First signs of foreclosure timeline speeding up

From RealtyTrac:

September Foreclosure Activity Decreases 24 Percent From a Year Ago to Lowest Level Since December 2005

Average time to foreclose decreases annually for first time in report history

Properties foreclosed in Q3 2016 took an average of 625 days to complete foreclosure, down from 631 days in the previous quarter and down from 630 days a year ago — the first year-over-year decrease since ATTOM began tracking average foreclosure timelines in Q1 2007.

The average time to foreclose decreased from a year ago in 19 states, including Nevada (down 22 percent), Massachusetts (down 22 percent), Michigan (down 21 percent), Oregon (down 20 percent), and Texas (down 20 percent).

States with the shortest foreclosure timelines for properties foreclosed in the third quarter were Virginia (196 days), New Hampshire (230 days), Texas (246 days), Minnesota (250 days), and Mississippi (253 days). All five states with the shortest foreclosure timelines employ the non-judicial foreclosure process.

New Jersey, Hawaii, New York, Florida, Illinois with longest foreclosure timelines

Counter to the national trend, the average time to foreclose in Q3 2016 increased from a year ago in 27 states, including Pennsylvania (up 28 percent), Wisconsin (up 25 percent), Maryland (up 22 percent), Arizona (up 21 percent), and Colorado (up 20 percent).

States with the longest average foreclosure timelines for properties foreclosed in the third quarter were New Jersey (1,262 days); Hawaii (1,241 days); New York (1,070 days); Florida (1,038 days); and Illinois (942 days). All five states with the longest foreclosure timelines primarily employ the judicial foreclosure process.

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144 Responses to First signs of foreclosure timeline speeding up

  1. grim says:

    From MarketWatch:

    At the low end, homeowners are even more leveraged than they were during the bubble

    Ever since the shock of the financial crisis ebbed and buyers began to return to the housing market, one truth has dominated: mortgage lending is tight.

    But is it?

    It’s true that only the borrowers with the highest credit scores get home loans now. So much lending to people with higher credit scores and so little to those on the lower end of the spectrum has shifted the average FICO score up about 40 points since before the bubble burst.

    But measured in another way, lending is shockingly loose. And, according to one economist, that tells us a lot not just about the housing market, but about the economy as a whole.

    The 20% down payment may linger in Americans’ imagination, but it’s even less real today than Jimmy Stewart’s small-town banker from 1946. American homeowners, particularly those at the lower end of the market, are increasingly leveraged to pay for their houses, says Sam Khater, deputy chief economist at data provider CoreLogic.

    In fact, owners of entry-level homes, those in the $150,000 to $300,000 range — have more debt and less equity now than they did in 2005, at the height of mortgage mania.

    For Khater, that says less about credit markets and more about another defining feature of the post-recession housing market — its lack of affordability.

    “We have our eye on the wrong ball,” he told MarketWatch. “What I worry about is the leverage not from a default perspective but from an affordability perspective. Demand for credit has been weak. But the much bigger issue is the supply of housing, not supply of credit.”

  2. grim says:

    Atlantic City MSA forecast to be the weakest housing market in the country next year:

    http://www.housingwire.com/articles/38289-forecast-strongest-and-weakest-markets-for-next-year

  3. grim says:

    Pretty sure the 2,800 layoffs aren’t going to help that situation.

  4. grim says:

    This seems like trying to recreate the Hoboken Taxi Stand for just a few hours a day

    I take lots of Uber rides, I think I’ve already flown 55,000 miles this year, I’ll probably finish about 65-70k, most of that short-hop flights, so I see a pretty good cross-section in areas, times of day, etc. Most Uber drivers don’t do it full time, it’s just supplemental. I would say the typical is a college kid driving before, between, and after classes. Had a couple of moms doing it when their kids were at school. Usually the taxi guys don’t make it as uber drivers, as they get shit ratings.

    The timing on this is perfect, as it would allow a number of drivers to get a few rides in prior to heading to work. I’m sure the typical driver could do around 4 drop-offs per train, maybe a bit more. In fact, I’m sure they would pull from the surrounding regions for the early morning rush, since this might actually allow a number of drivers to pull more rides, start earlier.

    Obviously surge rules would not apply in this situation. The other factor to consider is uber ride-share, with multi-pax. One driver, one route, could easily take 3 passengers.

    I’m not a fan of the model, from a worker perspective, but I don’t see any reason why it wouldn’t work in this situation. They aren’t aiming for everyone, just enough passengers to not require a huge investment in building new parking.

    Even better, don’t bother building the light rail extensions. Subsidized Uber would be faster, cleaner, and cheaper than blowing 3 billion on a light rail that will get pissed on by locals.

  5. McBox says:

    Project Veritas video I posted yesterday of The Democrats paying people to be violent at Bernie and Trump rallies, 2.2 million views so far.

    Another video drops today. Author is a jersey boy from Westwood he exposed ACORN in 2008.

  6. grim says:

    Shouldn’t the tax policy try to help the ones that are barely above poverty levels? So that they can send their kids to decent colleges debt-free?

    Here are some great options:

    Bills to rein in college costs clears N.J. Senate committee

    Several of the bills would shift the traditional timelines for degrees in higher education.

    For example, a bill dubbed the 3-Plus-1 program would allow students to obtain a degree after completing three years at a community college and one year at a four-year college instead of the more traditional plan of attending two years at community college.

    Another would allow 4-year colleges to offer three-year degree programs to students willing to commit to a major early in their college career.

    And another would permit dual enrollment for college ready high school students who would be able to earn up to 15 college credits with the school district, the college and the student splitting the cost.

  7. grim says:

    I don’t care for the second option – 3 year schools, but the first and third look like incredibly effective options.

    3+1 has obvious benefits in being able to better leverage existing investments and infrastructure. I would love to see a program that has a guaranteed admission process if certain program requirements are met. Maybe a set list of pre-requisites per major and a minimum GPA threshold, and you get admitted to finish at another state school. The other obvious benefit is that the geographic distribution of community colleges will allow kids to stay home, significantly reducing college costs.

    Or, for those who may not be able to meet the GPA model, perhaps an additional year or an expanded course load to let them make up for that.

    The last option looks like it would be incredibly helpful for those kids in HS who have the initiative and are willing to take on the course load. However I wonder if those who are able to execute on something like this, are likely going to get scholarships elsewhere. However, I think there exists a group of kids that might really benefit from something like this. Combined with a 2+2 or 3+1 program with guaranteed admission, this could be a very effective, and cost effective higher ed approach for many.

  8. Joyce says:

    I like some of those options (though surely they’ll some unintended consequences). Coupled with any reform needs to be a change to the bankruptcy laws allowing student debt to be included.

  9. I can’t believe every MSM network has blacklisted this video. O’Keefe says it’s because they are afraid of a Hillary DOJ coming after them if they do:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s3jjFuqguws

    Project Veritas video I posted yesterday of The Democrats paying people to be violent at Bernie and Trump rallies, 2.2 million views so far.

