What Jersey Thinks

From the Star Ledger:

Christie says N.J. economy is better. Here’s what voters think.

Gov. Chris Christie has declared in recent months that New Jersey’s economy has vastly improved — but a new poll shows most voters aren’t feeling good about the state of their state these days.

The Quinnipiac University survey released Thursday found only 1 percent of New Jersey voters say the Garden State’s economy is “excellent,” while 35 percent say it’s “good.”

A larger number have a negative view, with 41 percent saying the economy is “not so good” and 20 percent saying it’s “poor.”

Ten percent of voters say the state’s economy is getting better, 29 percent say it’s getting worse, and 60 percent say it’s staying about the same.

But 16 percent of voters in Thursday’s poll say the state is a “very good” place to live and 61 percent say “fairly good.” Only 16 percent say it’s a “fairly bad” place to live and 7 percent say it’s “very bad.”

The survey also found 11 percent of voters say their own financial situation is “excellent,” 60 say it’s good, 22 percent say it’s “not so good,” and 6 percent say it’s “poor.”

This entry was posted in Economics, New Jersey Real Estate. Bookmark the permalink.

84 Responses to What Jersey Thinks

  1. Mike says:

    Good Morning New Jersey

  2. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Seems the 23% of people who look at nj unfavorably seem to frequent this blog. Esp the 7% that think this state is “very bad.” Majority fall into the pumpkin camp…..that this is a “very good” place to live.

    “But 16 percent of voters in Thursday’s poll say the state is a “very good” place to live and 61 percent say “fairly good.” Only 16 percent say it’s a “fairly bad” place to live and 7 percent say it’s “very bad.””

  3. 3b says:

    The majority fall into the pumpkin camp because they either refuse to acknowledge the pitiful financial state of the state or they simply don’t know.

  4. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    Has anyone ever seen an ant colony war? We had one on our front walk. Pretty small black ants fighting to the death on our front walk. Our walk to the driveway and sidewalk is some kind of paving stone, pattern of square and rectangle stones, maybe 7-9 inches? Mortar in between I guess, in excellent condition. Perfectly flat, so there is some sort of solid footing (concrete?). Anyway, it looked like someone dumped a substantial amount of coffee grounds dead center in the walk, not close to the house, but maybe a 18″ from the sidewalk directly out front. I took a garden hose to them and washed them to the sidewalk where skirmishes continued to ensue. I went back outside about an hour later and it looked like all those sidewalk skirmishes ended with 100% loss to both sides. In the place of the fallen soldiers there was now a large multitude of much, much smaller ants, maybe the smallest I’ve ever seen, not fighting, just wandering everywhere. I could then easily see the two nests on opposite sides of the walk, equidistant from the main battle ground. I took the hose to the VC tunnels and was surprised how big the holes in the topsoil became instantly. The one on the right was much bigger, like the size of two man-sized fists. The one on the left was like a single child-size fist. I’ll assume the child-sized fist nest was where the former home of the Democrat ants.

  5. Hillary's Cankles are ground zero for Zika virus says:

    The majority lives in the heavenly bliss of ignorance.

    http://tinyurl.com/NJ-Numbers-2017

  6. Hillary's Cankles are ground zero for Zika virus says:

    ExPat…

    You may need to seek some psychiatric help.

  7. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Wow. Really doubt education costs continue at this pace. There is no way you can justify the investment of 400,000 to get a job that pays anything less than 6 figures.

    “You’ll need to save a whole lot of cash if you want to fully fund this child’s education.

    We asked Matthew DeFelice, a certified financial planner with U.S. Financial Services in Fairfield, to run the numbers.

    He assumed you’re starting with a zero balance. Then he assumed conservative 4 percent growth rate on invested funds and a 5 percent inflation rate on annual cost of education.

    Using Rutgers University as a New Jersey state school example, the total cost of a four-year undergrad degree including room and board will be $463,812 when your grandchild attends college, DeFelice said.

