November Prices Push Higher

From CoreLogic:

CoreLogic US Home Price Report Shows Prices Up 7.1 Percent in November 2016

Home prices nationwide, including distressed sales, increased year over year by 7.1 percent in November 2016 compared with November 2015 and increased month over month by 1.1 percent in November 2016 compared with October 2016,* according to the CoreLogic HPI.

The CoreLogic HPI Forecast indicates that home prices will increase by 4.7 percent on a year- over-year basis from November 2016 to November 2017, and on a month-over-month basis home prices are expected to increase by 0.1 percent from November 2016 to December 2016. The CoreLogic HPI Forecast is a projection of home prices using the CoreLogic HPI and other economic variables. Values are derived from state-level forecasts by weighting indices according to the number of owner-occupied households for each state.

“Last summer’s very low mortgage rates sparked demand, and with for-sale inventories low, the result has been a pickup in home-price growth,” said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist for CoreLogic. “With mortgage rates higher today and expected to rise even further in 2017, our national Home Price Index is expected to slow to 4.7 percent year over year by November 2017.”

“Home prices continue to march higher, with home prices in 27 states above their pre-crisis peak levels,” said Anand Nallathambi, president and CEO of CoreLogic. “Nationally, the CoreLogic Home Price Index remains 4 percent below its April 2006 peak, but should surpass that peak by the end of 2017.”

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62 Responses to November Prices Push Higher

  1. grim says:

    November HPI YOY
    New York up 7.4%
    Massachusetts up 4.7%
    Pennsylvania up 2.8%
    New Jersey up 1.7%
    Delaware up 0.6%
    Connecticut down 0.5%

    New York-Jersey City-White Plains NY-NJ up 4.8%. This was higher than Chicago, Houston, Washington, and San Fran.

  2. Essex says:

    yeah baby….yeah

  3. grim says:

    So we lagged the upswing on the bubble by 1-2 years, we lagged the bottom by 1-2 years, are we lagging the recovery by 1-2 years too? Or even longer since NJ was hell-bent on dragging out foreclosures?

  4. The Great Pumpkin says:

    That’s what it looks like.

    grim says:
    January 3, 2017 at 9:48 am
    So we lagged the upswing on the bubble by 1-2 years, we lagged the bottom by 1-2 years, are we lagging the recovery by 1-2 years too? Or even longer since NJ was hell-bent on dragging out foreclosures?

  5. STEAMturd (channeling Clotpoll) says:

    Our pension shortfall lags no other state, though we are in a close race with Obama’s home state.

  6. grim says:

    Too big to fail, let the feds pay it.

    Maybe Mississippi and Louisiana can put on their big boy pants and fend for themselves for a few years.

    The amount of Federal tax dollars that have left NJ and gone to subsidize other states would more than make up for the pension shortfall. How about we get some of that government cheese for once?

    Or maybe we claw back some of that foreign aid.

  7. D-FENS says:

    Just hike the gas tax to pay for it. PA just did it. We are all rich here anyway and our houses are worth zillions.

  8. D-FENS says:

    Everything is awesome, everything is cool when your part of a team
    Everything is awesome, when you’re living out a dream

  9. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Agreed. It’s time to back up their talk. They want smaller govt, then stop taking from other states.

    Esp foreign aid, we can’t pay our pensions, but give other countries billions? Wtf?

    “Too big to fail, let the feds pay it.

    Maybe Mississippi and Louisiana can put on their big boy pants and fend for themselves for a few years.

    The amount of Federal tax dollars that have left NJ and gone to subsidize other states would more than make up for the pension shortfall. How about we get some of that government cheese for once?

    Or maybe we claw back some of that foreign aid.”

  10. D-FENS says:

    11:34 – You might help reduce diabetes while lightening people’s wallets…but you won’t win any votes that way. That’s going to backfire on them.

  11. grim says:

    By the way, where is Nom.

    All his flak-talk about NJ’s gas tax backfiring us and losing all the Pennsylvania revenue.