    Another video drops today. Author is a jersey boy from Westwood he exposed ACORN in 2008.

  10. It’ll be interesting to see if Chris Wallace has the balls to question HRC on it during the debate.

  11. Grab them by the puzzy (the good one) says:

    “The joke about Harvard is that it’s a hedge fund with a university attached to it,” Mark Schneider

    “Of course, normal hedge funds have to pay taxes on their earnings. Because it’s a nonprofit, Harvard doesn’t.

    And since bestowing tax exemptions is the same as spending cash from the government’s perspective (budgeteers call them “tax expenditures” for a reason), that means the American public effectively subsidizes Harvard’s moneymaking engine.

    The same goes for Stanford (endowment: $21.4 billion), Princeton (endowment: $21 billion), Yale (endowment $23.9 billion), and the country’s other elite institutions of higher education.

    In short they showed the extent to which some very rich colleges are getting richer thanks to tax benefits most Americans scarcely think about when we consider the resources devoted to higher education in this country. “It wasn’t until we started calculating these numbers that we realized how big the discrepancies were between these private universities and the schools that were going to be educating most of the workers of the future,” Schneider says.

    “It’s a web of hidden subsidies that need to be talked about and investigated so we can figure out whether this is a socially desirable system.”

    grim says:
    October 18, 2016 at 7:24 am

    Here are some great options:

  12. Ottoman says:

    He’s the one that spliced videotape of himself in a pimp outfit into the heavily edited right wing hit job on Acorn. Because the full tapes showed he wore regular street clothes when he was actually in their offices. As I recall, he had to pay $100,000 for that deception.

    I’m sure you still believe the planned parenthood videos are real too. Lies for Jesus are still lies, moron.

    “I can’t believe every MSM network has blacklisted this video. O’Keefe says…”

  13. Grab them by the puzzy (the good one) says:

    Student Loans Hurting Workers’ Ability to Save for Retirement

    Aon research finds workers with student loans have shakier financial health

    LINCOLNSHIRE, Ill., Oct. 18, 2016 /PRNewswire/ — While student loans can be a drain on short-term finances, a new survey from Aon Hewitt, the global talent, retirement and health solutions business of Aon plc (NYSE:AON), reveals that workers with student loans can also potentially feel the strain into their retirement years.

    The Aon Hewitt Financial Mindset® Study, which surveyed more than 2,000 U.S. workers, found that 28 percent of respondents currently have an outstanding student loan, and it’s not just younger workers. Nearly half of Millennial workers (44 percent), 26 percent of Generation X and 13 percent of Baby Boomers have student loans

  14. joyce says:

    Feel like responding to any questions today, Ottoman?

  15. Juice Box says:

    Expat -I wonder just how far down the rabbit hole we are going in the next three weeks.

    James O’Keefe’s next video dropping today supposedly will force MSM to cover the story. I wonder just how far down the rabbit hole we are going in the next three weeks.

    His latest tweet.

    James O’Keefe
    ‏@JamesOKeefeIII
    Tomorrow’s video is so damning, we’ll have the corporate media forced to cover this. Even if they’re dragged kicking and screaming. #Veritas

  16. Ben says:

    Shouldn’t the tax policy try to help the ones that are barely above poverty levels? So that they can send their kids to decent colleges debt-free?

    Where did people get this idea that college should be free? It’s a service that you and everyone else has always paid for. I can get on board with making it affordable. The answer has always been, make loans more available. It’s the only thing that has caused prices to be this high to begin with. Let the loans be discharged in bankruptcy. At that point, you’ll see all lenders start to rethink how much they are willing to lend out and colleges won’t be able to siphon off the billions that they do. These colleges are flush with cash and have more than they know what to do with due to these insane student loan guarantees.

    Bottom line, stop backing student loans and allow them to be discharged in bankruptcy like any other loan. At that point, tuition prices collapse. For whatever reason, the gut reaction is “no one would be going to college again”. And I say, EXACTLY you idiots. It’s very hard to run a college as a business when you have no students. It’s the only thing that will force universities to make it affordable.

  17. grim says:

    Ben 9:12 – Agree.

    It would never happen as many private colleges would collapse.

    Too big to fail.

  18. Juice Box says:

    Wikileaks Podesta emails Part 11 is out

  19. grim says:

    Oh by the way, Rutgers just built another $120,000,000 building. How many degrees will need to be conferred to pay for that?

  20. nwnj3 says:

    With every trickle of collusion, cover up and corruption that leaks out the “rigged” claim gains credibility.

  21. Juice Box says:

    lol – I hope WJC changed his phone numbers.

    I redacted the numbers, we don’t want Grim to get a visit.

    Subject: Re: WJCcalled me from home. Yes. 914 8** 3** gets him directly at house. Or call his cell 647 2** 0***.

  22. Fast Eddie says:

    With every trickle of collusion, cover up and corruption that leaks out the “rigged” claim gains credibility.

    She could gut a baby on live television and she’ll still win. Nixon is rolling in his grave.

  23. Juice Box says:

    Grim if you haven’t been to New Brunswick lately take a drive. I almost did not recognize the place since my days there, it literally is the epitome of millennials desire for a live-work-play gentrified city.

  24. nwnj3 says:

    She can “win” but it will be as legitimate as a Soviet Bloc election.

  25. grim says:

    My official position on the 2 NJ referendum questions is Yes/Yes.

  26. grim says:

    The basis for the Yes on gambling outside of AC is the amount of money that neighboring states have spent advertising and lobbying for a “no”.

    If our neighbors are fighting against it this vehemently, it’s going to be incredibly successful.

  27. Fast Eddie says:

    …it literally is the epitome of millennials desire for a live-work-play gentrified city.

    You just described Hoboken. The town tries to adhere to it’s roots but why kid ourselves, the place is playground and represents nothing of the past.

  28. No One says:

    Hillary will win because roughly 40% of Republicans drove the party to elect someone that roughly 60% of the voting population would have a permanent and strongly negative reaction to. And Hillary is hated by only 50% of the population. No wonder Trump thrives on and loves “the poorly educated”. He has been the same candidate throughout the election process – boorish, uninformed, mean, and unprincipled. Those people in the Republican party who helped him to become the nominee need to do some serious soul searching, but that’s the one thing that Trump and his supporters apparently have not and will not ever do.

  29. Comrade Nom Deplorable, verbally armed and dangerous says:

    Eddie,

    ” Nixon is rolling in his grave.”

    Nixon and his cabal were rank amateurs compared to the DNC, Hillary campaign, Dem operative groups, and the Obama Administration.

    They learned their lesson from Watergate: Control the watchdogs–FBI and Legacy Media effectively in the tank. There will be no Deep Thoat, no Woodward and Bernstein.

    Though if I am in one of O’Keefe’s videos, I would make damn sure that the “deadman’s switch” on information was in play and that the TPTB know it. Otherwise, they will be found dead of a suicide, having shot themselves in the back of the head. Twice.