    “To be able to pay for that in full you will need to save $1,231 per month or $14,775 per year through the year 2037 given the above assumptions,” DeFelice said.

    Using Princeton University as a New Jersey private school example, DeFelice said, the total cost of a four-year undergrad degree including room and board will be $611,641 when your grandchild attends college.”

    http://www.nj.com/business/index.ssf/2017/06/what_will_college_cost_in_18_years_biz_brain.html#incart_river_home

  8. The Great Pumpkin says:

    600,000 for Princeton, and you better be making 200k at the minimum for it to even make sense.

  9. 3b says:

    College tuition is not sustainable.

  10. Hillary's Cankles are ground zero for Zika virus says:

    “College tuition is not sustainable.”

    Exactamundo!

  11. Juice Box says:

    On the high end comparable tuition in England is 9,000 GBP per year. In Ireland it”s 7,500 EU to go to Trini ty.

  12. LurksMcGee says:

    Funny, college tuition isn’t sustainable, but idiots comment on news articles about “back in my day, my part time job handled tuition for the year” /facepalm

  13. 3b says:

    Lurks/ pumps perhaps than you can explain to us how it will be sustainable?

  14. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Weekend of shootings at Myrtle Beach leaves some tourists saying they won’t be back
    http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/local/article156869679.html

  15. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    Damn. I hate being in mod.

  16. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    I was a freshman at Rutgers in ’77 (skipped some grades, I’m not quite that old, just old). Back then an engineering degree cost $2600 per year, so about $13K living at school with a full meal plan and books.

  17. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    Starting salary was $26K. No brainer to go to college back then.

  18. The Great Pumpkin says:

    3b, I agree with you.

  19. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    It’s hard to believe that at the height of price inflation Rutgers was still less around $3600 per year all in. College prices just marched on at 10% inflation while the rest of the economy didn’t. Some alt-education paths are going to crop up and put colleges out of business. They only thing required is for the big corps to not require a college degree for entry level managerial career-track jobs.

  20. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    Stock disclosure –
    Sold most of my tech holdings into today’s rally (Kept some AMAT and a little of a few others).

    Sold most of my Discretionary (including AMZN) last week.

    I have sizable portfolio of Utilities and REITs that were bought starting in Feb/March. The S&P 500 Utilities and REITs are now expensive, but there is still some value in the MidCap 400 names.

  21. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    10 years ago I thought that the college tuition bubble would pop before my kids attended college. Now my oldest is about to finish 9th grade. I might just tell her to intentionally fail her exams to give her an extra year.

  22. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Sounds about right.

    “This interaction, with a handful of others over the course of my trip, only confirmed what I’ve been seeing more of during my reporting. In the past, when interacting with conservatives or overhearing their conversations, I’d always heard Fox News talking points, the same ones that former head Roger Ailes famously used to send out every morning in an effort to determine the country’s narrative, but in the past year something had changed: Conservatives were receiving their cues directly from Trump and his family, or else from alternative media companies like InfoWars and Breitbart.

    In my forthcoming book about the 2016 presidential election, The People Are Going To Rise Like The Waters Upon Your Shore, I chronicle how Donald Trump effectively replaced Fox News as the center of information for Republicans, starting with his brief but disturbing feud with former FNC host Megyn Kelly after the first Republican Primary Debate. This allowed Trump to cast Fox in the same “crooked media” pool as its competitors, a move that eventually inoculated him from his myriad of scandals as his supporters no longer trusted anyone who reported negative stories about their candidate.”

    http://www.thedailybeast.com/why-trump-doesnt-need-fox-news-anymore?yptr=yahoo

  23. LurksMcGee says:

    Expat, you might be on to something. When I look around at some of the buffoons I’ve worked with that held PhD’s, I realized that companies are to blame. Pre-requisites of certain degrees made the “demand” and colleges recognized it. In turn, tuition increased. Everything’s a business here and colleges did what any business would do.

    Once you eliminate the demand, costs go down.

