It’s a privilege to pay NJ taxes

From the Record:

Bergen’s property taxes among nation’s highest

Bergen County homeowners had the fifth-highest average property tax bill in the nation, at $11,159, last year, according to a new survey by RealtyTrac, a California real estate information company. Passaic County’s single-family tax bill averaged $8,904, according to RealtyTrac.

The survey also confirms what Garden State homeowners have found out the hard way: New Jersey’s property taxes are among the highest in the nation, averaging more than 2 percent of a single-family home’s value each year. Passaic actually had a higher tax rate (2.98 percent) than Bergen (2.07 percent), apparently reflecting Passaic County’s lower property values.

Nationally, property tax rates average 1.3 percent of the property value, according to RealtyTrac.

“New Jersey has been in this unenviable position for a long time,” said Joseph Seneca, a Rutgers economist. “Property taxes are driven primarily by the costs of local government and public education, and the steady rise over the years in these costs.” In addition, local governments in New Jersey rely almost exclusively on property taxes, while in other states, local governments are funded in part by sales and income taxes, according to Henry Coleman, a Rutgers professor who studies public finance.

“New Jersey is a rich state, and rich states enjoy lots of high-quality public services, starting with education,” Coleman said.

The rate of growth in New Jersey property taxes has slowed since 2010, when a state law limited increases to 2 percent a year. In 2014, the average property tax bill in New Jersey actually grew by 2.16 percent, in part because of increased municipal spending to deal with last winter’s storms. Local governments are allowed to exceed the cap in certain cases, including response to disasters.

By contrast, the rate of growth from 2004 to 2005 was over 7 percent.

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90 Responses to It’s a privilege to pay NJ taxes

  1. anon (the good one) says:

    without Michael, this site can’t get to 50 posts a day. Let alone the usual 100

  2. Dentss Dunnign says:

    Roselle has a tax of$ 8.22 of assessed value which is usually over market value ..http://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/437-W-6th-Ave_Roselle_NJ_07203_M55718-72857?row=5

  3. Fast Eddie says:

    “New Jersey is a rich state, and rich states enjoy lots of high-quality public services, starting with education,” Coleman said.

    Yes, the children.

  4. Comrade Nom Deplume, stuck in Boston says:

    [1] irrelevant

    My head just exploded. anon posted something that was original and not idiotic.

  5. Fast Eddie says:

    without Michael, this site can’t get to 50 posts a day. Let alone the usual 100

    We’re too busy working to support the Oblama voters on top of a mountain of personal responsibilities.

  6. grim says:

    Comments on the blog are highly correlated with contracts activity in the state, I ran the analysis a few years ago. It’s like clockwork, pretty good too, I think it was about .70.

  7. Liquor Luge says:

    People start hanging out here as they get closer to signing their lives away?

  8. Liquor Luge says:

    Grim should start a blog for people on death row and check the correlation.

  9. DaBomb says:

    6- Nah. Eddie got like 1000 comments and no contract

  10. Liquor Luge says:

    Out the door to tend to the business I didn’t build and to pay taxes to a gubmint that’s hell-bent on stealing every red cent they can get out of me.

  11. Fast Eddie says:

    6- Nah. Eddie got like 1000 comments and no contract

    20 year homeowner, two houses over that span, 4 contracts submitted in the last two years. Of those 4 contracts, 3 came within a few percentage points of my bid. That’s because I was too early and too diligent in my pursuit. Any time you want to discuss it all in greater detail, come to the next get-together. Drinks are on me since you’re going through a tough financial period.

  12. joyce says:

    well when the idiot posts 50 times as he’s usually having a conversation with himself, it aint hard to reach triple digits

  13. Fabius Maximus says:

    JJ, I think it was you that posted a few years back “Its an honor to pay taxes” It shows you’re earning and are the BSD.

