Recovery by next year?

From HousingWire:

TransUnion: Mortgage market will completely recover next year

The long, steady recovery from the housing crisis and the recession that followed is nearly over, with the consumer lending market, including mortgages, expected to recover completely in 2016, according to a new report from Transunion.

Transunion published its 2016 forecast for the mortgage market this week, and the report states that the mortgage market will return to its pre-crisis state by the end of 2016.

According to Transunion’s analysis, the national mortgage loan serious delinquency rate, which is the ratio of borrowers 60 or more days past due, will decline from 2.5% at the end of 2015 to 2.06% at the conclusion of 2016.

Consumer level mortgage delinquency rates peaked at 6.94% during the first quarter of 2010 and have been declining nearly every quarter since, Transunion’s report showed.

And the delinquency rate is expected to drop to 2.5% by the end of this year.

Transunion’s 2016 projection is that the year-end delinquency rate will sit at 2.06%, much more in line with the pre-crisis delinquency rate.

“We have observed that a ‘normal’ delinquency rate falls between 1.5% and 2% in the past, and our forecast puts the nation back at this level,” said Steve Chaouki, executive vice president and head of TransUnion’s financial services business unit.

“Newer vintage mortgage loans have been performing at this level for the last few years, but a combination of factors such as the funneling of bad mortgage loans through the foreclosure process, an improvement in the employment picture and an uptick in housing prices were needed to get back to normal,” Chaounki continued.

Transunion’s forecast also projects continued growth in the average mortgage debt per borrower, which has slowly gained in recent years, due in part to a rebound in housing prices.

Debt levels are expected to experience a $9,000+ gain by the end of next year from the year-end low observed in 2012, Transunion’s report shows.

This entry was posted in Foreclosures, Housing Recovery, Mortgages, National Real Estate. Bookmark the permalink.

141 Responses to Recovery by next year?

  1. Mike says:

    Good Morning New Jersey

  2. Comrade Nom Deplume, the anon-tidote says:

    Good morning Mike

    Grim, you know you’re just encouraging pumps with that headline

  3. grim says:

    Edit: Not for New Jersey

    How ’bout that?

  4. D-FENS says:

    It’s because I live here. If I were to sell my house…NJ would immediately recover after I left…even surpass the prices of the last bubble.

  5. Fast Eddie says:

    How many still can’t sell without taking a loss? What recovery? The heist by the housing robber barons a decade ago was epic. How many in the haughty towns are making payments on a depressed asset?

  6. anon (the good one) says:

    look it up and provide answers

    Fast Eddie says:
    December 10, 2015 at 7:50 am
    How many still can’t sell without taking a loss? What recovery? The heist by the housing robber barons a decade ago was epic. How many in the haughty towns are making payments on a depressed asset?

  7. Boston already has. My inclination is that RE prices will be going down again soon.

    It’s because I live here. If I were to sell my house…NJ would immediately recover after I left…even surpass the prices of the last bubble.

  8. Jobless Claims at up 13,000 to 282,00.

  9. anon (the good one) says:

    RE is going UP!

    @WSJ
    Amid a fierce market for college hires, companies are making offers quickly and figuring out job details later

    When a Job Offer Comes Without a Job
    Recruiters are looking at innate abilities of college hires rather than just skills to do a job
    By LINDSAY GELLMAN
    Dec. 1, 2015 7:38 p.m. ET
    Some companies are hiring first and figuring out jobs for these recruits much later.

  10. anon (the good one) says:

    @nicktimiraos

    Happy holidays, America: In 41 states, at least one gas station is selling gas for under $2 a gallon

  11. yome says:

    Regular Gas
    Fuel One $1.71
    Raceway $1.71
    Costco $1.75

  12. Fast Eddie says:

    Happy holidays, America: In 41 states, at least one gas station is selling gas for under $2 a gallon

    We’ve been clamoring for a long time to become more energy independent and use our own resources instead of relying on countries that hate us. It’s finally paying off.

  13. 1987 Condo says:

    #11-12….Bush’s fault? Or Haliburton? Someone’s to blame!

  14. Libturd in the City says:

    “Happy holidays, America: In 41 states, at least one gas station is selling gas for under $2 a gallon”

    Thank you Bushes.

  15. Libturd in the City says:

    I’m going back to Vegas.

  16. Fast Eddie says:

    I was just reading that half of the Oblammy care co-ops have collapsed due to spiking premiums and deductibles. People are opting out completely because they can’t afford it. And since there is no guaranty in place, insurance companies are not getting paid. Thanks Oblammy!

  17. D-FENS says:

    You know, the second I sold my 4×4 truck, and started driving a 4 cylinder commuter car, the price of gas immediately plummeted. Son of a b1tch.

  18. D-FENS says:

    Meanwhile…Grim quietly offloads his electric vehicle…

  19. Comrade Nom Deplume, screwing around at work says:

    [10] anon,

    Lemme guess. You are going to thank Obama for the fact that oil is going down, even though the cause is the Saudis trying to squeeze out North American shale producers.

    Well, since you don’t want North American shale production, you may actually have cause to thank Obama. Or at least the Saudis.

    BTW, the sun rose this morning. I suppose we should be thanking Obama, right Twidiot?

  20. Comrade Nom Deplume, screwing around at work says:

    [18] DFENS

    I’d keep that electric vehicle. Gasoline and oil don’t necessarily correlate, and gas is highly perishable, unlike oil. Some experts, including Schork, point out that there is no gasoline glut and are predicting high gas prices this summer.

  21. Ottoman says:

    Since most of Obamacare is built on right wing and capitalist principles this isn’t surprising if true (as someone who believes in trickle down economics, you’ve proven yourself not to be very bright). Heritage Foundation wrote about forcing individual mandates on the public back in 1989 which would, of course, hand more business and power to the big insurance companies. Of course the former head of Heritage is now in the process of bankrupting the state of Kansas as its governor.

    Sounds like you agree with the left that we need single payer to remove the corrupt hand of the market from destroying what is a basic American right.

    “I was just reading that half of the Oblammy care co-ops have collapsed due to spiking premiums and deductibles. People are opting out completely because they can’t afford it. And since there is no guaranty in place, insurance companies are not getting paid. Thanks Oblammy!”

  22. Comrade Nom Deplume, screwing around at work says:

    [17] DFENS

    I will take advantage to offload my MDX. Or keep the MDX for family hauling and pick up an economical beater for local driving/commuting/etc. Oil won’t stay down forever.

  23. Ottoman says:

    I’m thankful that the Midwest is poised for a massive earthquake thanks to fracking.

  24. Grim says:

    I should have bought that big Land Rover LR3. 8 miles to the gallon city doesn’t sound so bad anymore.

