The school vax window is closing

From the Daily Record:

NJ officials to parents: Get your teens a first COVID shot this week in time for school

With most schools about four weeks away from opening, New Jersey officials are urging parents to get their adolescents a first COVID shot this week in order to be close to fully vaccinated by opening day. 

The state Department of Health plans to have back-to-school vaccination clinics in districts across the state to raise the vaccination rate for 12- to 17-year-olds, which sits below 40%. There are nine clinics this week in Bergen County alone.

“For the folks who are eligible in both of those groups, 12 to 15 and 16 to 17, we need more of you to step up,” Gov. Phil Murphy said Monday.

The push comes as the delta variant continues to spread across New Jersey causing a rise in cases and hospitalizations, including among those younger than 18. Last week, Murphy reversed his stance and is now requiring students, teachers and visitors in all K-12 schools to wear masks when the new academic year begins with an anticipated in-person, full-time schedule.

This entry was posted in General. Bookmark the permalink.

245 Responses to The school vax window is closing

  1. leftwing says:

    Frist.

    I got nuthin’.

  2. BRT says:

    If Murphy had any brains, he would simply say, if a school meets an 85% threshold of vaccinated individuals, a school can drop the masks. Give them actual motivation.

  3. leftwing says:

    Southwest announces a noticeable acceleration of cancellations and slowdown of bookings for near term travel. Very significant they felt the need to do a regulatory filing over it (dropped an 8K this morning) and that the turn occurred so rapidly.

    Anecdotally a rational, educated, healthy, and vaccinated attorney friend discussed with me yesterday how he and his wife were considering cancelling their flight/vacation coming up in a couple weeks.

    Get ready boys, some volatility may be on the horizon. Be liquid, be ready, be smart.

  4. Grim says:

    We are headed out tomorrow morning.

    In Moderna We Trust

  5. Juice Box says:

    Housing glut coming?

    A new report from Zillow Z, -1.84% ZG, -1.85% estimated that around 850,000 borrowers will exit their forbearance plans between August and October. If the past proves to be precedent, a significant chunk of these homeowners will opt to list their homes for sale.

  6. A Home Buyer says:

    A little late, but Bluey is perhaps the greatest children’s shown ever made.

    As an adult its hilarious, is not crude or ADHD / seizure inducing, and doesn’t push any agenda or politics. Its just incredibly creative and fun.

    Its a joy to watch with the young one.

  7. Ex says:

    Northeast Rail NYC gateway is a thing now.

  8. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Juice,

    I read an article that said it will be quickly absorbed by investors alone. So it should have almost no impact on bringing the price down. If I get some time today, will try to find it.

  9. Juice Box says:

    AWS just beat out Microsoft for the new $10 Billion NSA contract…bad for Microsoft since the government also cancelled the JEDI project Microsoft won too.

    I follow AWS’s distinguished engineer James Hamilton….They have been making their own chips for about four years now via acquisition of Annapurna Labs, and their own network gear for about 15 years.

    I have to wonder if they are going to expand more into chipmaking, their own needs for millions of chips is enough to overcome the costs and trouble of designing chips and manufacturing chips, as they consume enough of them that they could eliminate the chip bottleneck for them anymore, it seems AWS is definitely going to do its own network ASICs. It is just a matter of time for economic reasons that include the company’s desire to vertically integrate all core elements of its stack.

  10. No One says:

    10-day forecast for Orlando FL, every day about 89 and humid to make it feel like over 100 until after the daily thunderstorms send everyone running for cover.
    I hope Grim is staying on one of the monorail-served resort hotels at Disney. That way it’s easy to get to the park early, retreat to the hotel in the afternoons and come back when it cools off a bit later.

    The luxury way to go is staying at the Grand Floridian in one of the concierge buildings where they have breakfast, afternoon tea, and evening drinks in the building. Particularly nice because Disney restaurant breakfasts generally stink and nobody wants to waste their early park time getting it.

  11. JUice Box says:

    Pumps stick to your lane already….These are distressed homeowners….I suspect many are going to squat and wait to be kicked out by the sheriff perhaps 80%..The foreclosure bottleneck will be enormous and there may be need for another bailout…Who is going to take the losses on millions homes not making mortgage payments… IT WONT BE THE BANKS, and there are another million more homeowners also ending forbearance in the coming months….few are going to have spare tens of thousands of dollars to catch up on the missed payments. Another Fed bailout or perhaps government HAARP type program will be coming, keep an eye out for the legislation…

  12. Juice Box says:

    Ex – re: “Life is good when you’re an heir”

    Just enough water in that pool that they maybe able to save the house when the next fire comes. 400 Malibu homes burned to the ground in 2018. The Topanga Canyon fire in 1993 did similar damages. I visited Malibu right after that fire, nothing was left just piles of rubble.

  13. grim says:

    Nah, no Disney. Headed down to St. Martin.

  14. 3b says:

    Juice: And yet they are allowed to rebuild.

  15. BRT says:

    I’ll be in Disney in 4 hours. Contemporary. NJ is actually worse temperaturewise this week

  16. JCer says:

    Ex, I’d expect more for 16m, it doesn’t have an ocean view nor any beach frontage.

    I could buy 4 of these for the price of that house, note it’s 1325 sqm which is 14000 sqft

    https://www.immobiliare.it/annunci/64574925/

    Somehow I think I’d rather be on the riviera rather than in Malibu, it’s certainly better for yachting.

  17. 3b says:

    BRT/ Grim Enjoy your vacations with your families! We are staying fairly local, off to Rehoboth Beach tomorrow. So looking forward to it! Stay safe.

  18. Nomad says:

    Ali Wolf Chief Economist at Zonda. Interesting and still frustrating for those still trying to buy a home.

    https://twitter.com/AliWolfEcon

  19. leftwing says:

    “I visited Malibu right after that fire, nothing was left just piles of rubble.”

    Point Dume is fantastic. I was surprised how cheap the lots of burned down houses were offered and sitting, right up to pre-pandemic. haven’t looked recently.

    Just need to build the home like in the Caribbean…with full knowledge that it will be ravaged every so often by nature so keep it solid and basic. That doesn’t mean cheap, it means leave the 10k lighting fixtures and custom trimming with ancient woods behind.

    Value is in the dirt, and the dirt’s proximity to salt water. Everything else is incidental and risk.

  20. NJCoast says:

    Grim-Dutch or French?
    Nah, no Disney. Headed down to St. Martin

  21. grim says:

    French, staying in Grand Case.

  22. NJCoast says:

    Pack a couple of these for the beach if they don’t supply free lounges.
    https://shop.fatboyusa.com/collections/lamzac?_ga=2.148942518.1065154983.1628700843-471579180.1628700843

  23. No One says:

    BRT,
    Contemporary has always looked fun but I’ve only looked down upon it from the monorail. Enjoy

  24. Fast Eddie says:

    So, the woke-ing dead at Go0gle are going to chop up to 25% pay for those WFH? Don’t they realize how much WFH reduces the carbon footprint? Oh, why am I being so allusive… the f.ucking woke crowd x-coms don’t give a flying shit about a green planet any more than the ones they rail against.

  25. 3b says:

    Fast: Liberal hypocrisy! Just like the green czar John Kerry and his private jet.

  26. SmallGovConservative says:

    BRT says:
    August 11, 2021 at 11:25 am
    “I’ll be in Disney in 4 hours…”

    Can’t speak to Disney, but been in southwest FLA for the past two weeks and can’t overstate how ‘normal’ things are here. No panic and more importantly, no one attempting to make a ‘statement’ one way or the other; just people going about their business in the way that they feel comfortable. Lots of people wearing masks indoors, but just as many not. Restaurants, food stores, gym all busy and all feel ‘normal’. Movie theatre was empty but I attribute that as much as anything to Suicide Squad being an absolutely terrible movie.

  27. Phoenix says:

    Eddie,
    Google has done the math, they will knock 25% off, plus the employees will still take the job.
    It’s a win win for Google. The earth gets cleaner, Google saves money.

  28. Phoenix says:

    WFH is leverage against an employee or employer.

    It’s all about who has the upper hand. Who wants what more.

    If it’s good for one, then why not for the other?

    Capitalism, the fuel that sets the planet on fire.

  29. BRT says:

    I stayed at the grand Floridian before. Definitely nicer. Contemporarys advantage is you can walk from magic kingdom. California grill is awesome on the roof as well

  30. Phoenix says:

    “BRT,
    Contemporary has always looked fun but I’ve only looked down upon it from the monorail. Enjoy”

    Contemporary has splotches of yellow all over it from the falling complementary jars of Grey Poupon they give out at the Grand Floridian.

  31. 3b says:

    Phoenix: Google can do what they want in the end. I am sure there are lots of other tech companies out there who will be happy to pick up those Google employees who chose to leave. WFH is not going away.

  32. Phoenix says:

    3b,
    And the employees can do what they want in the end as well. But I would not be surprised if other employers don’t take advantage of this and follow as well with decreased wages for those who choose to WFH.

    It’s a game that will be played over and over again by both sides.

    And it’s not about ‘carbon footprint,” it’s about the mighty greenback.

    Google will be fine no matter what these employees do.

  33. 3b says:

    Phoenix: There are people who will take the pay cut, depending of course on how much the pay cut is. But the time savings alone is worth a lot for many, especially those with children. There are commuting savings which speaking for myself I can tell you are significant , there are potential tax savings, and day care savings as well. And again the quality of life improvement. We don’t know how it all works out, but WFH is a significant part of the equation. A lot of companies finding they have a lot of real estate that they really don’t need.

  34. Phoenix says:

    There are people who will take the pay cut, depending of course on how much the pay cut is.

    So a deal is negotiated. However, this benefits Google, as they will search for more WFH employees and keep paying them less, saving Google money.

    It’s going to be used as a bargaining chip and/or leverage by both sides.

    I’d bet Google would like to get some of those North Korean or Russian hackers on their payroll if they could…

  35. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Juice,

    Couldn’t find the article I read, but will try some more. Read this for now.

    To demonstrate the power of equity, the number of foreclosure starts peaked at nearly 733,000 at the height of the foreclosure crisis in the third quarter of 2009. At the time, house prices had declined by nearly 11 percent compared with a year earlier. Had all other factors remained unchanged in 2009, except annual house price appreciation was replaced with the positive 11 percent year-over-year rate from the fourth quarter of 2020, there would have been 34 percent fewer foreclosure starts, according to our analysis. Over 249,000 foreclosure starts may have been prevented in that quarter alone. With enough equity, a homeowner has the option of selling the home, an option that doesn’t exist for a homeowner in a negative equity position.

    Indeed, this time it’s different. House price appreciation is expected to remain positive, if not accelerate, due to the ongoing supply and demand imbalance in the housing market. Forbearance is not a permanent solution to housing distress and eventually the emergency protections will expire, but because so many homeowners have a considerable equity buffer, we’re more likely to see a foreclosure trickle than a tsunami.

    https://blog.firstam.com/economics/will-the-end-of-forbearance-trigger-a-wave-of-foreclosures

  36. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Yup. Well said.

    Phoenix says:
    August 11, 2021 at 4:47 pm
    3b,
    And the employees can do what they want in the end as well. But I would not be surprised if other employers don’t take advantage of this and follow as well with decreased wages for those who choose to WFH.

    It’s a game that will be played over and over again by both sides.

    And it’s not about ‘carbon footprint,” it’s about the mighty greenback.