  14. DaBomb says:

    Doin fine thanks. Similar track as yours, as far as homeownership goes. Plus I bought two foreclosures in the 2010-11 period that I am renting and will unload at some point. Plus inherited a 30 doors RE portfolio (eat that Mikey!) in a war zone kind of place that I am managing and will reshape as I can agree with other parties. As far as the invite, I pass. :)

  15. FKA 2010 Buyer says:

    Not a Curt Schilling fan but I salute him for doing what any Dad would do. One of these a$$clowns went to Montclair State
    ————-

    Curt Shilling Eviscerates Twitter Trolls Going After His Daughter

    It all started last week when Schilling congratulated his daughter, Gabby, for getting accepted into college and starting a softball career. A dad proud of his daughter … that’s benign enough, right? Well, no. Not in the say-anything-and-apologize-later world of 2015 social media.

    What followed was a number of sexually suggestive tweets about Gabby fired off to her dad, some of them even implying rape and other horrible things. (You can see some of the Twitter taunts here, most of it isn’t fit to post on The Stew). Schilling’s blood boiled, as any father’s would, and he jumped in the flame war, ignoring rule No. 1 of the Internet: Don’t feed the trolls.

    http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/mlb-big-league-stew/curt-schilling-eviscerates-twitter-trolls-going-after-his-daughter-150948250.html

  16. Juice Box says:

    F – Bergen County

  17. grim says:

    There was a great NPR podcast a few months ago about a journalist that confronted her internet trolls. Turns out most trolls are pretty worthless sacks of shit with no lack of psychological issues.

  18. FKA 2010 Buyer says:

    Today’s Privilege News: Publicly agreeing with Joe the Plumber about evil wealth redistribution while behind closed doors loving a lowering your tax bill because of how your earnings are classified.
    ——–
    Private Equity Payouts Leave the Rest of Wall St. in the Dust

    The big private equity firms were able to generate large amounts of cash last year by selling their holdings during a buoyant stock market, providing hefty payouts to their founders. Henry R. Kravis, a co-founder of K.K.R., received about $220 million. Leon D. Black, the chief executive and co-founder of Apollo, took in $331 million.

    The bulk of these payouts came in the form of dividends, or “distributions” in private equity parlance. Mr. Schwarzman, for example, received $570.5 million of distributions on his 45 percent stake in Blackstone’s partnership shares.

    But the private equity chieftains stand out not only for the size of their earnings. They also stand out for the way they pay taxes.

    While Mr. Blankfein and other bank chief executives are taxed at ordinary rates on their salaries and bonuses, Mr. Schwarzman and his rivals pay the 23.8 percent federal capital gains tax rate on the bulk of their earnings. This is because most private equity profit derives from income on the firm’s investments, a source known as carried interest, or carry.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/04/business/dealbook/private-equity-payouts-leave-the-rest-of-wall-st-in-the-dust.html?ref=dealbook&_r=0

  19. Toxic Crayons says:

    anyone catch the new series of articles on inside jersey magazine?

    http://www.nj.com/inside-jersey/

    Article titles include:

    The High Cost of Jersey: Why we leave

    The High Cost of Jersey: More about taxes

    Poll: Are you moving out of N.J. in the next 5 years?

    The High Cost of Jersey: Why some of us are willing to pay for it, and some of us are not

  20. JJ says:

    Income tax not property tax. Funny this weekend we looked at some homes in Old Canterbury in Rockville Centre. The week before I went to an open house of a house I could afford and found out it had 37K in taxes but owner has “greived” I then found out he only filed paperwork a week before open house and that stuff can take 2-3 years to kick in. Then women said I have a house even better than this for only slightly more money with much less taxes. So I look and house was really nice and I could affor but taxes were 26K. Realtor tells me see it is 11K less.

    Fabius Maximus says:
    March 4, 2015 at 9:38 am
    JJ, I think it was you that posted a few years back “Its an honor to pay taxes” It shows you’re earning and are the BSD.

  21. nwnj says:

    Does anyone think it was suspicious or just coincidental that the Hillary email scandal story broke the same day as the fear mongering spectacle?

    The nightly news sure didn’t cover the Hillary stuff much which I think is explosive. Many, many laws appear to have been broken.

  22. grim – Isn’t that the bare minimum to get your troll license?

    There was a great NPR podcast a few months ago about a journalist that confronted her internet trolls. Turns out most trolls are pretty worthless sacks of sh1t with no lack of psychological issues.

  23. grim says:

    Hillary is done, are you kidding? She used an AOL account exclusively? How does that even happen.

