Slow but strong

From NJ Business:

NJ Home Sales Cool, Prices Remain Hot for Fall

High prices and low inventory have continued to cool sales throughout New Jersey. While New Jersey saw a slight decline in closed sales the past few months, overall sales are up 13.6% since the start of the year.

“For the past two years, the housing market has been an anomaly for a number of reasons,” said 2021 NJ Realtors President Jeff Jones. “The return to a more balanced market after almost a full two years of this competitive, in-demand atmosphere will be slower than potential buyers want and, likely, faster than those on the fence to sell will expect.”

Single family closed sales were down 17.5% in September 2021, to 7,756. Townhouse-condo closed sales were down 8.1% to 2,479, and adult community homes followed suit with a decrease of 14.4% to 729. Yet despite fewer sales, median sales price increased again across all categories in September. The single family median sales price increased 7.3% to $440,000; the townhouse-condo median sales price increased 5.1% to $310,000; and adult communities median sales price increased 26.4% to $303,330.

While listings are down year-over-year, the year-to-date new listings for all markets is down just 1.2% over the same period last year, which points to the market making up ground this fall, when new listings are typically lower.

The number of single family homes for sale remains low, but is still above the historical low of this past winter, which had the lowest number of homes for sale in over a decade, if not more. In September, there were 18,863 single family homes for sale throughout the state, representing a 26.1% decrease, which is typical of the decreases of the past three months.

This entry was posted in Demographics, Economics, New Jersey Real Estate. Bookmark the permalink.

139 Responses to Slow but strong

  1. dentss says:

    First

  2. dentss dunnigan says:

    Lets go Brandon

  3. Libturd says:

    How dumb are we?

  4. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Interesting.

    “As we trade around the volatility in bitcoin (BTC), the signals from @yassineARK’s analysis of on-chain data have become quite important. In this blog, Yassine shares how he, @kenoshaking, and others have taken advantage of Bitcoin’s transparency and created trading signals.”

    https://twitter.com/cathiedwood/status/1454245667975618568?s=21

  5. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Fair Lawn Nabisco Site Sold: Mayor
    Fair Lawn Mayor Kurt Peluso announced that a sale of the site was complete, but details are sparse. The Nabisco bakery was closed in July.

    https://patch.com/new-jersey/wayne/s/hwbqd/fair-lawn-nabisco-site-sold-mayor?utm_source=nearby-news&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=alert

  6. grim says:

    Updated Vaccination by Age Range for NJ:
    10/9 vs 10/29

    At Least 1 Dose
    Total Pop: 9.2m
    Total 1st Doses: 7.0m – 76% of total pop (Up from 72%) – Bloomberg reporting 75%

    12-15 – 450k population – 280k dosed – 62% 1 Dose (Up from 59%)
    16-17 – 240k population – 210k dosed – 87% 1 Dose (Up from 83%)
    18-29 – 1.5m population – 1.0m dosed – 67% 1 Dose (Up from 66%)
    30-49 – 2.4m population – 2.0m dosed – 83% 1 Dose (Up from 79%)
    50-64 – 2m population – 1.8m dosed – 90% 1 Dose (Up from 85%)
    65-79 – 1.1m population – 1.2m dosed – 100% 1 Dose (Up from 99%)
    80+ – 415k population – 420k dosed – 100% 1 Dose (Up from 95%)

  7. 3b says:

    Juice: Biden needs to stop with that I’m Irish but I do t take a drink crap. It’s way beyond old.

  8. Phoenix says:

    3b,
    Biden is way beyond old. That’s normal for him.

  9. Phoenix says:

    No One,
    Why do you think she got off so easily? Hiring a hitman to kill a child as well?

