriced entrees at the better restaurants which wouldn’t even survive in North Jersey as the food tends to be less than mediocre. One is much better off making the drive up to the Viking Village in Barnegat and buying some of the freshest (and overpriced, yet worth it) seafood caught that morning by the local fisherman. Their never frozen shrimp and sushi grade tuna are both outrageous as is all of their shell fish. Heck, last trip down I put some butter, garlic salt and some pepper on some of those shrimp and grilled them. I swear it tastes better than lobster tail. Best new addition on the island is Surf Taco. I’ve been to OCMD a few times. It’s nice, especially up by Duck, but the rest of it is pretty much Wildwood. The Delaware beaches are nice, but the traffic down there gets outrageous.

    I’ll stick with LBI.

  32. JJ says:

    My beach town did that years ago. The beaches are residents only. A homeowner can get passes as well as the parents of the homeowner, children of homeowners. If you rent house you have to turn back in your own beach passes. Passes are free. But are picture ID and renewed every year. On top of that it is resident only parking on street, one car per household gets sticker.

    The beaches are beautiful and clean. They are pretty empty all the time. It is also a killer on local stores. The town takes point of view. So what. They have to pay the property tax regardless if store is occupied or not.

    Also town is basically crime free. Hard to do a robbery if you cant park on street or go to beach. If if you bike ride or walk there you still cant get on beach.

    However, it is a 100% different approach that kills off all bars and restaurants and summer rental business. Also since FEMA funding helps in storms and FEMA may give you heat rebuilding private beaches.

    Not all towns could ever attempt this.

    Ben says:
    August 4, 2014 at 9:44 am
    Why do you think that the high-end shore towns go out of their way to limit public beach access? They hide behind “ecological” arguments, but really it’s straight up class warfare with an intent to keep property values high.

    Belmar went on a crusade a few years back to try to terrorize every twenty something out of the town hoping it would increase values. I couldn’t even walk the boardwalk after 11 p.m. without getting harassed by a rent-a-cop. They even had a municipal ordinance that outlawed “use of foul language”.

  33. JJ says:

    We dont allow supermarkets, drug stores, ice cream parlors or mini golf it brings in the white trash. Once the town even went so far to put in a pedestrian toll in. Charge a toll to keep folks from next town from walking or biking over. The orthodox jews etc. put and end to that. I liked it.

    The really snooty town not far from me has no on street parking, they actually have a beach club with ZERO parking spots. And you cant park in front of your own house. And town is a no standing zone. Pull over to answer a phone call get a ticket.

    Love it. Folks who live a few blocks from beach club you call up and a town vehicle swings by and picks up your family for free and drops you off for free. That town has zero stores or commercial business. However, beach club behind gates serves breakfast, lunch and dinner.

    I like that. But most folks would think that is insane plus I cant afford that town anyhow.

    Libturd in the City says:
    August 4, 2014 at 9:48 am
    I find LBI 180 degrees different than almost any other shore community in NJ or on the sound. And I’ve been to most of them. What makes LBI different, IMO, is the fact that virtually nothing has changed since I went there as a kid nearly four decades ago. Same mini-golf, same custard shops and same higher-end (said with tongue in cheek) restaurants. There’s no boardwalk (a huge plus) and the beaches are never overcrowded. Each community from Barnegat down to Holgate have completely different feels to them as the median value and size of the homes tend to cling together. Hence, there are sailing schools in Loveladies/Harvey Cedars and Wawa’s and Rite Aids in Ship Bottom/Surf City. But what I really love about the island is that you can really let your young teenagers out without supervision. The whole island always seems to be flooded with 10 to 16 year kids on bicycles and skateboards. But they are not the tattooed, show-off type. Many are blue collar kids. Plus, the benny issue doesn’t exist on LBI since almost no one lives there all year round. There are no parking issues, almost no one day-trips there and there are plenty of live bands and bars to frequent. My only knocks are, the lack of Indian, Thai and Chinese food. The lack of a legitimate supermarket on the island (that Acme blows) and the lack of a movie theater for rainy days. The overpriced entrees at the better restaurants which wouldn’t even survive in North Jersey as the food tends to be less than mediocre. One is much better off making the drive up to the Viking Village in Barnegat and buying some of the freshest (and overpriced, yet worth it) seafood caught that morning by the local fisherman. Their never frozen shrimp and sushi grade tuna are both outrageous as is all of their shell fish. Heck, last trip down I put some butter, garlic salt and some pepper on some of those shrimp and grilled them. I swear it tastes better than lobster tail. Best new addition on the island is Surf Taco. I’ve been to OCMD a few times. It’s nice, especially up by Duck, but the rest of it is pretty much Wildwood. The Delaware beaches are nice, but the traffic down there gets outrageous.

