What’s worse? High cost of living or the taxes?

From the Star Ledger:

Did 2M people really leave N.J. because of high taxes?

More than two million people left New Jersey between 2005 and 2014, taking billions of dollars in income and economic activity with them, according to a state business group that blames high taxes for the exodus.

The Business and Industry Association’s new report said so-called outmigration over a 10-year span cost the state $18 billion in net adjusted gross income, 75,000 jobs, $11.4 billion in economic activity, $4.2 billion in labor income and $8.4 billion in household spending.

“This outmigration of New Jersey residents has had a substantial and continuing negative impact on the state’s economy,” the report said. “When New Jerseyans leave the state they not only take their income with them, but they take income taxes, sales taxes, property taxes and purchasing power with them as well.”

New Jerseyans most often move to Pennsylvania, New York, Florida, California and North Carolina, though Pennsylvania is traditionally the most popular destination.

“These individuals are relocating to states that offer a more favorable tax structure than New Jersey in order to avoid paying certain rates for taxes — or in some cases, paying taxes at all,” the report said.

“With an average monthly housing cost of $1,530, a per capita state and local tax burden of $6,675, average energy expenditure per person of $4,404 and an average car insurance premium cost of $1,595, one can see why our young residents who are entering the workforce at the entry level of the wage scale will find it challenging to afford living in New Jersey,” NJBIA said.

This entry was posted in Demographics, Economics, Employment, Politics, Property Taxes. Bookmark the permalink.

65 Responses to What’s worse? High cost of living or the taxes?

  1. Mike says:

    Good Morning New Jersey

  2. grim says:

    Damn it’s cold out, and we’re not even close to how cold it’s going to get tonight.

  3. Essex says:

    truth be told it all sucks.

  4. grim says:

    New prediction – NJ is going to tax pension contributions, and not pension withdrawals.

  5. The Great Pumpkin says:

    This article is a bunch of bs. Feeding off the elderly nj population to get clicks for their article.

    Enough with the myth that people leave due to taxes. New York and California are taxed states that have the highest populations in the country. Enough with the bs. All the matters in the equation is the opportunity to make money vs the costs of that opportunity to make money. Nj, Ny, and Cali might be high tax states, but they provide a hell of a lot of opportunities to make big money. If you can do math, you will see that even with the high taxes, you are better off in these locations, unless you have some great job lined up in a low cost location.

    Read a comment from this article in which some elderly man talks about nj in a negative way. States that he raised 6 kids and put them all through college. He also states that he is building a home down south for his retirement in a couple years. He states that his kids have been leaving to other states. So this ignorant piece of crap gives no acknowledgement to the life nj has given him. If he raised his family in some low cost location, no way in hell does he own two properties and put 6 kids through college. Ignorance is bliss. He is looking at this from a personal viewpoint, which totally clouds his vision, and he actually thinks all these people are leaving jersey and that jersey is dead. All I ask from him, is some factual data that supports this. The population of jersey keeps going up. There are more millionaires than ever, but I’m supposed to believe that nj is dead? Come on, man!!

  6. The Great Pumpkin says:

    5- Supports your notion that these new american generations are the smartest ever. Everyone bashes the younger generations having no idea how tough American education has become. It’s highly demanding. These kids have a much more challenging education than their parents did.

    This also supports my notion that America will roar during the 2020’s. I think we are on the verge of something special. All the stars are lining up with demographics, education, and economic factors. Can’t wait to live in the 2020’s. And remember, these kids are taught to be creative, to focus on critical thinking as opposed to memorization. They are going to change the world.

    “Still, it was hard to know how his team had stacked up against those from the perennial powers China, Russia, and South Korea. “I mean, the gold? Did we do well enough to get the gold?” he said. “At that moment, it was hard to say.” Suddenly, there was a shout from a team across the lobby, then a collective intake of breath as the Olympians surged closer to their laptops. As Stoner tried to absorb what he saw on his own computer screen, the noise level in the lobby grew from a buzz to a cheer. Then one of his team members gave a whoop that ended in the chant “U.S.A.! U.S.A.!,” and the smattering of applause from the other Olympians grew more robust, and finally thunderous. Beaming, one of Stoner’s teammates pulled a small American flag out of his backpack and began waving it. Stoner was grinning. For the first time in 21 years, the United States team had won first place. Speaking last fall from his dorm at Harvard, where he is now a freshman, Stoner recalled his team’s triumph with quiet satisfaction. “It was a really great moment. Really great. Especially if you love math.””