  30. Juice Box says:

    re: NJ referendum..

    If things keep going they way they are in the Medowlands the only use real use would be a ca*s*ino. The American Dream Mall developer Triple Five still hasn’t secured the $2.65 billion financing needed to finish the mall.

  31. Comrade Nom Deplorable, verbally armed and dangerous says:

    No One,

    No one wants to hear it but the emails make clear that the DNC and media did their best to promote Trump, the “pied piper” candidate, over others. To deny the fact of a fire when everyone is choking from smoke is the worst form of deceit.

    Add in the circumstantial evidence of strategic voting (which may or may not have proven decisive but did exist–again, too much smoke to conclude no fire) and you come away with the inescapable conclusion that this election is rigged, but the ultimate joke is on The Donald–it was rigged back in the primaries and he was the result.

  32. nwnj3 says:

    Hillary by her comments and those of her surrogates are contemptuous towards large swaths of the electorate. The difference is that the perception of the two candidates has been framed by the fake narratives told by a collusive media.

    And the Democrat party has a huge, huge block of ignorance who routinely votes against their best interests. NAFTA, TPP were both written up and approved by them. Those did more than(or will do, we know she’ll approve it under another name) anything to crush private unions.

    Not to mention the gutting of millions of previously family sustaining careers that have been undercut by the illegal hordes emboldened constantly by Dems.

    That story is not being told but of course the access Hollywood story was planted on the front page for a week. RIGGED.

  33. D-FENS says:

    D’Souza’s message for Christians planning to not vote this November. If not now, when? If not us, who?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dE7E4xKUe6I

  34. lost says:

    I had the same thoughts. Watch the advertising money work and our populace vote no against their own best interest.

    grim says:
    October 18, 2016 at 9:47 am
    The basis for the Yes on gambling outside of AC is the amount of money that neighboring states have spent advertising and lobbying for a “no”.

    If our neighbors are fighting against it this vehemently, it’s going to be incredibly successful.

  35. Comrade Nom Deplorable, verbally armed and dangerous says:

    Final thought for the day. . .

    Asking the Legacy Media if there is collusion and election-rigging is like asking a prisoner if he committed a crime.

  36. D-FENS says:

    Naked statue of Hillary Clinton sparks fight in Manhattan

    http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/naked-statue-hillary-clinton-sparks-fight-manhattan-article-1.2834970

    ARTICLE

    Naked statue of Hillary Clinton sparks fight in Manhattan

    BY Laura Bult follow

    NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

    Updated: Tuesday, October 18, 2016, 9:44 AM

    Tweet

    email

    An artist erected an obscene statue of Hillary Clinton in downtown Manhattan Tuesday morning causing a heated fight between defenders of the profane piece of protest art and women trying to tear it down.

    The grotesque caricature of the Democratic candidate appeared outside the Bowling Green station during morning rush hour on Tuesday and shows Clinton with hoofed feet and a Wall Street banker resting his head on her bare breasts.

    The statue was up for less than three hours before an enraged woman toppled it over and started yelling at the statue’s creator.

  37. I too agree with Ben, but I disagree with grim. I was using an inflation calculator to get an idea of what college should cost. In the 1977 Rutgers was $2600 per year all in(meal plan, dorm), $2800 with books. That works out to a little over $11,128 today. The costs went up very quickly such that the costs were $3500, let’s say $3750 with books all in 4 or 5 years later, which is actually cheaper, inflation adjusted, only $9,359.50 in today’s dollars. What has changed today at colleges is not the buildings, the amenities, the cost of fuel, etc., but rather the multitude of layers of administrative, non-teaching staff. If the government got out of the college banking swindle game colleges would just lay off as much staff as they needed to get back to the real cost of education. I know a lot of people who work at colleges in Boston. The salaries aren’t as high as other places, but they are the cushiest gigs around. I only know of one guy who left once landing a college IT management job. He left to start his own business and the college, BU, kept him on at half time, same salary to find a replacement. He got another two years salary and benefits out of BU just by not finding the right guy to replace him very quickly. Nobody cared. It wasn’t their money and there are no stockholders to satisfy.


    Bottom line, stop backing student loans and allow them to be discharged in bankruptcy like any other loan. At that point, tuition prices collapse. For whatever reason, the gut reaction is “no one would be going to college again”. And I say, EXACTLY you idiots. It’s very hard to run a college as a business when you have no students. It’s the only thing that will force universities to make it affordable.

    grim: Ben 9:12 – Agree.

    It would never happen as many private colleges would collapse.

    Too big to fail.

  38. grim says:

    The statue was up for less than three hours before an enraged woman toppled it over and started yelling at the statue’s creator.

    Didn’t Trump end up buying that nude painting of him from the artist?

  39. grim says:

    I do love the double standard though.

    Naked statue of Trump with the little pee wee is OK.

    Naked statue of Hillary with wall street sucking at her teet, not OK.

    Which side respected the artists’ right to freedom of speech?

  40. Don’t forget this art show from last week that the liberals chased out of Brooklyn and they were forced to find a new venue in Chelsea. It’s ironic how it is the liberals that are now the fascist f.ucktards.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=arOU1bU0cXQ

  41. lost says:

    You have to look at the big picture. Get rid of all these jobs in the name of extreme efficiency, and you lower costs at the expense of jobs. So now you lowered the cost of college, but increased the cost of taxes, since these layoffs will now be sucking off the govt tit because there are not enough jobs to go around. I don’t know the answer, but going to extremes on either end is not good for anyone.

    The big question we all need to find an answer to, and quickly, is to how to deal with extreme efficiency in labor under the capitalist system. We are quickly approaching the point where you can’t use labor to divide up the resources among the population because there is not enough labor to go around. Efficiency has taken what used to take a 100 people to do, and replaced those 100 people with automation in which only a few profit from this activity instead of a 100 or more.

    So how can the capitalist system continue to divide up resources on the basis of labor, with fewer and fewer people involved in labor? How can this competition take place if there are fewer and fewer opportunities to compete in the capitalistic system? Can you blame the legions of people that have given up on finding a spot to compete and instead have their hand out? Efficiency in labor has allowed for less and less people to compete in the economic system. It has destroyed the very essence of capitalism which is ” competition.”

    And I’m just making this clear…..I don’t have the answers to this problem, I’m just pointing out the problem we are facing in this ever changing landscape.

    “If the government got out of the college banking swindle game colleges would just lay off as much staff as they needed to get back to the real cost of education. I know a lot of people who work at colleges in Boston.”

  42. McBox says:

    Hoofs were a nice touch.

  43. grim says:

    Easy, limit work hours.

  44. D-FENS says:

    The statue would have been complete if it had one of Hillary’s hooves on Bernie Sanders’ neck.

  45. grim says:

    Redefine full time as 24 hours a week and make it illegal to work more than 36 hours a week, even in salaried and management jobs.

