NJ’s future of smaller, taller, more expensive apartments

From ROI NJ:

Rutgers Real Estate Center releases landmark study on school-aged children in multifamily properties

The number of school-age children in multifamily housing units increases with the number of bedrooms, regardless of the residents’ income level and building product type. And, if income and bedrooms are fixed, it can be shown that denser properties will have fewer school-aged children.

Those are just two of the conclusions drawn from a white paper released Thursday by the Center for Real Estate at Rutgers Business School, the institute’s effort to answer one of the most pressing questions in the industry.

Here are the key takeaways from the landmark paper, the center’s first:

  • Across all income levels and building product types, the number of school-age children increases with the number of bedrooms;
  • For any given number of bedrooms and product types, the number of school-age children decreases as renters’ household incomes rise;
  • Holding income and the number of bedrooms fixed, the number of school-age children has an inverse relationship with density (e.g., garden apartments, with fewer units per building, have a greater number of school-age children, and mid- and high-rise buildings, with a greater number of units per building, have a lesser number of school-age children);
  • Buildings with an average income of less than $50,000 per year have a similar number of school-age children, regardless of whether the buildings include affordable units or market-rate units;
  • Buildings constructed before 2000 have a significantly higher number of school-age children living in market-rate units than do buildings built after 2000; and
  • On average, the number of school-age children per 100 affordable units is significantly higher than the number of school-age children per 100 market-rate units.
  • The collaborators feel the study provides an unprecedented level of context for the oft-contested issue of the effects of development on generating school-age children by controlling for a number of important variables, including: household income; whether the units were market-rate or designated affordable housing; the number of bedrooms in each unit; and building type and age.

    “The issue of school-age children in new multifamily development is frequently a contentious debate, and one that can benefit immensely from robust, hard data that takes into account a multitude of variables,” Davis said.

    This entry was posted in Demographics, Economics, New Development, New Jersey Real Estate. Bookmark the permalink.

    81 Responses to NJ’s future of smaller, taller, more expensive apartments

    1. grim says:

      Full Text:

      https://www.rutgersrealestate.com/publications/white-papers/school-age-children-study/

      This appears to give municipalities a fairly strong argument against being forced to permit affordable housing.

      On average, the number of school-age children per 100 affordable units is significantly higher than the number of school-age children per 100 market-rate units.

    2. leftwing says:

      Frist baby.

      Took off to the shore 2p yesterday. Relax today checking screens every so often (HON earnings play) and get some sun in before the next week of bad weather. Good day everyone!

    3. grim says:

      Wife and kid down on LBI next week, looks like a washout.

      I’m stuck flying around the US and making whiskey.

    4. leftwing says:

      Bummer on the family, sorry to hear.

      How old is your child now? Always Fantasy Island……

    5. grim says:

      Turning 6 shortly.

      They stay in Beach Haven a few blocks from Fantasy Island, so it’s all good. They go down with their cousins so it’s a bunch of kids/chaos anyway, rain or not. Which is why dog sitting and making whiskey is just fine with me.

    6. The Great Pumpkin says:

      Is your generation doing better than your parent’s generation? Income inequality is real, dude! Keep dreaming that people are better off today than before 1973 (the year income inequality started its rise till present)

      Blue Ribbon Teacher says:
      July 20, 2018 at 12:45 am
      If it’s a smaller pie, than you obviously think the standard of living has decreased since 1940.

    7. 3b says:

      The garden apartments in my town and there are a lot were built right after world war 2. They originally housed young married couples or singles, old people and the occasional divorced Mom with a kid or two. They are all one and two bedrooms. They are now packed with children and multi generation families. Another 70 one and two bedrooms are being built now right across the street. It will be finished early 2019.

    8. The Original NJ ExPat says:

      Anybody want to guess the religion of the attacker?

      Violent act in Lübeck: Several injured in bus
      In Lübeck’s district Kücknitz several people were injured in a violent crime in a bus. The police were unable to provide information on the severity of the injuries in the afternoon. A police spokesman said there had definitely been no deaths. For details, the speaker initially did not name. The environment at a bus stop in Kücknitz was cordoned off.