  7. dentss says:

    So please explain why NJ CA and other high taxed states are losing income and lower taxed states median income stays the same or goes up ….https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._states_by_income

  8. The Great Pumpkin says:

    6- Yes, the elderly generation are the one’s that these types of article feed off of….just like chris christie did. He saw the demographics and saw the people his age complaining about the costs of taxes (besides the point that even if their taxes were low, they would still bi!ch because that’s what elderly human beings do) and used this as political power grab. Music to the elderly populations ears to attack public workers as a means of lowering their taxes and create a picture that nj is finished and he(fatman) can save it. The elderly population can’t resist that combo. Christie used it well. Well played.

  9. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Easy. Growing population. Cali, Ny, and nj can only support so many opportunities. It’s inevitable that some that don’t get an opportunity will seek other opportunities and move. The younger generation or less skilled individuals are the ones that usually leave. Once they get their skills up, they then go back to cali, ny, and nj in search of higher paying opportunities.

    dentss says:
    February 13, 2016 at 8:00 am
    So please explain why NJ CA and other high taxed states are losing income and lower taxed states median income stays the same or goes up ….https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._states_by_income

  10. Grim says:

    8 – expat pension income greater than median?

    This would indicate unsustainable or non-economically driven income gains.

    No idea if it’s the case, But I would love to see the number.

  11. Grim says:

    Retirees selling primary homes after establishing residency in another area? Another possible driver or increasing incomes in low tax areas that’s not driven by local economy.

  12. Grim says:

    NNJ Cop and Teacher retiring to So. Carolina will singlehandedly push up the median income.

  13. The Great Pumpkin says:

    I would like to add that Nj, Cali, and nyc are for high skilled individuals that’s why they are high cost. You have highly educated/skilled individuals in these areas competing with each other. These areas will never die.

    The companies leaving nj will eventually be replaced by companies looking to take advantage of the highly educated workforce. Yes, it’s incredibly difficult for companies to find highly educated workers. Most highly educated workers already have jobs in the low cost area, or they wouldn’t be living there. When a highly educated individual looks for a job, they only go to a few locations around the country and nj happens to be one of them.

  14. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Agree, most of those low cost economies get their capital from retirees. That’s their economic model. Keep it low cost (crappy schools, retirees don’t care about school) and continue to attract retirees. Otherwise, they are dead.

  15. The Great Pumpkin says:

    It’s actually a huge redistribution of wealth from the rich to the poor. Never thought of it like that, but that’s what it is. It’s taking wealth from the wealthy areas and spreading it through low cost areas in need of capital.

  16. grim says:

    What NJ Makes – The US Takes – and that would be money.

    Given what we remit to the Federal government, which doesn’t come back, and our steady outflow of relatively wealthy retirees. One wonders what would happen to the US if NJ really were to shit the bed.

    Is there any doubt that NJ is a strong net contributor to the US economy?

  17. yome says:

    1,400 Indiana people learn their jobs are moving to Mexico

    Same story all over. All is left is high taxes.Problem with high Property Taxes is they give you no choice. Either you pay or leave. At least, consumption tax you have the choice not to consume

  18. grim says:

    Top 10 by GSP

    Top 10 by GSP per Capita

    We are probably number 1 if you are looking at GSP by land area, meaning mile per mile, we are the most economically productive state in the country.

  19. Ben says:

    Supports your notion that these new american generations are the smartest ever. Everyone bashes the younger generations having no idea how tough American education has become. It’s highly demanding. These kids have a much more challenging education than their parents did.

    The kids who excel at math are the top echelon of students. The general population’s math skills are falling off the wayside. I saw it first in when I was TA at Rutgers. I watched a steady decline over those three years. I see it as a high school teacher now. The kids who excel are trained from a very young age.

    Consider this…the town I used to teach it, there was a group of students, call them the 10 top % that will take up to Calc BC by high school, score 800 on their SAT math, and place in the top ranks among any state competition. We’ve even had kids represent the country on the national level.

    They are enrolled in Kumon by like age 5 or something. Their parents push them non-stop throughout elementary school. They are in Algebra by 7th grade. They take an SAT prep course freshman year outside of school. They get an 800 on their SAT Math in the sophmore year. They get 5’s on Calc AB and Calc BC exams. The math they do in school hardly challenges them at this point and they are capable of more. Used to be, that this was more rare than it is today. That doesn’t mean school got harder. They still take the same classes that were available 15 years ago. I’ll also point out, not every town has this class of elite students.