    Everyone takes a pretty significant pay cut.

    Unemployment falls to near single digits.

  46. STEAMturd knows hyper incarceration makes hyper gentrification oh so much easier says:

    “The American Dream Mall developer Triple Five still hasn’t secured the $2.65 billion financing needed to finish the mall.”

    Perhaps call the mall Revel?

  47. yome says:

    Re: Referendum Question Number 2
    Why vote Yes? Don’t we want to stop the Seniors age 62 and above from leaving the state? Discuss

  48. STEAMturd knows hyper incarceration makes hyper gentrification oh so much easier says:

    “Get rid of all these jobs in the name of extreme efficiency, and you lower costs at the expense of jobs. So now you lowered the cost of college, but increased the cost of taxes, since these layoffs will now be sucking off the govt tit because there are not enough jobs to go around.”

    This excuse is probably the primary cause of government inefficiency. Every time the economy slows and unemployment claims tick upwards, the government expands. But when the economy gets rolling again, despite the government’s efforts, those unnecessary government jobs are not removed. Eventually, the government does real damage to the economy as businesses (to a small extent) and individuals (to a much greater extent) have less to spend on discretionary items since they must pay more and more to the government for these unnecessary workers. It definitely would have been much more cost effective for the government to subsidize private businesses through incentives to encourage hiring. Instead, you end up with NJ. Too much government. Too much regulation. A rapidly disappearing middle class (except for those unnecessary public sector workers).

  49. grim says:

    Public Question 1: Casino Expansion Amendment

    Do you approve amending the Constitution to permit casino gambling in two additional counties in this State? At present, casino gambling is allowed only in Atlantic City in Atlantic County. Only one casino in each of the two counties would be permitted. Each casino is to be located in a town that is at least 72 miles from Atlantic City. The amendment would allow certain persons to apply first for a casino license.

    Public Question 2: Gas Tax Dedicated to Transportation Funding Amendment

    Provides that an additional three cents of the current motor fuels tax on diesel fuel, which is not dedicated for transportation purposes, be dedicated to the Transportation Trust Fund. In doing so, the entire State tax on diesel fuel would be used for transportation purposes. The entire State tax on gasoline is currently dedicated to the Transportation Trust Fund and used for transportation purposes. The amendment would also provide that all of the revenue from the current State tax on petroleum products gross receipts be dedicated to the Transportation Trust Fund. In doing so, the entire State tax on petroleum products gross receipts would be used for transportation purposes. This amendment does not change the current tax on motor fuels or petroleum products gross receipts.

  50. STEAMturd knows hyper incarceration makes hyper gentrification oh so much easier says:

    The truth is, the casin0 would be great for NJ, at the expense of AC and other surrounding out-of-state casin0s. On the bright side, NJ’s gaming commission makes sure the casin0s don’t rip you off too badly. This is not the case in other jurisdictions besides the Gulf Coast and in Nevada. In these regions, the regulations are setup to give the unsuspecting gambler a chance. This is why I don’t step foot inside tribal and other state casin0s. The truth is, you can vote against it and the massive population center of the metro area will continue to daytrip to the Sands, Foxwoods and the like. Or it can pass and we will keep the money from Genting which is an Asian-based gaming company and the state of Pennsylvania. I only see two negatives to the casin0. First, it will be the death knell to AC which it probably should be. Second, traffic around the Meadowlands already sucks balls. It will get worse! Though one positive exists too. The total tax revenue this casin0 will generate will more than make up for the loss in revenue from AC. It’s really as simple as keeping NJ gambling revenue in NJ or not. I fully expect this not to pass. Genting has paid too much to lose. Keep in mind Resort World (dumb name) gave 40 million to NY last year. All of the Las Vegas casin0s combined gave 30 million. NJ currently gives 18 million. That number will most likely double if the referendum is approved. It’s a no-brainer actually. Unfortunately, NJ is a state filled with progressive idiots who couldn’t tell the difference between propaganda and fact.

  51. Fast Eddie says:

    It definitely would have been much more cost effective for the government to subsidize private businesses through incentives to encourage hiring.

    This concept is too scary for those searching for a purpose in their lives. They’d rather have someone else fight their battles, that’s why the vote democrat.

  52. yome says:

    The final product, signed into law Friday, eliminates the estate tax, raises the retirement income tax exclusion, increases the Earned Income Tax Credit for the working poor, creates a tax deduction for veterans, and rolls back the sales taxes three-eighths of a percentage point.

    http://www.nj.com/politics/index.ssf/2016/10/christie_signs_23-cent_gas_tax_road_funding_deal.html

    What I read the other day was eliminating State income tax for the 62 and above. I guess forget that

  53. D-FENS says:

    Jeesh. The Pedals the bear story is now national news.

  54. STEAMturd knows hyper incarceration makes hyper gentrification oh so much easier says:

    The Pedals story is another part of the pussification process.

  55. joyce says:

    Is that not enough Yome?

    “Retirement income tax

    A married couple filing their taxes jointly can currently exclude their first $20,000 in retirement income from state income taxes.

    That will increase to $100,000 for joint filers, $75,000 for individuals and $50,000 for married couples filing separately over four years.”

  56. lost" says:

    So what’s the answer if this doesn’t work? That’s the big question. Can capitalism exist under conditions in which labor opportunities become scarce due to extreme efficiency? Should we maintain this same model of capitalism based on labor competition when only a small portion of the population is needed in labor to keep up with the needs of society?

    “This excuse is probably the primary cause of government inefficiency. Every time the economy slows and unemployment claims tick upwards, the government expands. But when the economy gets rolling again, despite the government’s efforts, those unnecessary government jobs are not removed. Eventually, the government does real damage to the economy as businesses (to a small extent) and individuals (to a much greater extent) have less to spend on discretionary items since they must pay more and more to the government for these unnecessary workers. It definitely would have been much more cost effective for the government to subsidize private businesses through incentives to encourage hiring. Instead, you end up with NJ. Too much government. Too much regulation. A rapidly disappearing middle class (except for those unnecessary public sector workers).

  57. yome says:

    Joyce,
    Is this enough to stop the retired from leaving? Property tax is still high. Do retired seniors get a break on property tax?

  58. lost says:

    I really think things are going to change drastically this century when it comes to labor and economics, or you will have a ton of make work jobs to keep the economy going. Make work is pointless; if it’s not needed, why put people through it, improve the economic model to fit today’s needs based on the evolution of automation.

  59. grim says:

    Every client I have, and every new prospect I talk to, the third question out of their mouth is “Do you provide technology to enable robotic process automation”?

    Every client.

  60. grim says:

    I can share a story about how we came up with an automation process involving SMS notification to customers, that eliminated 25 jobs in a US company. The project cost less than $100k, and reduced cost by more than a million dollars a year. Project hit payback in about 2 months.

    Go long automation.

  61. lost says:

    I don’t want to sound like I’m coming off as lacking empathy, or worse, a pompous fool. So please don’t take it that way.