      After first unconfirmed reports, a man had stormed a bus. Then he should have started with a knife on several bus travelers. Police and rescue workers are on site. The backgrounds are still completely unclear.

    9. grim says:

      So much for Murphy, from the APP:

      NJ jobs: Employers cut back in June, but here is who is hiring

      New Jersey’s job market slumped in June, the state said Thursday, due in part to big losses in the leisure and hospitality industry.

      The sluggish report seemed to do little to ease the challenges for employers who are trying to hire in a tight labor market.

      “Not easy to find qualified people,” said Bill Sepe, owner of Manasquan Lighting, who has had a “help wanted” sign on the window of his store for the past year.

      The monthly unemployment report showed New Jersey lost 500 jobs. Its unemployment rate dipped from 4.4 percent to 4.3 percent, not because more residents are working but because fewer residents said they were actively looking for work.

      Economists had expected a better report since the U.S. added 213,000 jobs in June, particularly since New Jersey got off to a torrid start at the beginning of the year.

      But they weren’t sure if it was a blip or if it was a sign that the state’s economy is cooling.

    10. Libturd questioning the gender of Hillary's Cankle fluid. says:

      BRT – Too much Loco Moco and you’ll look like a Samoan. I only get it when I am in Vegas (lots of casin0s cater to Polynesians since there is no gambling on the islands) and when I do, I can never eat lunch or dinner that day. I prefer it with large slices of onion under the gravy. Though rarely do they make it that way.

    11. leftwing says:

      “it’s a bunch of kids/chaos anyway, rain or not. Which is why dog sitting and making whiskey is just fine with me…”

      It’s all good, enjoy it while you can. Ten years goes by fast, (s)he won’t want to know you on vacation then lol.

    12. Blue Ribbon Teacher says:

      Agreed, but the reality is, how many times do I have gravy, ground beef, and leftover rice available simultaneously. Right now, I’m just poaching eggs and putting them on rye toast everyday. I put chili peppers and chives/scallions from the garden on.

    13. Blue Ribbon Teacher says:

      Is your generation doing better than your parent’s generation? Income inequality is real, dude! Keep dreaming that people are better off today than before 1973 (the year income inequality started its rise till present)

      Income inequality is real. And so is economic growth. Stop looking at a stupid chart from one of your favorite propaganda sites and look around you. You have a computer in your pocket. You have multiple computers at home and work. You have multiple gigantic tvs in the house. You are able to go out and get any type of food you want. Your car lasts twice as long. The houses are bigger.

      There’s a lot of things wrong in this country right now. The standard of living ain’t one of them.

    14. grim says:

      Rye toast is where it’s at.

      Little butter, brown it in a pan, eggs on top.

    15. The Original NJ ExPat says:

      9:25

      Sources told Lubeck News the suspect was an Iranian man in his mid-30s who is now in police custody.

    16. The Original NJ ExPat says:

      The suspect, who was allegedly wearing a “smouldering backpack”, was arrested after attacking several people with a kitchen knife.

      https://www.ntnews.com.au/news/knifeman-in-germany-city-of-lubeck-in-bus-stabbing-rampage/news-story/39e9b28a6d6c6a7fc933376547eff0f7

    17. The Original NJ ExPat says:

      I haven’t had Loco Moco in close to 18 years, and that was in a tiny greasy spoon in Kauai.

      BRT – Too much Loco Moco and you’ll look like a Samoan. I only get it when I am in Vegas (lots of casin0s cater to Polynesians since there is no gambling on the islands) and when I do, I can never eat lunch or dinner that day. I prefer it with large slices of onion under the gravy. Though rarely do they make it that way.

    18. The Original NJ ExPat says:

      My favorite snack lately is inspired by my trips to McSorley’s Old Ale House in my 20’s. One of the things they serve there is a sleeve of saltines, a slab of cheese, some raw onions, and mustard. I’ve modernized it a little bit. Instead of saltines I use Trader Joe’s crackers, the kind that comes with 4 or 5 mini tubes of assorted crackers. Add a slice of Vermont cheddar on each cracker, a little bit of very, very thinly sliced red onion, topped with a little Gulden’s. My wife had never had crackers, cheese, onions, and mustard before. She’s now a fan.