    Now lets talk about the bottom half. These kids are enrolled in normal classes that we all probably took. They are exposed to all these experimental methods that have been shoved down our throats by educational researchers. They don’t learn math like you or I did. In fact, they don’t learn processes to calculate anything. They learn magic tricks. Many teachers flat out resist these new methods and stick to what works but the younger non-tenured teachers have no choice. Either an admin is shoving it down their throats or worse, the parents do. They also have access to a calculator and use it as a crutch at a very young age. Mental math has gone by the wayside.

    Couple that with a shift in how parents hold their children responsible, the pressure they put on teachers by going to their superiors inevitably leads to grade inflation. This was much much less prevalent 20 years ago. These days, everyone gets As. The only reason school has gotten more difficult for kids is because of the evolution of sports.

    20 years ago, Johnny played Little League and it was a 20 game season at best which ended in the spring. Practice was 2 days a week. Today, Aiden is enrolled in Little League, the middle school team, and 2 traveling teams. He plays about 3.5 hours of baseball a day. He even plays in the summers and the fall. At some point, there’s no longer any time to even think about school and the system has adjusted accordingly. Less rigor, less learning.

    The groups of students that are excelling at Math are doing so because Math is their sport. They go to competitions after school. They train for it every day. You can’t take what their doing and claim school is more rigorous and students are learning more. Most of those gains are made after school possibly through a school funded program or just on their own.

  20. Mike says:

    4 Maybe tax the value of their lucrative benefits

  21. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Powerful!!

    We need politicians to stop using negative bs to get votes. Christie and the nj media should be kicked out of our state for using fear to attract votes and viewers. Don’t scream and shout that we have the highest property taxes in the nation, instead explain why it is this way. Explain that other wealthy areas in the country pay the same taxes and property costs. Don’t make state to state comparisons on cost of living. You are just comparing the top ten wealthiest states to the top 10 poorest states. Instead compare zip codes, not states.

    grim says:
    February 13, 2016 at 8:24 am
    What NJ Makes – The US Takes – and that would be money.

    Given what we remit to the Federal government, which doesn’t come back, and our steady outflow of relatively wealthy retirees. One wonders what would happen to the US if NJ really were to shit the bed.

    Is there any doubt that NJ is a strong net contributor to the US economy?

  22. yome says:

    What do we do when jobs are reserve for a chosen few. In South Korea,most everyone is educated but the number of jobs offered is for the best of the best. Today,we are looking at Professional Jobs like Accounting getting shipped to low cost Countries not to mention back office jobs.This are educated with Student Loans to pay. Doctors and Lawyers are being replaced by robots

    “The companies leaving nj will eventually be replaced by companies looking to take advantage of the highly educated workforce. Yes, it’s incredibly difficult for companies to find highly educated workers. “

  23. Leave No Billionaire Behind (the good one) says:

    retirees only care about buying adult diapers

    a shame, really, that they give up on the their obligation to make the world a better place.
    ‘get the govt out of universal healthcare for old fatrs!, they shout.
    but kids should pay for private insurance

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    February 13, 2016 at 8:19 am
    Agree, most of those low cost economies get their capital from retirees. That’s their economic model. Keep it low cost (crappy schools, retirees don’t care about school)

  24. The Great Pumpkin says:

    20- Ben, I think you are coming from a very exclusive view pt. You are with the best, so you automatically brush off how much more the avg student is challenged today as opposed to the past. Plus, aren’t these top 10% populations the ones that have always impacted society the most? If math that is considered to be highly advanced is so easy that it’s boring to them, then we are indeed heading in the right direction. Time to rewrite the curriculum and challenge these students even more. Maybe let them dive into real life applications where they can be rewarded monetarily. Come up with an invention to not only be rewarded with a grade, but also a monetary reward that is shared with the school?

  25. Alex says:

    20-Great post Ben.

    Now to pumps, regarding your “supports your notion that these new American generations is the smartest ever.”

    from the Atlantic article:

    “To be sure, though, most students today aren’t learning much math: Only 40 percent of fourth-graders and 33 percent of eigth-graders are considered at least ‘proficient’.”

  26. The Great Pumpkin says:

    I think about this all the time. If new jobs aren’t created from new tech (like it always has in the past), there will have to be a revolution in the economic systems of the world. It will have to account for a large segment of the population unable to find work because a machine can do it better and for cheaper.