  24. Fast Eddie says:

    Plus inherited a 30 doors RE portfolio…

    It seems like everyone who has advice for me regarding real estate has inherited real estate.

  25. nwnj says:

    #23

    Even worse, she had her own email domain created on a leased server the same EXACT DAY that she became SoS.

    Claims that she was never given a state.gov mailbox, like that’s an excuse. Let the body count begin…

  26. Juice Box says:

    re: #23 – AOL? NSA definitely has copies of everything then.

  27. Libturd in Union says:

    “without Michael, this site can’t get to 50 posts a day. Let alone the usual 100”

    For what it’s worth, I’ve been busy as heck at work. On occasion, I can get a topic going. Just don’t have the time these days. In other news, and I knew this was coming from the day I bought the place, but the bathroom on the main floor of my multi almost fell through the floor. I am looking at an 8K repair bill. Which not surprisingly, is how much that has built up in my maintenance account. Sometimes I wish I could just sell the place already. But then I’d have to save for my kids’ college.

  28. Libturd in Union says:

    Eddie…on inheritances. I’ve never inherited a shiny penny. Nor do I plan to. My parents instilled in me the need to save to have enough money to absolutely party in retirement. Though my dad is in his late 80s, they are taking huge month long trips with cruises to Europe and Asia this Spring and Fall. Their goal is to spend everything before they go, but to have enough to live off of comfortably if they buck the odds. I plan to follow the same plan. I can’t wait for my boys to grow up. :P

  29. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    [23] grim,

    What I found hysterical about Hillary’s email use is that it violates every tenet of common sense, more than a few procedural guidelines, and probably a few federal laws, yet as I scrolled past MSNBC, I noticed that Rachel Maddow was shilling for her last night with “so what? Everyone does it.”

    I was waiting for her to say “What difference does it make?”

  30. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    [19] toxic,

    That’s because, as is always pointed out on this blog and elsewhere, “It’s different here.”

    And my response is always “and you’re proud of that?”

  31. Comrade Nom Deplume, a.k.a. Captain Justice says:

    [13] Rory Martin,

    “Its an honor to pay taxes” It shows you’re earning and are the BSD.”

    You owe me a new keyboard to replace the coffee-soaked one.

  32. Juice Box says:

    re# 29 – Makes no difference. The choice in 2016 will be neoliberal or neocon. Nothing else will change.

  33. Juice Box says:

    2005-06 peak price? Perhaps not in your lifetime.

    WASHINGTON (MarketWatch) — The hardest-hit states won’t get back to their housing-boom-era peak prices this decade.

    That’s according to a MarketWatch analysis of the latest home-price data from CoreLogic. For this analysis, MarketWatch looked at the year-over-year growth rates both nationally and at state levels for the states where prices skidded at least 20% from their peaks.

    The news is actually better for Florida and Nevada, the hardest-hit states, than some of the states in the Northeast. Since Connecticut prices were actually lower on the year, by 1.3%, that means that, at the current rate, the Nutmeg State will never get back to its peak in home prices. Similarly, at the current, paltry 1.3% rate of appreciation, it will take 28 years for Rhode Island to recapture the bubble peak.

    By contrast, Florida and Nevada may reach their previous peaks in prices in the early part of the 2020s.

    http://www.marketwatch.com/story/hardest-hit-states-wont-revisit-house-price-peaks-this-decade-2015-03-03?dist=lcountdown

  34. This made me laugh:

    “What this means is that now there’s four years of highly confidential email about the government stored next to Clinton’s groupons and reminders to shut down her hometown.aol.com website before the entire thing was deleted.”

    http://jezebel.com/hillary-clinton-probably-used-an-aol-account-to-conduct-1689064763

  35. I’m with you Lib. Have your kids skip college and go into the family business of landlording. (Or were you thinking something different ;-)

    Which not surprisingly, is how much that has built up in my maintenance account. Sometimes I wish I could just sell the place already. But then I’d have to save for my kids’ college.