    19. The Original NJ ExPat says:

      https://www.traderjoes.com/fearless-flyer/article/3961 Cheap, and better than any supermarket crackers.

    20. Russian Bot says:

      “Anybody want to guess the religion of the attacker?”

      That’s pretty easy. Here’s another one that’s even easier:

      Anybody want to guess the religion, race, socioeconomic status and gender of the next school shooter?

      My prediction: middle to upper middle class christian white boy.

    21. NJCoast says:

      At the shore it’s Kneips hard roll, pork roll, egg and cheese.

    22. Bystander says:

      BRT,

      Not one to defend Blumpy but the level of debt to secure this standard of living is far greater than previous generations can even comprehend. My parents and in laws were born in early 40s and believe me, they think we are all nuts paying so much for housing and huge upgrades. Truth is..we are but the circus ain’t folding yet. It will.

    23. chicagofinance says:

      I am interested in any advice….

      grim says:
      July 19, 2018 at 5:20 pm
      Does anyone have a suggestion for the best current deal on WSJ digital and print? I’ve exhausted all my tricks….

      Let me see what I can do, no promises.

    24. Bystander says:

      So Orange moron now setting up Federal Reserve as fall guy for some bad numbers he is seeing. As someone said “Next, he will say it is a Liberal Elite organization and enemy of state”

      Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump)
      “The United States should not be penalized because we are doing so well. Tightening now hurts all that we have done. The U.S. should be allowed to recapture what was lost due to illegal currency manipulation and BAD Trade Deals. Debt coming due & we are raising rates – Really?”

    25. Blue Ribbon Teacher says:

      Not one to defend Blumpy but the level of debt to secure this standard of living is far greater than previous generations can even comprehend. My parents and in laws were born in early 40s and believe me, they think we are all nuts paying so much for housing and huge upgrades. Truth is..we are but the circus ain’t folding yet. It will.

      I think a quick national default or a inflationary default would be a reset button that easily cures this in 10 years. The standard of living in general has been on an upward trajectory. The only thing that threatened it long term was opening trade borders to “trade” with nations of poor people.

    26. Trick says:

      Expat

      Light or Dark?

    27. grim says:

      The standard of living in general has been on an upward trajectory.

      Huh?

      Access to technology has improved.

      Cost of technology is dramatically reduced.

      But is this really a higher standard of living?

      I don’t know about that. In the 1950s, a typical family had a stay-at-home-mom and 4 kids.

      Today, you have two working adults and if you are lucky, can afford a single kid. This is the new norm.

    28. Libturd questioning the gender of Hillary's Cankle fluid. says:

      CHI,
      SCTV of yesterday is far superior to SNL of today. There was so much more originality.

    29. The Great Pumpkin says:

      Capitalists with enormous amounts of capital decided that they should take even more. Don’t blame tariffs for this. Just look what happen to the HUGE corporate tax this past year, was any of it really shared with workers like Trump said it would? Nah, the elite took even more because they payed for this law.

      Tariffs are a problem, but the real problem is that our current elite don’t care about anyone but their money. They are supposed to take care of society by providing jobs and investing in the maintenance of the community. This stuff is barely happening today because the current elite in power don’t feel like its their obligation to do anything for anyone, but themselves. For them, who cares about public schools or things that. That’s a waste of money, the people should take care of themselves, but the thing that blows over these capitalists heads is how? How do the people take care of themselves while barely getting raises and getting offered crap jobs with no benefits? It’s wrong what has been going on, and it’s sad that you can’t see it.

      “I think a quick national default or a inflationary default would be a reset button that easily cures this in 10 years. The standard of living in general has been on an upward trajectory. The only thing that threatened it long term was opening trade borders to “trade” with nations of poor people.”