  24. 3b says:

    Pumps well we agree on something!

  25. chicagofinance says:

    I’m sure that the hipster douchebags and sundry green-living advocates never think twice about scarfing down the best NYC pizza……hypocrites….
    http://www.foodrepublic.com/2015/10/05/why-is-coal-fired-pizza-so-hot-right-now/

  26. 3b says:

    Part of the reason for the massive increase for the everyday colleges is the fact that parents are incredibly gullible. They believe the hype that school a is better than school b. Unless it’s for a specialized program and with the exception of the ivies and baby ivies they are all the same. An accounting degree from Fordham is no better than an accounting degree from Rutgers but parents lap the bs up. I have seen it time and time again.

  27. The Great Pumpkin says:

    I was thinking the same thing. Expat is right.

    LurksMcGee says:
    June 19, 2017 at 12:16 pm
    Expat, you might be on to something. When I look around at some of the buffoons I’ve worked with that held PhD’s, I realized that companies are to blame. Pre-requisites of certain degrees made the “demand” and colleges recognized it. In turn, tuition increased. Everything’s a business here and colleges did what any business would do.

    Once you eliminate the demand, costs go down.

  28. The Great Pumpkin says:

    3b, we agree again!

    “Unless it’s for a specialized program and with the exception of the ivies and baby ivies they are all the same.”

  29. The Great Pumpkin says:

    If my kid can’t get into an ivy, she is going to state school.

  30. 3b says:

    That’s two for two pumps! Who knew!

  31. LurksMcGee says:

    And the blog tide is turning. First me, then 3B. Who knows, Expat might even start agreeing with Pumps.

  32. Hillary's Cankles are ground zero for Zika virus says:

    3B,

    I would also argue that the economics program at Montclair State was about equal to that of the program at Rutgers when I went through. Same books used. Same wacky profs existed in both schools too. The only difference that I could remember was that I actually learned something, where my brother’s classes (taught in lecture halls better suited for a rock concert) imparted little economic knowledge on them. For lab sciences and other disciplines where there are corporate partnerships, I can see where a larger more robustly equipped college would provide an educational advantage.

  33. Hillary's Cankles are ground zero for Zika virus says:

    I won’t agree with Pumps until I see some wage inflation in industries outside of convenience stores.

  34. 3b says:

    Stu I agree smaller settings could be better.? At the end of the day the result is the same an accounting,history etc degree from Montclair,Rutgers, Rowan etc is just the same as one from Fordham , Manhattan, Iona, Fairfield etc and the same as univ Delaware, Rhode Island on the out of state side. Many many parents are clueless.

  35. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    Just for launching Nagasaki and Hiroshima on some ants? Ok, maybe. I had a manager once, my worst boss ever, a micro-manager with no vision. I’m not up to his level, so that makes me feel OK.

    This guy, now retired, had a management style where he would come in about 10:30AM and then occasionally pull his managers in, almost exactly 15 minutes before they would normally leave, for long chats. So guys who showed up at 7AM would get called in at 4:15PM to have a conversation that ran until 6:15PM. I was the only one who programmed him to not pick me very often. Every time he called me in I would just talk and talk and talk with him until he finally kicked me out at 7PM. He would literally tell me it was time for me to go home to my family. This worked great as he would only call me in about 3 or 4 times a year because I could outlast him at his own game. Other guys got called in once a week. The three years I worked for him he didn’t ever even give me a review, which didn’t matter a bit because I got the same raise as other managers every year with none of the wasted face time. Anyway, he was a really sick bastard, and if I say so, you know it has to be true. He had these “traps” for some type of rodent, groundhogs or squirrels or something other species that does damage in gardens? I’m thinking it was a smaller rodent, maybe chipmunks? Anyway, he would gleefully tell me how his system worked. He used plastic joint compound or some other similar containers (the few gallon type). He would fill them with anti-freeze (which seems expensive, maybe he bought up flushed anti-freeze from a quick oil change place?). Then he would put wooden slats against several edges as ramps for rodents to crawl up to the sweet smelling toxic stew. Finally, he would add seeds (sesame?) to the antifreeze, where they floated as treats that enticed the rodents until they fell in and drowned. I didn’t ask, and I have no idea if he just dumped the antifreeze through screens occasionally, discarded the carcasses and reused it. There’s also a possibility that it worked with water, not anti-freeze, but the method was just the same? I don’t dwell on the conversation(s) often as I’m only an ant killer;-)

    ExPat…

    You may need to seek some pchiatric help.