  36. Libturd in Union says:

    Nah. The landlording business is a good one if you are handy, but Gator Jr. is not. He inherited Gator’s smarts and my athleticism. His common sense is somewhere in the middle. The meaning of my statement was simply that managing real estate can be time consuming, as it has been this winter with all of the shoveling and now this massive bathroom fix as well as the fact that we are turning over both units this month. It all adds up to one big PITA. But the fact that I will not have to pay for my two kids’ college more than my downpayment on the multi and about 75K in upgrades makes it all worthwhile. Too bad I don’t get to see the reward for another 13 or so years.

  37. chicagofinance says:

    One of the other major trolls is a Brookdale student……

    FKA 2010 Buyer says:
    March 4, 2015 at 9:40 am
    Not a Curt Schilling fan but I salute him for doing what any Dad would do. One of these a$$clowns went to Montclair State
    ————-

  38. Libturd in Union says:

    But every one picks on Montclair State. I’m sure Anon was secretly hoping it was me.

  39. The Great Pumpkin says:

    For the children? More like the services are for the adults. Wealthy people want a good education system for their children and to maintain real estate values. They also want access to everything and anything. They also want lots of local govt so that they have total control over their quality of life in their town. This costs money.

    Once again, this state costs a lot of money to live in because it provides for the affluent lifestyle. You can get anything you want in New Jersey( the nyc metro area in general). People complaining about much cheaper states should first go and live there. This way they can find out why it is so much cheaper. Good luck with hospitals, education, safety (all those cops we have), restaurants, and quality of life in those states. You will be bored and go out of your mind. Ask lynch how much he loved buff when he was drafted by the bills. He said the biggest thing on a sat night was going to the only applebees in town and that’s a city. Catch my drift?

    Moving from jersey to cali is fine. Similar lifestyles. Moving from jersey to ohio, carolina, florida, or arizona is a major change. If you are poor and living in nj, you will prob be better off in these states if you can find a job. If you have money to spend, you will go out of your mind with boredom. People with money don’t belong in cheap cost of living areas. They are cheap for a major reason.

    Fast Eddie says:
    March 4, 2015 at 8:51 am
    “New Jersey is a rich state, and rich states enjoy lots of high-quality public services, starting with education,” Coleman said.

    Yes, the children.

  40. homeboken says:

    Pumpkin – Please look at your right hand. Make fist. Now shove that up your a$$.

    You speak as if the rest of the country is back-woods nomads, and only NJ will do. You are a total waste, so please go f!st yourself.

  41. jj says:

    Funny when I was looking at the house in the rich neighborhood this weekend and the realtor said it was a great investment and home values rise much quicker than my house and hold their value. It is true in last ten years home price has risen double the value of my house.

    Then I dug into some numbers. Taxes are 20K a year higher in that town and to buy that house I would need to pull 500K out of bank, lets say it is plain munis paying 4% tax free or 20K a year. So right there home needs to rise 40K a year more than my house to break even.

    Add in the rich town tax, aint no one coming by and doing cheap repairs in a 1.2 million home and add in fact a house 1,200 square feet bigger than my house will suck up utilities.

    Then I dug some more and found out if market crashes or I lose my job I cant rent it out at a profit.

    I can afford it my wife was one who is scared to move as it is a 30 year committment and she does not want to go to work and if we can sell unlike my house I cant just rent it out or leave it empty.

  42. anon (the good one) says:

    well, we all remain here in NJ right?
    don’t see nobody moving to Alabama

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    March 4, 2015 at 1:36 pm
    For the children? More like the services are for the adults. Wealthy people want a good education system for their children and to maintain real estate values. They also want access to everything and anything. They also want lots of local govt so that they have total control over their quality of life in their town. This costs money.

    Once again, this state costs a lot of money to live in because it provides for the affluent lifestyle. You can get anything you want in New Jersey( the nyc metro area in general). People complaining about much cheaper states should first go and live there. This way they can find out why it is so much cheaper. Good luck with hospitals, education, safety (all those cops we have), restaurants, and quality of life in those states. You will be bored and go out of your mind. Ask lynch how much he loved buff when he was drafted by the bills. He said the biggest thing on a sat night was going to the only applebees in town and that’s a city. Catch my drift?

  43. Xolepa says:

    Case in point: just finished past weekend visiting Boston area for my son and DIL’s house hunting tour. Mass. schools system are rated higher than NJ yet property taxes are 1/2 to 1/3 of similar ones in NJ. So, how come they ‘take care of the children’ better than we do?