    Valerie Cincinelli, 37, was sentenced to 48 months in federal prison after pleading guilty to obstruction of justice
    With credit for 30 months served in jail and good behavior, she could be released to house arrest in five months
    Cincinelli was initially charged with murder-for-hire, which could have landed her in prison for up to 40 years
    Ex-NYPD cop was accused of offering her boyfriend $7,000 to hire a hitman to kill her estranged husband, Isiah Carvalho
    Boyfriend John DiRubba turned on Cincinelli after learning she was also planning to have his 13-year-old daughter killed

  10. Fast Eddie says:

    How dumb are we?

    Shelves are bare, supply chains non-existent, goods and services have become uncoupled in price, fuel and energy is skyrocketing, first-responders have become villains – being fired for opposing vaccine mandates while illegal aliens stream across the border unchecked and unvaccinated, crime is up, schools are eager to teach marx1sm and rac1al division and the federal government wants to tax people with a net worth as little as $600 to pay for cronies and votes… all run by a party previously identified as democrats because mean tweets are mean. So you tell me; how dumb are we?

  11. Fabius Maximus says:

    Wayne sounds like a nice place.
    Five of nine Wayne BOE members no-show meeting amid book controversy

    https://www.northjersey.com/story/news/passaic/wayne/2021/10/28/wayne-nj-school-board-members-no-show-amid-book-controversy/6185898001/

  12. Fast Eddie says:

    The Wall Street Journal reported Thursday that the departments of Justice, Homeland Security, and Health and Human Services are considering payments of $450,000 to those who crossed the border illegally and were separated from family members. It is in response to a lawsuit by civil rights groups.

    Hmmm… pondering how to game the system for this one!

  13. JCer says:

    What is wrong with this administration, these people broke the law and as such were detained, they are entitled to nothing, the government was clearly within it’s rights to do what it did, whether you agree with their actions or otherwise it was legal.

    Furthermore the “civil rights groups” should be sued for the expenses bared by the federal lawsuit for the frivolous lawsuit. Real leadership nips this kind of thing in the bud, the federal government needs to send a message that is not playing around and it will not bow to frivolous lawsuits.

  14. Fast Eddie says:

    To all you homeless Veterans, no check for you!!

  15. Bystander says:

    Sure, Ed…the disease is the cure. Only in delusion land would have problems started on Jan 20, 2021? Where are these bare shelves? So far, worst want Traders Joe’s did not have my coffee creamer Dow 36k..mic drop. Again, you got a 78 year old Trump as solution. Lots of dummies on your side ready with their mean tweets..and little else in their noggin.

  16. Phoenix says:

    To all you homeless Veterans, no check for you!!

    To be fair, when has any repup or democrat ever done anything for them?

    Yet people keep volunteering to sign up.

  17. p says:

    If this were China every one of those ships would have been unloaded months ago.

    If Americans were patriots, they would have solved this. Instead, everyone here is out for themselves and not “patriotic.”

    Zucky Facebook Meta dork has done his part to divide the country as well.

    Smoke ’em if you got ’em. Its all downhill ahead.

    Just wait till that brain dead Biden angers the Chinese just a bit too much. Or will America implode on it’s own?

  18. Phoenix says:

    Bystander,
    Is that all you think is unavailable, coffee creamers?

    Well, certainly not in my line of work. The amount of shortages is staggering.

    But the sun is out. For now.

  19. Juice Box says:

    Should make for a REALLY SPOOKY NIGHT…

    “A solar flare erupted Thursday that’s set to reach Earth tonight and “supercharge” the aurora borealis tonight, making it visible as far south as NY/NJ. So tonight when you’re stumbling from party to party—yes, you are that wasted, but no, you’re not hallucinating.”

    NOAA realtime forecast is here

    https://tinyurl.com/3h7uxfz8

  20. Juice Box says:

    Any of you Clifton boys going?