    I’ll stick with LBI.

  34. Libturd in the City says:

    JJ…I know a lot of the beach towns on the south side of Long Island. They are surprisingly nice, but I just don’t like the feel of them with the overcrowded rest of the Island either 4 miles north or just east or west of each town. For whatever reason, it still feels like Long Island to me. I’m not just talking Oceanside and Long Beach.

  35. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    [31] libturd,

    ” I’ve been to OCMD a few times. It’s nice, especially up by Duck, but the rest of it is pretty much Wildwood. The Delaware beaches are nice, but the traffic down there gets outrageous.

    I’ll stick with LBI.”

    I think that the Wildwood feel is limited to the first 12-14 blocks. The boardwalk doesn’t go very far up island so that element tends to stay down at the southern tip. Now, would I prefer Rehobeth? Sure, but cost and traffic are worse, and we have friends in OC so that more than makes up for it.

    As for the rest of OC, it sounds as if LBI is pretty similar. Can’t say because I’ve never been.

    Still, you can keep LBI. Makes no sense for you to travel to OC, just as it makes no sense for me to go to LBI.

  36. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    A guy I knew from my days in DC recently took a GC job in Oklahoma City. He loves it.

    http://www.cnbc.com/id/101891238

  37. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    [36] redux

    And yes, Eddie, I know, you’d rather be dead in the Port Authority bus terminal than alive in OKC.

  38. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    Still waiting on the expat list that was due a few days ago. Whenever it is late, it is large. Wonder if we set another record for people fleeing this sinking ship.

    But as we have discussed before, the expat list doesn’t seem to tell the whole story and this is discussed in the wiki about the Federal Register’s quarterly publication:

    “The Federal Register list is supposed to include the names of all persons giving up U.S. citizenship, not just those who are determined to have given up U.S. citizenship for tax reasons.[17] However, comparisons with the FBI’s NICS statistics reveal that lists of ex-citizens published in the Federal Register might not be complete.[15] In 2012, the FBI added 4,652 records to the NICS “renounced U.S. citizenship” category in 2012, much larger than the number of names published in the Federal Register expatriate lists during the same period.[15] About 2,900 of those were added to NICS in one large batch in October 2012; FBI spokesman Stephen G. Fischer attributed this jump to State Department efforts to clear a backlog of earlier renunciants who had not been provided to the FBI previously.[18] However, in 2013, the number of records of renunciants added to NICS again exceeded the number of names published in the Federal Register expatriate list, with 3,128 renunciants in the former against only 3,000 losing citizenship or permanent residence by any means in the latter.[16] Media reports have suggested this means the Federal Register expatriate list has been ‘lowballing its numbers'”

    So it would appear, contrary to the assertions of some here, that the trickle of former citizens and LPRs who are departing our shores is greater than being reported. Quel suprise!

  39. painhrtz - whatever says:

    North side of Brigantine, sadly you have to go through AC to get there. I’m still kicking myself all these years later for not buying the house we rented out in college. 60K in 1996 for 3 bedroom bungalow 300 yards from the beach. sure Sandy probably washed it into the ocean. but I still would have owned dirt 300 yards from the beach.

  40. NJCoast says:

    Grim you are exactly correct about the shore towns in Monmouth county using various methods to segregate classes. Many people in the wealthy shore communities take part in the bars, concerts, boardwalks, and other amenities of the more honky tonk shore towns, they just don’t want that stuff in their back yards.

  41. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    Final thought for the day: We all want companies to stop offshoring or inverting, but how badly do we really want them if this is the result?

    ““Bringing Jobs Back to the U.S. is a Bruising Task” takes a close look at two mid-sized companies, Stanley Furniture and Chesapeake Bay Candle, which have recently reopened manufacturing plants in the United States. The road has been filled with challenges, including shortages of skilled workers, regulatory difficulties and an unwillingness of consumers to pay more for the “Made in the USA” label. In the end, one company shut down its new $10 million plant. The other is making a go of it.”

    And this on the plant that shut down:

    http://pulse.ncpolicywatch.org/2014/04/02/stanley-furniture-plant-shutting-down-400-to-lose-jobs-in-wnc-county-with-states-highest-unemployment/

    I have one of their amoires and while I think it is decent, it isn’t so wonderful that I’d pay a premium. In fact, the glides on the drawers started to break (plastic) and I had to buy a replacement kit. At least now there are plenty of spare parts for it when I put it up for sale on Craigslist later this month.

    And on that note, off to the salt mine.