  44. grim says:

    Lots of talk about income inequality and economic mobility.

    Economic mobility and the potential to move from lower income quartiles to higher income quartiles is significantly greater in NJ than in any of the “cheaper” places listed above. Especially Alabama.

    And if you fail, the social safety net is stronger here.

    Price of opportunity and failure I suppose.

    This is a much more compelling rationale than simply having good pizza and bagels.

  45. grim says:

    http://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/reports/0001/01/01/economic-mobility-of-the-states

    Eight states, primarily in the Mideast and New England regions, have consistently higher upward and lower downward mobility compared to the nation as a whole.

    Maryland, New Jersey, and New York have better economic mobility than the national average on all three measures investigated; Connecticut, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Utah have better mobility than the national average on two measures.

    Nine states, all in the South, have consistently lower upward and higher downward mobility compared to the nation as a whole.

    Louisiana, Oklahoma, and South Carolina have worse economic mobility than the national average on all three measures investigated; Alabama, Florida, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, and Texas have worse mobility than the national average on two measures.

  46. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Why are you so mad? Reality sinking in that the grass is not really greener on the other side? I hope every single person that thinks jersey is second hand to these backwards locations to please go and live there. Instead of complaining about taxes, you will complain about your compensation which will suck. Sure you will pay less taxes, but you sure as hell will have almost no chance to make serious money, but hey your cost of living is cheap, now you no longer need to complain about that. Instead you could complain about how little in taxes, rent/mortgage, or insurance you paid because you make no money.

    So everyone out there complaining about the cost of living in jersey, please leave. By leaving, you will make jersey cheaper for me, while at the same time eliminating some competition in the economy for me. Thanks.

    homeboken says:
    March 4, 2015 at 1:50 pm
    Pumpkin – Please look at your right hand. Make fist. Now shove that up your a$$.

    You speak as if the rest of the country is back-woods nomads, and only NJ will do. You are a total waste, so please go f!st yourself.

  47. The Great Pumpkin says:

    48- most of the country is backwards. Coastal areas and few metro areas in the plains are the only livable places for people that grew up in a area like north jersey. Most other places you will not like. Going on vacation and living in a place is two different worlds. You have to live there to realize how bad it is after growing up in a place like Ridgewood. Most areas of the country shut down at 930/10 pm. They also have almost nothing to do.

  48. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Boston area is the same as north jersey. Taxes are almost the same. Cost of living is almost the same. The people are almost the same. I’m not talking about areas like DC, philly burbs, conn, md, coastal fl, or coastal Cali.

    Xolepa says:
    March 4, 2015 at 2:23 pm
    Case in point: just finished past weekend visiting Boston area for my son and DIL’s house hunting tour. Mass. schools system are rated higher than NJ yet property taxes are 1/2 to 1/3 of similar ones in NJ. So, how come they ‘take care of the children’ better than we do?

  49. grim says:

    Probability of a lowest rung income individual moving to the top rung income is double in the NY metro area compared so locations in the south and midwest.

    So if you’ve “made it” here, and now want to take that elsewhere, realize that if you had lived elsewhere, you probably would not have “made it”.

  50. The Great Pumpkin says:

    50- Take Long Island, west Chester county, and rock land county in ny. Those places are exactly like north jersey. High taxes and expensive properties. Why is the rest of ny state not like that? You can blame govt all you want. The truth is, these places are expensive to live because they are filled with wealthy people competing to live there. Simple as that. They demand a certain lifestyle, meaning they demand a lot of services like a top notch education and an extremely low crime rate. Low cost of living areas do not have wealthy people competing to live there.

    Yes, fast Eddie, we are bleeding wealth in north jersey. Why? The stats say so. When was the last time nj was not ranked in the top 3 in the nation in terms of wealth? If nj is screwed than the whole country is screwed.

    Businesses that avoid this state are looking for cheap labor to take advantage of. That is why they are not coming. Not because of taxes, but because their business model requires cheap labor which you will never find in a high cost of living area. People need to get paid to live, don’t pay enough and you will not be able to hire a workforce. People complaining about these businesses need to address this; are you really worried about a business not coming here that was going to provide min wage jobs/low wage jobs that no one could survive on anyway? We need real jobs that a family can survive on, not more jobs that will require govt welfare to survive.