  25. Comrade Nom Deplume, screwing around at work says:

    [21] otto,

    Inevitably, you will end up with a two- or three-tier system unless you (a) outlaw employer-sponsored plans (including Taft-Hartley plans, oh the horror); (b) ban individual market policies, including supplemental policies that are guaranteed to crop up once you create a floor with single payer/cat health; and (c) somehow convince states to regulate MDs and providers much more closely in order to prevent them from disfavoring your low rent single payer clients.

    Bonus if you try to implement that at the same time you bail out state and municipal government pensions.

    Then it will be time to offload my excess firearms at sky-high prices, get some popcorn and watch the carnage unfold.

  26. If you say so says:

    D-Fens,
    Questions
    1. Is there a finite amount of Oil, or is there plenty left, and how much effort to get to the last of it.
    2. Do you have children, or do you care about children.
    3. Bottom line, do you need a pickup, or want a pickup.
    4. If you are doing fine without your pickup, you are doing the world and the children good service by saving resources.
    5. Whatever oil you save may help lower gas prices due to supply and demand, thereby allowing/enticing someone to buy an inappropriate vehicle to make up for the good you have done.
    6. I think license plates should be like dealer plates and follow the vehicles. This would allow for drivers to own multiple vehicles and choose the appropriate one for the task at hand. You may need a pickup on the weekend but not for your commute to work. 2 registrations, double insurance, etc. Another form of theft……

  27. Grim says:

    This Omnia battle is getting interesting

  28. Comrade Nom Deplume, screwing around at work says:

    [23] otto

    “I’m thankful that the Midwest is poised for a massive earthquake thanks to fracking.”

    I’m thankful that there’s a better than minimal chance you’ll be capped someday.

  29. Grim says:

    Horizon going all out on marketing and sign ups, despite the state legislature trying to pass a law to ban it.

  30. Raymond Reddington formerly Phoenix says: says:

    29. Grim,
    Corporations are much faster than the legislature.
    So is molasses. Molasses also has a higher IQ.

  31. Raymond Reddington formerly Phoenix says: says:

    Best quote in the article–America and it’s self induced corrosion…. Greed will get you every time, unless you die first-Old goats check out before the storm.

    “The best way to beat the enemy is probably to go to their homeland,” Chen said of his factory in Alabama. “As our former leader Deng Xiaoping put it, we’ll cross the river by touching the stones.”

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-08-30/chinese-build-u-s-factories-bringing-jobs-along-with-tensions

  32. D-FENS says:

    26 – I predict that things I cannot even imagine will happen affecting oil output and production. The term “Peak oil” now seems silly in retrospect.

    For example, I could not have guessed that attempts by the Saudi’s and OPEC to crush the shale industry in the US would have actually had the opposite effect…

    https://www.aei.org/publication/saudis-drive-to-kill-us-shale-has-backfired/

    They’ve now consolidated, and were forced to innovate through technology in order to survive. Domestic production continues, only more efficiently and cheaper.

  33. Libturd in the City says:

    “I’m thankful that the Midwest is poised for a massive earthquake thanks to fracking.”

    That science is right there on par with the climate change make believers.

  34. Raymond Reddington formerly Phoenix says: says:

    27. Grim,
    Christie will be getting a bill to sign shortly. Lots of money at stake…..

  35. Libturd in the City says:

    D-Fens.

    Oil will bounce back eventually. You can see it coming with the increase in traffic on the roads and the extended better than average performance of the car dealers and manufacturers. Though the frackers have done a fantastic job gaining efficiency. There was simply too much put online too fast to try to capitalize on the $100/barrel oil prices. Saudi Arabia will win the next battle, but the fractures will ramp up again to find an equilibrium. Unless the lefties get their way and over-regulation based on questionable science makes fracking too expensive to compete. Though, on the bright side, it would bring on the inevitable WWIII sooner, rather than later, which IMO, would be the smart move.

  36. Raymond Reddington formerly Phoenix says: says:

    33. Libturd,
    There is some evidence that fracking has caused some localized earthquake activity.
    Common sense also dictates that pumping unknown proprietary chemicals at high pressure to break rock underground can’t possibly be the smartest thing to do.
    Problem is you can’t always do the smartest/right thing to do when you don’t have the coin to pay for it…..

  37. D-FENS says:

    http://www.proactiveinvestors.com/columns/power-talk/23614/stewart-dalby-is-the-saudi-war-on-frackers-working-23614.html

    Certainly the pain the Saudis say they feel is real enough. The Saudis said they would use their substantial foreign reserves to finance the production increases. But the reserves appear to be sinking as fast as the oil price.

    Last year they were US$737bn and fell to a three-year low of US$647bn in September. According to the International Monetary Fund (IMF) the Kingdom’s budget deficit will reach 20% of GDP this year, or roughly US$140bn.

    The Saudis have just announced they are tapping international bond markets for the first time, another sign of the damage that lower oil prices are having on their public finances.

    One commentator who has been saying for the past few months that the Saudi strategy is not working is Ambrose Evans-Pritchard of the Daily Telegraph.

    He has written if the aim was to choke the US shale industry, the Saudis have misjudged badly.

    Okay, Wood Mackenzie estimates the major oil and gas companies have shelved 46 large projects, deferring US$200bn of investments.

    But the problem now for the Saudis is that the US shale frackers are no longer high-cost. They are now mostly mid-cost. As oil prices have fallen so has the price of rig hire. Technological innovations have also reduced costs.

    Evans-Pritchard said John Hess, the head of Hess Corporation, a fracking group, told him: “We’ve driven down drilling costs by 50%, and we can see another 30% ahead.”

    In a recent article Evans-Pritchard concluded: “Until now shale drillers have been cushioned by hedging contracts. The stress test will come over coming months as these expire.

    “But even if scores of over-leveraged wild-catters go bankrupt as funding dries up, it will not do OPEC any good. The wells will still be there. The technology and infrastructure will still be there. Stronger companies will mop up on the cheap, taking over the operations.”

  38. Libturd in the City says:

    “There is some evidence that fracking has caused some localized earthquake activity.”

    I will not deny that, but the ground also shakes when trucks drive past my house. Otto, in his typical ignoring of any evidence that does not support the liberal playbook, claims, “the Midwest is poised for a massive earthquake.”

    Massive earthquake? Massive lie!

  39. grim says:

    I am no healthcare expert, but when I see outrage from hospitals and legislators, I’m apt to believe that Horizon is on the right path.

    Why not develop a plan that provides discounted rates at specific providers?

    If I was in the market for a plan, Omnia includes Hackensack – it’s not a matter of only including cut-rate hospitals.

  40. Fast Eddie says:

    Ottoman,

    Sweetheart, trickle down or whatever it’s called has allowed me to take advantage of endless opportunities. As a result, my investments are growing, I purchased a house in one of those towns that matter and lo and behold, I just got a raise and a bonus. All this and I’m still able to take care of you and your people through my contributions also know as taxes.