  42. Anon E. Moose says:

    Eddie [4];

    there’s a vast number of plebians up sh1ts creek due to the financial screw1ng they got during the bubble heist.

    If you’re talking about underwater homedebtors who ‘harvested their equity’ during the bubble years only to blow it on luxury cars/SUVs and vacations (after all, it’s tax-deductible! *wink*), I’m afraid I don’t have much sympathy of them as victims.

    About the only good reason for a HELOC in my mind is improving the asset, big ticket maintenance and upgrades. If they had done that, their houses wouldn’t be in sh!t condition, but would command market-leading prices — and they could easily sell if they wanted to. Well, they didn’t. Like I said last week, they already sold a piece of the house – they sold it to the bank. Turns out the bank price wasn’t as good as they thought it was.

  43. grim says:

    41 – In the past year I helped 3 clients repatriate their support organizations back to the US in a way that resulted in an overall lower TCO than offshore. However, worth noting we can do this, but only through the use of technology to increase productivity, reduced infrastructure costs, improved overall sales, such that a lower US-based headcount could provide equivalent performance. What almost always moves the needle is that the level of quality that can be provided by US resources will almost always rival off-shore, especially in situations where cultural compatibility and affinities are important.

    The biggest single driver for repatriation over the past two years has been companies trying to leverage enhanced customer experience and quality as a competitive differentiator.

  44. Libturd in the City says:

    Pain. My sister owns in the Brig. She’s bay side and Sandy wrecked her place. To make it worse, she bought it a year before Sandy, but she did have the insurance for it. Sandy forced her to raise it like 12 feet or something, which is really kind of silly for a 100-year storm, but I guess it will definitely be protected for her lifetime. She just finished her kitchen this week and can finally use the place again.

    Brig is quiet and near AC (which is a plus in my book), but really…not a lot going on around there besides laying on the beach. On the bright side, they do have a Dunkin, which LBI doesn’t.

  45. anon (the good one) says:

    they paid over $600 million to get on Man U shirts

    what a joke

    Ebola for Palestine says:
    August 4, 2014 at 8:42 am
    I don’t have a problem with regulation. I do have a problem with using my tax $$$ to violate BK law in order to bail out a shit company that builds deathtrap cars no one wants.

  46. anon (the good one) says:

    If you can’t afford NJ, you can’t afford NJ

    Fast Eddie says:
    August 4, 2014 at 8:59 am

    If you can’t afford Manhattan, you can’t afford Manhattan

  47. anon (the good one) says:

    what does that mean?
    are you surprised that blue collar people behaves well? or are you saying that rich people are the problem?

    Libturd in the City says:
    August 4, 2014 at 9:48 am

    Many are blue collar kids.

  48. anon (the good one) says:

    @NewsBreaker: BREAKING: General Motors Financial served with DOJ subpoena over subprime loans since 2007 – @CNBC @BreakingNews

  49. grim says:

    Stop knocking Jimmy Carter, the Obama comparison is insulting:

    http://www.calculatedriskblog.com/2014/08/public-and-private-sector-payroll-jobs.html

  50. Fast Eddie says:

    anon (the good one),

    If you can’t afford NJ, you can’t afford NJ

    Tell that to the sellers looking for top dollar for their sh1thole. I’ll probably wait ’till the nest is empty and just move to Manhattan in a few years. It has been discussed.

  51. painhrtz - whatever says:

    Lib I was last there about 8 years ago. I barely recognized the place but the Sunoco I worked at was still standing. Sadly the 24 hour bar I wasted many a night and day in, Crily’s Circle Tavern was no more. They had their own bus service for Island residents. Brig really is one of my favorite Mid level shore towns.

  52. daddyo says:

    My problem with LBI has always been the water situation. It seems like the beach has a 45deg slope and wicked riptides. You are always one mistake away from certain death. There is no way I would let my kids in that water.

    We have been going to Cape May for the past 6 years, and the beach itself is second to none.

  53. grim says:

    I was very impressed with the beach in front of Revel. I didn’t go on it, as I forgot my trunks and AK47, but quite beautiful. That was a tremendous engineering job.

  54. Fast Eddie says:

    Hey look! It’s the $629,000 special! You think I was kidding when I said in an earlier post today that everything is listed at 629K? Take three steps beyond your backyard and you’re in Hawthorne. Pink toilet covers in a yellow bathroom, walnut paneling, carpets; Yes, meticulously maintained!!

    http://www.njmls.com/listings/index.cfm?action=dsp.info&mlsnum=1429562&dayssince=&countysearch=false

  55. Fast Eddie says:

    Moose [42],

    The industry always mentions how “prices have rebounded” but they never mention how many of these stup1d f.ucks’ have HELOC’d the p1ss out of the place. A real double whammy. And I love when I hear a seller say, “I need to get X amount of dollars for the place.”