    Tell corporations to stop killing high paying jobs in the name of more profit, we need good jobs. Hearing about economic success in areas of the country with low costs of living just tells me that we are shifting our good paying jobs to lower paying jobs. Low paying jobs work well for people in low cost of living areas, but not so much in the high cost areas.

  51. Ragnar says:

    Pumpkin is so full of BS describing the rest of the country as a wasteland.
    So what exactly are these elite restaurants and entertainments after 9:30PM you engage in on a constant basis? In what ways exactly does NJ’s government “support our affluent lifestyle”?

    Like Grim says, I live here because I work here. My firm remains here despite not because of NJ’s government and policies.

  52. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Amen!!

    There is a reason people come to the big city from the small town to make it big. There are nowhere near the opportunities to make money in Carolina as compared to jersey.

    grim says:
    March 4, 2015 at 2:35 pm
    http://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/reports/0001/01/01/economic-mobility-of-the-states

    Eight states, primarily in the Mideast and New England regions, have consistently higher upward and lower downward mobility compared to the nation as a whole.

    Maryland, New Jersey, and New York have better economic mobility than the national average on all three measures investigated; Connecticut, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Utah have better mobility than the national average on two measures.

    Nine states, all in the South, have consistently lower upward and higher downward mobility compared to the nation as a whole.

    Louisiana, Oklahoma, and South Carolina have worse economic mobility than the national average on all three measures investigated; Alabama, Florida, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, and Texas have worse mobility than the national average on two measures.

  53. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Bs? Why don’t you go live in Kansas where your cost of living and taxes will be much cheaper. Better yet, why didn’t you stay in Florida? Why in the hell did you come to jersey? You make me sick. Jersey helped you become extremely wealthy, yet you piss on the state. You made all this money, yet you don’t want to pay the taxes?!?!? How are the taxes too high, if this economy and state mints millionaires on a regular basis? People like you need to leave jersey and come back where you came from.

    Ragnar says:
    March 4, 2015 at 5:04 pm
    Pumpkin is so full of BS describing the rest of the country as a wasteland.
    So what exactly are these elite restaurants and entertainments after 9:30PM you engage in on a constant basis? In what ways exactly does NJ’s government “support our affluent lifestyle”?

    Like Grim says, I live here because I work here. My firm remains here despite not because of NJ’s government and policies.

  54. The Great Pumpkin says:

    56- * go back where you came from.

  55. The Great Pumpkin says:

    56- Don’t get me started on restaurant and night life. You can’t even be serious.

  56. jcer says:

    Taxes are high here because the people can afford to pay. That’s the answer. What has the government done for that money…..a whole lot of nothing, they are extremely wasteful. Incomes are high here so there is demand to live here. It is not that it is so wonderful and incredible here, it is that they get paid 250k per year here and jobs with that salary are scarce. NJ and all of the NYC suburbs are really not where anyone wants to live, taxes are high, schools are good,traffic is bad, and they are boring places….but to work in NYC where a lot of the economic activity for this country happens and to make a good salary people put up with it. The truth is practical matters drive the decision, you need space for your family and everything costs so much in NYC you move to the burbs. Almost no one really wants to be here, they want the money they can make here and make the sacrifices to get it.

  57. Essex says:

    You guys are funny. North Jersey isn’t Manhattan. You might be able to see it from there, but it aint NYC. It has more in common with Mayberry than you might imagine.

  58. jcer says:

    Essex, bingo the suburbs are boring, boring places. What they have is free parking, schools your kids can go to, they are clean….. Not much different than any other suburban areas anywhere else in the world. Housing costs and taxes for that matter are a function of how much you can make. As soon as you find yourself in a place with limited economic opportunity, costs become much lower.

  59. The Great Pumpkin says:

    I pretty much stated the same thing. So I agree with you.