    The machines should be looked upon as a good thing. Isn’t that the ultimate goal? To not have to do the grunt work and instead focus all efforts on enjoying what life has to offer. Truly hope we get to that point in my lifetime.

    yome says:
    February 13, 2016 at 9:01 am
    What do we do when jobs are reserve for a chosen few. In South Korea,most everyone is educated but the number of jobs offered is for the best of the best. Today,we are looking at Professional Jobs like Accounting getting shipped to low cost Countries not to mention back office jobs.This are educated with Student Loans to pay. Doctors and Lawyers are being replaced by robots

    “The companies leaving nj will eventually be replaced by companies looking to take advantage of the highly educated workforce. Yes, it’s incredibly difficult for companies to find highly educated workers. “

  27. The Great Pumpkin says:

    The rigor of the test and the scoring has increased dramatically. That’s what that testing fight was all about the past two years. The scores don’t necessarily mean the schools are failing, just that new expectations have been implemented that are way more challenging. Going to take some time to get them up into the higher percentiles.

    Alex says:
    February 13, 2016 at 9:27 am
    20-Great post Ben.

    Now to pumps, regarding your “supports your notion that these new American generations is the smartest ever.”

    from the Atlantic article:

    “To be sure, though, most students today aren’t learning much math: Only 40 percent of fourth-graders and 33 percent of eigth-graders are considered at least ‘proficient’.”

  28. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Put it this way, if you took that same test these kids took last year and gave that same test to the generation living in the 60’s, who do you think would do better on it?

  29. Libturd says:

    The “New Math” is the 5-finger discount.

  30. Alex says:

    29-

    In light of the current curriculum being dumbed-down, you know the answer.

  31. chicagofinance says:

    NJ is essentially suburbs of two of the top 6 metro areas in the country……also it has the second biggest port in the country. Finally, it has one of the strongest and most well developed shore regions.

    The numbers are skewed by its small size and population density.

    grim says:
    February 13, 2016 at 8:36 am
    Top 10 by GSP

    Top 10 by GSP per Capita

    We are probably number 1 if you are looking at GSP by land area, meaning mile per mile, we are the most economically productive state in the country.

  32. dentss says:

    #22 …it’s tough to explain away unaffordability

  33. Essex says:

    The $$$ argument is significant. But just because someone makes money, doesn’t mean they don’t understand the fleecing that occurs in this area. It is just what the local governments can get away with…oh and Newark.

  34. chicagofinance says:

    Essex: I was at Prudential HQ for a function on Thursday…….I am still disappointed to see how little Newark has changed. Seriously….after all this time it is still barely above flatlining……WTF is wrong with these people? It has all that transportation, an airport and proximity to NYC with a subway line ….not just trains and buses……they suck so bad it is just numbing…….and they chew up resources like locusts……

  35. Not ChiFi 1 says:

    ChiFi, indulge me in this little theory.

    Newark has a what comes first dilemma, egg or chicken.

    We know all the social problems, NYC had it too exponentially. Difference is that NYC under Guliani had the money and political power to institute a soft police state at the street level. The criminal element not caught up in the “soft police state” machinery, fled to other more friendly areas.

    It is well know within the criminal justice world, that many of these borderline thuggish, thug loving world ended up in greater metro NY/Philly’s smaller size cities. Paterson and Jersey City’s bad areas were always edgy, but since the mid 90’s they are worse. Same goes for Newburgh, Mount Vernon, the Poconos, and as far out as rural North Carolina. North Carolina like southern states have a big issues of warrant runners hiding out in small cities and rural areas and living the criminal life on the down low.

    So, who is going to add 500 cops on duty around the clock? So, who is going to clean house and fire a lot of the corrupt element with a badge and prosecute Joey D? Where is the money to first, do the invasion and then secure and hold the positions, allowing the investment capital to come in? Who is going to be sure that that capital is legit and things are not a la Sharpe James Family & Lovers Investment Trust like it was with PruCenter development?

    Capital and political will eventually will show up, but only when the Real Estate premium makes it worth it. Think Hoboken and Jersey City early 80’s.

  36. 3b says:

    Pumps: you speak like you are an expert on how great NJ schools are and how much harder the curriculum is now vs. 20 or more years ago. Well I beg to differ. Clot/ splat and I are the only two on this blog; and i don’t really post any more who have put kids through prestigious blue ribbony school systems from k to 12. And if you think they are something to be all that impressed about you are mistaken. And they were all honors ap and supa. The curriculum even at that level is dumbed down.