    PA increased their gas tax too (8 cents a gallon on January 1st), and gas is *STILL* less expensive in Jersey. So realistically, we lose nothing.

    Gas buddy this morning has NJ at 2.441 a gallon and PA at $2.661 a gallon.

    Still $0.22 cheaper in NJ.

  12. D-FENS says:

    My bank account disagrees.

  13. D-FENS says:

    Diesel is nearly the same price in NJ as regular Gasoline right now. I think that’s supposed to go up in the next few days too.

  14. Comrade Nom Deplorable, Zombie Hunter says:

    “grim says:
    January 3, 2017 at 11:12 am

    Too big to fail, let the feds pay it.

    Maybe Mississippi and Louisiana can put on their big boy pants and fend for themselves for a few years.

    The amount of Federal tax dollars that have left NJ and gone to subsidize other states would more than make up for the pension shortfall. How about we get some of that government cheese for once?”

    I, for one, would like to see how some of those ‘studies’ on fed dollar flow are compiled. Is it straight-up transfer payments? Is Medicare factored in? Does it include DoD spending that skews heavily to certain states? Does it account for indirect effects? Is it normed for the fact that states like Mississippi have much smaller, less concentrated populations?

    Because, as Twain said, there’s lies, damned lies and statistics.

  15. Comrade Nom Deplorable, Zombie Hunter says:

    Grim:

    “By the way, where is Nom.

    All his flak-talk about NJ’s gas tax backfiring us and losing all the Pennsylvania revenue.

    PA increased their gas tax too (8 cents a gallon on January 1st), and gas is *STILL* less expensive in Jersey. So realistically, we lose nothing.”

    Agreed but only to a degree. We saw this coming in that PA has been phasing in gas taxes for a year I think; this is the last tranche of hikes from the 2015 legislation if memory serves. So PA, which was cheaper and by a decent margin (at Costco anyway), isn’t any longer, especially since some dealers took advantage to tack on some extra pennies. For the most part, I continued to tank up in NJ but really only as needed. I probably will today since I am in Cherry Hill.

    It isn’t a straight up proposition however. First, NJ only took commuter business from PA before the gas tax hike. But DE may cut into both PA and NJ, especially for stations away from the Wilmington/New Castle area (closer to Newark/Elkton). So if Wawa on 202 or Costco is equal to or cheaper than NJ, they get my business (and I get bonus points).

    So there was a benefit to PA that was short lived. Shame that PA did not see fit to cancel its last tranche. But I am not that adversely affected–I have better options than most.

  16. Comrade Nom Deplorable, Zombie Hunter says:

    “Gas buddy this morning has NJ at 2.441 a gallon and PA at $2.661 a gallon.”

    Gas buddy has my local Costco (and one of the closer stations to me) at $2.25 and the E-xxon just over the PA line in DE at $2.25. The Wa I typically hit in NJ is at $2.37.

    So I’m good on my side of the river.

  17. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Nom, there are givers and takers. Those states are def takers. Just compare natural disaster payouts.

  18. The Great Pumpkin says:

    One of the best breakdowns I have ever read in a comment section of forbes.

    “This writer suffers from an inability to understand economic theory in a non-academic setting. I read this after reading the Uber article I’ll also be commenting on, and see the same pattern of implied “all things being equal” assumptions that only focus on the factors the author wants to focus on while ignoring everything else. And that sort of thing is fine in the classroom, but in the real world, you can’t limit the factors you’re discussing.