  41. Grim [27];

    I’m going to give Omnia a whirl. I have to change docs to stay in “tier 1″, but when the whole nut is coming out or your own hide, you do what you have to do. Oh to be an oppressed government worker paying single digit percentages of their health premium.

    I’m not too concerned that the legislature can get out of their own way to do anything about anything. And if they do, they will probably force them to honor premiums, but ‘spread the wealth around” by prohibiting restrictions on docs and hospitals. Winning!

  42. grim says:

    I wonder if Christie refuses to sign

  43. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Nom, are you finally starting to realize that the Great Pumpkin is coming? Come on, I deserve some credit for calling this back in 2012. Remember me going back and forth with fast eddie, stating any house purchased now in a good location is a great deal, you just need 10 years to realize it. The economy is heating up. Low energy costs, tight labor market, and coming out of the down period in the never ending boom/bust cycle says get ready to launch. Couple more years and it’s party time. Just sucks, you know what follows a big party…..yup, huge hangover. So you better sell during the boom and buy back in during the down time.

    Comrade Nom Deplume, the anon-tidote says:
    December 10, 2015 at 6:32 am
    Good morning Mike

    Grim, you know you’re just encouraging pumps with that headline

  44. Ragnar says:

    Ottoman should try to live his life without any tools, products, or ideas that “trickled down” from rich people. He’d basically be living like Gollum, sucking the guts out of fish, and wearing dirty moss as clothes. Don’t forget to apply this rule to your dentristry work as well. Just bash your rotten teeth out with rocks when you can no longer bear the ache.

    Thanks to capitalism, individual rights, and a vast number of millionaires who have improved the state of human life in innumerable ways over the past several hundred years, my life is much more pleasant than that.

  45. The Great Pumpkin says:

    And don’t forget about the role of the worker in this whole process. Without the worker, there would be one guy with an idea. Too bad he has no help to make it happen. Amazing how you discount the role of workers. They are the most important piece of the puzzle, they are the producers who do it cheap enough so that the guy with the idea can profit.

    I would also like to add that many of capitalism’s biggest contributions were brought about by workers who were never given any credit or profit for their contributions. Their owner took all the credit and profit.

    Ragnar says:
    December 10, 2015 at 10:38 am
    Ottoman should try to live his life without any tools, products, or ideas that “trickled down” from rich people. He’d basically be living like Gollum, sucking the guts out of fish, and wearing dirty moss as clothes. Don’t forget to apply this rule to your dentristry work as well. Just bash your rotten teeth out with rocks when you can no longer bear the ache.

    Thanks to capitalism, individual rights, and a vast number of millionaires who have improved the state of human life in innumerable ways over the past several hundred years, my life is much more pleasant than that.

  46. Libturd in the City says:

    Does anyone really believe in trickle-down? Or is it just a catchphrase that the left dangles in front of righties to get their goat?

  47. The Great Pumpkin says:

    So now you have switched your position from a few years back when we used to debate. A few years back, you had no hope for jobs, never mind a raise. Now look at you, buying a house and getting a raise. The great pumpkin is coming baby!

    Fast Eddie says:
    December 10, 2015 at 10:29 am
    Ottoman,

    Sweetheart, trickle down or whatever it’s called has allowed me to take advantage of endless opportunities. As a result, my investments are growing, I purchased a house in one of those towns that matter and lo and behold, I just got a raise and a bonus. All this and I’m still able to take care of you and your people through my contributions also know as taxes.

  48. grim says:

    Does anyone really believe in trickle-down? Or is it just a catchphrase that the left dangles in front of righties to get their goat?

    It’s a naive oversimplification, but the problem is, there are strong examples of both trickle-up and trickle-down patterns in the economy. This is entirely about political divisiveness, and nothing to do with the economy.

    Problem is, look at companies like Apple keeping dollars off-shore, or Pfizer moving the HQ to Ireland to cut tax liability. Clearly high comparative corporate tax rates are going to create a problem, where businesses will seek the lowest cost operating arrangements, and take jobs with them. Like I said, a grain of truth. How do you solve the issue of ex-repatriation of jobs and tax jurisdiction with trickle-up? To me, I see a huge population of unemployed workers collecting big benefits payments.

  49. Libturd in the City says:

    Nice explanation Grim. It’s precisely syncs up with my thoughts on it.

    This political divisiveness is going to destroy this country. Regardless of which side one supports.

  50. 1987 Condo says:

    I’m thinking “no master plan” may work….look, we all (?) wanted a national energy policy, we decried it for decades..looked like we were SOL, then, with no coordinated political effort, the oil shale revolution takes place and the US looks energy sufficient, or as sufficient with any other country…..hmmmm

  51. Trapper Dan says:

    Tiered healtcare plans? Bring on the death panels!

  52. chicagofinance says:

    Dropping my kids off at school this morning……local teachers are working without a contract…….message to Union reps……you look like entitled and clueless a%%holes when you put huge placards on your car dashboards with harsh comments about how you are working without a contract and the school Board is screwing you ……when your fcuking car is a brand new Mercedes station wagon which is MUCH nicer than either one of my cars…….and frankly is the nicest car in the entire lot…….

  53. Ragnar says:

    See the history of “trickle down” in Wikipedia. It’s a pejorative only, reflective of a mentality that sees commerce as zero sum rather than win-win activity.

  54. Ragnar says:

    Don’t most Americans work “without a contract”?

  55. Libturd in the City says:

    I never understood why teachers don’t strike. Perhaps because things must not be too bad?

    The teachers went on strike when I was in 7th grade. We almost burnt the school down. I recall ceiling panel surfing in the hallway and flaming paper airplanes. Lots of broken windows too. I felt bad for the principal who was somehow put in charge of watching the entire school of over 2,000. We were all herded into the gym. That didn’t last long.

  56. Trapper Dan says:

    re# 53- Dirty renters should not complain about taxes.

  57. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Show me which corporation is paying this high tax rate of 35%. Absolutely no one, it’s the equivalent of the msrp when you go car shopping. Why don’t you call it like it really is. These are greedy individuals trying their hardest to avoid paying taxes. Simple as that. Saying the taxes are too high is a got damn excuse. They want to go to some tax haven and pay almost nothing, the U.S. can not compete with those low rates, we have a large society to take of along with the rest of the world.

    When people refer to trickle down economics, they are referring to the idea that lowering the tax rates and lowering the wages will result in high growth in the future. It’s totally bogus. They pocket that capital instead of investing in growth. They are too scared to risk capital and earn profit the honest way (with a good product that people want and need). They are obsessed with the idea of avoiding taxes (ask greece how that worked out). The taxes are lower than they have ever been, you can’t even lower it anymore without totally shooting up the debt. So should we artificially lower the tax rates to unsupportable levels, that leaves future generations with the huge bag of debt?