    If property taxes are forcing you out, you have issues. Downsize, and cut your costs. You don’t have to leave nj to get low property taxes (did you see that list of nj towns with low property taxes?), but you can’t live in a ritzy town in some beautiful home and expect to have a low cost retirement. Doesn’t work anywhere in America, esp jersey.

    yome says:
    October 18, 2016 at 2:11 pm
    Joyce,
    Is this enough to stop the retired from leaving? Property tax is still high. Do retired seniors get a break on property tax?

  62. Alex says:

    Uh oh.

    From the WSJ:

    “China to World: We don’t need your factories anymore”

  63. lost says:

    2:22/2:24

    Grim, this is exactly what I’m talking about. What’s the answer, no idea, but this reality is fast approaching. Extreme changes will Capitalism based on labor, does not work when automation has taken over most of the labor. The current economic model and the means of how we participate are going the way of the dinosaur.

    Just think, social security and pensions were based on this model of capitalism, and no longer work. They are based on ever expanding triangles, where the base continuously expands to support the weight of the retirees. With less and less people working, the model now looks like a cylinder as opposed to a triangle, hence, they are falling short of the revenue needed to keep them afloat. Something has to give, and what that is, I don’t know. But changes are coming fast.

  64. Joyce says:

    Yes, they do.

    yome says:
    October 18, 2016 at 2:11 pm
    Joyce,
    Is this enough to stop the retired from leaving? Property tax is still high. Do retired seniors get a break on property tax?

  65. Fabius Maximus says:

    So my funny thought on Trump in Edidson was if he was embracing the HIB expansion model as part of his immegration model or when he says that he is bringing the jobs back from overseas, is he leaving out the workers that are coming with the jobs to fill them.

    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/oct/17/donald-trump-hindu-nationalism-india

  66. Fabius Maximus says:

    Grim part of the problem with the Uber model is that there is no contract of service. SO if the college kids take off for the summer, who is picking up the slack? most of the workers will still have to get to the train.

    I see your point that the cost of the light rail is high. If you don’t want to go that way, go with the Jinty model, where you have small independent companies and drivers, running a set route. It works getting people into the Port Authority every morning, without impacting NJT.

  67. grim says:

    Sure, if it doesn’t work, it doesn’t work.

    But why not give it a shot, and see, instead of just running out and spending millions on nonessential infrastructure like parking lots? Pretty sure there are numerous alternatives for that capital that would be a much more productive use. Or, simply not collect the taxes at all.

    Lest I remind you of the Sandy trains fiasco. Let’s park brand new locomotives below sea level, before what was predicted to be a massive flooding event. NJT clearly not the brightest decision makers. Oh, and not a single person fired. $120 million in damages, not a single person held accountable.

    Letting someone else give it a go doesn’t seem so far fetched. Last I heard Uber was doing 50-60 million rides a month.

    I know, it’s very scary to NJ’s municipal overlords to face a scenario that doesn’t grow their fiefdoms larger. If NJ mayors could build pyramids, they would. Er.. they do. Uber would be much more effective if they employed the mayor’s brother.

  68. Comrade Nom Deplorable, verbally armed and dangerous says:

    Grim,

    “Go long automation.”

    Done and done.

  69. Flee? says:

    lost, longer term, the cost of education should go down with time — top quality MOOCs, low-cost interactive learning platforms (even primary schools are providing access to things like IXL — major advances in the last five years and pace is picking up).

    On topic of health care, the costs should go down with a large pipeline of many medicines becoming generic (due to major drugs with expiring patents).

    Currently, there is no indication that either of these are costs is about to go down. This is like knowing that Fannie Mae will go down but still getting a margin call on a short position — but things can remain irrational for longer than reasonable. May be over long term, these costs will go down.

  70. Flee? says:

    Fabius, there are some Indians that support Trump because of all the anti-muslim, anti-illegal-immigration, anti-black, rhetoric. Hitler is considered as a great leader in some places (granted, with 1.2B people, even tiny fraction becomes a sizable crowd).

  71. grim says:

    MOOC?

    Give me a break, the crowd screaming for free college is the same crowd who is insulted by merely suggesting they explore community college. Suggesting that they go out and learn on your own? Right.

  72. Anon E. Moose, saying 'Come back, JJ' says:

    Grim [17:26];

    MOOC?

    Give me a break, the crowd screaming for free college is the same crowd who is insulted by merely suggesting they explore community college. Suggesting that they go out and learn on your own? Right.

    You have to realize what the Bernie Bros (i.e., “free college crowd”) want from their “free college” experience. It isn’t the education and isn’t the job skills or even job prospects. They want the six-year ecs-fueled frat party environment; something 13th grade just doesn’t deliver on.

  73. D-FENS says:

    Oh dear…
    http://www.cbs46.com/story/33418363/witness-clinton-forward-together-tour-bus-dumps-human-waste-into-storm-drain
    Witness: DNC tour bus dumps human waste into storm drain
    Posted: Oct 18, 2016 1:21 PM EDT
    Updated: Oct 18, 2016 4:20 PM EDT

  74. grim says:

    She’s been shitting all over us for years, what’s new about that?

  75. grim says:

    Wonder what she promised to Equador to get them to cut of Assange’s internet access.

    Going to be interesting when Hillary pulls a Trump, extradites him, and then prosecutes him, a special prosecutor Im sure.

  76. Already works in Europe:
    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-10-18/americans-work-25-more-than-europeans-study-finds

    Redefine full time as 24 hours a week and make it illegal to work more than 36 hours a week, even in salaried and management jobs.

    Everyone takes a pretty significant pay cut.

    Unemployment falls to near single digits.

  77. D-FENS says:

    @dineshdsouza
    It seems some Republicans are more afraid of losing their party to @realDonaldTrump than they are of losing the country to Hillary

  78. Flee? says:

    Grim,

    Some MOOCs are taught by really top people — I’ve taken a few here and there (comp.sci related). Some of the best teachers, and the model works at scale too.

    Community colleges will have teachers of varying level, the will have to calibrate the course to the group of students they have (dumb it down if the students are very weak, and scramble wildly if the students are very good). With the instructors of some of the MOOCs, the sky is the limit, and there are courses at easier levels too.

    It doesn’t have to be a “learn on your own” type thing. A MOOC-based curriculum where a teaching-assistant will be there to help in person (frees the TA from grading, preparing course material, etc.) can work in principle. That, along with a no-frills college building (note, I don’t even mention a campus), should address a significant chunk of courses.

  79. grim says:

    For sure.

    But read Hansons studies on socioeconomics and demographics of Mocs.

    Because rich white guys love them.

  80. McBox says:

    Another messy day in politics, a former TV reporter from Arkansas come forward about Bill Clinton molesting her several times.

  81. lost says:

    A lot of people had this wrong.

    “Not very long ago, it was fashionable to ask if millennials would ever crawl out of their parents’ basements and into a realtor’s office. Enthusiasm for that view, which had gained wide exposure by 2012, lost steam as mortgages got easier to come by and millennials kept insisting that no, actually, they do want to own a home.