    Google will be fine no matter what these employees do.

  37. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Absolutely. Nailed it.

    Phoenix says:
    August 11, 2021 at 5:34 pm
    There are people who will take the pay cut, depending of course on how much the pay cut is.

    So a deal is negotiated. However, this benefits Google, as they will search for more WFH employees and keep paying them less, saving Google money.

    It’s going to be used as a bargaining chip and/or leverage by both sides.

    I’d bet Google would like to get some of those North Korean or Russian hackers on their payroll if they could…

  38. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Like I said…this is going to create two tiers of employees.

    Second class will be remote with few elite able to pull it off sprinkled in.

    First class will be in the office and getting paid the most.

    Getting paid the same as you did in office this past 2 years was a badge of honor. Very fortunate. Companies were not in position to cut salaries if you worked remotely because there was no choice given. Everyone had to work from home. Now the real game of chicken begins.

  39. The Great Pumpkin says:

    There is no reason for a company to continue to pay a remote worker the same as an office worker. Like i said in the previous post, the only people working from home getting paid big bucks are the elite that have the company by the balls. Most of these elite have been already WFH for the past 15 years.

  40. 3b says:

    Phoenix: WFH was not common place years ago , the technology simply was not there. Anyone who knows anything about corporate life and what we do, knows that. It has also been pointed out numerous times here by the technology people. Denying that fact is just delusional. I have friends and family in many areas of corporate America, finance, accounting, banking, marketing, technology, law, and Human Resources; many of them at the top of their respective industries. All acknowledge that WFH is a game changer, and it was not even a real concrete discussion 15 or 20 years ago. We all know that we have been in our professions for years, not on the outside trying to look in. The Google matter will resolve itself, but WFH is here to stay, and it’s a God send for the young millennial couples with children.

  41. Phoenix says:

    “it’s a God send for the young millennial couples with children.”

    Until the teachers demand it as well…

    Until you are replaced with someone from Gary, Indiana for 1/2 price, but are still paying NJ taxes.

    Until you are replaced with someone from India, for 1/2 the price of an employee from Gary, Indiana….

  42. BRT says:

    So the weather is cooler and less humid in Florida right now. All my friends in NJ would be horrified with what I’m seeing at Disney Springs

  43. Ex says:

    It’s hot as fuuuuuuuck in The Valley.
    Fortunately where I am is always 10 degrees cooler.
    Just by virtue of the fact that I am there.

  44. Juice Box says:

    Ex – Hotter here 95 F and high humidity we are roasting. Storms again tonight. My grass has grown nearly 1/2 foot since last week!…

  45. Juice Box says:

    Phoenix – The SS agents guarding him now must have to turn a blind eye. He cannot be 100% clean, addiction simply does not work that way, that video of him talking on the phone while smoking some crack looked recent too. His SOHO gallery art sales are next month….the pressure will be intense, he will fly out to NYC perhaps without family and be almost alone in a hotel, easy to score in NYC anything you want too….SS is supposed to not interfere in any form or fashion.. I would hate to be on his detail…If the sale does not go well do to media pressure? All bets are off then…

  46. 3b says:

    Phoenix: The teachers can have it, but they have to take the rest of what corporate America has as well. They can’t have it all. As I have said numerous times here corporate America has been hiring for positions that are geographically agnostic, this was before WFH became common place. And yes could go to India as well , nothing anyone can do about that, simply thinking if there was no WFH, then it would not be an issue is nonsense. And if the jobs all go to India or the Philippines or wherever, then as Clot used to say people will be huddled around fires in oil drums, and scavenging for food, as in none of it will really matter then.

  47. The Great Pumpkin says:

    You are seeing this wrong…I try to get you to see the light, but it’s impossible.

    3b says:
    August 11, 2021 at 6:25 pm
    Phoenix: WFH was not common place years ago , the technology simply was not there. Anyone who knows anything about corporate life and what we do, knows that. It has also been pointed out numerous times here by the technology people. Denying that fact is just delusional. I have friends and family in many areas of corporate America, finance, accounting, banking, marketing, technology, law, and Human Resources; many of them at the top of their respective industries. All acknowledge that WFH is a game changer, and it was not even a real concrete discussion 15 or 20 years ago. We all know that we have been in our professions for years, not on the outside trying to look in. The Google matter will resolve itself, but WFH is here to stay, and it’s a God send for the young millennial couples with children.

  48. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Just like you used to say the millennials don’t want to live in the suburbs. I tried over and over to get you to see the light, but you refused to open your eyes.

  49. NJCoast says:

    My 88 yr old dad is here visiting and began reminiscing about growing up in Fair Lawn in the ‘30’s. I pulled up the street view of his house which was still the same. He remembered all the neighbors names. His next door neighbors were the Rutts. “They had a little hot dog place, I wonder if it’s still there….”

  50. 3b says:

    Phoenix: There is only one person on this blog who despises WFH and we all know why. But make no mistake, WFH is not going away.

  51. 3b says:

    Phoenix: If Hunter was a Trump there would be howls from
    The main stream media, instead we have crickets.

  52. Phoenix says:

    The media is going to be gentle on him, as it is HIS father that is currently in power in America.
    The American government can and will destroy who it wants once it targets you.

    They don’t want that bullseye. It’s why the Daily Mail has better stories than American papers.

  53. Phoenix says:

    3b,
    WFH is here to stay, both good and bad. And so is AI, which will monitor every keystroke, a camera to make sure you are looking at the screen, a timer that will make sure you increase your efficiency every year in order to get a raise.

    Robots will eliminate more jobs, contactless delivery some more. You won’t need cashiers- it will be like other countries where you just walk in and out and it’s all charged automatically.

    Well, they better find something for the rest of Americans to do when they are all unemployed, or it will be like Clot said, plus they are fully armed so it should be some good entertainment for the next 20 years.

  54. 3b says:

    Phoenix: A lot of truth in what you say. The Boomers will be ok though!

  55. BRT says:

    Coast, someone dug up the relish recipe from an old paper. Mrs Rutt submitted it to the paper as a family recipe before they ever opened.

  56. Phoenix says:

    Apparently, if you live in Jennette, Arkansas Google will drop your salary from 150k to 20k because their algorithm has determined that will make you the wealthiest person who lives there.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9885625/Google-staff-AGREE-pay-cuts-return-allowed-work-home-permanently.html

  57. Phoenix says:

    3b
    They will. And like they have in the past, they will so the seeds of despair to those that come after them.
    They were given the 40 hour work week with paid overtime, vacation time, pensions, benefits and unions by groups like those who mined coal and died to give them those benefits.
    Like the locusts they are, they took the ball, ran with it, attached like ticks and drained so much blood out of the system that when it came time for the younger folks, there was nothing left.
    No pension, no benefits, no unions, no lunch hour, no vacations. no Social Security, no Medicare.
    But they did give a gift, the gift of debt. In NJ to the tune of 200 BILLION DOLLARS.
    Then they sail off to Costa Rica or Florida with the debt left to the youth.

    “All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.”

  58. Phoenix says:

    Don’t get diarrhea. Too much time at the toilet and you will get 3 demerits.

    https://www.pcmag.com/reviews/teramind

  59. joyce says:

    I wonder if this will change or impact their visa applications for international workers.

    Phoenix says:
    August 11, 2021 at 10:34 pm
    Apparently, if you live in Jennette, Arkansas Google will drop your salary from 150k to 20k because their algorithm has determined that will make you the wealthiest person who lives there.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9885625/Google-staff-AGREE-pay-cuts-return-allowed-work-home-permanently.html

  60. Hold my beer says:

    Phoenix

    I thought having 3 chickens and a goat would make you the wealthiest person there.

  61. Phoenix says:

    HMB,
    Thanks to you Google will now add that to their algorithm. Some poor guy there just took a 19k pay cut and received a goat for a bonus.

  62. Hold my beer says:

    Phoenix

    Maybe this could be used as a campaign to get WFH folks to relocate to Arkansas.

    https://www.kait8.com/2020/02/21/arkansas-leads-us-meth-use-study-finds/

  63. Hold my beer says:

    Texas is about to get much worse with COVID. The ICUs and hospitals are almost full, staff shortages. And school is starting.

    Bonus. The largest demographic of unvaccinated but eligible Texans are parents of young children.

    https://www.wfaa.com/article/news/health/coronavirus/coronavirus-numbers/dallas-fort-worth-icu-beds-are-dwindling-and-doctors-say-get-covid-19-vaccine/287-ede9a1ca-a086-468a-9bd2-7c3d1bc78f00

  64. Hold my beer says:

    Hospitalizations up 400% in the last month. Only 46% of 16-49 year olds fully vaccinated and only 26.9% of 12-16 year olds are. Although the 12-16 group was at 20% about a month ago. I think Texas will look a lot like NYC in Spring of 2020 in another month. Except it will be under 50 year old adults and kids filling the hospitals. And Abbott has signed an executive order banning mask mandates and is appealing a judge’s ru.I got allowing Dallas county to put one in place.

    https://apps.texastribune.org/features/2020/texas-coronavirus-cases-map/?_ga=2.39899490.1353198812.1628763002-1950378696.1628465561

  65. Hold my beer says:

    Ru.I got should be ruling

  66. Ex says:

    9:04 let’s see is Joe puts his corrupt kids on the payroll and gives them offices in the Whitehouse. See the difference??

  67. Ex says:

    Here let me help: Apparently they’ve had some testimony by the comptroller; in the state of New York that means they’ve essentially given him immunity. So I would focus on the kids. My guess is [COO Matthew] Calamari is kind of easy picking and that there are similar ways to give money for the kids. We’ve heard a lot of this reporting about Ivanka Trump getting consulting fees, ‘consulting fees’ for things that she may or may not have done. That looks to me like the next place, but we’ll just have to see.”

  68. 3b says:

    EX It’s still wrong and even if it was exactly the same , the media would be all over it if it was Trump as I said.

  69. Phoenix says:

    “Anyone who says crime doesn’t pay isn’t doing it right.”

    Elizabeth Keen.

  70. Phoenix says:

    Interesting thing for a lawyer to write:
    https://rhdefense.com/who-says-crime-doesnt-pay

  71. Fast Eddie says:

    9:04 let’s see is Joe puts his corrupt kids on the payroll and gives them offices in the Whitehouse. See the difference??

    LMAO. That would be like Cal1gula appointing his horse as his counsel. See the difference?

  72. Phoenix says:

    Eddie,
    America is completely off the rails right now. It’s a giant free for all s*** show.

    Dementia Joe walking around forgetting which door he came out of ten minutes earlier.

    Cuomo and his son. Chinese billionaire buying thousands of acres in Texas from greedy boomers.

    Covid going rampant in the summer, and it doesn’t spread as well in the heat
    -while at the same time the planet earth is cooking away the hottest it’s ever been.

    I believe Clot’s predictions will come true. But then again, I believed them when he posted them. It’s not that much of a stretch.

  73. Phoenix says:

    And since I’m not invited to the party anyway as I’m not much fun there, a tidbit.

    “If we’re lucky, SARS-CoV-2 will evolve, like the 1918 virus dubbed the “Spanish flu,” to become less lethal. After infecting an estimated 500 million worldwide and killing at least 50 million, the 1918 flu virus receded. But hope that this coronavirus will attenuate over time is no guarantee that it will. We already know that coronaviruses can become much more lethal; we need look no further than SARS-CoV-1, which killed 50 percent of those aged 65 and older, and MERS, which killed one out of three infected.”