    Trickle up economics works. It puts money into workers hands. The money in worker’s hands creates demand. Demand drives growth. If you don’t put the money in the consumers hands, they can not signal to businesses that they demand products, which leads to stagflation or deflation. It’s really as simple as that, too bad greed gets in the way of running an economy the efficient and right way.

    “Clearly high comparative corporate tax rates are going to create a problem, where businesses will seek the lowest cost operating arrangements, and take jobs with them. Like I said, a grain of truth. How do you solve the issue of ex-repatriation of jobs and tax jurisdiction with trickle-up? To me, I see a huge population of unemployed workers collecting big benefits payments.”

  58. The Great Pumpkin says:

    It’s illegal, they have teachers by the balls.

    Libturd in the City says:
    December 10, 2015 at 11:23 am
    I never understood why teachers don’t strike. Perhaps because things must not be too bad?

    The teachers went on strike when I was in 7th grade. We almost burnt the school down. I recall ceiling panel surfing in the hallway and flaming paper airplanes. Lots of broken windows too. I felt bad for the principal who was somehow put in charge of watching the entire school of over 2,000. We were all herded into the gym. That didn’t last long.

  59. anon (the good one) says:

    it’s pure envy consuming you of seeing people driving good cars. this ain’t Russia for people to drive Ladas

    take your fukcing kids out of school if it bothers you that much teachers don’t arrive to school riding donkeys

    chicagofinance says:
    December 10, 2015 at 11:11 am
    Dropping my kids off at school this morning……local teachers are working without a contract…….message to Union reps……you look like entitled and clueless a%%holes when you put huge placards on your car dashboards with harsh comments about how you are working without a contract and the school Board is screwing you ……when your fcuking car is a brand new Mercedes station wagon which is MUCH nicer than either one of my cars…….and frankly is the nicest car in the entire lot…….

  60. 1987 Condo says:

    #56….they put them in jail. My wife’s district finally got a new contract, typical 1%-2% but lost a year of service…coincidentally find out local union rep gets a $3,000 stipend to be a rep and got approval from board to pre-visit China, at district expense prior to the planned school trip next year.

  61. Ben says:

    Dropping my kids off at school this morning……local teachers are working without a contract…….message to Union reps……you look like entitled and clueless a%%holes when you put huge placards on your car dashboards with harsh comments about how you are working without a contract and the school Board is screwing you ……when your fcuking car is a brand new Mercedes station wagon which is MUCH nicer than either one of my cars…….and frankly is the nicest car in the entire lot…….

    I know two teachers at my last school. One of them drove a Porsche. Another one drove an Audi Convertible. Two nicest cars in the lot. They were both bought for them by their wives who made a lot more money than they did. I seriously doubt the teachers are raking it in. Maybe a handful in each building. I feel sorry for the ones busting their butt, making 50k a year, hopelessly hoping for just a $1k increase in salary. The reality is, they probably won’t get it, and get pretty annoyed because everyone in town looks at them with disdain because someone in the building drives a Mercedes.

  62. Essex says:

    Ben,

    Come on man. Interjecting reality into knee- jerk stupidity.

    P.S. I may be shallow, but I don’t trust financial advisors who drive crappy cars any more than I would a salesman who tools around town in a rusty minivan.

  63. Ragnar says:

    I’d like to see private schools where the teachers are rich and driving luxury cars and the kids are learning how to be incredibly knowledgeable, rational, productive and creative.
    In other words, I’d like to see lots of millionaires created in the field of education, as the industry revolutionizes itself by dramatically improving the quality of its services relative to the cost of providing that service.

    Like what happens in industries that exist in the capitalist economy.

  64. Comrade Nom Deplume, the anon-tidote says:

    Oops . . .

    “December 9, 2015 Wednesday 3:00 AM GMT
    950 words
    Three out of Four US Employers to Be Hit With Cadillac Tax by 2022;
    Even Bronze-Level Plans Subject to Excise Tax, Finds UBA Survey

    INDIANAPOLIS, IN; Dec 09, 2015

    Many employers falsely assume that the Cadillac tax will apply only to the richest plans. However, newly release data from the 2015 UBA Health Plan Survey shows that even the lowest quality “Bronze-level” health insurance plans on the Affordable Care Act (ACA) exchanges are at risk of triggering the tax, potentially affecting 74 percent of employers by 2022.

    “When the law was created, it was assumed that only three percent of plans would trigger the Cadillac tax, and it was marketed as a tax on ‘the rich benefits of executives,'” says Les McPhearson, CEO of UBA. “The reality is that this tax will weigh heavily on a majority of American businesses that can’t afford it and will have to make severe cuts to stay above water. Unless something changes by 2018, the tax will hit more government employers — like schools and fire departments — than finance firms.”

    United Benefit Advisors’ Health Plan Survey, the nation’s most comprehensive benchmarking survey of employer-sponsored health plans, includes responses from more than 10,000 employers that mirror 99 percent of American businesses.
    The Cadillac tax, which takes effect in 2018, will levy a 40 percent tax on health insurance plans that cost more than $10,200 for individuals and $27,500 for families. The excise tax is not currently based on benefit levels, but is solely based on annual premiums. Current regulations also will include employer and employee contributions to Health Reimbursement Arrangements (HRAs), Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) and Flexible Spending Accounts (FSAs). (UBA does not include these amounts into the trend increases below.)

    Using a six percent rate or “trend” increase, compounded each year, UBA finds that by 2018, 30 percent of employers will be subject to the Cadillac tax; by 2020, 50 percent; and by 2022 it will hit 73.79 percent of employers.

    According to the survey, based on statewide plan averages, only 7.5 percent of employers with plans that have greater than 90 percent actuarial value (AV) will trigger the tax by 2022. Of those plans with a statewide average AV between 80 and 89.99 percent, 58.68 percent will get hit, and for plans with AVs between 70 and 79.99 percent, 33.79 percent will face the Cadillac tax.
    “Many of these employers, even after reducing benefits and premiums, will still not be able to lower their annual costs under the Cadillac tax thresholds,” says Carol Taylor, Chairwoman of the UBA Client Compliance Solutions Committee and the Director of Compliance with D & S Agency, a Virginia-based insurance firm and UBA Partner. “The Cadillac tax hits those employers with an aging workforce, those with high claims and those in areas with high medical care costs. They should be strategizing now, however, to mitigate liabilities as much as possible.”

    “Employers will continue to cut benefits and increase deductibles in an effort to curb consumer health care spending by passing costs onto their employees, as we’ve seen in recent years,” says McPhearson. “There is potential for changes to the law that could make it affect fewer businesses, but unless employers start planning now for the changes coming January 1, 2018, they could face devastating cost increases.”

    A self-serving study to be sure, but as I’ve said of ACA all along, intentionally defective.

  65. Comrade Nom Deplume, the anon-tidote says:

    [62] ben

    Those are all legit points but when you tool around my daughter’s old school in the Brig, the cars are all uniformly nicer than what I was driving. And I wasn’t driving domestic or low level foreign.