    When I talk about services, I’m talking about services attracted to money. Everything is at your finger tip. Any want or need can be had for the right price in the ny metro area. If you think it is boring here, try living in other parts of the country where the cost of living is low. How many times can you go to the same 2 restaurants?

    jcer says:
    March 4, 2015 at 5:32 pm
    Taxes are high here because the people can afford to pay. That’s the answer. What has the government done for that money…..a whole lot of nothing, they are extremely wasteful. Incomes are high here so there is demand to live here. It is not that it is so wonderful and incredible here, it is that they get paid 250k per year here and jobs with that salary are scarce. NJ and all of the NYC suburbs are really not where anyone wants to live, taxes are high, schools are good,traffic is bad, and they are boring places….but to work in NYC where a lot of the economic activity for this country happens and to make a good salary people put up with it. The truth is practical matters drive the decision, you need space for your family and everything costs so much in NYC you move to the burbs. Almost no one really wants to be here, they want the money they can make here and make the sacrifices to get it.

  60. The Great Pumpkin says:

    North jersey is close enough to nyc to be a part of it. Manhattan is expanding into New Jersey as we speak. No one wants to raise their family in the city. They want to live in a burb outside the city that is close enough to use the city for all it is worth.

    Essex says:
    March 4, 2015 at 5:33 pm
    You guys are funny. North Jersey isn’t Manhattan. You might be able to see it from there, but it aint NYC. It has more in common with Mayberry than you might imagine.

  61. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Yes, the burbs are boring, but you are a 15 min to an hour from nyc. Work and play in the city, but live in the burbs. Doesn’t get any better than jersey.

    jcer says:
    March 4, 2015 at 5:38 pm
    Essex, bingo the suburbs are boring, boring places. What they have is free parking, schools your kids can go to, they are clean….. Not much different than any other suburban areas anywhere else in the world. Housing costs and taxes for that matter are a function of how much you can make. As soon as you find yourself in a place with limited economic opportunity, costs become much lower.

  62. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Ok, if I was living in a burb in Jacksonville, Florida, what exactly what I have to look forward to? Think it’s boring here, what exactly would you do there?

    How about going to an area like this. Look up 123 Corine Ct, Shelby NC. Tell me exactly what do you do with your money here? Think it’s boring in northern jersey, how would you survive here?

  63. anon (the good one) says:

    first post today got it right. Michael makes the blog lively and therefore the number of posts is approaching 70.

    first post today got it right indeed

  64. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Look at this map of Starbucks locations. When you zoom out of the map to a view of the entire United states, you see all you need to see. There are five big red circles representing where the highest concentration of Starbucks are. The map does not lie. Red circles are located in Seattle region, sf region, southern cal region, chi region, and northeast. Get it now?

    Also, nyc metro area has the highest concentration of Starbucks in the country. Hmmm, I wonder why?

    https://opendata.socrata.com/Business/All-Starbucks-Locations-in-the-US-Map/ddym-zvjk

  65. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Lmao, some towns in nyc metro area have more Starbucks than the entire state of Mississippi! Still think it’s fun in these low cost areas?

  66. anon (the good one) says:

    interesting. high income folks demand quality

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    March 4, 2015 at 6:11 pm

    Also, nyc metro area has the highest concentration of Starbucks in the country. Hmmm, I wonder why?

  67. anon (the good one) says:

    same thing apply to museums, art, hospitals

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    March 4, 2015 at 6:15 pm
    Lmao, some towns in nyc metro area have more Starbucks than the entire state of Mississippi! Still think it’s fun in these low cost areas?

  68. grim says:

    anon = pumpkin?

  69. I just sent an email to hillary2016@aol.com, but it bounced. I then tried to get that user name but it has already been taken. drat.

    Anybody who knows my gmail account name, I pretty much own that username around the internet since the early 90’s. I even have it at aol.com and was able to get back into my account today by knowing my first pet’s name. My account profile at AOL says I’ve been a member since 11/97, but that is wrong. I’ve had my AOL ID since at least 1993 or 94. CompuServe and Bix before that. I traded online with Schwab in 1991 with a DOS based platform, if you can believe that. Schwab branded that platform “The Equalizer”. It was $40-$100 commission per trade back when that was actually a good deal.

  70. anon (the good one) says:

    @CNBCnow:

    Governor Chris Christie declares state of emergency for New Jersey ahead of winter storm that will impact state late Wednesday into Thursday

  71. ^^^^Maybe I should change my handle to “Old guy with a CRT and a mechanical keyboard.”