    In this article, the overall assumption is that blue states have higher housing costs than red states because zoning regulations in blue states limit housing, while red states have fewer regulations and therefore unlimited housing. But that’s clearly wrong. The reason blue states have housing shortages is because there are far more people than homes, because so many people want to live in these places; thus driving up prices. And if urban developers got rid of zoning rules, they might have more homes or they might have fewer homes, depending on what benefits landlords; yet the standard of living would plummet, as people were forced to live next to factories and whatnot. And if half the population of New York City moved to Alabama this year, home prices in NYC would plummet and home prices in Alabama would skyrocket. Not because policies changed, but because of supply & demand. And Alabama could never build enough homes to ever get home prices anywhere near as low as they are now. This article assumes that Alabama could build homes for infinite people. But in reality, it’d take Alabama decades to build enough housing for even a fraction of these people, as they just don’t have the dense residential areas NYC has. Because in reality, NYC has far far more housing than Alabama, and it’s still not enough. So the issue isn’t that red states are better at building housing. It’s that they have lower demand for housing, because fewer people choose to live in those places. Moreover, if Alabama real estate skyrocketed and forced them to build more densely, you’d soon see them being forced into the zoning rurals of blue states. That’s because like most laws, zoning rules solve a real problem. And that’s something libertarian-types refuse to acknowledge, that we’ve tried things their way and our regulations are the cure for the disease they want to inflict upon us. There was a time New York had no zoning rules, and it was a disaster that was so bad that they preferred restrictions instead. I know libertarians like to pretend the government only creates rules to gain power, but that’s ridiculous. They don’t say that because it’s true. They say it because it completely undermines their beliefs if they acknowledge reality.

    So why don’t more people move to red states if the housing is cheaper? Because the jobs suck and pay less, which negates the lower housing costs completely. And one mistake this article makes is to base cost of living on a specific hypothetical middle-class worker, with the idea that someone making $40k a year will have more spending power in a red state than in a blue state and therefore is “richer” by that standard. But in reality, the same person won’t earn $40k in NYC as they do in Birmingham. Why? Because, cost of living is factored into your pay. And a job that pays $40k in NYC doesn’t pay nearly as much elsewhere. So to do this properly, you can’t assume the person makes the same wages in both places, since that’s never the case. A Starbucks employee in Birmingham makes less than a Starbucks employee in San Diego, even if they do the same job.

    And so to take the whole thing into account, we just have to look at where the people are to determine which places have the best standard of living. Why do people pay a premium for housing in San Francisco instead of moving to Birmingham? Because they believe life is better there. It’s that simple. By this author’s theory, red states have better living due to cheaper housing, but the proof is in the pudding: People still will pay a premium to live in blue states. So cheap housing isn’t proof that red state policies are right. It’s a symptom that they’re wrong, since people would rather pay a housing premium to be in California than receive a housing discount in Alabama.
    And what’s weird here is that an Adam Smith economist should surely realize all this, since it’s basic supply & demand across the board. Why is housing more in blue states? More people want to live in those places. Why are wages higher in those places? Tougher competition for good workers. Why do poor people live in expensive states instead of cheap places? That’s where the jobs are and they’ll make less money if they go rural. Just a glance at unemployment rates in these states will tell you that. If you want a good paying job, you’re better off living in a blue state. And if red states paid better, their housing costs would go up too. After all, I live in Austin, which is in a red state. But housing ain’t cheap here, because the economy is so good and the city can’t really grow physically larger due to terrain. And try to find housing in West Texas now that the fracking boom has made the land worth more. That place is literally the wild west, yet you’d be lucky to get anywhere you can keep your workers, because demand is so much higher than supply and you can’t magically create more housing even in a red state.

    But really, this whole piece is trying to solve a mystery it can’t solve because it’s looking at the wrong info. Southern states don’t vote Republican because they benefit from cheap housing. They vote Republican because they hate Democrats, liberals, gays and atheists. They say this all the time. They don’t care that their economies are doing poorly or that their rivers are more polluted. It’s all just team warfare. Meanwhile, truly poor urban people rarely vote, which is why Democrats count on middle-class voters to elect them, since the poor vote in such low numbers. It’s rare to find people who truly vote by their pocketbooks. That’s why Republican politicians only run against Obama these days, and not on their economic plans. And it’s all about how he’s a social!st intent on destroying capitalism, even though the Dow Jones and the rich are doing better than ever, while inequality continues unabated; which would make Obama the worst social!st since Bill Clinton. Republicans care far more about fictional policies Obama isn’t doing than they do about the actual policies that affect them. Trying to use economics to decipher voting patterns is like using calculus to determine which sandwich you want for lunch. You can find an answer, but that doesn’t mean it made sense.”