    A flurry of reports released yesterday should further dispel the notion that millennials are allergic to homeownership.

    Half of U.S. homebuyers are under 36, Zillow reports, based on a survey of 13,000 respondents, and first-time buyers account for 47 percent of purchases.1 First-timers make up 52 percent of prospective buyers planning home purchases in 2017, according to the results of another survey, published today by Realtor.com. When the company conducted the same survey last year, it found that only 33 percent of prospective buyers were first-timers.

    Millennials, it seems, are poised to take a bigger share of the U.S. housing market.

    This is mostly a matter of basic math and common sense.

    First-timers have always made up a large share of home purchases, and their median age has hovered around 33. Back in the days when serious people were afraid that young people, burdened with student debt and enamored of city living, had quit on homeownership, the oldest millennials simply hadn’t yet reached the age at which most Americans have historically bought their first homes.

    Now, millennials are aging into the prime years for first-time homebuying, and evidence is mounting that they’re becoming the dominant force in the U.S. housing market. ”

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-10-19/look-who-s-driving-the-u-s-housing-market

  82. D-FENS says:

    From:john.podesta@gmail.com To: cheryl.mills@gmail.com Date: 2015-03-04 20:41 Subject: Special Category

    Think we should hold emails to and from potus? That’s the heart of his exec privilege. We could get them to ask for that. They may not care, but I seems like they will.

  83. D-FENS says:

    https://twitter.com/MichaelCohen212/status/788398258070679553

    @MichaelCohen212
    1989 photo @realDonaldTrump, #RosaParks & #MuhammadAli all receiving #NAACP medals for helping America’s inner cities. A man for ALL people!

  84. D-FENS says:

    Why Did Vote-Rigging Robert Creamer Visit The White House Over 200 Times During The Obama Admin

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-10-18/robert-creamer

    “you can imagine our surprise when we discovered that a Mr. Robert Creamer showed up on the White House visitor logs 340 times beginning in 2009 when Obama took office and culminating with his latest visit in June 2016. Moreover, in 45 of those instances, Creamer was scheduled to meet with POTUS himself.”

  85. nwnj3 says:

    Bill is a predator and Hill enabled him for decades. Most if not all of the serial offender types need cover to operate and she provided that.

    That story won’t be told with near the same vigor as Trump’s transgressions however. Most of that is buried or destroyed and will not see the light of day.

    Welcome to the NWO unmasked. Media, gov and corporations inseparable and all pursuing a global agenda.

  86. Juice Box says:

    wikileaks part 12 Podesta emails is out.

  87. Comrade Nom Deplorable, Bunker Builder says:

    It’s all going to Shiite, folks. Clot was right.

    Good article in National Law Journal today about an issue that I felt might get some traction and now it is–State AGs pushing back on other state AGs. In this case, Exxon filed a petition to enjoin the Mass. AG from collecting docs for its climate change fishing expedition. Northern liberal state AGs filed amicus briefs in support. Texas and conservative southern AGs filed amicus briefs in opposition.

    So far, this is in the amicus arena but a federal judge in Texas asked why the AGs aren’t actually showing up as parties. Personally, I think that the judge’s comment was misguided since there was no cause of action that allowed the AGs not named in the petition to be parties, merely amici. But I think that day is coming and when it does, TSWHTF in a big (legal) way as it will be the closest you can get to all out warfare between states without invoking the Insurrection Act.

  88. D-FENS says:

    Rasmussen was the only poll showing Romney winning in 2012 if I recall correctly.

  89. Tywin says:

    LA Times poll showed Obama winning in 2012.

  90. D-FENS says:

    10:40 – That’s true. And it was actually one of the most accurate. Maybe Rasmussen has learned from their mistakes but they were an outlier in 2012.

    http://www.latimes.com/politics/la-na-pol-poll-faq-20161006-snap-story.html

    Have you done this before?

    Yes, the team of researchers at USC who conduct the poll used the same technique four years ago to forecast the 2012 election.

    How’d that turn out?

    The poll was one of the most accurate of the year. It predicted that President Obama would be reelected with a margin of victory of 3.32 percentage points. He won by 3.85 points. Most other polls underestimated Obama’s margin by more than that.

  91. HEHEHE says:

    The thing about this election that perplexes me is what the people who run our government behind the scenes have planned for us over the next few years after the election of HRC? The media wants her, the Wall Street/Corporations want her, the military industrial complex wants her.

    I haven’t seen them getting so solidly behind another candidate GOP or Democrat in my lifetime.

    This was evident even before Trump won the GOP nomination and the expected anti-populist backlash by the entrenched.

  92. Hillwitch Attacks says:

    Not even in the WH and already started.

    From the IB Times

    Political Capital
    Election 2016
    Hillary Clinton And Wall Street: Financial Industry May Control Retirement Savings In A Clinton Administration
    By David Sirota @davidsirota AND Avi Asher-Schapiro On 10/19/16 AT 12:50 AM

    While Hillary Clinton has spent the presidential campaign saying as little as possible about her ties to Wall Street, the executive who some observers say could be her Treasury Secretary has been openly promoting a plan to give financial firms control of hundreds of billions of dollars in retirement savings. The executive is Tony James, president of the Blackstone Group.

    The investment colossus is most famous in politics for its Republican CEO likening an Obama tax plan to a Nazi invasion. James, though, is a longtime Democrat — and one of Clinton’s top fundraisers. The billionaire sculpted the retirement initiative with a prominent labor economist whose work is supported by another investment mogul who is a big Clinton donor. The proposal has received bipartisan praise from prominent economic thinkers, and James says that Clinton’s top aides are warming to the idea.

    It is a plan that proponents say could help millions of Americans — but could also enrich another constituency: the hedge fund and private equity industries that Blackstone dominates and that have donated millions to support Clinton’s presidential bid.

    The proposal would require workers and employers to put a percentage of payroll into individual retirement accounts “to be invested well in pooled plans run by professional investment managers,” as James put it. In other words, individual voluntary 401(k)s would be replaced by a single national system, and much of the mandated savings would flow to Wall Street, where companies like Blackstone could earn big fees off the assets. And because of a gap in federal anti-corruption rules, there would be little to prevent the biggest investment contracts from being awarded to the biggest presidential campaign donors.

    A Washington power player who reportedly turned down a slot in President Barack Obama’s cabinet, James first outlined the retirement savings initiative in a speech a year ago to the Center for American Progress (CAP). The liberal think tank was founded by Clinton’s current campaign chairman, John Podesta, and is run by her former top policy adviser Neera Tanden. James and Blackstone made six-figure donations to CAP that year, and the group gave him a platform to propose a new payroll tax that he said would fund guaranteed retirement benefits.