  36. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    Rowan used to be Glassboro, right? We took a road trip there once. One of my friends had a brother who w/as going there. We left Rutgers early in the morning, stopped off at AC to win money card-counting at Blackjack and then went to Glassboro. My friend’s brother lived in an on-campus apartment where they had this little framed picture of the Dark Side of the Moon prism and then extended the Roy G Biv from the framed picture all around the apartment. I think Saturday night ended with us using somebody’s pretty powerful projector to project a p0rno on the white windowless side wall of the neighboring dorm while we drank beers while watching the film in lawn chairs. Good times, good times.

  37. Xolepa says:

    Unless it’s for a specialized program and with the exception of the ivies and baby ivies they are all the same.

    Thanks, 3B, did my part.

    Sent two to Ivies, one to baby Ivy

  38. Xolepa says:

    When I started commuting to Rutgers, about 7 minutes way, all tuition/fees combined per semester were $373. Finished 4 years later at $470. Not complaining except for the fact that my parents got the end of that bargain, not I.

  39. 3b says:

    Good for you Xolepa. Not all can avail of ivies or baby ivies. The main reason for ivies etc is for the connections and network opportunities. How better is the education? I don’t know. I worked with a ton of them in my former career some were excellent in fact brilliant. Others were morons and still others good or average. I too have done my part put all my kids through nj state schools. They received a great education as we paid for it and we demanded and got results. They are all working in their chosen fields and doing very well. We too have done our part. Educated our children. No loans for us or them.

  40. 3b says:

    Ex pat Rowan has grown dramatically in the last 10 years.

  41. 3b says:

    Ex sick indeed! Surprised it never escalated.

  42. Juice Box says:

    Chi – Tommy’s is gone now too, I haven’t been to the Galleria in a while.

    http://www.tommyscoalfiredpizza.com/

    Also NYC won’t permit new coal ovens. They can only be passed down, so there won’t be a massive resurgence in NYC anyway.

  43. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    When Dahmer left the band we all lost our enthusiasm. Seriously, you never had a magnifying glass while you sat on the curb? I keep forgetting the first generation of the coddled are now adults.

    Ex sick indeed! Surprised it never escalated.

  44. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    Kids catch fireflies now, but in our day you swung a whiffle ball bat at them.

  45. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    Bigger screen p0rn?
    Ex pat Rowan has grown dramatically in the last 10 years.

  46. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    It amazes me how free college used to be (in a social sense, not a monetary sense). In the late 70’s it wasn’t a big deal for the Finance Club, or something just as innocuous, to rent a print of Deep Throat, get permission to show it in Scott Hall or or the Student Center, charge $1 admission and make a couple hundred dollars for the club net. Imagine doing that today, much less get a $1.75 pitcher of beer at the RUsty Screw afterward.

  47. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    Keg parties gave way to ra.pe culture; same thing, just no kegs.

  48. 3b says:

    Ex pat. Of course we did. And lighting bugs or fireflys too. But for an adult to methodically plan and poison critters and enjoy it well I think that’s a little different.

  49. The whitest guy says:

    We shot pigeons with blow guns. Very tough to kill as they are mostly feather and little meat. I kid you not, I once killed a rabbit at about 50 feet, with a Mylec street hockey ball and a wickedly accurate wrist-shot. In a million years, I never expected to be able to kill it, let alone hit it. The bunny took too hops and rolled over dead. It was pretty funny at the time.