  19. D-FENS says:

    Some days, I think the fact that most people polled in NJ hate Chris Christie’s guts is proof that he did a good job.

  20. grim says:

    I’m just saying, there won’t be big losses of gas tax revenue due to PA customers no longer tanking up in NJ, because based on the numbers, they will probably continue to do so.

  21. Fast Eddie says:

    Ford (F) CEO Mark Fields said the investment is a “vote of confidence” in the pro-business environment being created by Donald Trump. However, he stressed Ford did not do any sort of special deal with the president-elect.

    http://money.cnn.com/2017/01/03/news/economy/ford-700-jobs-trump/index.html

  22. STEAMturd (channeling Clotpoll) says:

    I remember when Montclair raised their parking meter rates from 25 cents and hour to 50 cents an hour. The reasoning, when I asked the mayor…the collections didn’t even cover the cost of the parking authority. A couple of years later when it went up to 75 cents an hour, the reasoning was that this is what Bloomfield charges. Of course, Caldwell and and Verona are still a quarter an hour. Neither charge on Sunday either.

  23. STEAMturd (channeling Clotpoll) says:

    Verona –

    “The coins required to be deposited in parking meters or fees collected for permit parking as provided herein are levied and assessed as fees to provide for the proper regulation and control of traffic upon the public streets and also the cost of supervising and regulating the parking of vehicles in the parking meter permit zones created thereby and to cover the cost of the purchase, supervision, protection, inspection, installation, operation, maintenance, control and use of the parking meters described herein.”

    the cost of supervising

    That’s funny. Twice, my windows were smashed in NYC when my car was being supervised.

  24. Tywin says:

    TRUMPED:

    http://money.cnn.com/2017/01/03/news/economy/ford-700-jobs-trump

    Ford is canceling plans to build a new plant in Mexico. It will invest $700 million in Michigan instead, creating 700 new U.S. jobs.

  25. Tywin says:

    OBAMA:

    http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2016/12/flashback-obama-mocks-trump-plan-keep-carrier-jobs-usa-video

    “But for those folks who have lost their job right now because a plant went down the Mexico, that isn’t going to make you feel better. And so what we have to do is to make sure that folks are trained for the jobs that are coming in now because some of those jobs of the past are just not going to come back, and when somebody says, like the person you just mentioned who I’m not going to advertise for, that he’s going to bring all these jobs back, well how exactly are you going to do that? What are you going to do?

    There’s — there’s no answer to it. He just says, ‘Well, I’m going to negotiate a better deal.’ Well, how — what — how exactly are you going to negotiate that? What magic wand do you have?”

  26. Fast Eddie says:

    History will not be kind the Obama and rightfully so. His legacy is that of division, diversion and aloofness. He speaks in sound bites, never defined a vision and never followed through. No one of his side was ever on board with any of his ideas because they lacked a plan for the long run. They only latched on because they wanted to get a piece of the action and enhance their personal gain. He ridiculed, whined and finger-pointed for eight years – a true indication of one who lacks leadership. Escort him to the door, he’s done.

  27. Comrade Nom Deplorable, Zombie Hunter says:

    Twyin,

    I can’t help but wonder what sort of sub rosa promises Trump is making to CEOs. Some sort of tax breaks or new enterprise zone designations?

    Lighthizer has his work cut out for him as our trade partners are going to scream bloody murder over Trump’s efforts to rebalance trade. This isn’t my area but I do know that we have treaties, agreements, and international norms that are very detailed, and anything or anyone that pushes on them can expect to be challenged, and hard.

    Good thing that I consider Lighthizer an a$$hole. I’d hate to think that someone I like is taking on all that heartburn.