    My daughter’s LA teacher drove a Lexus convertible. The only teacher I knew of that drove a less-expensive car was the hippy-dippy teacher who would wear her Obama buttons into school

  66. D-FENS says:

    Why don’t suburban and exurban teachers use their collective political influence to lobby for something like the fair school funding act?

    http://www.senatenj.com/index.php/doherty/doherty-announces-three-colleagues-join-the-fair-school-funding-act-as-co-sponsors/9177

  67. Comrade Nom Deplume, the anon-tidote says:

    [60] anon

    “it’s pure envy consuming you of seeing people driving good cars. this ain’t Russia for people to drive Ladas”

    Classic. So many unintended meanings on so many levels. And so many psychological nuances. I can’t decide if this is projection or hostile attribution bias.

  68. Fast Eddie says:

    A few years back, you had no hope for jobs, never mind a raise.

    I still don’t and it’s still a rarity. I opened the right door, chose the correct numbers, threw salt over my shoulder and received some lady luck. For the majority, all of it is out of reach. I could lose my job tomorrow. A lot of people did and they never recovered.

  69. Trapper Dan says:

    Look at meee!!!!!!

    “In this most recent survey, 60 percent of the 18- to 29-year-olds polled say they support committing U.S. combat troops to fight ISIS. But an almost equal number (62 percent) say they wouldn’t want to personally join the fight, even if the U.S. needed additional troops”

    http://www.npr.org/2015/12/10/459111960/millennials-want-to-send-troops-to-fight-isis-but-not-serve

  70. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Rich wives with no jobs drive the same thing. How do you know who these teachers married or what kind of money they inherited. For all you know, they could have a spending problem and be in debt. If they are doing a good job, they deserve a contract and an acceptable wage for a professional. You can’t say that a teacher doesn’t deserve a raise because they drive a mercedes. You are doing what people accuse the left of doing. You know what I mean, you have 40 billion dollars, so you can chip in with more taxes. How is what you are doing to teachers any different? You have a mercedes, you don’t need a raise….you have the nicest car in the lot.

    chicagofinance says:
    December 10, 2015 at 11:11 am
    Dropping my kids off at school this morning……local teachers are working without a contract…….message to Union reps……you look like entitled and clueless a%%holes when you put huge placards on your car dashboards with harsh comments about how you are working without a contract and the school Board is screwing you ……when your fcuking car is a brand new Mercedes station wagon which is MUCH nicer than either one of my cars…….and frankly is the nicest car in the entire lot…….

  71. Ben says:

    Those are all legit points but when you tool around my daughter’s old school in the Brig, the cars are all uniformly nicer than what I was driving. And I wasn’t driving domestic or low level foreign.

    My daughter’s LA teacher drove a Lexus convertible. The only teacher I knew of that drove a less-expensive car was the hippy-dippy teacher who would wear her Obama buttons into school

    So…from what I gather, teachers seem to be borrowing more than they can afford, just like the rest of America.

  72. The Great Pumpkin says:

    73- Ben, bigger question should be why are the low paid teachers driving the nicest cars in the lot? It thought administrators make the big bucks? After thinking about this question, you will throw the theory that teachers are driving nice cars because they are highly paid.

  73. The Great Pumpkin says:

    you will throw the theory, that teachers are driving nice cars because they are highly paid, right out the window.

  74. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Yes! That’s the fast eddie I know and love.

    Fast Eddie says:
    December 10, 2015 at 12:47 pm
    A few years back, you had no hope for jobs, never mind a raise.

    I still don’t and it’s still a rarity. I opened the right door, chose the correct numbers, threw salt over my shoulder and received some lady luck. For the majority, all of it is out of reach. I could lose my job tomorrow. A lot of people did and they never recovered.

  75. Comrade Nom Deplume, the anon-tidote says:

    [73] ben

    “So…from what I gather, teachers seem to be borrowing more than they can afford, just like the rest of America.”

    The problem with that argument is that, all things being equal, if teachers are borrowing to afford snazzy cars, and are driving nicer wheels than the parents that (arguably) make more, sometimes much more, it presupposes that the teachers are all going into hock big-time.

    If a teacher is borrowing to finance a 50K ride on a 50K salary, that is a much bigger DTI than if I borrowed 35K on a 150K salary. Of course, my example is anecdotal and representative of one of thousands of profiles, but I think it illustrates my point.

    But I haven’t heard of teachers losing their homes to foreclosure or declaring bankruptcy at a higher rate than the general population, which one would expect if teachers were overextending themselves at a rate greater than the rest of the economic strata that they occupy.

    So, while the examples that Chi and I cite are possibly outliers (I concede that possibility), you’d be on more solid ground if you backed up that argument and not the argument you posted.

  76. Comrade Nom Deplume, the anon-tidote says:

    [75] pumpkin

    I direct you to post 77. You’re a senior financial analyst, why didn’t you think of this first?

  77. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Exactly, I know why….. they inherited, married a well off spouse, or did well with investments. I highly doubt that the teachers are buying over their heads, but you never know.

    Comrade Nom Deplume, the anon-tidote says:
    December 10, 2015 at 2:31 pm
    [75] pumpkin

    I direct you to post 77. You’re a senior financial analyst, why didn’t you think of this first?

  78. Trapper Dan says:

    You can lookup the salaries here.

    http://php.app.com/edstaff/search.php

  79. The Great Pumpkin says:

    79- The most a teacher will make is low six figures and that’s after a long time. Their salaries are not enough to support the high life, that’s a fact. I don’t know why you are trying to paint the picture that this is some lucrative career. You go into banking for that.

  80. Libturd in the City says:

    Find your oldest kid’s teacher and post the salary. This should give us a good average to go on. Mine makes $76.6K.

  81. Libturd in the City says:

    With summers off, I might add.

  82. Libturd in the City says:

    Whoa…his math teacher makes $104,255. She’s very good, but we’re talking 5th grade. This week they are focused on reviewing long division.

  83. Trapper Dan says:

    re# 82 – $103k – 32 years on the job, probably eligible for about 60% pension.

  84. Trapper Dan says:

    Also can and will retire soon, so life expectancy perhaps another 20 years. She looks healthy so lets say 30. At least two million in pension payouts, plus medical add in another 700k for that. Perhaps 3 million all in for retirement at 57 or 58 years old.

  85. Libturd in the City says:

    It is truly strange. Whenever you talk with a teacher or a union rep., everyone is making $50K. But when you look online,many between 90 and 110K. What gives? I know my kids Kindergarten and math teacher were 6 figures. Even his non-tenured 3rd grade teacher is now at $75K . I found one finally, his 4th grade teacher was a 2nd year teacher $52,219. So how do some make so much and others so little?