  37. Ragnar says:

    I wonder if NJ schools were the source of Pumpkin and Anon’s “education”.

  38. Captain Nom Deplume of the Adventure Men. says:

    Scalia dead. Otto and anon hyperventilating from delight

  39. yome says:

    Another Supreme Court Justice appointment for O

  40. Essex says:

    Doubt Obama will put another justice in before he leaves.

  41. Ben says:

    The rigor of the test and the scoring has increased dramatically. That’s what that testing fight was all about the past two years. The scores don’t necessarily mean the schools are failing, just that new expectations have been implemented that are way more challenging. Going to take some time to get them up into the higher percentiles.

    The rigor hasn’t increased. I would know. My students typically take up to 3 end of the year tests. Two AP Physics exams and the SAT2 Physics. Testing rigor hasn’t gone up. The way in which they ask the questions has changed. The questions coming out of standardized testing centers are worded very poorly and also poorly designed. A lot of them fail to actually test for knowledge and application. Just because more people are getting them wrong doesn’t mean rigor has increased. It’s borderline a scenario in which someone asks you something so dumb that there is no right answer.

  42. Ben says:

    Pumps: you speak like you are an expert on how great NJ schools are and how much harder the curriculum is now vs. 20 or more years ago. Well I beg to differ. Clot/ splat and I are the only two on this blog; and i don’t really post any more who have put kids through prestigious blue ribbony school systems from k to 12. And if you think they are something to be all that impressed about you are mistaken. And they were all honors ap and supa. The curriculum even at that level is dumbed down.

    I’m on the front lines of this battle. Honors is code for increased GPA weighting without any set standards. Parents are able to forcibly put pressure on the teachers of these classes to make sure they get higher grades. AP used to be great because we were shielded from dumbing down curriculum because we would hide behind the guidelines of the college board. But now, the people in academia that have hijacked the college board have made that a crapshoot as well. They destroyed AP Bio, AP Chem, and AP Physics. The best thing you can hope for is that your AP teacher still teaches a college course without trying to teach to the test. If they teach to the test, you are set up for a very bad class which will be of little use for you after the age of 18.

  43. Captain Nom Deplume of the Adventure Men. says:

    [41] sx

    There hasn’t been an election year nomination and confirmation in 82 years.

    Logistically, it is difficult. And the politics of this threaten to be so disruptive, neither side may want Obama to name someone.

  44. Hughesrep says:

    Name himself.

    Buck it list.

  45. Hughesrep says:

    Thomas on suicide watch?

  46. chicagofinance says:

    I hate to be so reflexively negative, but no classless power grab is beyond Obama’s hubris. I really fatigued of the brazen stunts this guy seems to think are defensible.

    Captain Nom Deplume of the Adventure Men. says:
    February 13, 2016 at 6:50 pm
    [41] sx

    There hasn’t been an election year nomination and confirmation in 82 years.

    Logistically, it is difficult. And the politics of this threaten to be so disruptive, neither side may want Obama to name someone.

  47. chicagofinance says:

    I am

  48. No Billionaire Left Behind (the good one) says:

    was thinking of black label to warm up my cold toes, but the breaking news has offered far more pleasant warmth

    indeed

  49. No Billionaire Left Behind (the good one) says:

    overdose on pain killers the most likely reason

  50. Hughesrep says:

    He was full of $goy.

  51. chicagofinance says:

    Apparently we should get on a boat and leave America ASAP
    By John Podhoretz February 12, 2016 | 1:09am

    The message from Thursday night’s Democratic debate is that everybody in America should get on a leaky rowboat and find somewhere, anywhere, else in the world to live — because life in the United States is a nightmare from which millionaires and billionaires and the Koch brothers and the Republicans will not allow us to awake.

    The two candidates for the Democratic nomination spent most of two hours arguing over who was the better diagnostician of the moral diseases, ideological calamities, spiritual infirmities, racial injustices and downright evils that are being visited upon the suffering 320 million who have found themselves through no fault of their own trapped between two oceans in a dystopian oligarchic hell they call America.

    Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders were essentially auditioning last night for the role of Snake Plissken. Do you remember Snake Plissken? He was the eyepatch-wearing hero of “Escape from New York,” the 1981 science-fiction picture in which Manhattan has become a prison and Snake Plissken is the only guy who can find the way out.

    Only the America from which they want to liberate us is Barack Obama’s America. Oh, they don’t say as much. Hillary blames the Koch brothers. Bernie blames millionaires and billionaires and the campaign finance system. They both blame the Republicans.