  74. Phoenix says:

    A friendly reminder on a hot sunny Thursday.
    Get screened for skin cancer. Once it makes it to your brain you are as finished as Cuomo, actually, even more finished.

  75. 3b says:

    Phoenix: Clot never said when exactly his predictions would come true, but I would argue we are a lot closer today then we were when he was making them.

  76. BidenIsTheGOAT says:

    It’s always about the TDS. Still.

    Totally indefensible corruption over a lifetime, degenerate kid who is a national security disaster, and all the TDS afflicted can come up with is”trump did it too.” Pathetic.

  77. SmallGovConservative says:

    Ex says:
    August 12, 2021 at 7:25 am
    “let’s see is Joe puts his corrupt kids on the payroll…”

    The Dem stooges never quit! As if Kushner spear-heading T’s highly successful middle-east peace initiative(s) is the same as Hunter’s blatant and outrageous corruption — only in the mind of a dunce like Ex…

  78. Ex says:

    Dick and Liz Uihlein of packaging giant Uline, along with roofing magnate Diane Hendricks, together had contributed around $20 million to groups backing Johnson’s 2016 reelection campaign.

    The expanded tax break Johnson muscled through netted them $215 million in deductions in 2018 alone, drastically reducing the income they owed taxes on. At that rate, the cut could deliver more than half a billion in tax savings for Hendricks and the Uihleins over its eight-year life.

    But the tax break did more than just give a lucrative, and legal, perk to Johnson’s donors. In the first year after Trump signed the legislation, just 82 ultrawealthy households collectively walked away with more than $1 billion in total savings, an analysis of confidential tax records shows. Republican and Democratic tycoons alike saw their tax bills chopped by tens of millions, among them: media magnate and former Democratic presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg; the Bechtel family, owners of the engineering firm that bears their name; and the heirs of the late Houston pipeline billionaire Dan Duncan.

  79. Ex says:

    Sixteen months late, Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) on Wednesday filed a disclosure with the Senate revealing that on Feb. 26, 2020, his wife, Kelley, purchased stock in Gilead Sciences, a company that produces an antiviral drug used to treat COVID-19.

    Under the STOCK Act, which prohibits members of Congress from using information not available to the public for private profit, the disclosure should have been filed within 45 days of the purchase, The Washington Post reports.

  80. Fast Eddie says:

    I’m smart! Not like everybody sez! I can run things!!

    https://tinyurl.com/aywm395x

  81. BidenIsTheGOAT says:

    $15k. Lol. Big scandal there.

    It should be illegal, but if you are going to bother insider trading wouldn’t it be in the millions like Malinowski?

  82. joyce says:

    BidenIsTheGOAT says:
    August 12, 2021 at 9:10 am
    It’s always about the TDS. Still.

    Totally indefensible corruption over a lifetime, degenerate kid who is a national security disaster, and all the TDS afflicted can come up with is”trump did it too.” Pathetic.

  83. The Great Pumpkin says:

    BidenIsTheGOAT says:
    August 12, 2021 at 9:41 am
    $15k. Lol. Big scandal there.

    It should be illegal, but if you are going to bother insider trading wouldn’t it be in the millions like Malinowski?

    joyce says:
    August 12, 2021 at 9:53 am
    BidenIsTheGOAT says:
    August 12, 2021 at 9:10 am
    It’s always about the TDS. Still.

    Totally indefensible corruption over a lifetime, degenerate kid who is a national security disaster, and all the TDS afflicted can come up with is”trump did it too.” Pathetic.

  84. SmallGovConservative says:

    Hold my beer says:
    August 12, 2021 at 6:09 am
    “Texas is about to get much worse with COVID…”

    This was bound to be the case given SlowJoe’s disastrous immigration policy. We’re literally importing tens of thousands — if not hundreds of thousands — of un-tested and un-vaxxed illegal immigrants every single month, with no idea how many of them are covid positive. And Texas is on the front line, legally incapable of stopping or controlling the entry or transit of this covid ‘bomb’ that Joe has unleashed.

  85. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Both sides do it, Joyce.

  86. Phoenix says:

    “Dick and Liz Uihlein of packaging giant Uline, along with roofing magnate Diane Hendricks, together had contributed around $20 million to groups backing Johnson’s 2016 reelection campaign.”

    Americans have accepted that this practice is legal. Yes, legal.

    America is a nation of laws. That makes this okay.

    So when do we decide we no longer wish to be a nation of laws?

  87. Covid Bomb says:

    Boom!

  88. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Facebook has removed a network of over 308 Russian accounts on Facebook and Instagram after the group ran an unsuccessful campaign described as a “disinformation laundromat” to smear COVID-19 vaccines in India, Latin America, and, to a lesser extent, the United States.

    https://apple.news/Adyfk6ax7Q5OgCf3lKBrB1Q

  89. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Cat Nip

    Thieves want to turn your car’s catalytic converter into easy cash. This is why they want it, how they get it, and what they do with it.

    https://apple.news/ACAv6AJIORt2FuLnzXShFAQ

  90. The Great Pumpkin says:

    A supply-chain revolution is underway. The long-standing model of Western companies sourcing goods from China at ultralow costs was under pressure before the pandemic, as tariffs and rising Chinese wages made that nation’s products less of a bargain. Now, after Chinese factories abruptly shut down in the early pandemic just as demand spiked for crucial supplies, a new model is taking shape. The big winners are Asian countries that can underprice China, notably Vietnam, Thailand, and India, plus low-cost neighbors of the U.S. and Western Europe, such as Mexico and Poland.
    Major players are leading the move. Foxconn, maker of Apple products at huge factories in China, announced last July that it would invest $1 billion in India. Production of the iPod has moved to Vietnam. Hasbro is shifting toy production from China to Vietnam and India.
    Companies have also become more wary of globe-spanning supply chains. Sending a standard shipping container from Asia to the U.S. cost around $3,000 pre-pandemic; in recent months the cost has been $15,000 to $19,000, wrecking the economics of Asia-based production strategies, especially for high-bulk products such as furniture. The larger lesson is that while low costs are great, they aren’t risk-free. For U.S. companies, moving at least some production to Mexico or even the U.S. may be an insurance policy that’s worth the price. Mexico in particular is looking especially attractive. “China surpassed Mexico in terms of total employment costs back in 2015,” says Kevin Keegan, a partner in PwC’s consulting business. “If you think about the USMCA [U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement], and you think about fairly heavy goods that were made in China, making those in Mexico now is actually a better cost proposition for the North American market.”
    Global companies aren’t abandoning China, however. Many have spent decades building relationships there, and Chinese manufacturers have developed know-how that can’t be found elsewhere. In addition, migrating from China “requires a lot of spending,” Keegan notes, which means a lot of planning. Still, he says, “we do expect that in the next six months or so there will be more of an effort to reconstruct the supply-chain footprint.” Patrick Van den Bossche, a partner at the Kearney consulting firm, says, “The trend that started as moving away from China as a single source has now matured into a trend of companies trying to geographically diversify.” The emerging model is sometimes called China-plus, a more stable kind of globalization for importers, while China prospers by producing more sophisticated exports and increasingly basing its economy on domestic consumption.

    https://apple.news/AsY3NIfMaQ62x6fFua1eiBQ

  91. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “While many auto companies are blaming the 20% drop in US auto sales since April on chip shortages, the Mannheim used car price suggests that sales have peaked and that prices will round trip, one of many reasons we believe inflation will surprise on the low side of expectations!”

    “Another tick down for used car prices, will be interesting to see where this goes.

    Used cars play an outsized role in driving the auto market.”

  92. Phoenix says:

    Should have asked for 1B

    “Consulting firm Accenture is hit by Russian cyber hackers who demand $50M after claiming they stole six terabytes of ‘top secret’ data”

  93. Phoenix says:

    Rats formerly known as Arthur Anderson.

    Yeah, some of us still remember you.

    I wish the Ruskies would dump that data online for free.

  94. Phoenix says:

    Looks like they broke in using Hunter Biden’s laptop.

    Password was hookersandblow.

  95. Hunter's Laptop Secret Service says:

    He sh0uld have used an ampersand

  96. Captain Cheapo says:

    PSE&G is giving away up to 2 power strips and 12 a19 light bulbs for just the tax and shipping ($8.80). The power strips are “smart”. It’s about $50 worth of climate change saving crapola. Get in touch with your inner progressive Cheapo.

    I you haven’t noticed. I’m back. And so far, COVID free.

    http://click.e.marketplace.pseg.com/?qs=e84184b2b33284b745284cca5cc35f3a9c3ffd0666326f98179fa6cb7eac3fa20eed305ed8875444a918b01d5ba8700811f9601793e4915ac3c2ea8865098068

  97. Fast Eddie says:

    Re: Bluey

    Olay, caught ten minutes of the cartoon and read a few reviews. The verdict is still out for me, not sure what the motive is nor the intent. To determine pure entertainment value, put Bluey up against Elmer Fudd blowing Daffy Ducks f.ucking beak off and measure the kids reaction.

  98. Hold my beer says:

    Smallgovconservative

    Its actually all the people on both sides not getting vaccinated and whites not wearing masks causing the surge. I bet roughly 80% of white customers I see in grocery stores and big box stores are not wearing masks. Non mask wearers are over 95% when I’m in the rural areas of Texas. The percentage of fully vaccinated Hispanics is almost the same as whites now in Texas.

  99. Libturd says:

    That’s not the narrative. The Mexicans are swimming across the Gulf to Florida too. Haven’t you heard?

  100. Phoenix says:

    All you ever get from JCP&L is power outages.

  101. Libturd says:

    PSE&G is actually pretty good considering.

  102. Hold my beer says:

    Libturd

    It’s the truth. Even mask wearing in the Vietnamese grocery stores is only 55-60%. Looks like I will go back to shopping at hmart or going to a traditional grocery store at the open

  103. BRT says:

    Lib, actually, they are sending them to all 50nstates free of charge. I know someone who is a citizen, they came back from Baja border on foot after visiting and was flown to Newark free of charge because they assumed she was with the rest of them

  104. Ex says:

    1977 Capital Theater, NJ — what’d I’d give to be old enough in 1977 to get through the door:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bFZHrDe-2K8

  105. Libturdian Thoughts says:

    I don’t know.

    First it was, don’t get vaccinated and don’t wear masks.

    Now it’s, the immigrants aren’t vaccinated and don’t wear masks!!!

    Do you have any idea how silly the right looks right now? And DeSantis is slowly becoming the voice of the party?

    Perhaps you ought to ask some of those evangelists that blessed the White House when Trump was in office for their copy of the Book of Exodus and start researching the 40 years in the desert. Cause it’s coming. And I’m not talking about climate change.

  106. Libturdian Thoughts says:

    Now how much money was spent on that useless wall?

  107. BidenIsTheGOAT says:

    Yep, I know someone who connected through Denver. All of the empty seats were filled with illegals right before the door shut. That is your government at war with you. Flooding the country with disease carriers while stripping your rights.

  108. 3b says:

    Lib : We can’t just discount the people crossing the border as no big deal as it relates to Covid, then scream about Americans not getting the vaccine. It’s got nothing to do with racism it’s pure common sense.

  109. Libturdian Thoughts (self generated, how novel) says:

    If you changed the channel as often as you changed the story, you would live a lot longer.