  28. Comrade Nom Deplorable, Zombie Hunter says:

    Pumps:

    “One of the best breakdowns I have ever read in a comment section of forbes.”

    You don’t get out much, do you?

  29. STEAMturd says:

    Was listening to CNN yesterday. As has been the case of the left since the day Trump was elected, they harp on every nuanced syllable he utters and especially tweets. This particular segment was about Trump’s New Year’s tweet wishing his friends and even his enemies, a happy new year to Hillary Some lefty bimbo political expert then states that wishing your enemy a happy new year equates almost exactly to calling Trump supporters the deplorables. Really? Has CNN become the new Fox News. I also couldn’t help but notice how hot all of the newscasters were.

    Now I’m trying to figure out what’s worse? Having to listen to all of the dummies on Fox make up BS about Obama for 8 years? Or to watch the next 4 to 8 years of CNN and CNBC making up BS about everything Trump says.

    Then Wolf Blitzer (is that really his name) comes on and starts talking about how all of Trump’s appointees are not vetted and will all be raked over the coals before serving. The one righty on the panel asked what vetting meant, to which Wolf (really gay name) responds, they haven’t even revealed their income taxes which prompted a round the panel smirk. It was actually really funny.

  30. STEAMturd says:

    Must proofread. Just too busy.

  31. Tywin says:

    Nom, Trump is doing what should have been done starting decades ago: shame CEOs who sell out their country, and countrymen, for increased profits while the country slides down the toilet. It’s this toxic “only next quarter matters” CEO mindset that needs to be destroyed, and replaced with long-term thinking and investment.

  32. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Conservative: Why is housing so expensive in blue states? It’s the damn govt.

    Funny, all of a sudden, they forgot about supply and demand. What does this have to do with me getting out much? That entire post shreds your conservative bs talking points to shreds.

    Comrade Nom Deplorable, Zombie Hunter says:
    January 3, 2017 at 12:58 pm
    Pumps:

    “One of the best breakdowns I have ever read in a comment section of forbes.”

    You don’t get out much, do you?

  33. Fast Eddie says:

    Pat,

    Come up with a new alias already!

  34. No One says:

    Pumpkin,
    I think you should run off to Sweden and live in marital bliss with that commentator on Forbes. You two have so much in common – a dislike for economic freedom, and a unlimited belief in other people’s interest in your long and tedious essays posted as comments to other people’s websites. Each of you a modern-age Charles Kinbote, please flee together to Zembla.

  35. Comrade Nom Deplorable, Zombie Hunter says:

    Pumps:

    “That entire post shreds your conservative bs talking points to shreds.”

    Now which points of mine might those be? Please use my words, not some bastardization that fits your argument.

  36. Essex says:

    Trump using the Bully Pulpit to retain American jobs. Making it look easy.

  37. Comrade Nom Deplorable, Zombie Hunter says:

    Tywin,

    “It’s this toxic “only next quarter matters” CEO mindset that needs to be destroyed, and replaced with long-term thinking and investment.”

    Which is eminently achievable through changes to the tax code. The irony is that the mindset developed from “skin in the game” legislation championed by . . .

    Wait for it . . .

    Democrats!

    Oh the irony. Admittedly a fine idea but susceptible to gaming and gamed it was.

  38. The Great Pumpkin says:

    The guy makes a point, and because it goes against your beliefs, you get mad at the messenger.

    The guy makes a point. If all the people in NYC decided to move to Alabama, guess what would happen to Alabama and NYC real estate values. So why do conservatives blame regulation for the cost of real estate in places like sf and nyc?

    This is not a direct attack on conservatives. I’m just trying to understand their thought process. I grew up with a bunch of conservatives in my family. I’m sorry I don’t just easily eat up what I’ve been told, but instead question it.

    No One says:
    January 3, 2017 at 1:35 pm
    Pumpkin,
    I think you should run off to Sweden and live in marital bliss with that commentator on Forbes. You two have so much in common – a dislike for economic freedom, and a unlimited belief in other people’s interest in your long and tedious essays posted as comments to other people’s websites. Each of you a modern-age Charles Kinbote, please flee together to Zembla.