    But let’s face it: It’s Obama’s world. They and we are all just living in it.

    And what a world. “There is,” Sanders said, “massive despair all over this country.” Wages low. Millions in prison.

    The highest rate of childhood poverty in the world. The old have inadequate health care, don’t have enough money for food, are chopping up their pills to make them last longer.

    Hillary said immigrants are living in fear. There’s systemic racism. Police brutality.

    And don’t forget the horrors of being white, with “an increase in alcoholism, addiction, earlier deaths. People with a high school education or less are not even living as long as their parents lived . . . Coal miners and their families who helped turn on the lights and power our factories for generations are now wondering, has our country forgotten us?”

    She concluded the debate by saying Sanders’s focus on punishing Wall Street was limited.

    That’s because “if we were to stop that tomorrow, we would still have the indifference, the negligence that we saw in Flint. We would still have racism holding people back. We would still have sexism preventing women from getting equal pay. We would still have LGBT people who get married on Saturday and get fired on Monday. And we would still have governors like Scott Walker and others trying to rip out the heart of the middle class by making it impossible to organize and stand up for better wages and working conditions.”

    Every now and then, one or the other would grudgingly say America had “potential,” but only to point out that it was potential to which it was not living up. Sanders even went into a long peroration about how horrible it was Hillary once said something nice about Henry Kissinger, who is 92 years old and last served as a US government official 40 years ago.

    I thought “The Walking Dead” was a frightening vision of America. That zombie show is a walk in the park compared to Thursday night’s debate.

    The loathsome and reprehensible caricature of America foisted upon its citizenry by Sanders and Clinton — a country with undeniably serious problems and challenges that is still the last great hope of Earth and a place Americans should and mostly do still feel grateful to have as their unique birthright — is another sign that we have a great many lessons we’re going to have to learn all over again.

    In the 1980s, Democrats found themselves forced to battle the impression that they were anti-American. So desperate were they to dispel this idea that at their convention in 1984, Democrats waved a thousand flags and chanted “USA” and sang the national anthem until their voices went hoarse.

    And that was after four years of a Republican president.

    In 2016, after seven years of a Democratic presidency, look where they are now.

  52. relo says:

    Scalia = Vigoda.

  53. Fabius Maximus says:

    I was joking to some friends that CC shouldn’t try for AG, he should hold out for a Justice.

    I think O has to nominate. If you want to play fantasy picks how about Hillary? The GOP gets to pick either Justice Clinton or President Clinton!

    Best election EVER!

  54. yome says:

    Obama is going to nominate a Supreme Court Justice

  55. Captain Nom Deplume of the Adventure Men. says:

    [47] chifi

    I woke to the news that Obama will name a successor. This means he conveniently has someone in mind. I corrected and applaud your clarity of vision.

    That said, this pick will be fraught with peril for both sides. You thought you’ve seen nomination battles? This may prove to be the mother of all nmination battles. Whoever is chosen will get a beating the likes of which Bork/Ginsburg/Estrada/Thomas couldn’t have fathomed.

  56. Captain Nom Deplume of the Adventure Men. says:

    Redux

    I stand corrected. And I think I need a new phone

  57. Captain Nom Deplume of the Adventure Men. says:

    [49] anon

    I hope to know that same warmth whe we learn someone has busted a cap in your azz

  58. No Billionaire Left Behind (the good one) says:

    sadly, uncle clarence has no one to do his homework for him now

  59. Alex says:

    Hey gullible warmists, you’ve got some splaining to do.

  60. grim says:

    Second amendment weeps today.

  61. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Hey gullible doomer, nj and the education system is not falling apart. Either is America.

    Alex says:
    February 14, 2016 at 10:08 am
    Hey gullible warmists, you’ve got some splaining to do.

  62. The Great Pumpkin says:

    So please provide evidence of how it was dumbed down compared to your education? I want solid evidence, not your opinion. Compare your work to your kids work and show me evidence of how it is dumbed down.

    3b says:
    February 13, 2016 at 3:24 pm
    Pumps: you speak like you are an expert on how great NJ schools are and how much harder the curriculum is now vs. 20 or more years ago. Well I beg to differ. Clot/ splat and I are the only two on this blog; and i don’t really post any more who have put kids through prestigious blue ribbony school systems from k to 12. And if you think they are something to be all that impressed about you are mistaken. And they were all honors ap and supa. The curriculum even at that level is dumbed down.

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