  110. Fast Eddie says:

    Now how much money was spent on those that useless democrat programs wall?

    There, fixed it.

  111. Libturdian Thoughts says:

    3b,

    It IS pure common sense. How about, no vaccine, no entry?

    You know, DeSantis is killing the cruise industry in Florida by not allowing the requirement of proof of vaccination to cruise.

    Are we good with that too? Oh, vaccinations only matter for immigrants.

    Stop with the narratives. Is immigration a problem? Sure. Is it stoppable? Nope!

  112. 3b says:

    Lib : I agree. And yes immigration is stoppable, no other country is actively letting immigrants into their country during a pandemic. It makes no sense.

  113. Libturd says:

    This is what I mean about the silliness of politics. You can be anti-immigration. Fine. But don’t use Covid (like anyone can stop unvaccinated people from trying to come in) as an excuse to say why bother? People even snuck in was Trump was in office. Though, the smart ones waited until he was no longer in office to cross knowing the Dems are much more immigrant friendly. Can you blame them? Future voters.

    So again, what should Biden do? Build another symbolic wall for how many billions?

  114. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Lmao!! Wild.

    Libturdian Thoughts says:
    August 12, 2021 at 3:35 pm
    I don’t know.

    First it was, don’t get vaccinated and don’t wear masks.

    Now it’s, the immigrants aren’t vaccinated and don’t wear masks!!!

  115. Libturd, never using one-offs to try to prove a point says:

    I don’t want to sound like a dick, but elections have consequences. Trust me when I say this. If you want to have a shot at getting right wing policies in place, you ain’t going to succeed through populist policies. These policies drive out even the disenchanted (like me) to vote against it. I have voted for many Republicans in my life. I am still a registered Republican. Really! But the party of McConnell, Trump and DeSantis is not getting my vote nor the EC vote (or the majority vote) anytime soon.

    It’s like I always said. I can agree that there are a lot of terrible things that the current Left is doing. I can’t stand most of the cancel culture stuff for example. But the anti-science, post-conspiracy, absolute nonsense that the right has adopted is the same lunacy that has started many dangerous movements. All my opinion. All my own thoughts.

  116. NJCoast says:

    Bob Weir owes me a juicer he stole from the dressing room at Convention Hall AP. That’s all I’m going to say about him.

  117. Libturd says:

    What up Coast?

  118. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Like i told you…census came out today. Give it 20 years and whites will be a minority and they will be picked on like every other minority always has in america.

    “Census shows US growth driven by minorities; white pop falls under 60 percent”

    https://apple.news/AXGlLbff7QLWwfO84m9rsOQ

  119. Crushednjmillenial says:

    The dem priorities or narrative on COVID is twisted, in my opinion.

    Businesses closed due to COVID (Atilis gym fined 100s of thousands of dollars). Riots open.

    Churches closed due to COVID. Borders open.

    Here immunity was supposed to be at 70% vaxxed. We’re there, but it’s still not good enough.

    One final COVID note – this disease is just weird. Since I was vaxxed in the spring, I have been to mask-less bars in red parts of the USA – PA, SC, GA, and TX. People dancing on packed dance floors, big groups chatting together, dozens or hundreds of ppl and all indoors, no masks. This has been going on since spring 2021 (to my own eyes), but prob even earlier. Even in NJ, I’m seeing like 50/50 between no mask and some form of masking at groceries and whatnot. How in the world is there still anyone out there who hasn’t either been vaxxed or caught COVID (and natural immunity) by now? I’ve been in bars with thousands of ppl in close proximity who then presumably also go about their daily business without masks on, etc

    Persoanlly, I still mask in public indoor spaces unless I walk into a bar or restaurant or wedding or something social like that wheee all other ppl are not wearing masks. Anyway, Gottlieb said delta wave should be on the way out soon.

  120. Crushesnjmillenial says:

    Herd immunity*

  121. leftwing says:

    “I know someone who is a citizen, they came back from Baja border on foot after visiting and was flown to Newark free of charge because they assumed she was with the rest of them…”

    LOL, was thinking maybe I’ll head overseas and for the return rather than hassle passport control, vaccination status, testing, and possible isolation just land Mexico and walk across. Look at ICE and deny my citizenship. Prolly get me home faster.

    “But the party of McConnell, Trump and DeSantis is not getting my vote nor the EC vote…”

    Nice try but that is the functional equivalent of saying the party of Schumer, AOC, and Sanders…..

    Ballot box will tell…and as I’ve always held here exogenous factors are more important especially for swing races. The unknowns will drive those races…COVID variants, lockdowns, spending, Fed movements, stock market and housing values, social signals, and for the House redistricting…Pick a toss up District and you can run a matrix for where each would become a critical mass to move the vote.

    In the House there are 17 retirements coming and 14 net seats across 13 states changing hands…I haven’t done a deep dive to see the safety of the retirees’ Districts nor the Gov/Legislative makeup of the States impacted by redistricting but those two items are more relevant than whether someone is a ‘populist’ or ‘communist’…

    Plus, more importantly, with a majority of just three there is no way any reasonable prediction may be made whatsoever on the House makeup for 2022. Might as well play black or red.

  122. JCer says:

    The elephant in the room is that the Covid vaccine most widely in use is now widely ineffective. The latest studies show only a 42% effectiveness rate for the Pfizer vaccine, less than half it’s effectiveness against the prior strains. It seems while the effectiveness rate has slipped for the others not quite as much moderna and the J&J are over 70% effective at preventing symptomatic Delta. So the most widely used vaccine is now the least effective, if the NIH and CDC weren’t a bunch of political hacks armed with this data they’d be advising a move away from the Pfizer vaccine and perhaps moderna or even J&J boosters for people having received the Pfizer vaccine. Israel is currently seeing the effects of almost exclusively using Pfizer.

  123. Libturd says:

    We’ll see. I may be up for another bet, but not THIS early. I guess one day AOC and the progressives will get their time in the spotlight. But not under the current administration. They are more of a distraction to them at this point. The kids though. They are the progressive ones. The old people are too set in their ways to give it a chance. I expect a lot more of the Obama type for the time being.

    If you don’t find another celebrity on the right like Trump, but less of a showman, it’s over. There is simply no attractive candidate in the current ranks. The few that had a shot have been shown the door with daggers pointed in their backs. Now you are left with pure garbage, like the rep who opened an open carry restaurant. That’s a hell of a qualification.

  124. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “Speaker Pelosi announced the House is raising its maximum annual salary for staff to nearly $200k.

    The move is aimed to help “recruit and retain the outstanding and diverse talent” and ensure pay parity between House staff and other federal employees.”

    https://twitter.com/axios/status/1425924859276705794?s=21

  125. Libturd says:

    But it does look like Delta is up and down. It seems to find the easy bait and then moves on. Now we wait and see what’s next.

    I haven’t read back past today’s thread, but I’m sure you guys heard about the million illegal boosters already taken?

    We are really closer to a third world country than ever before. Terminal A at EWR was pure ghetto in the truest sense of the word. It reminded me of the airport in Chennai. Only the airport in Chennai had SOME working air conditioning.

  126. leftwing says:

    “One final COVID note…I have been to mask-less bars in red parts of the USA – PA, SC, GA, and TX. People dancing on packed dance floors, big groups chatting together, dozens or hundreds of ppl and all indoors, no masks. This has been going on since spring 2021 (to my own eyes), but prob even earlier. Even in NJ, I’m seeing like 50/50 between no mask and some form of masking at groceries and whatnot. How in the world is there still anyone out there who hasn’t either been vaxxed or caught COVID”

    C’mon, get with the program.

    Silly rabbit, superspreaders are for Repubs.

    Published four hours ago. Event occurred in the lawless empire of the wall-eyed racist soc1al1st. No spreading, of course.
    https://abc7chicago.com/covid-lollapalooza-outbreak-super-spreader/10946665/

    Published two hours ago. Politically right attendees in a politically right State. Superspreader!
    https://www.webmd.com/lung/news/20210812/sturgis-motorcyle-rally-2021

    See how easy that was?

    If you are with the Left you start with your desired conclusion then adjust logic and facts to support it.

  127. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Jcer,

    Or maybe had everyone taking the vaccine we wouldn’t be dealing with this on the level we are. Any coincidence the hardest hit places right now are conservative hot spots? My body, my choice, but not when it comes to abortion.

  128. Libturd says:

    Just in case I’m infected and asymptomatic, I have to wear a mask in my home when the D is around and I am eating dinner in a separate room than the rest of the family since they didn’t go to Vegas. D is wearing a mask too. I plan to stop this nonsense tomorrow.

    BTW, the breakthrough numbers are really being reported incorrectly. The vaccination is working if you get mildy sick. Much like any other flu vaccine. Yet even asymptomatic cases are being counted as breakthroughs, which they are not. Be careful of how stats are taken.

    BTW, the cas1nos were super mask compliant. Then the same compliant masked people would go into a restaurant and leave their masks off for 90 minutes to eat. Stupid is as stupid does.

  129. Phoenix says:

    Boomer needs another bailout.

    The New York Times: The Long, Slow Drowning of the New Jersey Shore.
    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/08/12/magazine/new-jersey-shore.html

  130. PumpkinFace says:

    What an amazing call! Great call! Epic.

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    August 12, 2021 at 4:35 pm
    Like i told you…census came out today. Give it 20 years and whites will be a minority and they will be picked on like every other minority always has in america.

    “Census shows US growth driven by minorities; white pop falls under 60 percent”

    https://apple.news/AXGlLbff7QLWwfO84m9rsOQ

  131. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Play nice, pumpkin face.

  132. 3b says:

    Phoenix: Let the water win and go back as nature intended it, and no buyouts.

  133. 3b says:

    FB delays return to office for those who will actually be going back to at least January of 2922.

  134. SmallGovConservative says:

    Hold my beer says:
    August 12, 2021 at 1:54 pm
    “Its actually all the people on both sides not getting vaccinated and whites not wearing masks causing the surge [in Texas].”

    The numbers don’t support this. Texas vax stats are on par with blueish states like Michigan — and many others. The difference? Texas is on the front line. We’re the only country in the world that is knowingly and willingly importing hundreds of thousands of un-tested and un-vaxed illegal immigrants in the middle of a pandemic. Unless and until he gets control of the border, Biden and the malfeasant Dems own covid.

    https://www.mayoclinic.org/coronavirus-covid-19/vaccine-tracker

  135. leftwing says:

    “If you don’t find another celebrity on the right like Trump, but less of a showman, it’s over. There is simply no attractive candidate in the current ranks. The few that had a shot have been shown the door with daggers pointed in their backs.”

    Unless I’m dense and missing the little /s thing-ey am I to assume your statement is irony given the events in Albany on Tuesday?

    Or have the Cuomo-sexuals (their self identifying term, not mine) already forgotten their Grammy Gov?

  136. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Small,

    On that tracker, when you click on “fully vaccinated,” how did you draw the conclusion that blue states and red states are equally vaccinated?

  137. LurksMcGee says:

    As for the census data, I think the decline in children is on a lag and temporary thing. After the massive number of millennials/salmon move back to the suburbs, there will be another uptick in children. Now this data may not seen for a few years, but I think 2021-2023 will see a sharp rise and then maybe plateau.

  138. 3b says:

    Lurks: The trend for millennials has been one to two children, fairly similar for Gen X too. The birth rate is only rising among white women in their 40s , and some of them are skipping the Father thing. I don’t see any increase from the one to two children norm, whether they live in the city or suburbs, or rural areas.