  50. Fast Eddie says:

    Seriously, you never had a magnifying glass while you sat on the curb?

    Indeed!

  51. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    3b: Maybe you misread? It was my boss who devised and executed the rodent poisoning methods, not me. All I did was spray some water on ants. My wife suggested we pour some dish detergent or splenda on the ant mounds, so I guess she’s a lot worse than me, but most people don’t seem to think so.

    Ex pat. Of course we did. And lighting bugs or fireflys too. But for an adult to methodically plan and poison critters and enjoy it well I think that’s a little different.

  52. 3b says:

    Ex pat I was referring to your boss not you. Sorry for the mix up.

  53. Fast Eddie says:

    Can I pour some dish detergent or splenda on some co-workers?

  54. jcer says:

    I don’t like critters in my house. I’ve availed myself to the fine folks on line to buy commercial grade pesticides and rodenticides to kill anything in and around my house. Systemic pesticides like imidacloprid or fipronil will absolutely decimate ant colonies.

  55. Fast Eddie says:

    I love the smell of fipronil in the morning! It smells like victory!

  56. Fast Eddie says:

    Toxic baiting with fipronil has also been shown to be extremely effective in locally eliminating German wasps.

    LOL! See, you just can’t trust those Fräuleins!

  57. Fast Eddie says:

    Fipronil is a broad-spectrum insecticide that disrupts the insect central nervous system by blocking GABA-gated chloride channels and glutamate-gated chloride (GluCl) channels, resulting in central nervous system toxicity.

    Radical!

  58. Juice Box says:

    Ah the joys of home ownership in the summer.

    Pest control was just at my house last week for the quarterly spray. Hornet nests were removed, ant colonies nuked since they were digging up my patio in a few areas, and dug up lots of stone dust and sand. They can build a town if you don’t get them out. Key is to keep kids and animals off those areas for a few days. The pesticides will dissipate and have a reasonable half-life.

    I was a bit worried since my pool thermometer which I thought was mercury-in-glass broke and leaked into the pool. Turns out they don’t use mercury anymore (it was a red liquid) some other liquid alloy or alcohol is used. Whew, I thought I was going to have to call Hazmart cleanup.

    My lawn looks like I paid a fortune for lawn maintenace this year. Nope it’s just two applications of Scott’s turf builder and lots of rain.

  59. The whitest guy says:

    Rain is the key to a green lawn. Fertilizer is more to kill weeds. The correct amount of water though will make any lawn green.

  60. Anon E. Moose, Ghost of JJ says:
  61. The whitest guy says:

    http://weather.cod.edu/satrad/nexrad/index.php?type=DIX-N0Q-1-48

    Huge line of thunderstorms just entering the state.

  62. grim says:

    Ewr to mia in 2hr

    Ugh

  63. The whitest guy says:

    You are not in the bad storm. That one will be here in about 40 minutes. Good luck getting out!

  64. chicagofinance says:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AltMeuPkWRs

    The whitest guy says:
    June 19, 2017 at 4:23 pm
    You are not in the bad storm. That one will be here in about 40 minutes. Good luck getting out!

  65. The whitest guy says:

    Just had a 57 mph gust in EWR. Would suck to be taking off and that gust hits.

  66. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    AFAIK, red liquid in thermometers is always red alcohol, silver is mercury. I haven’t seen a mercury thermometer since Physics class at Rutgers 35+ years ago. It sure was fun to bat around those mercury balls when one broke, though. It was like air hockey without the air.

  67. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    Remember the good old days when your Mom had to add her own mercury to the Bumble Bee Tuna?

  68. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Great read.

    Proof that capitalism doesn’t really reward or credit the true creators. Capitalism rewards the salesman/con man. Creators get their butts kicked by the salesman in the game of capitalism. Tech world is loaded with stories to support this.