  56. grim says:

    Rickels must have really pushed that plywood paneling hard in the day.

  57. Libturd in the City says:

    My oldest brother bought a condo in Cape May. He rents it out for 6 weeks during the Summer and the rest of the Summer and year, it’s his to use. Even with the management fees and the condo fees, it’s break even if not slightly profitable. Nice beaches, cool old homes, decent restaurants, but it’s a long haul from up here. He lives in Moorestown so it’s not too bad of a drive for him. One has to love the older housing stock and formality of Cape May. Plus the gays love it so it can’t be that bad!

  58. Libturd in the City says:

    Anon…when I say blue collar, I’m playing off the generalization that blue collar parents kick their kids butts if they do any wrong. Sorry if you didn’t get it. I’ll put it in a form in which you might be able to understand it.

    Rich teenager: Throws rock at your car and shatters windshield.
    Rich father: Pays for it and tells kid no Custard Shack tonight.

    Blue collar teenager: Throws rock at your car and shatters windshield.
    Blue collar father: Makes kid stay in the beach house for the rest of the week and makes kid pay for it out of his kid’s next two birthday and Christmas gifts. Kid also gets his butt whipped by dad in front of all of his friends.

    Now tell me how I shouldn’t generalize while you lazily accept that everything that comes from the far left is the gospel.

    Baa.

    Plus…You were dangerously close to discussing the topic which I banned you from further plagiarizing about.

  59. grim says:

    58 – What about the rednecks from PA, who help their kids break the windshield and then try to cover it up?

  60. Libturd in the City says:

    Rickels/Channel::Home Depot/Lowes
    Caldor/Bradlees::Target
    Two Guys::Kohl’s.

    What’s new is always old.

    It might be time to reopen Rustler under a new name.

  61. Libturd in the City says:

    That’s not a problem Grim. PA rednecks are so dumb, it’s probably their own windshield which they broke.

  62. Michael says:

    Lmao!!

    anon (the good one) says:
    August 4, 2014 at 11:47 am
    If you can’t afford NJ, you can’t afford NJ

    Fast Eddie says:
    August 4, 2014 at 8:59 am

    If you can’t afford Manhattan, you can’t afford Manhattan

  63. Michael says:

    Lmao!!! Are you trying to kill me?? I can’t stop laughing.

    Fast Eddie says:
    August 4, 2014 at 12:28 pm
    anon (the good one),

    If you can’t afford NJ, you can’t afford NJ

    Tell that to the sellers looking for top dollar for their sh1thole. I’ll probably wait ’till the nest is empty and just move to Manhattan in a few years. It has been discussed.

  64. painhrtz - whatever says:

    eddie nothing says 600K like a concrete hard scape for a backyard. Make sure you take the picture wet so you can’t see the masonry incinerator you will be spending your summers on.

  65. Libturd in the City says:

    NY investigates mortgage firm’s $86 million sale
    New York probes $86M sale of insurance subsidiary by largest holder of troubled mortgages
    Associated Press
    By Jeff Horwitz, Associated Press

    NY investigates mortgage firm’s $86 million sale

    WASHINGTON (AP) — New York’s top financial regulator is investigating whether the nation’s largest overseer of troubled mortgages, Ocwen Financial Corp., is overcharging struggling homeowners on insurance.

    In a letter Monday, New York Financial Superintendent Benjamin Lawsky said Ocwen created complex business arrangements to funnel as much as $65 million to Altisource Portfolio Solutions S.A. That company is led by former Ocwen executives and is partially owned by Ocwen’s executive chairman, William Erbey.

    Lawsky said the extra expense of policies imposed by Ocwen “can push already struggling families over the foreclosure cliff.”

    The Associated Press reported last week that some mortgage companies appeared to be selling or had sold nearly nonexistent insurance subsidiaries to skirt new federal rules banning commission payments from subsidiaries.

  66. Andrew says:

    Libturd/#44-Dunkin Donuts just opened 100 yards from Ron-Jon on LBI. Change is inevitable everywhere, especially now that Sandy has weeded out everyone “undesireable”

  67. Libturd in the City says:

    Thanks for the tip Andrew.

  68. anon (the good one) says:

    James S. Brady is an American hero

  69. Libturd in the City says:

    You do know that he was an (R), right?

  70. Libturd in the City says:

    Just making sure.