  139. 3b says:

    US sending the military to evacuate the American embassy in Kabul Afghanistan, what a colossal waste of American lives and all those who survived now without limbs and all sets of other physical and mental issues and the billions of dollars wasted!! A monumental failure!

  140. 3b says:

    According to a Deloitte survey end of 2020, 41 percent of millennials surveyed fell stressed all or most of the time and that’s because of their financial situation.

  141. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Lurks,

    I def can see that. That’s normally how I would see it. Bottom line, need to get past this virus so people feel safe having a baby again.

  142. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Lurks, the more I think about it, the more i think you are absolutely correct. Just like there was a 10 year gap push to when people start buying houses (used to be 20’s /now it’s 30’s), I think baby making got pushed back too for the very same reasons.

  143. The Great Pumpkin says:

    30 is definitely the new 20…no doubt about it.

  144. Libturd says:

    I’m sure all of the covid cases in Vegas was caused by illegal immigration too. Man, the political stupidity displayed here is cringeworthy.

  145. Libturd says:

    https://www.texastribune.org/2021/07/02/texas-border-wall-migrants-fentanyl/

    Some interesting stats in this article.

    I thought Trump had immigration under control. It appears the numbers you are seeing today are just slightly higher than Trump’s numbers in 2019. Hmmmmm. And this is on Biden.

  146. Libturd says:

    Lies, lies, scapegoating and lies. This is the Republican Party of today. It’s all they have left. And a lot of name calling too.

  147. 3b says:

    Lib: I think it’s a valid point. Discounting any impact on Covid Numbers by illegal immigrants is just as cringe worthy as those who say it’s all their fault.

  148. Ex says:

    That’s on brand for Weir. One thing Fast E
    & I would agree on……”what a long strange trip it’s been”

  149. Ex says:

    Fear, uncertainty, and doubt is a propaganda tactic used in sales, marketing, public relations, politics, polling and cults. FUD is generally a strategy to influence perception by disseminating negative and dubious or false information and a manifestation of the appeal to fear.

  150. Libturd says:

    3b,

    It’s not a valid point at all. You have Republican Governors using every law in the book to make it illegal to mandate mask wearing and vaccination, yet they want to close the border because these illegal immigrants might not be vaccinated. No. You don’t get to play it both ways. This is scapegoating at its worst. It is no less. This is one of the main tenets of populism. Outright lying and using xenophobia to rile up the masses. Making false statements with absolutely no proof behind it. Building a completely ineffective wall which has done less than nothing to stop the spread of drugs and illegal immigration. Nothing. A big fat waste of money as predicted. Go ahead and defend it. Then I’ll show you how crime increased in all of the border towns too. I am simply too tired to argue with people clutching at straws.

    Yes, Mexicans are most likely unvaccinated. Republicans wouldn’t have it any other way. It’s their choice!

  151. Libturd says:

    “Peter Wilkins argued that “The end of history and the post-Cold War extension and deepening of capitalism are central to understanding the rise of contemporary populist movements.” Pippa Norris and Ronald F. Inglehart examine two theories on the causes of support for the growing populist movements in Western societies. The first is the economic insecurity perspective which focuses on the consequences created by a transforming contemporary workforce and society in post-industrial economies. Norris suggests that events such as globalisation, China’s membership of the World Trade Organisation and cheaper imports have left the unsecured members of society (low-waged unskilled workers, single parents, the long term unemployed and the poorer white populations) seeking stronger authoritarian populist leaders such as Donald Trump and Nigel Farage. The other theory is the cultural backlash thesis, in which Norris and Inglehart suggest that the rise of populism is a reaction from previously dominant sectors of the population, the white, uneducated, elderly men of today, who feel threatened and marginalised by the progressive values of modern society. These groups in particular have a growing resentment towards their traditional values being scolded as politically incorrect and are much more likely to become supportive of anti-establishment, xenophobic political parties.”

    This last sentence really explains it all to the “T”. Don’t blame me, blame Norris and Inglehart. They are 100% right.

  152. The Great Pumpkin says:

    When I look at politics today, it truly reminds how good political strategy really is. I see smart people from both sides succumbing to bs.

    I get it though, in order to keep society going, this is how you have to do it. Have to keep idles minds occupied on bs in order to have stability in a world based on chaos. If people aren’t angry about team blue /red issues, then they will focus on why does my neighbor have more than I do, and eventually act on it. I guess team politics is a key to stability.

  153. Fast Eddie says:

    It took the Taliban about a week to take over Afghanistan. The O’Biden administration is shocked! They had to go to Delaware to tell slow Joe. The Ayatollah would personally like to thank Resident O’Biden.

    In further news, O’Biden is pleading with OPEC for more oil because we needed to stop being energy independent because it was killing the “global” climate here in America.

    And finally, Hunter is merely a truly honest version of Joe because Hunter doesn’t mind telling a Russian “pr0stitute” everything when she says, “Go on, tell me more.” I wonder what CNN and MSNBC front page would look like if Hunter’s last name was Trump?

  154. Fast Eddie says:

    Lies, lies, scapegoating and lies. This is the Democrat S0cial1st Republican Party of today. It’s all they have left. And a lot of name calling too.

    There, fixed it.

  155. BidenIsTheGOAT says:

    There is nothing inconsistent with saying citizens and non citizens have different rights. If you want to wrap toilet paper around your face because it makes you feels safe then go ahead but don’t force me to. On the other hand allowing unchecked migration at any time regardless of a pandemic is totally reckless. We’re the only idiots to allow it.

  156. BidenIsTheGOAT says:

    Yeah, it’s comical to hear the left complain about conspiracy theories when they spent five years perpetuating nonstop hoaxes. But we know the conspiracy theory and misinformation accusations are just a front for censorship.

    Just like the current vaccine narrative. Simply saying the vaccines are deeply flawed is enough to trigger the censorship police.

  157. Libturd says:

    I didn’t buy the hoaxes. Your side buys them hook, line and sinker.

  158. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Yea, can’t wait. The crap you have to deal with as a teacher. America!!

    “Parent attacks teacher after mask dispute on first day of school in California district, official says

    The teacher suffered “lacerations on his face, some bruising on his a face and a pretty good knot on the back of his head,” the Amador County Unified School District superintendent said.”

    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/parent-attacks-teacher-after-mask-dispute-first-day-school-california-n1276736

  159. Libturd says:

    How are the vaxes deeply flawed?

    The masks are flawed!

    Fauci is flawed!

    The CDC is flawed!

    The WHO is flawed!

    Let’s call in the Mr. Pillow Guy. He’ll know what to do.

  160. BidenIsTheGOAT says:

    Well let’s see. Off the top of me head. They don’t prevent infection. Seems like a pretty important property for a vaccine.

    The don’t stop you from spreading the virus once you contract it. Seems like a defect.

    The effectiveness to prevent disease seems to be dropping continuously. We don’t know how much because the government stopped reporting.

  161. Phoenix says:

    Start with an easy one this morning.
    Why the white population is decreasing.

    https://bit.ly/3iInqJN

  162. Phoenix says:

    Eddie,
    Do you believe America has unlimited reserves of oil?

  163. Hold my beer says:

    Phoenix

    You need to put a triggering warning on that one.

  164. Phoenix says:

    Covid ain’t going anywhere. It is going to keep circulating, constantly evolving and adapting.
    Some Americans, plus others, are always going to have a reason, or find a way, to avoid any way of taking this or any other vaccine. Good luck with that. It’s here to stay.

  165. Fast Eddie says:

    Let’s call in the Mr. Pillow Guy. He’ll know what to do.

    Started a company that employees 2,500 people directly and who knows how many ancillary jobs. How many jobs did Oblammy and slo-joe create with their companies? We know AOC crushed at least 25,000 jobs because capital1sm breeds evil deeds.

  166. Phoenix says:

    HMB,
    Haha.
    All joking aside, it’s what they really think. All I hear from women where I work is what a pain it is to have kids. Years ago white women would have a litter. As 3b said the other day, they are having one at 40, then raising them alone.

    So how are they getting pregnant in the first place was the question I posted. Inquiring minds would like to know.

    It’s the irony of racist Karens – they are afraid of races other than their own, yet they have the goods to create humans that look like them and they refuse to do it- cause it is work and sacrifice.

    Personally, raising my child has been the most pleasurable work I have ever had. I don’t get to “Zoom” and WFH. Some days are terrifying. I find the time I have with my child to be the best time ever. It was never a chore for me.

  167. The Great place says:

    Yup, it’s absolutely sad.

    Imagine having a vaccine and nipping this in the butt, but people won’t take it. What a joke. Why did we even pay all this money to accelerate the process of finding a vaccine? Why? What was the point?

    Phoenix says:
    August 13, 2021 at 9:18 am
    Covid ain’t going anywhere. It is going to keep circulating, constantly evolving and adapting.
    Some Americans, plus others, are always going to have a reason, or find a way, to avoid any way of taking this or any other vaccine. Good luck with that. It’s here to stay.

  168. Fast Eddie says:

    Eddie,
    Do you believe America has unlimited reserves of oil?

    No, but we’re the largest producers in the world if we choose. But, we have to save the world or at least give the appearance that we are because it gets progressives elected when we say such things as “green” and “renewable” and other feel-good phrases and words. L1berals love touchy, feely words and such, it hides their flaws and guilt and makes them feel like they’ve accomplished something.

  169. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Yet, these same people who won’t take the vaccine, will fight their child’s teacher on the first day of school for telling their child to wear a mask. People are f’ed up. These same people will attack teachers all over social media 24/7 when the school is forced to go remote. America!!!

  170. Phoenix says:

    Eddie,
    My take on this, and maybe I am wrong. I believe the USA has a limited amount of oil. It is safely stored where Americans have access to it in the future if necessary. I think it is better to use someone else’s oil and keep ours in reserve for our future.

    Maybe this thought process is flawed. Help me out. And I’m not pro-Biden either. I just believe, being pro American, that keeping a stockpile of oil, clean water, and unpolluted land is necessary for future generations. Am I wrong?

  171. Phoenix says:

    GP,
    Call your union. Fight to WFH.
    Every career is in a battle right now. Go down to the Fine Grind and have a slice of humble pie with that latte.

    You have had a whole summer to be off. Almost nobody gets that. Why are you still complaining?

  172. Juice Box says:

    PPI – The producer price index for final demand increased at a 7.8% pace for the 12 months ended July, according to the Labor Department, one of the highest readings since the early 1980s.

    Federal Reserve says these cost increases are “transitory” like a fart in the wind.

    Death, Taxes and Inflation folks…ole Ben Franklin’s quote should be updated.

    Our new Constitution is now established, and has an appearance that promises permanency; but in this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes. — Benjamin Franklin

  173. Fast Eddie says:

    I just believe, being pro American, that keeping a stockpile of oil, clean water, and unpolluted land is necessary for future generations. Am I wrong?

    You’re absolutely correct and I agree. But to calm the masses with such reassurance is to generate complacency and we need fear and chaos. How else would the s0c1alist democrats get elected?

  174. Phoenix says:

    “No, but we’re the largest producers in the world if we choose.”

    More like pumpers and processors. Nature “produced” it.

    Personally I would like to leave a bit for the children of America to have, just like boomer got to enjoy.

    You want to produce, bring back manufacturing.