    “An example: multitouch, the technology that allows the iPhone’s touch-screen to track several fingertips at once — it’s why you can pinch to zoom. Where does it come from? Jobs always maintained that multitouch was invented at Apple. It wasn’t.
    As Merchant demonstrates, it was actually invented several different times, including in the 1960s at England’s Royal Radar Establishment and in the 1970s at CERN. The specific multitouch technology that went into the iPhone was pioneered around the turn of the millennium by a man you’ve almost certainly never heard of named Wayne Westerman. A brilliant engineering Ph.D. at the University of Delaware, Westerman worked on multitouch in part because he suffered from severe repetitive strain injury, which made conventional keyboard interfaces agony. Apple acquired Westerman’s company, FingerWorks, in 2005 — whereupon it and Westerman disappeared behind Apple’s Titanium Curtain. The rest is, and isn’t, history. (Apple wouldn’t let Merchant interview Westerman, or any current Apple employee, for “The One Device.” Merchant did, with characteristic thoroughness, track down Westerman’s sister.)”

    The iPhone Is 10 Years Old. Here’s the Story of Its Birth. – The New York Times
    https://apple.news/AKE2HzwzuTk-TOXnVnIZEgQ

  69. The Great Pumpkin says:

    This was from Phil Murphy. I know nobody on this blog likes him, but he gets it when it comes to the economy. I really think he will get nj back on the road to economic juggernaut. Everything I have read points to his understanding that giving corporations and rich tax breaks doesn’t work to produce growth in an an economy producing huge income inequality. When you do that in the current economic conditions, those tax breaks just produce more income inequality and contribute to more stagnant growth in the future short term.

    “If the #AHCA passes, New Jersey will lose 41,900 jobs and state GDP would drop by $4.8 billion. Quite simply, this law trades jobs, economic activity and access to healthcare for tax cuts for corporations and the wealthiest.

    It is time for Governor Christie and Lieutenant Governor Guadagno to stand up to Washington on behalf of the people of New Jersey. Are they with President Trump or with New Jersey?”

    http://www.commonwealthfund.org/~/media/files/interactives-and-maps/2017/aca-job-loss/new-jersey.pdf

  70. The Great Pumpkin says:

    And if anyone thinks lowering taxes is the “holy grail” of putting more money in your pocket, look to Kansas or any other state trying this experiment. It hurt the economy so bad that they actually lost money even though they have lower taxes. Be very careful of looking at the economy one dimensionally, you need to look at it from all angles.

  71. leftwing says:

    can’t believe i’m replying….

    “Proof that capitalism doesn’t really reward or credit the true creators [Westerman]. Capitalism rewards the salesman/con man. Creators get their butts kicked”

    actually, i can’t reply, the statement is so inane. you’re right donkey, 1 billion phones and a trillion dollar company all Westerman. steve jobs, just a con man.

    if Westerman was so great, then he shouldn’t have SOLD in 2005 and did it all himself.

  72. The Great Pumpkin says:

    This is your future if you move to the south. No where to run, nowhere to hide.

    “The decision comes after weeks of furor over high assessments. Nearly a quarter of the 318,000 residential parcels in Fulton had assessments that were up 50 percent or more; half were up by at least 20 percent. Local governments had pleaded with the Board of Assessors to reduce the values and rescind the assessments.”

    http://www.myajc.com/news/local-govt–politics/fulton-county-freeze-residential-property-values-2016-levels/kIp2BTruPElYJoHnSTyehO/

  73. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Maybe I didn’t explain myself correctly. But why does Jobs get all the credit for thousands of other geniuses work? He is great for pushing people to their limits, but he was a salesman. He was not the genius behind the product like he is credited with. He took visions and made other people create them and then took full credit.

    leftwing says:
    June 19, 2017 at 8:34 pm
    can’t believe i’m replying….

    “Proof that capitalism doesn’t really reward or credit the true creators [Westerman]. Capitalism rewards the salesman/con man. Creators get their butts kicked”

    actually, i can’t reply, the statement is so inane. you’re right donkey, 1 billion phones and a trillion dollar company all Westerman. steve jobs, just a con man.

    if Westerman was so great, then he shouldn’t have SOLD in 2005 and did it all himself.