  86. 1987 Condo says:

    My wife made mid career switch…11 years HS Math teacher (Has BS in Actuarial science-MA Education) $60, 300

  87. 1987 Condo says:

    She drives a 15 used old mini van…she may get a new car next year, but that will be based on my income.

  88. 1987 Condo says:

    #89..15 year old

  89. Libturd in the City says:

    Math teacher is at 21 years. I suppose those 3% a year guaranteed increases add up. I wish I got that!

  90. D-FENS says:

    J3sus christ…no wonder taxes are so high.

  91. The Great Pumpkin says:

    You want teachers to make crap? Take away the professional requirements of the job. Eliminate the need for multiple degrees and tests needed to enter the field. Just don’t cry when the teacher is total garbage and resembles your local Walmart employee.

  92. Fast Eddie says:

    Omg… those salaries are s1ckening! Holy sh1t, what a scam!

  93. Libturd in the City says:

    Gotta keep them voting for the blue team.

  94. Essex says:

    84. Makes you wish you did the job. Remember, You are around children all day long. That counts as combat pay in most places.

  95. The Great Pumpkin says:

    92- you think a math teacher making 60,000 is too much? There is no satisfying some people. That’s cheap in my book, not much more than a bus driver and only 3 to 4 times more than minimum wage. That’s a joke for a professional. Take away the pension and benefits, and why would someone sign up for this? Even with the pension, why would you sign up for this?

  96. The Great Pumpkin says:

    97- 60,000 after ten years. That sucks!!

  97. Bystander says:

    Fast,

    “You didn’t build that.”

  98. 1987 Condo says:

    For comparison:

    The current starting salary for a trooper (NJ) is $62,403.60 (including uniform allowance

    The median salary for the state’s 20,525 municipal officers was $90,672 last year, meaning half earned more and half earned less.

  99. 1987 Condo says:

    North Jersey probably higher:

    “Any police officer that says they’re not making enough money needs to re-examine themselves,” said Saddle Brook Township Police Chief Robert Kugler. In that Bergen County town, 30 of 31 officers made six figures last year, and the median salary was $121,177.

  100. chicagofinance says:

    Please explain…
    Chipotle’s CEO has no good answers, but says “I’m sorry”……stock goes up 6%……WTF?

  101. chicagofinance says:

    Do you understand my point? Don’t be a representative for a class that is supposedly suffering when you clearly are not…….it is pure lack of self-awareness…..which implies lack of empathy…….which implies they don’t give a sh!t how it looks….which implies they don’t give a sh!t about the town…..I’m not saying it is true; it just looks unseemly…..

    Essex says:
    December 10, 2015 at 11:50 am
    Ben,

    Come on man. Interjecting reality into knee- jerk stupidity.

    P.S. I may be shallow, but I don’t trust financial advisors who drive crappy cars any more than I would a salesman who tools around town in a rusty minivan.

  102. leftwing says:

    “Does anyone really believe in trickle-down? Or is it just a catchphrase that the left dangles in front of righties to get their goat?”

    Or vice versa?

  103. leftwing says:

    g0ddammit!!!!

    I just typed some serious questions around Omnia/Horizon after doing some reading and the farking blog at the post.

    WTF Grim?

    Not the first time it has happened…..it doesn’t show up as moderation pending, just takes me back to the top of the page and nothing shows below…..

    Anyway, greatly condensed, seems the Omnia is what used to be PPOs, more or less using in-network to providers and hospitals while Horizon Advantage is more traditional insurance?

  104. leftwing says:

    104 and 105 clear……the one in the middle…..poof

  105. Comrade Nom Deplume, screwing around at work says:

    For the record, I don’t give a rat’s patootie what teachers in NJ make.

    Nor do I care what they make in PA, so long as they do the job. Unfortunately, I find their commitment lacking in what is considered a well-paying district.

  106. Ben says:

    It is truly strange. Whenever you talk with a teacher or a union rep., everyone is making $50K. But when you look online,many between 90 and 110K. What gives? I know my kids Kindergarten and math teacher were 6 figures. Even his non-tenured 3rd grade teacher is now at $75K . I found one finally, his 4th grade teacher was a 2nd year teacher $52,219. So how do some make so much and others so little?

    If you just look up average salary for each district, the point is made…most make anywhere from 50k to 60k….but you are only talking base salary.

    I started out at 58k (MS + 30 Credits). I supposedly was at 64k when I left. My last paycheck was smaller than my very first one 6 years prior. Pension, healthcare, and step freezes are to thank for that. And no, those contributions to healthcare were not a good thing, they didn’t save you a dime. It freed up money for the board of ed in your town to spend on something wasteful.

    I had enough and negotiated somewhere else. Now at 85k and looking at 4k in raises each year because I was able to negotiate my way up the ladder. The biggest raises come at the end (courtesy of the union…seniority rules for them).

    Very few are in a position to do that. Anything outside of Physics/Chemistry, you are likely looking at starting out at the minimum 45-50k for bachelors, 50-55k for masters, 55-60k for Phd. And maybe, if you are lucky, 20 years later, you are in the 100k club. Anyone you see jump the ladder is either really good at negotiating or just a friend of someone high up in district.

    Every teacher in my last district came in a 47k. in 25 years, bachelors, they have 80k. Masters, 90k. PhD 100k. Not exactly a gravy train.

  107. Ben says:

    Nor do I care what they make in PA, so long as they do the job. Unfortunately, I find their commitment lacking in what is considered a well-paying district.

    What district is this?

  108. Marilyn says:

    And you thought Girls gone wild was sleazy wait until you see NJ unions gone wild.

  109. Comrade Nom Deplume, screwing around at work says:

    [25] redux

    “The alliance allows Horizon to negotiate lower payments to some of the most well-regarded — and most expensive — hospitals in the state. In return, those Tier 1 hospitals would receive more patients. But these patients will essentially migrate from Tier 2 hospitals, some of which are on a less-secure financial footing. And executives at some facilities say they could become unstable if they lose valuable, higher-paying Horizon members.”

    This is a collorary to what I was talking about. It cuts against the Democratic idea that everyone should be in the same boat. No one should be entitled to better or cheaper unless all partake equally. It’s like the judge (who denied my friend a carry permit) said: “You aren’t entitled to any more self defense than the next person.”

    The Democratic goal is to force everyone into a single system, and to prevent deviations from that system. Concierge medicine would be outlawed; doctors would be required to accept only patients on the single payer plan and take what they are paid. Employer plans would go away but that is no loss to employers provided that they get out of the penalty regime as well.

    The future of healthcare under single payer is pretty clear and you are already seeing the best and brightest start to avoid healthcare for other endeavors. It’s one reason that states are quietly dropping or have dropped their longstanding opposition to foreign-trained docs whose training is generally viewed as inferior–they see the decline and the possibility of physician strikes so they need to import more bodies. Ironic, really.