  175. SmallGovConservative says:

    Phoenix says:
    August 13, 2021 at 9:35 am
    Eddie,
    “I believe the USA has a limited amount of oil… I think it is better to use someone else’s oil and keep ours in reserve for our future…”

    It’s a false choice that only a lazy, incompetent Dem administration would lead you to believe you need to make. Lazy prognosticators have claimed “peak oil” multiple times in the past, only to be proven wrong by the advent of fracking and other technological innovations. The important fact is this: T successfully wrested oil pricing power from OPEC, allowing for low prices domestically and a huge geopolitical advantage over adversaries like Russia and Iran. In just a few months Biden has completely ceded pricing power back to OPEC and is now reduced to begging them for production increases to try to alleviate the pain that Americans are feeling at the pump. More importantly, he has enabled Iran (and to a lesser extent Russia) to escape the box that T had put them in so that they can cause much more trouble for us and our allies.

  176. JCer says:

    SmallGov, that is exactly right. Our ability to pump is all about handicapping the oil producing countries, who literally need to produce oil to balance their budgets. Oil is strategically important and we should keep a huge stockpile as well in order to manipulate the oil markets in the face of OPEC and oil producing countries collusion. Instead somehow we fill our strategic reserve at high prices and sold off during a glut.

    On the vaccine and breakthroughs, the elephant in the room is that the Pfizer vaccine is totally ineffective in 2/3rds of people against delta, we have data that largely confirms this. Anecdotally my wife has a friend from college both her and her husband vaxed, both COVID positive, wife had Moderna and Husband had Pfizer, wife is pretty much asymptomatic where as the husband is VERY sick. The Biden admin has done horribly on vaccine hesitancy, instead of the Gobbels style propaganda blitz honesty would likely have been a more successful policy, people are stupid but not that stupid they realize when you are trying to use propaganda on them. If we were being transparent they would shift on the vaccination advice away from Pfizer at this point.

  177. Phoenix says:

    People who own Teslas aren’t feeling any pain at the pump at all.

  178. Fast Eddie says:

    On the vaccine and breakthroughs, the elephant in the room is that the Pfizer vaccine is totally ineffective in 2/3rds of people against delta, we have data that largely confirms this.

    Link, please.

  179. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Jcer,

    Do you realize people are going to use that “elephant in the room” as a reason to not take the vaccine. Just another bs reason to add to their list.

  180. BRT says:

    Imagine having a vaccine and still having teachers pushing for remote work

  181. JCer says:

    https://www.rt.com/usa/531865-mayo-clinic-covid19-vaccines-delta/

    Israeli pre-print studies highlighted this fact in July, this is not surprising based on what we’ve observed. The data in the study isn’t great, nor was the israeli study but the durability of Pfizer seems to be considerably poorer than moderna or even J&J.

  182. 3b says:

    Jcer I thought it was about 42 percent effective ?

  183. JCer says:

    I have to link to Pravada because the US media takes it’s marching orders from the Biden admin, if they didn’t they would have picked up on what the israeli’s were finding.

  184. joyce says:

    What is capitalistic about the government selectively giving private companies tax breaks?

    Fast Eddie says:
    August 13, 2021 at 9:23 am

    We know AOC crushed at least 25,000 jobs because capital1sm breeds evil deeds.

  185. JCer says:

    yes the number was 42% from Mayo, the Israeli’s came up with a lower number 37% or 38%, outside of official controlled studies it is hard to assess the data, considering it is reported breakthrough cases where given the nature of COVID how many are going unreported? It seems fairly ineffective just looking a the mechanics of the immune system and the time dependent variability it seems like mRNA and Pfizer specifically elicit a mostly antibody based response and a very strong one at that which explains the waning effectiveness and the variant susceptibility. True symptomatic breakthrough causes with the Pfizer vaccine are literally no different than being un-vaccinated, the ability to spread the disease, the amount of virus, there is no evidence to suggest it is providing protection especially 6+ months after vaccination.

    Key to long term immunity is t-cell and natural killer cells and the ability to not only identify a section of the virus but rather identify other parts as well to provide wider defenses against mutations. This is why I cringe every time I see the media publishing falsehoods that the vaccine provides “better protection” than prior infection. A stronger antibody response, quite possibly, but given that SARS infections afforded a level of protection against COVID shows the superiority of natural immunity, there are significant differences between these viruses yet the immune system provided good protection to the formerly infected with a totally different virus that is only structurally similar.

  186. leftwing says:

    “In terms of hospitalizations, both were more reliable, with Moderna being 92% effective at preventing severe cases requiring hospitalization from coronavirus, while Pfizer was 85% effective.”

    “True symptomatic breakthrough causes with the Pfizer vaccine are literally no different than being un-vaccinated, the ability to spread the disease, the amount of virus, there is no evidence to suggest it is providing protection especially 6+ months after vaccination.”

    One of these two statements is the money shot.

    I don’t have an opinion on which or the time right now to form one.

  187. leftwing says:

    “Key to long term immunity is t-cell and natural killer cells and the ability to not only identify a section of the virus but rather identify other parts as well to provide wider defenses against mutations. This is why I cringe every time I see the media publishing falsehoods that the vaccine provides “better protection” than prior infection. A stronger antibody response, quite possibly…there are significant differences between these viruses yet the immune system provided good protection to the formerly infected with a totally different virus that is only structurally similar.”

    This statement is likely among the most important on here regarding the virus…

    It is criminal the approach/attack/disdain government at all levels have toward prior infection.

  188. JCer says:

    When they are talking about breakthrough cases it is almost always Pfizer as it was the most widely given vaccine. The viral load and susceptibility to spread among the vaccinated should be ringing alarm bells, this means in those people the vaccine is literally doing nothing, offering no protection, if it was partially working the viral load would be reduced as would symptoms. The NIH and CDC should be very carefully assessing the breakthrough cases and if they are they aren’t freely sharing this data. For example my wife’s friend and her husband would be classified in the same way unless her husband get hospitalized, he clearly has no protection from the vaccine(Pfizer), where as she has very minimal symptoms(Moderna) literally mild cold like symptoms. It is hard to account for how different people’s immune systems but until we examine a significant number of symptomatic breakthrough infections in a good body of people across vaccine type for viral load we will not understand if it vaccine durability vs. delta being able to overwhelm immune defense of the vaccine. It is quite possible that Modern provides some protection even in the breakthrough cases but in the pfizer cases it alarmingly looks like viral load is as if the person was un-vaccinated and therefore it most likely is providing no protection whatsoever.

  189. leftwing says:

    “Do you realize people are going to use that “elephant in the room” as a reason to not take the vaccine. Just another bs reason to add to their list.”

    Do you realize your statement above rather than refuting JCer’s point actually proves it?

    Naaaah, you don’t.

  190. JCer says:

    left my opinion has been the second one, I was telling people last summer at bbq’s not to place too much hope on the vaccines, it is a part of the solution but not a silver bullet. Given the type of virus we are dealing with we’ve never seen a 100% effective vaccination program against these types of viruses.

    Pumps, take a different one. I’d suggest if people are at risk i.e 45 or older(pre-existing conditions, etc), and have never been infected they should probably take a 3rd shot of moderna if they had Pfizer and took it more than 6 months ago. Instead we pretend than there aren’t vaccinated folks in the ICU and suppress any mention of it, it erodes trust in the medical establishment and the media. If I posted my hypothesis on facebook or youtube they would be flagged and removed despite being scientifically accurate. They are doing the same to credentialed doctors and scientists.

    We know for a fact Indomethacin reduces the length and severity of SARS in humanized mice, we have data from India indicating it does the same in Humans infected with COVID, why are we not using a $2 drug as front line defense? The approach of our health agencies is insane, kill the economy, don’t attempt or recommend any treatment unless it is an experimental vaccine in which case that’s ok. Why are we trying to kill people?

  191. JCer says:

    My point is we have thrown caution to the wind with the vaccines, if the effectiveness has waned we need to prioritize correcting this for the at risk population. Vaccinating 16 year olds isn’t going to help, this notion that we can use the vaccines to gain herd immunity seems to be a fallacy.

  192. BRT says:

    The at risk should be given a booster and a preventative dose of monoclonal antibodies. They should be supplementing with zinc and vitamin d.

  193. 3b says:

    Univ Mich Consumer sentiment index has a “stunning “ decline from end of July to early August; a drop of 10 points, attributed to delta variant

  194. No One says:

    Libturd,
    So older white guys don’t like it when good ideas and pro-success practices in society are replaced with bad ideas and destructive practices?
    I see people of all races and sexes who don’t like it when that happens, actually.

    Old people in China didn’t generally like the Cultural Revolution. Some young “progressives” in the US now are worse than those Red Guards.

  195. JCer says:

    BRT absolutely Vitamin D deficiency is tied to bad outcomes. I’m still waiting for the studies on elderberry to come out, I suspect they’ll find reduced risk of hospitalization/death. We always assume the ancient people didn’t know anything but I’m thoroughly convinced the greek’s/roman’s knew more than we give them credit for, like treating wounds with honey and wine vinegar, it actually is very effective at preventing infection. Elderberry as prophylaxis against flu is more effective than the flu vaccine.

  196. chicagofinance says:

    Bystander: THE SOLUTION!

    WORK & LIFE

    These People Who Work From Home Have a Secret: They Have Two Jobs
    When the pandemic freed employees from having to report to the office, some saw an opportunity to double their salary on the sly. Why be good at one job, they thought, when they could be mediocre at two?

    By Rachel Feintzeig
    Aug. 13, 2021 10:55 am ET

    They were bored. Or worried about layoffs. Or tired of working hard for a meager raise every year. They got another job offer.

    Now they have a secret.

    A small, dedicated group of white-collar workers, in industries from tech to banking to insurance, say they have found a way to double their pay: Work two full-time remote jobs, don’t tell anyone and, for the most part, don’t do too much work, either.

    Alone in their home offices, they toggle between two laptops. They play “Tetris” with their calendars, trying to dodge endless meetings. Sometimes they log on to two meetings at once. They use paid time off—in some cases, unlimited—to juggle the occasional big project or ramp up at a new gig. Many say they don’t work more than 40 hours a week for both jobs combined. They don’t apologize for taking advantage of a system they feel has taken advantage of them.

    “It’s two jobs for one,” says a 29-year-old software engineer who has been working simultaneously for a media company and an events company since June. He estimates he was logging three to 10 hours of actual work a week back when he held down one job. “The rest of it is just attending meetings and pretending to look busy.”

    He was emboldened by a new website called Overemployed. Started by two tech workers this spring, it aims to rally workers around the concept of stealthily holding multiple jobs, framing it as a way to wrest back control after decades of stalled wages for some and a pandemic that led to unpredictable layoffs.

    Gig work and outsourcing have been on the rise for years. Inflation is now ticking up, chipping away at spending power. Some employees in white-collar fields wonder why they should bother spending time building a career.

    “The harder that you work, it seems like the less you get,” one of the workers with two jobs says. “People depend on you more. My paycheck is the same.”

    Overemployed says it has a solution.

    “There’s no implied lifetime employment anymore, not even at IBM, ” writes one of the website’s co-founders, a 38-year-old who works for two tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. The site serves up tips on setting low expectations with bosses, staying visible at meetings and keeping LinkedIn profiles free of red flags. (A “social-media cleanse” is a solid excuse for an outdated LinkedIn profile, it says.) In a chat on the messaging platform Discord, people from around the world swap advice about employment checks and downtime at various brand-name companies.