  39. Comrade Nom Deplorable, Zombie Hunter says:

    Essex:

    “Trump using the Bully Pulpit to retain American jobs. Making it look easy.”

    Trump is taking credit for sunrises. And it isn’t easy nor will it be continual. Eventually folks will catch on.

  40. The Great Pumpkin says:

    No offense, but you seem to take up any conservative talking point, so I mistakenly put words in your mouth. I just assumed you agree with 99% of conservative talking points, maybe I’m wrong.

    ““That entire post shreds your conservative bs talking points to shreds.”

    Now which points of mine might those be? Please use my words, not some bastardization that fits your argument.”

  41. STEAMturd says:

    What’s missing from those comments Pumps, is the evidence of any truth whatsoever. But it sure sounds good, doesn’t it. Just like Obamacare not costing anyone anything in the long run and somehow now covering illegals and those with preexisting conditions. It sure sounds good, until you dig a little.

    Start with the line that says, “They vote Republican because they hate Democrats, liberals, gays and atheists.”

  42. No One says:

    I wonder if parking meters are really just a jobs-creation program, created to keep public employees busy until they can collect a pension.

  43. STEAMturd says:

    “That’s why Republican politicians only run against Obama these days, and not on their economic plans.”

    Really?

    Trump barely mentioned Obama. He focused almost exclusively on Cankles.

    When will the LEFT get it that Trump understands that bad publicity is still publicity. He’s like an adult that never learned how to deal with his ADHD. And the left keeps giving him the attention he craves. I would even go as far to say that the left put him in office from this. We still haven’t seen his tax forms and never will. And quite frankly, he doesn’t effin care. And his supporters back up this kind of bravado. But keep providing it, all the way until he is reelected. I am currently embarrassed by my comrades on the left. They are so effin elitist that it hinges on ignorance. The fact that Pelosi is still representing is all we need to see.

  44. STEAMturd says:

    “I wonder if parking meters are really just a jobs-creation program, created to keep public employees busy until they can collect a pension.”

    You might be on to something here. Or just on something.

  45. The Great Pumpkin says:

    I was called a social!st by conservatives over and over again when I questioned these ceo’s and their business practices. Someone had to do something, I’m glad you agree.

    Tywin says:
    January 3, 2017 at 1:17 pm
    Nom, Trump is doing what should have been done starting decades ago: shame CEOs who sell out their country, and countrymen, for increased profits while the country slides down the toilet. It’s this toxic “only next quarter matters” CEO mindset that needs to be destroyed, and replaced with long-term thinking and investment.

  46. The Great Pumpkin says:

    My fault. Should have posted link. That post was from a 2014 article, before Trump became mainstream.

    ““That’s why Republican politicians only run against Obama these days, and not on their economic plans.”

    Really?

    Trump barely mentioned Obama. He focused almost exclusively on Cankles.”

  47. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “The Bottom Line
    Public scrutiny of CEO compensation has encouraged business leaders to begin to see that a rising tide doesn’t necessarily lift all boats. In many cases, low-wage workers get hurt the most because they don’t have transferable skills. The concept of retraining workers is on the radar, but it’s easier said than done and decades too late for the American manufacturing industry. (To learn more, see Evaluating Executive Compensation.)

    Until a better solution is found, education, flexibility and adaptability are the keys to survival. So far, the only answer that politicians and business leaders agree on is the value of an educated, flexible, adaptable workforce. (At the individual level, you can take action on this issue if you Invest In Yourself With A College Education.)”

    Read more: Globalization: Progress Or Profiteering? | Investopedia http://www.investopedia.com/articles/07/globalization.asp#ixzz4UjCkklZJ
    Follow us: Investopedia on Facebook

  48. Comrade Nom Deplorable, Zombie Hunter says:

    ” The Great Pumpkin says:
    January 3, 2017 at 1:45 pm

    No offense, but you seem to take up any conservative talking point. . .”