    Rather than funneling the hundreds of billions of dollars of new tax revenue into expanding Social Security benefits, as many Democratic lawmakers have called for, James proposed something different: A decade after George W. Bush’s failed attempt to divert Social Security revenue into private retirement accounts, the Blackstone president outlined a plan to create individual retirement accounts, some of whose assets would be managed by private financial firms.

    “Managing the Guaranteed Retirement Accounts in a pooled fashion would let them leverage that scale to pay lower fees,” James said. “They would also have access to [the] highest quality managers who could adopt long-term investment horizons and invest in less liquid, but higher returning, asset classes that are more appropriate for retirement funding.”

    In the blueprint of the plan, James lamented that 401(k) systems “don’t invest in longer-term, illiquid alternatives such as hedge funds, private equity and real estate,” and said the new program could invest in “high-yielding and risk-reducing alternative asset classes.” In a CNBC interview, James said he wants the billions of dollars of new retiree savings to be invested “like pension plans.” He noted that in “the average pension plan in America, about 25 percent is invested in stuff we do, in alternatives, in real estate and private equity and commodities and hedge funds.” Unlike stock index funds and Treasury bills, those investments generate big fees for financial firms — and critics say they do not generate returns that justify the costs.

    Clinton’s campaign did not respond to International Business Times questions about James’ proposal.

  93. Juice Box says:

    Sigh

    All new heath, dental insurance this year open enrollment info just sent. No idea what provider all brokered via Willis Towers Watson…

    Aetna

    AmeriHealth

    CIGNA

    Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield

    Oxford health

    Might as well start digging my grave now….

  94. D-FENS says:

    WTF is wrong with Rubio? Is he saying we should ignore Democratic corruption today, so that it’s easier to ignore Republican corruption later?

  95. Juice Box says:

    re: “Perplexes me”

    The federal budget is nearly 4 Trillion now. The last thing the beltway wants is an outsider “businessman” to come in and open the books with his accountants and drain the swamp.

    Income Taxes projected next year $2.2 trillion
    Social Insurance Taxes projected next year $1.1 trillion
    Projected Deficit 504 Billion or so?

    Imagine where the pork is….

  96. HEHEHE says:

    This report is SHOCKING LMAO!

    “We ranked all 50 states on cost of living, taxes, health care and other factors important to retirees. Here are the three states that fared the worst. Finishing dead last is New York. Living expenses in the Empire State are 29% above the national average. More worrisome: The percentage of residents 65 and up living in poverty is above average, too. The runner-up is New Jersey. The Garden State’s tax policies can be tough on retirees. There’s a 7% state sales tax and steep local property taxes. The combined state and local tax burden is the second highest in the nation. Rounding out the three worst states for retirement is California. Housing is expensive, and taxes can take a big chunk out of your nest egg. Most retirement income is subject to tax, and California imposes the highest income tax rates in the nation.”

    http://www.kiplinger.com/article/retirement/T047-C000-S001-3-states-to-avoid-in-retirement.html

    Hard enough living here gainfully employed.

  97. Comrade Nom Deplorable, now a suspected Domestic Terr0rist says:

    Went on the MIAC website to see if they publish their annual reports. When I tried to access the bulletin link, I received this ominous message:

    “You are not authorized to access this section. Your activity has been logged.”

    MIAC is a joint state-federal LEO “antiterr0rism” clearinghouse. Makes you wonder who passes for a terr0rist in their world

  98. Joyce says:

    Probably. Definitely why Obama campaigned against Bush’s war crimes, and then said (practically on his first day in office) let’s forget the past and look forward.

    D-FENS says:
    October 19, 2016 at 11:56 am
    WTF is wrong with Rubio? Is he saying we should ignore Democratic corruption today, so that it’s easier to ignore Republican corruption later?

  99. Comrade Nom Deplorable, Serial Tax Avoider says:

    HEHEHE,

    Was talking to a retired attorney about one of her old cases. Learned she lives part of the year on the shore and part of the year in Florida. Naturally, Florida is her tax residence.

  100. D-FENS says:

    Police investigate burglary at local Trump campaign office
    BY SBG SAN ANTONIO WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19TH 2016

    http://foxsanantonio.com/news/local/burglary-reported-at-local-trump-campaign-office

  101. HEHEHE says:

    “In the blueprint of the plan, James lamented that 401(k) systems “don’t invest in longer-term, illiquid alternatives such as hedge funds, private equity and real estate,” and said the new program could invest in “high-yielding and risk-reducing alternative asset classes.”

    Yeah because pension funds did so well investing in stuff like CMBS and RMBS in the past.

  102. HEHEHE says:

    “Naturally, Florida is her tax residence.”

    I am surprised she’s not been audited.

  103. Comrade Nom Deplorable, Taxpatriate. says:

    HEHEHE,

    “I am surprised she’s not been audited”

    Staying a nonresident isn’t hard. Law firms even publish how-to guides for escaping from the NJ Tax Prison to freedom in Florida.

    http://www.coleschotz.com/2B7963/assets/files/documents/Cole_Schotz_P.C._On_the_Road_to_Florida_November_1_2014.pdf

  104. walking bye says:

    Comrade/HeHEHe, had to let go of another older hourly the other day, had the car packed and running while I gave him his papers. He got a nice severance of roughly $100k . His new 5 year old home in metro-Tn in a very nice gated community would run him $2k a year vs $15k for 80 year old cape in NY. Put another way his property tax in NY would burn though his severance in 6 years vs at least 30 down South. His biggest worry was the new community he was going to was mostly professionals and he would not fit in

  105. lost says:

    This is what a lot of people complaining about NJ taxes do not get. If so many people and corporations didn’t do such a damn good job at avoiding their share of taxes, the middle class wouldn’t be getting hit so hard with taxes. The wealthy states all carry the highest tax burden for retirees and middle class because the wealthy are so efficient at avoiding their share of taxes. But no one wants to talk about that. Let’s just complain that the taxes are too high, but do nothing about the people avoiding their share of the tax burden.

    Nom, how many lawyers make a damn good living off of getting people out of paying taxes? If these people are willing to pay a lawyer that much money, imagine how much money the lawyer is saving them. Here in lies the problem. Who has to make up for those unpaid taxes? Yes, the middle class.

    The middle class can’t avoid the taxes. They get hit with automatic payroll tax deductions. Businesses claim to pay a high tax rate, but which business actually pays taxes on every single dollar made? So many play the cash game. For example, how many out there claim to the IRS that they barely made money, or were at a loss, but in reality, they made a nice profit, but hid it all from uncle sam. How many of these cases are out there? I don’t know any business that actually reports their true honest earnings to the irs. Not one.

    So why does no one pay attention to the role tax avoidance plays in making taxes more expensive for everyone else?