    “Avoid the slippery ladder in your career,” one Overemployed post says. “Take the side door instead.”

    This article is based on conversations with a half-dozen workers who have secretly worked multiple full-time jobs, as employees and contractors, during the pandemic. The workers spoke anonymously for fear of being fired or not being able to pull off the arrangement again. The approach doesn’t violate federal or state laws, according to employment lawyers, but it could represent a breach of contract or raise issues around confidentiality. And it could certainly result in an employee’s termination.

    The Wall Street Journal verified the workers’ accounts by examining offer letters, employment contracts, concurrent pay stubs and corporate emails. Most of them say they are on track to earn a total of $200,000 to nearly $600,000 a year, including bonuses and stock. They have paid off chunks of student-loan debt, plumped their kids’ college-savings accounts and bought everything from an engagement ring to a sports car with the extra cash.

    The money is incredible, the 29-year-old software engineer says. So is the stress: “I’ll wake up in the morning and I’m like, ‘Oh, this is the day I’m gonna get found out.’ ”

    A job search takes a left turn
    The Overemployed co-founder’s journey to two jobs started with a career slump. Passed over last year for a promotion he thought was in the bag, he saw half his team get promoted instead. Next came layoffs. He started looking for another job, assuming his number would soon be up.

    Upon receiving an offer from a tech company less than 10 miles down the road, he figured he would quit his current job. Then it occurred to him: What if he didn’t?

    “When push comes to shove, you’re going to become a number,” he says. He launched the website early this spring, five months after starting his second job, with the aim of alerting other workers to the possibility of diversifying their sources of income and benefits. “They say it’s a free market. I’m going to go ahead and get mine too.”

    ‘Am I trying to be, like, a five-star employee? Not really. I’m just trying to do the job I need to not get fired.’
    The pandemic has given us new opportunities to shirk and fib. No matter how many check-ins they load on someone’s calendar, bosses can’t keep tabs on remote workers like they did when they sat one desk over.

    Employees feel the freedom. The change is logistical—a worker can head to the beach this afternoon, and no one has to know—as well as emotional. After months away from the office, where workers forged deeper relationships with colleagues and identified more with their companies, many feel increasingly disconnected from their employers, says Vanessa Burbano, a management professor at Columbia Business School who has studied employee misconduct.

    To be sure, many employees have filled their days at home with more work, feeling pressure to prove themselves. But others have taken their foot off the pedal.

    The tech worker started declining calendar invitations for meetings. Nothing happened.

    “The beauty of working remotely is you actually have a choice,” he says. The boss at his first company, he says, was distracted by managing up. The worker started handing off responsibilities to an eager new colleague. He took advantage of the company’s unlimited PTO policy with a month off, citing Covid-19 burnout. By now he has perfected the art of diplomatically declining colleague requests. (Sorry, not enough bandwidth, he tells them.) If a complex project gets bogged down by co-workers, he doesn’t try to get things back on track; delays can make it easier for him to juggle his multiple professional identities.

    He spends his days switching off among three laptops—work, personal, other work—keeping the one for his new job synced up to a desktop monitor and his other work computer open beside it.

    “You have to physically switch and then that keys up your brain to say this is Job 1 or Job 2,” he says. To maintain separation and secrecy, other workers swear by color-coding browser windows or using external microphones that can be muted without alerting others on a video call. One worker manages double meetings by logging on to one via computer and the other via phone.

    “I’ve gotten better at hearing two different things at the same time and trying to process it,” he says. The phone enables a quick getaway if one meeting risks hearing the other during a sudden unmute situation.

    ‘Let’s be honest. You have to be pretty bad at being sly to get caught.’
    When the worker gets called on simultaneously in both meetings—it happens—he drops one call, answers the other’s query and then pops back onto the “dropped” call. Sorry, he had a network issue. What was the question again?

    Even better: Evade the meeting altogether. He often tells colleagues he doesn’t think their issue requires a call, and he can help them faster on Slack.

    “People love it because they’re like, ‘This guy just gets [stuff] done. He’s not wasting his time in these meetings,’ ” he says.

    One software engineer in Europe who has held down two jobs for most of the past few years says he was confused by the scene in his office when he first started working as a developer several years ago. Everyone looked so busy, but it didn’t seem like they were getting much done. Was he just a superfast, talented developer?

    “I think because I was new to the business I didn’t fully understand the unwritten rules,” says the man, who gave up his most recent second job in June but plans to try for a second one again in September.

    He took on his first double gig in 2018, telling his original company he would be attending a cybersecurity course in London. He moved there for several months, spent the hours he was supposedly at the nonexistent class at a new contract assignment, and earned an extra $350 a day. He has since cycled through several other remote double jobs, varying his use of video on calls so it won’t look weird if he needs to go audio-only and using two laptops, with the speakers muted on one, to pull off double-booked meetings.

    Once, he unmuted his speaker too quickly before turning off the sound on the other laptop. For five seconds, Meeting One could hear Meeting Two. He cringed. No one noticed.

    Nearly giving the game away
    Anybody who lives a double life for long enough will experience a close call. One worker was confused about his compensation and pulled up his pay stub to show his manager the discrepancy. To his horror, the paystub from his other job was listed on the same platform. He quickly stopped sharing his screen, telling his manager he didn’t feel comfortable showing his paycheck.

    A data scientist in Richmond, Va., was surprised when his boss suddenly reached out for a video call—the team never did video calls—while he was teaching a coding class at his secret second job. He told the students to take a 10-minute break and jumped on his other computer. Overemployed has a list of possible moves and excuses for those in a pickle, like an imaginary call from a child’s school.

    The data scientist had long been frustrated by the pace at his big bank.

    “I just felt like I wasn’t doing anything,” he says. He wanted to do contracting work on the side, but stuck in the office, it felt impossible. When the pandemic sent him home in March of 2020, he saw his chance, and began working for three other companies.

    “I had nothing to do,” he says of those early locked-down months. “It was the perfect time to try something.”

    ‘Every other Friday, when those paychecks drop, I am reinvigorated.’
    Soon he was working 100-hour weeks. Little of it was for his original job. Eventually, his manager confronted him, asking him to ramp up his effort.

    “My initial reaction was like, ‘I’m working so hard. How would you even say that?’ ” he says. “I guess from his perspective it looked like I wasn’t doing anything.”

    He eventually left his main job and took a full-time job, with benefits, at one of his other companies, negotiating an employment contract that gave him the ability to do work on the side.

    “Now I feel totally free,” he says.

    Workers still playing the game say they worry constantly about someone catching on. Yet they simultaneously feel their experiments in double work have finally given them a sense of control. Even if companies start calling people back to the office—whether this fall, or further down the line—those with two jobs say the world of remote work has gotten big enough to give them options. One woman in Atlanta, who was working for an insurance company and a telecommunications company, scoffed when one of her employers sent an email outlining a tentative return-to-work plan. Then a colleague started encroaching on her projects.

    Two-gig veterans have honed their craft over months, or years, on the jobs. Here are their tips for keeping the stress low, the payoff high and the whole thing secret.

    Avoid startups; they expect too much work. Your best bet is an older company that hasn’t quite mastered remote work yet but will let you work from home.
    Don’t start two jobs too close together, lest you find yourself trying to learn the lay of the land at two companies simultaneously.
    Hit that decline button. ‘Just because someone puts a meeting on your calendar in Outlook doesn’t mean you have to take it,’ one double worker says.
    When you do join a meeting, make sure everyone knows it. ‘Ask non-questions, restate what someone just said in different wording,’ a post on the Overemployed website recommends.
    Have a story. You’ll want excuses and explanations at the ready for tricky moments. Need to dodge a meeting? Say you need ‘head-down focus time to finish another deliverable,’ Overemployed recommends.
    Stay under the radar. Tap LinkedIn’s privacy settings to shield your profile from search engines or hide your connections. Need an excuse for not updating your profile? You’re worried about hacking and trying not to share too much online.
    Resist overwork. Boss asking too much of you? You can always drop one job and find another—or just take a breather. One double-job veteran is currently on a break, working just one job and pursuing personal coding projects and playing videogames during the workday. ‘It’s great,’ he says. ‘I have so much free time.’
    She handed in her notice and quickly landed another second job.

    “I now have leverage,” she says.

    She recently hired a personal assistant, who sits in on calls when she is double-booked and alerts her if she is needed in a meeting.

    “Am I trying to be, like, a five-star employee?” she says. “Not really. I’m just trying to do the job I need to not get fired.”

    How they get away with it
    Holding two jobs isn’t illegal, says Richard Greenberg, an employment attorney with Jackson Lewis PC in New York.

    “It’s more of a contract issue. You’re jeopardizing your employment. There’s very few things that rise to criminal violations,” he says.

    If a worker violates a noncompete agreement by working for another firm, the employer could sue him, says Claire Deason, a Minneapolis employment attorney with Littler Mendelson PC.

    A company could also theoretically sue a duplicitous worker for things like disclosing confidential information or misrepresenting himself, Mr. Greenberg says.

    But that could mean public attention on the issue. Chances are the worker would just get fired, Mr. Greenberg says. Maybe not even that.

    “Let’s be honest. You have to be pretty bad at being sly to get caught,” he says.

    Besides, managers sometimes see incentives to hang on to dead weight. Losing head count can amount to losing power in some organizations. No one wants to be caught short-staffed. And in the current tight labor market, workers often have the upper hand.

    Chris Hansen, a technology manager who lives on Cape Cod, was working for a startup last year when he noticed one of his coders engaging in odd behavior. The contractor had agreed to leave his role with a financial firm to help out Mr. Hansen’s team for a few months, per his deal with the staffing agency that hired him, Mr. Hansen says. But even after supposedly making the transition from his last role, the contractor wasn’t showing up to meetings. Work he turned in missed the mark.

    It turned out the man hadn’t left his original job, Mr. Hansen says.

    Mr. Hansen worried about hitting his own work goals. He felt frustrated and shortchanged. But he opted not to press the issue.

    “I could have cut him loose, I suppose, but that would have been cutting off my own arm,” he says. “It was better to have somebody than nobody.”

    Besides, the coder was a contractor: no benefits, no job security. Mr. Hansen says he can’t help but sympathize a little with contingent workers who game the system. “What incentive is there for people to be deliberately honest?” he says. “That loyalty between employer and employee is vacant.”

    When Laurie Ruettimann, now a human-resources consultant in Raleigh, N.C., was an HR executive at a Fortune 500 company, she dealt with an employee with a secret side gig. After being exposed by peers, the IT worker admitted the ploy. Ms. Ruettimann and her colleagues put him on a performance-improvement plan. A few months later, he was laid off.

    “That’s not a guy who’s built for longevity at an organization,” she says.

    One computer engineer put in long hours for years, climbing the ladder to become one of his company’s most senior engineers. Days were for meetings and strategy, nights and weekends for coding. He felt like he was performing free labor.

    He took a second job last year, figuring he would tap paternity leave at both companies once his pregnant wife delivered their baby, and then return to one job. But, even with the baby born, he can’t seem to quit the game. He is earning nearly $500,000, and working as much as 100 hours a week.

    “It’s 100% overwhelming, and my wife’s like, ‘How long can you do this?’ ” he says. But “every other Friday, when those paychecks drop, I am reinvigorated.”