    A gross overgeneralization. I’m offended. Even as Devil’s Advocate, I haven’t taken up some because they’re (a) clearly correct, (b) clearly incorrect, (c) not really conservative, or (d) I am just not that interested.

    Hell, I haven’t been here in a month; clearly I must have missed some.

  49. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Nom, I’m just basing this on years of reading your posts. You have changed and don’t wear the team flag as much as you used to, I’ll give you that. So I’m sorry for the generalization, don’t want to offend you.

  50. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Wow, this is great. These comebacks are priceless.

  51. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “Crash their economy and then condescendingly ask why they are living with their parents”

    “Next time someone complains about millennials, maybe remind them of what generation linoleumed over all those beautiful hardwood floors”

  52. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “”Kids these days have it too easy,” said the generation that could buy a house with unskilled work at the age of 21″

  53. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Trump is no conservative. Old school conservatism is dead. He indeed hijacked the Republican Party.

    He attacked house republicans for trying to pull a fast one and remove oversight of their actions. Is team politics dead (please!)?

  54. No One says:

    Pumpkin can keep himself entertained for hours, like a dog licking his balls.

  55. Steamturd thinking about the remains of Hillary's umbilical stump says:

    A dog eventually tires and naps.

  56. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “It’s become very clear that Trump will continue to make a lot of conservative Republicans very mad in 2017. And here’s why he can get away with it: It’s not just that Trump won the election and he’s going to be the president. Remember that, while the general election was very close, Trump utterly gutted the GOP in the primaries. That was the real landslide of 2016 and it sends the message that he doesn’t really need much from the Republican Party — especially its ideology — to succeed. Trump needed and probably still needs the official Republican label after his name, but that’s about it.

    Based on what the GOP House members did on Monday to gut the independent ethics office and the way Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell carries himself, they still haven’t gotten the memo. House Speaker Paul Ryan seems closer to understanding the state of things, but even he isn’t completely on board with the new realities. Maybe after Trump proceeds with more protectionist policies or pushes for big infrastructure deficit spending projects they’ll start to come out of denial. But Trump was a candidate and is going to be a president who likes fighting lots of battles all the time, and he’s really not going to care much about which side he’s fighting.”

    http://finance.yahoo.com/news/op-ed-trump-going-body-183114158.html;_ylt=A0LEVy8gOWxYP3MAImJx.9w4;_ylu=X3oDMTByMHZ0NG9yBGNvbG8DYmYxBHBvcwM3BHZ0aWQDBHNlYwNzcg–

  57. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “Let’s get one thing straight: Donald Trump won the 2016 election. Everyone else, including the Republican Party, lost. And boy, is the GOP about to learn this the hard way.

    First, President-elect Trump is not going to be shy about embarrassing them. Take Tuesday’s Twitter storm and Cabinet news from Trump as an example. If anyone thought Trump favored or would ignore the House Republican’s move to weaken the powers of the independent Office of Congressional Ethics, they thought wrong. Trump tweeted against the move, sharply criticizing it as being a bad priority compared to the more pressing need to fix health care and taxes. The House Republicans quickly responded with an emergency meeting and reversed their plans to gut that office . That was fast.”

  58. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Our govt changed right before our eyes. Always told the conservatives that the income inequality problem was going to bite them in the ass, but they didn’t want to listen. Now your ideology is dead. Same with the Democratic Party as we know it, going damgerously more to the left as the republicans slide more towards the left to the center. All of this is due to income inequality. The bill has come due and change is the form of payment.

  59. Fabius Maximus says:

    “Ford (F) CEO Mark Fields said the investment is a “vote of confidence” in the pro-business environment being created by Donald Trump. ”

    Did you miss the part were production is still moving to Mexico, they just aren’t building a factory for it.

  60. D-FENS says:

    The fact remains, 80% of Ford’s production is within the United States while only 63% General Motors production is in United States. Also Ford never required a government bailout.

Comments are closed.