    (Neither of which is true…anymore.)

  72. LOL. My oldest AOL email left in my inbox is from 10/2011 from yelp asking me to please confirm my email address.

  73. NJT says:

    IMHO the number of ‘Cluster B’ (look it up) personalities (they dominate politics)decreases dramatically as you move out from urban areas. Not saying there are none in small rural towns just that the meter moves more towards the mean (it varies at anywhere between 2-10% though some say higher) more.

    The ‘city’ (and the shore) has its attractions but I don’t want to live there (or in a boring ‘cuttie cutter’ suburb).

    For me the trick is to live in the periphery and enjoy the best of both worlds.

    *Grew up on a farm where I could see Manhattan on a clear day then, later, worked
    there (did a stint in the USAF, too).

  74. NJT says:

    #72

    Almost my story. Ah, Schwab!!

    Illary… Never met or talked to the woman but Bill…no comment.

  75. The Great Pumpkin says:

    69,70- Too funny. Thanks for the laugh.

  76. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Think about this. If nj lowered their taxes to the equivalent of these low cost states, what impact would this have on jersey?

    I would think you would get something similar to what you see now, but on a totally exaggerated level. Meaning, the price of real estate in the towns with money would rise dramatically while the patersons would remain the same. Think taxes are the only thing keeping prices in check in this state (not that it is a good thing), but all that tax money would just get dumped right back into the price of real estate.

    This is just “thinking”, I’m not stating this as fact.

  77. Juice Box says:

    Cumon folks fess up already. High taxes mean less diversity in your town.

  78. Juice Box says:

    Was listening to CNN on they way home, they made it sound like the DOJ report said they found that the white hooded folks are all in Missouri. There are plenty here hiding behind their high taxes, yet no mention of what goes on in Chicago with their PD or NYC.

  79. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Lol.. That’s for sure. I’m not going to lie, you pay more to avoid a certain class. Anyone stating otherwise is prob lying. They say money doesn’t discriminate, but too bad the people spending it do. Raising the price on something is the easiest way to keep certain people out without being called out on it.

    Juice Box says:
    March 4, 2015 at 7:49 pm
    Cumon folks fess up already. High taxes mean less diversity in your town.

  80. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Fast Eddie doesn’t think high taxes has anything to do with keeping rift raft out. I challenge you on this issue. High taxes are specifically meant to do that. Lower the tax rate in some of these towns and their school system will be overridden with people trying to get into that town and school system that don’t belong there. As long as they can’t afford it, they don’t belong there. You want really cheap taxes, but be careful what you ask for.

  81. Liquor Luge says:

    By Punkin’s rationale in the post above, Bernards HS should be the size of MLK.

  82. Liquor Luge says:

    Scrolling through the anon/Punkin circle jerk on one of these threads is like peeling an onion of stupid.

  83. jcer says:

    76, not disagreeing about the periphery. But from a practical standpoint if you need to be at 50th and 6th at 8 am it isn’t going to work. If your job is in Morristown you have some better options, for the rest of us our choices are not that good, it is a 50×80 lot with a god awful shack on it for 750k and 15k in property taxes minimum. The problem being anywhere else that you’d have the same career opportunities is largely the same or worse.

  84. Thomas says:

    83. “…keeping ‘rift raft’ out.” Gotta love the pumpkin-bumpkin! But Pumps, increasing property taxes suppresses home prices. Wouldn’t increasing home prices do the same thing?

  85. jcer says:

    80. Juice in the northeast color doesn’t matter as much as in other parts of the country, they want to keep the less affluent out. If you are rich you can be purple, no one cares, but truly rich towns have low tax rates.

  86. Ben says:

    Lol.. That’s for sure. I’m not going to lie, you pay more to avoid a certain class. Anyone stating otherwise is prob lying. They say money doesn’t discriminate, but too bad the people spending it do. Raising the price on something is the easiest way to keep certain people out without being called out on it.

    Less to do with taxes and more to do with price tag. If Basking Ridge and Princeton lowered their taxes, people that make 80k a year might be able to actually move into those towns. People making $35k a year….yeah right

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