  197. chicagofinance says:

    Pressure on NJBPU to raise electricity prices to account from increase in cost of power generation and demand increases……

    Phoenix says:
    August 13, 2021 at 11:04 am
    People who own Teslas aren’t feeling any pain at the pump at all.

  198. Phoenix says:

    “I now have leverage”

    It’s such a wonderful word. So good in fact it should replace the word Freedom.

  199. Fast Eddie says:

    What is capitalistic about the government selectively giving private companies tax breaks?

    It’s not permanent, it’s an incentive. I’m not sure what you’re asking.

  200. Phoenix says:

    “It’s not permanent, it’s an incentive. I’m not sure what you’re asking.”

    An 8 year non permanent “incentive.”

    “Dick and Liz Uihlein of packaging giant Uline, along with roofing magnate Diane Hendricks, together had contributed around $20 million to groups backing Johnson’s 2016 reelection campaign.

    The expanded tax break Johnson muscled through netted them $215 million in deductions in 2018 alone, drastically reducing the income they owed taxes on. At that rate, the cut could deliver more than half a billion in tax savings for Hendricks and the Uihleins over its eight-year life.”

  201. joyce says:

    I don’t understand what you don’t understand. Equal protection under the law isn’t a difficult concept to grasp. Providing a “temporary” incentive to special interest groups gives them unfair advantage over others in the same industry and/or geographical area.

    You think you support freedom, liberty, capitalism … when it’s really corruption, corporatism, fascism. Your father would not be proud.

    Fast Eddie says:
    August 13, 2021 at 2:02 pm
    What is capitalistic about the government selectively giving private companies tax breaks?

    It’s not permanent, it’s an incentive. I’m not sure what you’re asking.

  202. Fabius Maximus says:

    “like Cal1gula appointing his horse as his counsel.”

    Well I wouldn’t call her a horse. That’s a bit too mean.

    https://twitter.com/The1OnlyRichie/status/1425872887811039237

  203. Libturd says:

    NoOne,

    Where does the scapegoating come from? Why is it always so prevalent? Because dumb people will always believe it and the masses are asses.

    Had my weekly call with my folks. DeSantis is done in Florida (at least with the old people). He will not win reelection. Anyone want to wager an early bet?

  204. JCer says:

    libturd, I wouldn’t want to take that bet. The optics in FL are bad he is posturing to the national electorate while Florida burns. It is a Chris Christie type move, he is likely in trouble unless the outbreak in FL reverse course. In general a bad outbreak is bad for the incumbent whether or not they are culpable for exacerbating the situation.

  205. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Jcer,

    So what are you and BRT suggesting? That the vaccine is pointless to take?

  206. BRT says:

    I dunno, my experience in Florida so far is nobody cares about covid at all. People are acting normal here.

  207. Libturd says:

    Well it’s going to be tough to win the national without Florida.

  208. Libturd says:

    Vegas was definitely in Covid fear.

  209. Libturd says:

    In other news, my mom said that Biden was flying illegals all over the country spreading covid.

    Well we know where they get their news from.

  210. JCer says:

    Eddie, the incentives are largely because the tax structure is inherently unsustainable. When a large corporation can literally attract talent and has the freedom to choose a location why would they select to operate in a heavily regulated, high tax and high cost area? a smaller operator has not such option, they will not get the talent to come to the sunbelt but amazon could go to lots of places and get people to follow. The 50 employee company won’t get talent in Alabama but amazon, apple or microsoft will. They give the incentives because 6% tax of something is better than 12% tax of nothing.

  211. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Where are you, 3b? Paging 3b. I told you why people like remote work, and you said I was a full of it, and know nothing about corporate work. Well guess what…i was right and you were wrong again. So don’t belittle me.

    “A small, dedicated group of white-collar workers, in industries from tech to banking to insurance, say they have found a way to double their pay: Work two full-time remote jobs, don’t tell anyone and, for the most part, don’t do too much work, either.”

  212. JCer says:

    pumps we need to work on your reading comprehension. Pfizer is highly ineffective against Delta, don’t take it, get something else if you can it’s better than nothing but only half as good as Moderna, get the Moderna or even J&J if you are getting vax’d. Furthermore take other measures, Vitamin D supplementation and even antibody treatments for the at risk population.

  213. Fast Eddie says:

    You think you support freedom, liberty, capitalism … when it’s really corruption, corporatism, fascism. Your father would not be proud.

    If you owned a company and we’re offered a tax incentive, would you decline? Just curious.

  214. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Im a teacher, and at this point in my career, I understand how every single class is going to fall into avgs. One or two overachievers. Couple good students. Then your avg students who do enough to get by. Then a slew of individuals that want to do nothing all day everyday.

  215. Fast Eddie says:

    The 50 employee company won’t get talent in Alabama but amazon, apple or microsoft will.

    Where is Amazon, Apple and Microsoft’s headquarters?

  216. JCer says:

    Pumps that’s old new I knew a guy who did this years ago, got a new job, kept his old job and told his employer he needed to move for family reasons or something. Proceeded to hire someone in Russia for like $15 an hour to do coding and answer emails for him. Was able to collect double pay, I think he had a gambling problem so I’m not sure how lucrative it was as he probably lost all that money but he was easily pulling more than 500k a year from 2 development gigs. Normalizing WFH will just make this type of arrangement more common.

  217. JCer says:

    Eddie, those companies are headquartered where they were founded. They have facilities all over the place, companies with a brand will get people to relocate for a job where smaller players will not. Pretty much every big business in NJ is getting some kind of tax break.

  218. BRT says:

    Jesus you are stupid.

  219. SomeOne says:

    Lib,

    “In other news, my mom said that Biden was flying illegals all over the country spreading covid.”

    Is she happy for you that Biden is not arranging such flights to NJ?

  220. leftwing says:

    So, a few homework assignments I need to do over the weekend….

    Breakthrough data…hard stats….asymptomatic, mild asymptomatic, severe asymptomatic, hospitalized, dead…ideally by vaccine mfr.

    UofM…saw that cross…deep dive into whether the decline ‘due to variants’ is fear of the variants themselves or fear of another round of shrill stupidity from frightened little gnomes in government. Makes a difference to me from an investment perspective.

    Lambda…..

    Any headstart on data sources appreciated.

    Lib, you’re like a dog with a bone on hypocrisy and scapegoating talking points so not going to engage on those topics on a summer Friday afternoon…would note to keep an eye on Lambda…that strain was dominant but isolated in South America. On that point alone if it is substantially unaffected by antibodies as may be the case leaving the Southern border wide open is beyond mind boggling.

    Also, just put on a starter position in a stock I played for earnings…looks very interesting, may hit many of your criteria. I scratched the surface enough to initiate, I’m going to figure out this weekend how much I really like it. Will post.

  221. leftwing says:

    mild and severe *symptomatic*, obviously….

  222. joyce says:

    I’ll answer your question. I would, and it would continue to be a flaw in the system. What does your question have to do with capitalism and selective tax incentives?

    Fast Eddie says:
    August 13, 2021 at 2:46 pm
    You think you support freedom, liberty, capitalism … when it’s really corruption, corporatism, fascism. Your father would not be proud.

    If you owned a company and we’re offered a tax incentive, would you decline? Just curious.

  223. Phoenix says:

    Back to the mines:

    A new artificial intelligence (AI) platform monitors vital signs of employees when they look at their smartphone to see if they’re sick.

    Binah Teams, created by Israeli company Binah, comes in the form of an application for smartphones, as well as tablets, laptops and desktops.

    Once installed, an employee, student or any other team member just has to look at their device’s camera for the AI to determine vital signs like heart rate, oxygen saturation and respiratory rate in a couple of minutes.

    The results could help a business remotely determine ‘with medical grade accuracy’ if a team member really is ill, although employees couldn’t legally be forced to use it.

  224. 3b says:

    3b is on vacation man child. Of course this is going to happen to some extent . My Sister knew someone who did this and was busted, she lost both jobs. Do you think companies are not aware that this could be going on, and measures are already or will be in place to prevent it? Or is your fantasy that because of this article all corporate America will go back to the office? That is your fantasy and we all know it. As I have said you really have no business commenting on WFH and corporate America, you have zero point of reference. We all know you hate WFH because you are concerned it will negatively impact your personal situation.

  225. 3b says:

    The majority of people down here in Rehoboth beach, no masks. Some of the restaurant/bars stores employees do, but the majority don’t. And neither do the vast majority of people on vacation.

  226. Juice Box says:

    More than one gig in Tech in nothing new. I used to regularly bill for more than one client when I was consulting as a contractor as that was legal and all. Did I work the 60 hours I billed? Sometimes more…sometimes less….

    Collecting a paycheck while someone else does the actual work? That is legendary, and happens more than you think. There was one worker who mailed his hard token RSA fob to his “contractor” and the contractor logged into the VPN and did all the work……work found out I think years later…

    Executives get away with it all the time too. Work fulltime at one company and on the board of another etc, while all the time running another consulting gig collecting a check.

  227. BRT says:

    Juice, you also forgot that those execs somehow find the time to train and compete in a triathlon.

  228. The Great Pumpkin says:

    From WSJ, what was I just saying the other day about “tiers” on this blog..

    “It’s a common refrain these days: Let workers decide where and when they work.

    The impetus, of course, stems from the pandemic, when employers sent office workers home for a year and a half, with surprisingly few hiccups. Productivity didn’t suffer, and workers enjoyed their newfound freedom. Now, we’re told, companies can’t go back to the old, controlling ways without workers revolting.

    That may be, but here’s what almost certainly will happen if the hybrid advocates win the day: Companies will have a two-tier workplace, with on-site workers getting the bulk of the promotions and raises.”

    https://apple.news/AX22yL9mSTCKZPNsW3Ot6qA

  229. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “In a Hybrid Office, Remote Workers Will Be Left Behind”

  230. 3b says:

    The teacher with no corporate experience is the expert on what we in corporate America do and how we do it , whether in the office or at WFH. It is absolutely bizarre , but yet he he is everyday screaming about how bad it is. The real reason of course is that his personal situation may be impacted by the big decline in commercial real estate, that is why he hates it. Yet he has the nerve to come here and lecture us every day that are in corporate America how bad WFH is. Why can’t those of us who are in corporate America come to this blog and discuss WFH, since we are the ones actually doing it. Why can’t we discuss what we like, what we don’t, what works well , what doesn’t and any other issues surrounding WFH. But no, we can’t every time myself or someone else brings up the topic or tells about a friend or family members company going WFH, we have this man child come on screaming about how bad WFH is. It’s like he wants to shut the topic down.

  231. The Great Pumpkin says:

    3b,

    Are you done crying yet? Let it out!

  232. The Great Pumpkin says:

    I didn’t write the article…why are you getting mad at me. Go ask WSJ why they wrote it.

  233. 3b says:

    I have to fight the ignorance and stupidity of pumps all because WFH threatens him personally. No crying , but it is sad you have ruined the blog.

  234. The Great Pumpkin says:

    How did I ruin this blog? By offering another view? Sorry you can’t handle it.

  235. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Get on it, while you can. Also, they mostly build townhouses now. Unique single family homes (neighborhoods that were not mass produced) will sell for a premium in the future.

    “Zillow, Other Tech Firms Are in an ‘Arms Race’ To Buy Up American Homes
    “iBuyers” are gearing up to grow massively in the coming years, with unforeseen consequences for the U.S. housing market.”

Comments are closed.