    30. Libturd questioning the gender of Hillary's Cankle fluid. says:

      The standard of living for the wealthy has increased. They can ride a subsidized ferry to work. The average Joe suffers a different fate. He has to rot like a rat in a cage in a hot, cramped, smelly train station in the supposed greatest city on earth. I can guarantee you that the main train station in Mexico City puts Penn Station to shame. And this station serves the most profitable route Amtrak operates.

      Where are all of the smelly homeless people?

      https://bit.ly/2O3PlTa

    31. grim says:

      Port Authority a disgusting pit of patronage and corruption?

      Who coulda knew?

      It’s the public sector, they all just want to do good.

    32. The Original NJ ExPat says:

      LOL. The first time my buddy and I went there we didn’t know what the deal was. I had heard that McSorley’s only served their own and the variants were light and dark. We ordered one of each. The bartender just screamed “Motherfu.cker!” at us and gave us two of each. I then quickly figured out that you should order in increments of 8. Back then it was $1.75 for two, so $7 for 8 was the first increment that broke on an even dollar boundary. Also, the bartenders could grab 8 used classes between their knuckles, wash, rinse, and santize (three stainless steel tubs) and refill all 8 classes in under a minute.

      Expat

      Light or Dark?

    33. Libturd questioning the gender of Hillary's Cankle fluid. says:

      I could compare airports too.

    34. Bystander says:

      So, I finally got a second company to due an in person interview. Hurrah..although salary never came up. I am only getting this interview because my former boss recommended me. The other interview was because a family member pushed for me, although I got rejected in end. At 4.5 months, I am trying to reflect on what has changed to make this so difficult. In 1997 when I stared out, I had recruiters calling me non-stop for startups. Same in 2000 when I switched jobs for more pay. Recruiters all over me. It was nuts but that came crashing in 2001. Early 2002 was very difficult and a friend got me a crappy job for 1.5 years (Chi recalls Kwasha/Pwc/Mellon). I had multiple recruiters involved at end of 2003 and moved to mortgage IT. In 2006, a recruiter found me a huge bump up in salary and I basically forced offer from another mortgage firm. In 2007, things were collapsing but a friend offered me her PM job at an IB as she was leaving for Merrill Lynch. I was interviewed and hired. She was let go six months later (ouch). I rode it out to end of 2012 when I wanted out. Again, recruiters calling me all the time probably because FATCA, Dodd Frank, CCAR and general chaos of shifting environment created headcount need (consulting, mostly). Now it is 2018 and recruiters are essentially useless. Ones that I worked for in the past (and provided them multi-year profits as a strong consultant), they won’t even return a phone call. The ones that contact you are essentially hired goons for low-balling companies. Fill this job at $65/hour or this sr. job for $115k. There is absolutely no relationship or negotiation. Your skills are secondary. Your vast experience, a deficiency. That is pretty clear now. Work those connections more than ever. It is your only chance in this market for non-FO or developers.

    35. The Original NJ ExPat says:

      As mentioned earlier, this was true until 1970. It wasn’t until Nixon closed the gold window and the double-digit inflation of the 70’s took over that the Moms went to work. I was born in 1960, so I lived it. Two wives in our neighborhood worked. One had no kids and the other had nearly adult and nearly adult kids. Of course I’m not counting Avon Lady or part time realtor as a job.

      I don’t know about that. In the 1950s, a typical family had a stay-at-home-mom and 4 kids.

    36. Trick says:

      One time we went there with my wifes friend and she asked for a fuzzy navel, I thought the waiter was going to slap her. He then repeated light or dark….

    37. The Original NJ ExPat says:

      My Mom and 5 to 8 other wives used to have the priest over for lunch. Sure he got fed for free, but the women gave him hell about the church and birth control. I distinctly remember them saying, “How many children do you expect us to have?”

    38. The Original NJ ExPat says:

      1:02 Of course I’m talking about white collar upper middle class suburbs being single income (and usually single car) households. In places like Glen Rock it single income families lasted even longer, if not forever. My MIL was born in 1936, had a college degree and worked as a school teacher. She left the workforce for good in 1963. Hasn’t had employment for 55 years and counting now.