  110. Comrade Nom Deplume, screwing around at work says:

    [109] Ben,

    Unionville-Chadds Ford

  111. Ben says:

    oh, couldn’t speak on anything with respect to that district. First time I’ve ever heard of it.

  112. Ragnar says:

    My daughter’s school has an 8th grade Spanish teacher making $119k after 15 yrs.
    I see a lot of middle of the pack teachers making between 60k to 80k. Starting teachers appear to make $51k.
    Those salary levels seem reasonable to me for a white collar job in NJ. Except for the Spanish teacher and some staff psychologists and “resource in class” people whatever that means.
    I suspect that it’s not the teachers doing 80% of the work that are the cost drag on public schools. It’s the management and incentive structures, and the pay going to people who deliver a deadweight drag of bureaucracy on educational outcomes.

  113. Ben says:

    It’s in your best interest to have teachers in your town well paid. You get better teachers. That’s not rocket science. Better money attracts better talent.

    But on top of it, if you don’t pay your teachers adequately, they end up spending the entire day after school tutoring instead of working on material for your child’s class to stay above water financially. In the grand scheme of things, the difference between paying teachers an extra 5k is a drop in the bucket tax wise compared to the benefits. Furthermore, you’ll likely be able to sell your home for more if the district climbs the rankings. Trying to get a town population to buy into this is impossible…so it won’t happen. Those that pay well do and will continue to do so. Those that don’t, never will.

  114. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Funny, and teachers took all the heat because some fat man in charge told citizens that teachers are to blame for your taxes. Love to see that fat man sit in a classroom teaching kids math for 60,000 after 10 years. He would never do it. Not many would.

    1987 Condo says:
    December 10, 2015 at 3:32 pm
    For comparison:

    The current starting salary for a trooper (NJ) is $62,403.60 (including uniform allowance

    The median salary for the state’s 20,525 municipal officers was $90,672 last year, meaning half earned more and half earned less.

  115. Fabius Maximus says:

    The funny thing about people in nice cars is for the most part they are leased. Some people get caught in the lease trap where they just roll from one to the next. My kids old teacher, in her 20s driving a nice Audi. Shares an apartment with another teacher and is treading water until she gets married. She is tutoring 5 hours a week. $250 cash in hand a week can cover a nice payment.

  116. Ben says:

    The funny thing about people in nice cars is for the most part they are leased. Some people get caught in the lease trap where they just roll from one to the next. My kids old teacher, in her 20s driving a nice Audi. Shares an apartment with another teacher and is treading water until she gets married. She is tutoring 5 hours a week. $250 cash in hand a week can cover a nice payment.

    Which is why the idea of scanning the parking lot to determine whether your teachers deserve a raise is not the way to go about it. But like I said, the reason this profession sucks is that you can be the best teacher in the entire friggin state and you’ll still be loathed by a large percentage of the population.

  117. The Great Pumpkin says:

    lol.. they don’t get mad at the banker making 500,000 a year selling bs, yet they get mad at teachers for some strange reason. I think a lot of people had a bad experience with some teachers in their life. There is no other way to explain the hate the profession receives. It has to be one of the most despised professions out there.

    Ben says:
    December 10, 2015 at 5:44 pm
    The funny thing about people in nice cars is for the most part they are leased. Some people get caught in the lease trap where they just roll from one to the next. My kids old teacher, in her 20s driving a nice Audi. Shares an apartment with another teacher and is treading water until she gets married. She is tutoring 5 hours a week. $250 cash in hand a week can cover a nice payment.

    Which is why the idea of scanning the parking lot to determine whether your teachers deserve a raise is not the way to go about it. But like I said, the reason this profession sucks is that you can be the best teacher in the entire friggin state and you’ll still be loathed by a large percentage of the population.

  118. leftwing says:

    111-115

    There are a lot of interesting concierge medicine business plans floating around, have been for years. Under the old HillBilly universal payer model they made it illegal to effectively contract/pay a physician outside of the plan. Healthcare may end up going Soviet black market style, patients paying cash under the table for services. Or, I saw an interesting model the other day – “offshore medical” – which basically took care out of the country. Maybe you end up with the equivalent of these gambling boats departing NY Harbor. Travel three miles out to see, play a few hands of blackjack, and have an appendectomy.

    Free market model is the best. If my labor – whatever it may be – nets me say $100k I ought to be able to spend it where I like. Whether it is 10kg of Osetra Gold, 30 bottles of Louis XIII, a spree at the Short Hills Mall, or on my healthcare.

    Ditto teachers. I am on the record that I truly would like to see aggregate salaries of teachers increase dramatically, but only if the union is busted so that good teahcers can get 2x more and bad teachers cut and booted.

    One size fits all fits nobody.

  119. leftwing says:

    Nom, Kennetts Sq?

    I know Genesis very well.

  120. Essex says:

    103. Chi I think that what you drive really doesn’t equate to anything except possibly your ability to procure a car. As far as pay goes, I’ll echo sentiments and say yeah it’s not bad, but 1. there are no incentives and 2. you’ll never get rich. But yes, the earning is steady for the most part and the trade-off in time off is great. What you do get as a teacher is vilified by tax weary citizens, you are in a clerical hell currently with all of the paperwork, you are as I mentioned earlier surrounded by children all day. Let’s see most people do just the kids part for a year without seriously reconsidering their sanity.

  121. Grim says:

    Ben,

    That doesn’t make sense, isn’t tenure only applicable in one district? Doesn’t that, along with relatively stable union pay rules make it improbable that the best teachers would seek the highest salaries, because they aren’t there.

    I have never heard of teachers hopping through multiple districts in their career to earn a higher wage. Likewise, I’m sure if you heard that an outsider was hired for the top pay in the school, there would be a riot.

    Isn’t it the other way around?

  122. Libturd at home says:

    Ben,

    You know I think most teachers are paid fairly. It’s the benefits that always get my goat. You are right that the extra 10K or even 20K we pay now pales in comparison to the healthcare costs that the taxpayer will have to eventually bear. This never discussed by the progressives in support of the unions.

  123. chicagofinance says:

    You are still misinterpreting what I wrote……I am saying it is stupid and counterproductive on the part of the offending party. I think less of the person, as I know who she is now since my wife works in the district. I have no issue about what she is paid…..

    Ben says:
    December 10, 2015 at 5:44 pm
    Which is why the idea of scanning the parking lot to determine whether your teachers deserve a raise is not the way to go about it.

  124. Libturd at home says:

    ChiFi – On CMG, Starbucks culture sold to stupid American’s one 1,200 calorie burrito at a time. When a Koch Brother atones, no one listens. But when the organic burrito man atones, all is good in Dodge. I wonder if anyone knows about his Mickey D’s past life? I’m guessing not!