    Comrade Nom Deplorable, Taxpatriate. says:
    October 19, 2016 at 1:01 pm
    HEHEHE,

    “I am surprised she’s not been audited”

    Staying a nonresident isn’t hard. Law firms even publish how-to guides for escaping from the NJ Tax Prison to freedom in Florida.

    http://www.coleschotz.com/2B7963/assets/files/documents/Cole_Schotz_P.C._On_the_Road_to_Florida_November_1

  106. lost says:

    Why is the community gated? What are the neighborhoods and towns like outside that gate?

    walking bye says:
    October 19, 2016 at 1:27 pm
    Comrade/HeHEHe, had to let go of another older hourly the other day, had the car packed and running while I gave him his papers. He got a nice severance of roughly $100k . His new 5 year old home in metro-Tn in a very nice gated community would run him $2k a year vs $15k for 80 year old cape in NY. Put another way his property tax in NY would burn though his severance in 6 years vs at least 30 down South. His biggest worry was the new community he was going to was mostly professionals and he would not fit in

  107. Joyce says:

    Different handle – same sh1t

  108. D-FENS says:

    Well, it is October…it makes sense that the Great Pumpkin would make an appearance.

  109. nwnj3 says:

    Nothing is different wrt the gov/media/corp lobbyist alliance so we can expect more of the same with Hillary which is subjugation of nations and their citizens in order to pursue the global agenda. It’s all about money and always has been. The only difference this time is the extent they had to go to sell their flawed candidate in the face of an outsider. With Cruz even they wouldn’t have had to go to that extent because he was owned as well.

    The mask came off completely the media(corp owned) though. The major media is now complete fiction even rather than infotainment.

  110. Comrade Nom Deplorable, Manning the Barricades says:

    Lost,

    “Why is the community gated? What are the neighborhoods and towns like outside that gate?”

    If metro-Tn means Memphis, you can assume that they are sh1tholes.

    Brazilifcation, baby!

  111. Joyce says:

    Luckily, there are no gated communities or estates in Beverly Hills and Bel Air.

  112. lost says:

    So tax avoidance has nothing to do with other people now paying more taxes. Okay, I get it.

  113. Steamturd thinking Cankles should be included in the hyper incarceration (The good one) says:

    “So why does no one pay attention to the role tax avoidance plays in making taxes more expensive for everyone else?”

    Income gap baby. It’s the number one issue in our country and the middle class keeps swallowing the crumbs. Remember who owns the government. This is my exact reason for my absolute hatred of HRC. She is a slave to Wall Street.

  114. Steamturd thinking Cankles should be included in the hyper incarceration (The good one) says:

    I will send $1,000 of my hard earned money to the DNC if they make any attempt at curtailing current Wall Street practices. I just saw that GS had another brilliant quarter. Meanwhile, I’m chopping heads like a Chinamen with a bushel of broccoli at King Wok.

  115. Joyce says:

    Do we think he was smart enough to use a different device with different IP address when returning with a different handle?

  116. Anon E. Moose, saying 'Come back, JJ' says:

    Shillary [13:43];

    So why does no one pay attention to the role tax avoidance plays in making taxes more expensive for everyone else?

    How about an absolutely flat tax? No “loopholes”; no “avoidance”; earn a dollar? Pay a quarter — everyone. How many leftists like yourself are on-board for that? [Crickets]

    Each and every single loophole that exists in our tax law is put there as a bribe by the government to get someone to spend their money the way government would like them to, rather than how they might without that bribe.

  117. walking bye says:

    Lost,
    generally they are gated as there are many amenities in these communities that you do not want to share with the outsiders. ie: open clubhouse, pools, tennis courts, golf course, boat dock etc. The same can be said of some NJ beach towns that restrict parking and access to the beach. Gated is really the way to go. You do see it in some of the nicer new developments in Bergen county as well (Bears Nest, Woodland Heights etc) and these are next to the slobs of saddle river and upper saddle river.

  118. walking bye says:

    fwiw, I only buy gated in gated communities when buying out of state in VA, FL, or GA. I sometimes forget its considered strange back here as it really is not that unusual for some of these larger developments out side of NJ.

  119. Essex says:

    Lewellen Park gave America it’s first gated community. Edison lived there.

  120. 3b says:

    Heeees back!! Lost is definitely pumpkin!!

  121. Comrade Nom Deplorable, just waiting on the Zombie Apocalypse. says:

    3b,

    Seems we all came to that conclusion today.

  122. Comrade Nom Deplorable, just waiting on the Zombie Apocalypse. says:

    I’m not surprised Michael is back. After all, he always found his way home after all those family camping trips that he got left behind on.

  123. Comrade Nom Deplorable, just waiting on the Zombie Apocalypse. says:

    Or was that the footrest? I’m guessing his anger stems from the fact that his family moved while he was at school and didn’t tell him.

  124. Juice Box says:

    I did an informal drive by survey this week of a few very liberal towns in New Jersey. Not a Hillary sign or bumper sticker to be found, and a sprinkling of Trump signs, mostly local election signs. Many towns have the 1 month rule on political lawn signs, but here we are 18 days until the election.

    Call me crazy but I think the local supporters aren’t enamored with HER enough to put out a lawn sign. Plenty of political signs for the local Democrats, school elections etc, but where are the Hillary signs?

  125. HouseWhineWine says:

    Here’s the deal on the Clinton signs. The only place to get them in all of NJ is at the Princeton Democratic headquarters office on Nassau St. in Princeton. They are $10. a piece. Or, buy them online but too late at this point.
    Have discussed putting a sign up with friends, no one is inclined. We already know exactly who we are voting for, so what’s the point.

  126. McBox says:

    Re what’s the point?

    How about a ground game?

    If you haven’t been paying attention unaffiliated is a large portion of the voters this year more so than the last few decades.

  127. Steamturd thinking Cankles should be included in the hyper incarceration (The good one) says:

    Where can I get a “none of the above” lawn sign?

  128. D-FENS says:

    How on earth can Clinton expect to govern after all these scandals?

  129. Essex says:

    I think she’ll recycle Clinton-era shysters and be on her way.

  130. Essex says:

    I’ve seen a few Hillary signs and Trump bumper stickers. The Trump stickers are my favorite. Usually on the rear of a crapheap SUV with another sticker from the NRA or something macho.

  131. Comrade Nom Deplorable, just waiting on the Zombie Apocalypse. says:
  132. Essex says:

    I’m telling ya. I am loathe to pay the ask on some of these blue ribbon towns…..Yech.

    But listening to these morons crow about Las Vegas is surreal. What a crap hole.

  133. grim says:

    This debate is shit

  134. Essex says:

    It’s pathetic. Trump is a bore.

  135. Essex says:

    Hillary is actually fairly convincing as a seemingly competent leader. I wouldn’t let Trump run a f’ckin lemonade stand. His business acumen? Pffffffft. His B.S. is getting old.

  136. Comrade Nom Deplorable, just waiting on the Zombie Apocalypse. says:

    Good thing I didn’t waste time watching it.

  137. relo says:

    It’s for the children (and their Mom’s).

  138. I am looking forward to seeing some rentals in Boston this weekend. I want to be out by January and get my place on the market and sold before this new bubble collapses.

Comments are closed.