    39. The Original NJ ExPat says:

      Sometime in the mid 1980’s I took a girl to McSorley’s on a first date. We took the path in from Harrison. I warned her that there was only a men’s restroom, no women’s restroom. She said she was fine with that. I was surprised when she said she was going to the restroom, and I reminded her again. She stood in line for the restroom and when she was just inside the door she saw lots of guys draining it and shaking it. She was so horrified that she spun around and got burned on the cheek from the guy’s lit cigar who was in line right behind her.

    40. JCer says:

      Bystander finance sucks at the moment, nothing but cost cutting as far as the eye can see. Look by the coffee makers in any financial firm, you’ll see H1B notices for senior developers, business analysts, PM’s with salaries of about 65k. Once you add in the visa fees and H1B pimp costs that 115k makes sense. Basically the financial firms don’t care about quality, only cost at the moment and they can fill that role from a body shop for about 100k. Even in software development it is looking thin in finance. I used to get a call every few months from headhunters I’ve worked with in the past, the calls are now much more infrequent. Somehow in the so called down economy I was getting basically unsolicited job offers and now it seems very quiet. Around these parts it really looks like a jobless recovery.

    41. Libturd questioning the gender of Hillary's Cankle fluid. says:

      McSorley’s black & tan were pretty good when I was in college. We spent a lot of time Down the Hatch and at Boo Radley’s over at NYU for their $5 pitchers. Walked past Mamouns on the way back for $2 falafels which today are still only $3.50.

    42. Libturd questioning the gender of Hillary's Cankle fluid. says:

      This was back in the day when the Limelight was showcasing industrial music. The Ministry show there absolutely rocked.

    43. grim says:

      Working with a new healthcare client, provider not payor.

      I completely understand why healthcare is broken in America now.

      This is such a clusterf*ck of inefficiency, waste, stupidity, nonsense.

      Companies like Amazon could completely transform healthcare in America.

      I mean, to the extent of 40% of the overhead providing the service is completely waste an inefficiency of the process.

      Holy shit, healthcare is ripe for automation in a big, big way.

      Literally thousands of employees doing work that should not even need to be work. The bureaucracy of it is absurd. It is almost unbelievable in the waste and inefficiency.

      To imagine there are equally as many, if not more, counterparts on the payor (insurer) side, good lord who came up with this idiocy.

    44. grim says:

      This is so bad, that I almost wonder that there is a scam going on, that I just don’t understand how the scam works yet.

      I suspect, that the scam is though, they require the mass of bodies and manual processes as some sort of justification for the absurd prices being charged to the payors.

      That they can’t optimize it, because then the scam will be exposed, that Medicare is paying $1,000 for something that actually costs $10.00, but has $900.00 in processing overhead associated with it, and $90 in profit.

    45. D-FENS says:

      The Star Leger is reporting that Medical waste is washing ashore in NJ. Didn’t we go through this in the 1980’s?

    46. grim says:

      Hopefully find a beach whistle.

      Loved those as a kid.

      Probably the most disgusting name that anyone ever came up with. Like, it’s a whistle, put your mouth on it.

    47. Libturd questioning the gender of Hillary's Cankle fluid. says:

      Medical waste continues to come from the Arthur Kill. Hence, the cheap prices at NJ’s Ghetto Shore opposite the kill. I think the landfills (Mt. Koch proposed a ski resort 1,000 feet high) are all closed, but they still put the garbage they are not incinerating onto barges and all too often, it ends up in the soup to eventually wash up onto the northern beaches.

    48. Leftwing says:

      Regarding the standard of living the Brady Bunch house is for sale outside LA. 3BR/3BA I think. 1.9m. No chance an architect buys that today. Even if he forgoes the house keeper and six college tuitions lol.

    49. Leftwing says:

      McSorleys….. remember my first time. Was in awe of the urinals. Still am. Taller than me. Want to be buried in one.

      Limelight. Palladium. Bottom Line. CBGB. Good times. All gone.

    50. grim says:

      Miami a shithole? Sure?

      Gentrification 2.0? The rich are being pushed out by the richer in this Miami-area city

      When you think “gentrification,” Barbara Shaheen’s story is not what you’re picturing, guaranteed.