  125. chicagofinance says:

    I remembered reading this one earlier today……to be clear and consistent with my above posts…..at my firm we take pains to be modest in our appearance and approach…..in my industry, if you make a show of your wealth, the conclusion drawn is that you are making it on the backs of your clients…….so in the same vein, why would a teacher advertise wealth in the midst of a compensation negotiation which the community must underwrite?

    Essex says:
    December 10, 2015 at 11:50 am
    Ben,

    Come on man. Interjecting reality into knee- jerk stupidity.

    P.S. I may be shallow, but I don’t trust financial advisors who drive crappy cars any more than I would a salesman who tools around town in a rusty minivan.

  126. Comrade Nom Deplume, the anon-tidote says:

    [121] wing

    Closer to WC. Kennett is a farm town by comparison. Actually, it is a farm town

  127. Ben says:

    That doesn’t make sense, isn’t tenure only applicable in one district? Doesn’t that, along with relatively stable union pay rules make it improbable that the best teachers would seek the highest salaries, because they aren’t there.

    I have never heard of teachers hopping through multiple districts in their career to earn a higher wage. Likewise, I’m sure if you heard that an outsider was hired for the top pay in the school, there would be a riot.

    Isn’t it the other way around?

    I wouldn’t say improbable. It decreases the likelihood. I jumped this year. Convinced two others to as well. Some teachers are comfortable in their tenure bubble, others aren’t. Tenure does act as a mechanism to prevent movement and does have a wage suppressing effect as a result. Any teacher that prefers that, that is their decision. This rule applies more to elementary school teachers. They would be crazy to try to hop around. Same thing for any history teacher, for obvious reasons.

    Grim, you’ve heard of me haven’t you? I didn’t get this idea in my head. I researched it heavily. The highest paid teachers in each district that are still relatively young are the ones that do play the market. One other thing that I found was that those teachers that were fired had their salaries rise quicker than those that stayed in the same district. If you think about it, they still get credit for years taught but get to renegotiate every time they are fired.

    As per your last argument, it happens all the time. I personally saw at least 8 people come in hired close to the max in my school alone from outside of the district. Does it piss people off? Absolutely. They don’t riot. They just sit around and complain about it, and in some cases, ostracize the teacher. I find this happens when the teacher is bad at their job. If they prove their worth, no one really ends up having a problem about it. Then, they just sit around miserable cuz they’ll never make that much.

  128. Comrade Nom Deplume, the anon-tidote says:

    [128] pumps

    Ogallala has been in decline for some time. It’s an example of something that will kill you before a scarier disease will. We keep focusing on global warming but if we pump aquifers dry, what does it matter?

    Agent Smith classified us accurately

  129. Ben says:

    You are still misinterpreting what I wrote……I am saying it is stupid and counterproductive on the part of the offending party. I think less of the person, as I know who she is now since my wife works in the district. I have no issue about what she is paid…..

    I’m not sure of the situation, but if the board is playing games rather than settling, some times this goes on for years. That means step increases are frozen. They get it back retroactively years later. Sometimes, boards try to delay settlement because they wait for favorable legislation to be passed (i.e. increased benefit contributions). It’s a BS tactic and the board needs to be called out if they are delaying and forcing the teachers to work without a contract. At some point, you get sick of it and voice your opinion, which is what this teacher may be doing. You should be happen they aren’t doing what other unions have done, which is work to contract (in and out from first bell to last) and no extra help. It’s always a bullcrap situation because no matter what they do, the board is free to act like a bunch of jerks while the teachers will come out looking negative no matter what they try to do to settle.

  130. Libturd at home says:

    “As per your last argument, it happens all the time. I personally saw at least 8 people come in hired close to the max in my school alone from outside of the district. Does it piss people off? Absolutely. They don’t riot. They just sit around and complain about it, and in some cases, ostracize the teacher. I find this happens when the teacher is bad at their job. If they prove their worth, no one really ends up having a problem about it. Then, they just sit around miserable cuz they’ll never make that much.”

    Same is true in the private sector.

  131. Ben says:

    You know I think most teachers are paid fairly. It’s the benefits that always get my goat. You are right that the extra 10K or even 20K we pay now pales in comparison to the healthcare costs that the taxpayer will have to eventually bear. This never discussed by the progressives in support of the unions.

    Those benefits are the fault of the state. They let Horizon act like the monster it is and charge and arm and a leg to the towns for coverage. My father, who is a doctor dealt with horizon on the other side. If anyone ever thought to go after them, that would ultimately solve the problem of benefit costs. They are a non-profit running billions in surpluses jacking up rates every year. They also habitually bribe local politicians. They have no competition in state. It’s a whole different issue and usually out of the control of anyone. Me personally, I would have taken an extra 10k a year and forgone those benefits if I had an option. More money for me, less money the taxpayer pay. Is that an option? Nope…not in 99% of districts. Why? Your elected BOE reps are usually a bunch of idiot hacks.

  132. Libturd at home says:

    “Your elected BOE reps are usually a bunch of idiot hacks.”

    In Montclair the BOE is not elected. In Glen Ridge, they are. Which is why rather than building a new school for the increase in population, we are most likely converting a former school turned bank back into a school.

  133. Essex says:

    127. I get that. Yeah we live in times where that might really be important.
    We both know that mostly expensive cars are terrible investments. If you are leasing then you are simply driving something that you somehow could not afford to drive. But remember that this is an industry dominated by women and many of these are making decent money especially when most are second incomes.

  134. Juice Box says:

    re #13 – “We keep focusing on global warming”

    We aren’t focusing where we should be, fossil fuel and fossil water would not be an issue if we did not add another 1 Billion to the World population in the last 15 years. Currently we are adding net 200,000 new people to the population every day. 78 million extra souls this year alone.

  135. leftwing says:

    Oh my goodness, Chr1stmas came early?

    http://www.nj.com/politics/index.ssf/2015/12/nj_senate_panel_approves_public_worker_pension_ref.html#incart_2box_nj-homepage-featured

    What in the world is wrong with Republicans? Support holding a referendum.

    Let it go to ballot and then pull all the stops out from the liberal playbook using envy and fear to get voters to defeat it.

    If it doesn’t pass the issue is DOA. If it does pass the populace will get exactly what they deserve.

    One of the more astute observations during the financial meltdown regarded the American auto manufacturers. The comment was they were a huge retirement and health care fund that just happened to have an automobile manufacturer attached.

    We’ll see if NJ is just a huge retirement and healthcare fund that just happens to have a population attached.

  136. Juice Box says:

    re# 138 – towns should be eating these pensions not the state, lets hire some more hedge funds!

  137. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “I make deals all the time, I’m very good at it. But, look at Christie, he made a deal with his state’s entire public workforce and then he reneged on it and now they don’t trust him enough to negotiate another one and ya’ know what, I wouldn’t either. How do you negotiate with a liar? You DON’T! The guy can’t be trusted!” – Donald Trump

  138. Romeo says:

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