  74. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Lefty, you are okay with Jobs taking full credit for other people’s work? Sad part, although our society is better for it, he bullied these workers into giving up everything to create this and then takes all the credit. They practically lived in the lab to create this, where was jobs?

  75. 3b says:

    Pumps we have high taxes and it’s not helping our economy? And no we don’t like Murphy. He is a con man.

  76. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Can’t stress it enough, income inequality at these levels does huge harm to economic growth. Just look at that chart and tell me that’s not the ultimate bubble! Everyone loves to talk about bubbles, how bout the biggest bubble of them alll….the income bubble at the top. They either redistribute by giving jobs or raises, or watch the bubble blow the f!ck up and harm everyone including themselves.

    “Why does the US economy still feel iffy to most Americans despite an eight-year economic expansion and historically low unemployment?

    Look no further than this eye-popping chart of income growth between 1980 and 2014 courtesy of Berkeley’s elite-squad of inequality research, including Thomas Piketty, Emmanuel Saez, and Gabriel Zucman.

    Featured in a recent blog from the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business, the graphic highlights just how stratospheric income growth has been for the very wealthiest Americans – and how stagnant, in contrast, wages have been for the rest.”

    http://www.businessinsider.com/us-inequality-is-worse-than-you-think-2017-6

  77. leftwing says:

    “Maybe I didn’t explain myself correctly. But why does Jobs get all the credit for thousands of other geniuses work? He is great for pushing people to their limits”

    because he was the guy that envisioned the whole (creativity) and pulled it all the disparate technologies together into something new (creator)?

    Without him, it’s all just a bunch of separate pieces of technology lying around internationally.

    The article lists more individual technologies that went into the phone, “like gorilla glass, motion sensors, lithium ion batteries, arm chips, wireless technology and so on”.

    Quite frankly, the idea that jobs, et al did NOT have the technologies in house makes me respect him more as a ‘creator’. Each of the owners of each of those separate technologies did not envision the iphone, despite having their own technology right in front of them likely as they chatted away on their state of the art blackberries.

  78. The Great Pumpkin says:

    And I called it first….”biggest bubble in the world is the income bubble growing at the top”. It can not and will not last. Either fix it yourself (easy and smart way), or let it fix itself(hard way and there will be blood).

  79. The Great Pumpkin says:

    But he is one piece of the puzzle. He was a part of a “team,” and this team needs every piece of the puzzle to create. It’s not a one man job, yet we have crowned Jobs with this creation. Rest of the people get lost in history like they were not a part of that puzzle. Jobs played his role well, but so did everybody else.

    “Quite frankly, the idea that jobs, et al did NOT have the technologies in house makes me respect him more as a ‘creator’. Each of the owners of each of those separate technologies did not envision the iphone, despite having their own technology right in front of them likely as they chatted away on their state of the art blackberries.”

  80. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “There’s more. “The average pretax income of the bottom 50% of US adults has stagnated since 1980, while the share of income of US adults in the bottom half of the distribution collapsed from 20% in 1980 to 12% in 2014,” writes Howard Gold, founder and editor of GoldenEgg Investing, in the Chicago Booth blog.

    “In a mirror-image move, the top 1% commanded 12% of income in 1980 but 20% in 2014. The top 1% of US adults now earns on average 81 times more than the bottom 50% of adults; in 1981, they earned 27 times what the lower half earned.”

    Here’s a link to the full paper for the academically inclined.”

  81. leftwing says:

    ok, everyone gets trophy. happy?

  82. The Original NJ ExPat says:

    More popped pumpkin blisters. yuck.

  83. No One says:

    NJ report about some unpromotable financial analyst thinking about how other people’s money should be redeployed into hiking the salaries of halfwits and 3rd-raters in all fields, so the can enjoy NJ’s vast array of overpriced homes, property taxes, and nightlife.

Comments are closed.