      She isn’t poor, black or Latino, or being pushed out of an affordable inner-city neighborhood turned “cool” by mostly white hipsters with their expensive juice bars, galleries, and heavier wallets made out of recycled ocean plastic and organic fibers.

      In fact, Shaheen is white and grew up lounging on one of the most exclusive private beaches in South Florida. The town where she has lived for 70 years prohibits juice bars — or any other commercial enterprise. And her family’s waterfront property is currently worth $3.6 million, give or take.

      Still, Shaheen and some other long-term residents of Golden Beach say they aren’t welcome in the small city anymore. Some left when they couldn’t afford their homes, others when their neighbors, and Golden Beach lost its “small town” feel. Still others, like Shaheen, decided to stay despite the changes. But that hasn’t been easy.

      Shaheen says she’s the victim of a decades-long effort by city officials to use “bogus code violations” to push her out of her waterfront home to make way for something bigger, newer and a lot more expensive.

      “I guess they just didn’t want older homes or older residents,” said Shaheen, who is now in her 70s and whose family has lived in Golden Beach since 1944. “I don’t fit the vision of Golden Beach.”

    51. Leftwing says:

      OMG forgot my personal favorite Mondo Cane. Another unisex bathroom place. Keith Haring painted sign. Worth a mint now if you could find it.

    52. grim says:

      I thought NY permitted dumping of medical waste 100 miles offshore.

    53. Bystander says:

      Left,

      My wife grew up in Studio City within biking distance of house. I told her it was for sale and she claims to have never known it was there growing up. Me, dumbfounded. Life in LA LA land.

    54. The Great Pumpkin says:

      Grim,

      Great share. That article just shows how extreme income inequality is becoming. Wow, just wow.

    55. The Great Pumpkin says:

      I told you guys this over and over, but you don’t want to listen. Rich people don’t flee high taxes, they are the one’s that are responsible for it. Yet, I’m told over and over again that the rich flee high taxes…sure! They drive up the taxes and cost of living, forcing everyone else to leave.

      Want jersey to become affordable? Tell all the rich to leave. Good luck with that.

      ““Taxes there are very high now. It’s very expensive to continue to live there,” said Cathy Szabo, who lived in Golden Beach for 30 years before selling her house on Golden Beach Drive four years ago. “My mother had lived in a different house there too. I moved out shortly after she did.”

      The Szabos weren’t the only ones to leave. According to city officials, wealthy families from Venezuela, Brazil and Russia have replaced some of the previous generation of residents, mostly Northeasterners fleeing the winter or vacationing in South Florida. The number of children in town spiked from sixty to almost 400.”

      “Singer doesn’t deny that the town has issued violations to older properties that are consistently out of compliance with town standards. “We are trying to keep the community up to the standard that we expect and that everyone expects and we hope people do what they need to,” he said. He said residents — many of whom pay more than $100,000 a year in property taxes — expect the town to reflect that value. Town ordinances require homes to be well maintained, but have very few specifics.”

      Read more here: https://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/community/miami-dade/article214756520.html#storylink=cpy

      Read more here: https://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/community/miami-dade/article214756520.html#storylink=cpy

    56. Bystander says:

      One of the directors in Technology group for former IB, very talented and delivered a major banking ring-fence project. They fired him two weeks after it completed along with me. He know sells super high end furniture to rich people in Miami and Hudson Valley/Albany area. Claims he will make a killing. I don’t think he is wrong.

    57. The Great Pumpkin says:

      And article is money at showing how bad income inequality is getting. These are people living in 3 million dollar homes getting pushed out by the 1%ers. Meaning, your three million dollar home is too cheap, get the f’k out.

    58. The Original NJ ExPat says:

      Heh-heh. I went to all those places, didn’t care if it Disco or New Wave, I was there for the girls. I used to go to the red rope club places with two or three girls from work just so I could get waved in. Also Danceteria and the very, very, very end of Studio 54. I saw Elvis Costello at the Great Gildersleeves too. Luckily my girlfriend never found out;-)

      Limelight. Palladium. Bottom Line. CBGB. Good times. All gone.