  71. anon (the good one) says:

    yes, and the fact he protected a president who had Alzheimer’s in office is neither here, nor there. he saw the light on the gun control issue

    Libturd in the City says:
    August 4, 2014 at 3:19 pm

    You do know that he was an (R), right?

  72. Anon E. Moose says:

    Re: [72];

    yes, and the fact he protected a president who had Alzheimer’s in office is neither here, nor there.

    You’ve be so wrong for so long, why change now?

    he saw the light on the gun control issue

    And one more time.

    Brady’s wife, like Carolyn McCarthy, became the gun control nuttress after her husband was shot. Brady himself wasn’t in much condition to make policy decisions.

    Although Brady survived, the wound left him with slurred speech and partial paralysis that required the full-time use of a wheelchair. His neurosurgeon, Arthur Kobrine, described him as having difficulty controlling his emotions while speaking after the shooting, saying “he would kind of cry-talk for a while”, and suffering deficits in memory and thinking, such as failing to recognize people.

    Mrs. Brady seems to have softened enough to buy her son a 30-06 in 2002. Laws are always for the “other”.

    Bonus points if you can tell me precisely how any one of the “Brady Bill” provisions, had they been in effect at the time Hinkley bought the gun used in the shooting, would have stopped the purchase? Take you time; I’ll wait…

  73. grim says:

    Too serious…

    Corinthian leather is a term coined by the advertising agency Bozell to describe the upholstery used in certain Chrysler luxury vehicles. The term first appeared in advertising in 1974. Although the term suggests that the product has a relationship to or origination from Corinth, there is no relationship; the term is merely a marketing concept.

    The term was first used during the marketing campaign for the 1974 Imperial LeBaron, but the term is usually associated with the marketing campaign for the 1975 Cordoba and that campaign’s celebrity spokesperson, Ricardo Montalban, who described “the thickly-cushioned luxury of seats available even in soft Corinthian leather.”

    Despite the exotic origin suggested by the name “Corinthian leather”, much of the leather used in Chrysler vehicles during the era originated from a supplier located outside Newark, New Jersey.

  74. anon (the good one) says:

    @NewsBreaker: BREAKING: Man in New York City being tested for possible exposure to Ebola virus; had traveled to West Africa recently – @ABC7

  75. anon (the good one) says:

    @VP: Happy birthday to my good friend, President Obama.

  76. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    [76] anon

    Big Fcuking Deal

  77. Michael says:

    Blows some of your theories out the door. First, spending does matter when it comes to education. Second, just because fat man says the nj education system is broken, doesn’t mean it really is. He just took you for ride to gain power. A political power move on the masses. Economy just sank, he knew everyone would be jealous of teachers, just like hitler knew everyone would jump on the hate the Jew bandwagon for the same reasons. They played the masses in a brilliant power move.

    Now we have to pay money for all these new tests, and all the bs that comes with it. Who knows how much is being spent on training alone. The education system was never broken, fat man. Thanks for saving the state some money. You just added to the education bill.

    “A new education ranking released this week found that students in New Jersey are receiving a much better education than students in Mississippi.

    The ranking, from the personal finance site Wallethub, outlines the best and worst states for K-12 education, given the connection between one’s education and future earning potential. The ranking was based on 12 factors, including student dropout rate, pupil/teacher ratio, test scores, rates of bullying and school safety measures.

    The top scorers were New Jersey, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire and then Kansas. The site dubbed the areas with the worst school systems as Nevada, Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi and, lastly, the District of Columbia.

    Scroll over each state to see its ranking. (Story continues below.)

    The report also looked at which states are spending the most on education, and in turn, have the highest-quality school systems. Of the states the site ranked in its top five for education, four of them were also in the top 10 for “Total Current Expenditures for Public Elementary and Secondary Day Schools per Student,” as shown below:

    Overall, Wallethub’s rankings were somewhat similar to a recent list from the Annie E. Casey Foundation, which found the best states for education were Massachusetts, New Jersey, Vermont, New Hampshire and Connecticut. However, the foundation found the worst states were West Virginia, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Mexico and Nevada.”

  78. Michael says:

    78- If you say nj education stinks, you haven’t been to too many places in your life. Some states are a complete joke.

  79. grim (56)-

    That dark paneling is a symptom of the Watergate era.

    Draw the curtains, turn down the lights and make sure there’s a new blank tape in the secret recorder.

  80. Things should get really interesting when people start to realize that Ebola is probably already in the US.

  81. The Newark kid busts your car window, caps you, steals your car, then crashes it two blocks down the street.

  82. grim says:

    81 – And it probably isn’t the guy in Mt. Sinai

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  85. looky says:

    Can I copyright 20 pages of old newspaper articles ?

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