    59. The Original NJ ExPat says:

      Here was another trick for getting into the trendy clubs. You could usually find limos parked about a block away. You could slip them $20 just to drive you and your girl crew two blocks and let you off right in front of the bouncers and they let you right in. I wonder if the limo drivers were kicking back to the bouncers too?

    60. Bystander says:

      Grim,

      My old Irish grandmother used to say about being pricing errors “Funny how it never goes in your favor”. Of course, she was talking about a loaf of bread at local shop but truly it applies everywhere. Surely we know grocery stores make a killing from it. In medical billing, I truly believe that transparency and communication are the enemies of profit. You create easier experience and consumer will fight back more. I had one medical biller force six prompts before being connected to operator. If you hit 0 then told it was incorrect number. Hit it again and they hang up. You wait 45m to get person on phone. Medical industry does not want efficiency. It is very clear.

    61. grim says:

      Fair enough.

      I really pissed off Still Looking on Facebook the other day.

      There was a news article about the FDA creating a new class of drugs, “behind the counter”. Which were basically an entire new class of common pharmaceuticals that didn’t require prescriptions. For example, moving the most commonly prescribed cholesterol pills to this model, where you don’t need to deal with prescriptions, doctor visits, refills, renewals on the prescriptions, etc.

      I thought it was a great idea. I take Zyrtec, for years, it’s a miracle drug, I remember having to go to my allergist every 6 months or something to re-up the RX. Even though I really only ever took it for like two months of the year.

      I’m sure there is an entire industry around these drugs, that stands to lose tremendous revenue if they go “behind the counter”.

    62. The Great Pumpkin says:

      I’m grateful for this. As much as I think he is a clown, I’m grateful for what he is doing here.

      “By sheer dollar volume, the Chinese won’t be able to come close to the U.S. in a tit-for-tat battle. Trump’s comments point to a willingness to push the envelope as far as the U.S. needs to get Chinese tariff concessions, along with a pledge to stop allegedly stealing American technology.

      “I’m not doing this for politics, I’m doing this to do the right thing for our country,” Trump said. “We have been ripped off by China for a long time.”

      Trump said the U.S. is “being taken advantage of” on a number of fronts, including trade and monetary policy. Yet he said he has not pushed the tariffs out of any ill will toward China.

      “I don’t want them to be scared. I want them to do well,” he said. “I really like President Xi a lot, but it was very unfair.””

      Trump threatens tariffs on all $505 billion of Chinese imports – CNBC
      https://apple.news/AJdvq6y9cRYWFADpyrvx_vA

    63. grim says:

      List of drugs switched to OTC.

      Flonase
      Rhinocort
      Nexium
      Allegra
      Zyrtec
      Prevacid
      Laminal
      Plan B
      Miralax
      Mucinex
      Prilosec
      Claritin
      Nicotrol
      Monistat
      Lotrimin

      Lots of these are really just household names now.

    64. The Original NJ ExPat says:

      My ten-term Congressman, Mike Capuano, is usually never seen or heard from. Not here in Boston, not in DC, not anywhere. He also runs unopposed for as long as I’ve lived here. This year he has a primary challenge, from a black woman city council member. So now we’re hearing from Capuano, but I think his platform is a mistake. He’s running on impeaching Trump. I received an 8-1/2 by 11 glossy postcard yesterday (Together, we will….STOP HIM!). I don’t think it sells well and will chase Trump sympathizers to his challenger. He has a 15 second ad out too:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_qOZixnvpI0

      Primary is 9/4

    65. 1987 Condo says:

      Read this “fiasco” on healthcare pricing..written by former chief Actuary of Greater NY, guy teachers Actuarial Science at Columbia…can not figure it out..

      https://www.cnbc.com/2018/05/30/why-your-health-insurer-doesnt-care-about-your-big-bills.html?__source=sharebar%7Cemail&par=sharebar

      I co-wrote an internal paper when I was at Pru Healthcare in 1999 outlining how technology was going to transfer healthcare admin…..woops!

    66. Libturd questioning the gender of Hillary's Cankle fluid. says:

      You know what would work better than taxing the middle class and the rich?

      Shrinking the size of government.

      Try that on for size Plumpy.

    67. Bystander says:

      1987,

      Guy nails it. I love the “Detail Bill” mention. The medical billers dark little secret that they try not to share. How many people ever ask for one? I bet 90% of folks don’t even know it exists. That is some eye-opening information rather than just seeing lump sum co-pay.

    68. The Great Pumpkin says:

      Yup.

      “Experts frequently blame this on the high prices charged by doctors and hospitals. But less scrutinized is the role insurance companies — the middlemen between patients and those providers — play in boosting our health care tab. Widely perceived as fierce guardians of health care dollars, insurers, in many cases, aren’t. In fact, they often agree to pay high prices, then, one way or another, pass those high prices on to patients — all while raking in healthy profits.”

    69. Libturd questioning the gender of Hillary's Cankle fluid. says:

      What Grim is talking about is my main impetus for the move to CR. Believe me and my thousands of bills. I’m in collections right now on two different bills where I owe nothing as I hit Max OOP long before the medicine I am being billed for was provided. We are constantly correcting their mistakes.

    70. JCer says:

      Yes Libturd, that is what actually happens. Every time someone says they will tax the rich it ALWAYS ends up as a tax on the upper middle class. First there are not enough rich to generate the revenue they are looking for with a nominal tax. Secondly the rich usually have their lawyers and accountants 2 steps ahead and somehow always game/avoid the new taxes. Almost every federal tax increase target towards the upper class winds up hitting 50% of the people in the coastal states. The government, like healthcare is very inefficient and ineffective that needs to be addressed before throwing money at it.

      So much of this is driven by complex controls and regulations. I’d wager if the government operated without much of the regulation it has the amount of money lost still would be less than the cost of compliance.

    71. Juice Box says:

      re: “Read this “fiasco” on healthcare pricing.”

      I just spent two nights in the Hospital. Can’t wait for my 10% in-network and 40% out of network bill to arrive.

    72. Bystander says:

      Juice,

      Same on you for not asking if everyone was in network while on the gurney. I think my final breath, if it is in a hospital, will be “Are you in network?”, just so family does not get screwed. When I had my second kid, our OB/GYN chose same hospital as first kid. She was in network and facility was in network. I get bill from CIGNA stating hospital was out of network and $19,ooo charge. Of course, it was wrong but that was mutliple calls to fix.

    73. Bystander says:

      Shame on you..I meant

    74. Mike S says:

      CBGBs bathrooms vs McSorleys?

      Life is competition at this point – you need a two income household. It has nothing to do with you vs the USA’s 1%, it has to do with you vs the rest of the world. Provide more value and you will be fine.

    75. Not GrimskyHealth says:

      Grim relax pal!

      The system is as because that is the feature, not a bug.

      Those features that you are describing allow “rent seeking” to make a killing. Look up the name of any healthcare rentier and you’ll see they are making money hand over fist.

      grim says:
      July 20, 2018 at 1:31 pm

      Working with a new healthcare client, provider not payor.

      I completely understand why healthcare is broken in America now.

      This is such a clusterf*ck of inefficiency, waste, stupidity, nonsense.

      Companies like Amazon could completely transform healthcare in America.

      I mean, to the extent of 40% of the overhead providing the service is completely waste an inefficiency of the process.

    76. Not Mikepoo says:

      Hey Mike,

      How about we close the borders, and we take care of our own!. Take your value provision and uppity free market and poof be gone.

      Trump is compromised Moscovite Prez, but damn it. I love that he’s sticking to the Chinese and all those free traders.

    77. newbie says:

      NYC: Even the cheapest homes are waiting for buyers

      http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article/20180720/REAL_ESTATE/180729989

    78. Blue Ribbon Teacher says:

      Last time I was in CBGBs, I was seeing a friend’s band play right before he played the Letterman show. Went down to the bathrooms. They weren’t labeled. Took a guess, and I was wrong.

    79. Bystander says:

      Newbie,

      If NYC has the sniffles, Hudson County is about to get the pneumonia with the sh^ts.

    Comments are closed.