    Brighton Asylum is located at the REAR of:
    2 Brighton Ave
    Passaic, NJ 07055 (border of Clifton)

    https://brightonasylum.com/

  21. Juice Box says:

    Our trip to Six Flags Fright night is off due to rain. We are going to head to the Haunted Theater at the local college….

    https://brookdalehauntedtheater.com/

  22. chicagofinance says:

    “supply chains non-existent” you forgot to add ….. while our politically connected and unqualified LGBTQTIA+ Secretary of Transportation is on paternity leave…….
    “Brownie, you’re doing a heck of a job”

    Fast Eddie says:
    October 30, 2021 at 11:09 am
    How dumb are we?

    Shelves are bare, supply chains non-existent, goods and services have become uncoupled in price, fuel and energy is skyrocketing, first-responders have become villains – being fired for opposing vaccine mandates while illegal aliens stream across the border unchecked and unvaccinated, crime is up, schools are eager to teach marx1sm and rac1al division and the federal government wants to tax people with a net worth as little as $600 to pay for cronies and votes… all run by a party previously identified as democrats because mean tweets are mean. So you tell me; how dumb are we?

  23. Phoenix says:

    “Shelves are bare”

    A little bit of consumptive humility might just help these American consumers just a bit.

  24. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Now do the same for states in our country. It’s clear the current system in place is a race to the bottom. Just make a universal rate that all states can agree upon.

    “The agreement comes in two parts: It sets a minimum tax rate of 15% on the profits of large businesses and will raise additional revenue for most governments; and it shifts tax revenues to where companies sell to consumers, rather than where they are based.
    ‘The fact that we agreed on this new international tax system is good news for all of us’
    — French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire
    Rich-country governments are set to be the main winners from both parts of the deal. According to one analysis, additional revenues for the U.S. from the minimum tax will be 15 times those of China. Another report estimates that the total boost to 52 developing countries from the new way of allocating tax revenues would be about $1.5 billion to $2 billion a year, a fraction of the deal’s benefit”

  25. Hold my beer says:

    245k Covid cases in Texas schools this school year as of 10/24.

    I thought we’d hit 250k by Halloween. I was wrong. When that report comes out next week I think it will be 248k-249k as of 10/29.

    https://www.texastribune.org/2021/09/17/texas-schools-covid-19-cases/

  26. chicagofinance says:

    https://youtu.be/a3ROofd1aA0?t=162
    Juice Box says:
    October 30, 2021 at 12:08 pm
    Should make for a REALLY SPOOKY NIGHT…

    “A solar flare erupted Thursday that’s set to reach Earth tonight and “supercharge” the aurora borealis tonight, making it visible as far south as NY/NJ. So tonight when you’re stumbling from party to party—yes, you are that wasted, but no, you’re not hallucinating.”

    NOAA realtime forecast is here

  27. chicagofinance says:

    Juice: messed up…. this one is so much better!
    https://youtu.be/IDKbB45XA9M?t=171

  28. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “How the post-pandemic divorce boom is affecting the housing market
    The scramble for a new home is putting even more pressure on newly split couples”

    https://apple.news/AW2zIhOFvQcW5EuiNKnIQHA

  29. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Some bullish individuals out there.

    “@CathieDWood @elonmusk, hold it! Reborn Tesla is marching up up away in “a gigantic S-curve”, never looking back. Elon has created a new business paradigm that the world has never seen before, growing exponentially from EV to energy to FSD to Teslabot.”

    https://twitter.com/koguanleo/status/1443577318065119245?s=21

  30. JCer says:

    Phoenix as you are well aware the issue goes beyond consumption. The issue hits many critical areas, I’m hearing of shortages in everything from copper wire to hardware to circuit breakers to autoparts to cellphones basically anything and everything which comes from Asia which is practically everything and if we make it here there’s a good change some of the raw materials are sourced from asia.

    Worse than the issue of consumers having to do without is merchants who will actually miss the season when they get their merchandise, the financial hit will be really bad if you don’t get your winter clothing until march, this kind of thing will literally wipe out the weaker companies as without the ability to get inventory they cannot make normal sales volumes and cash flow and will be hard pressed to cover their fixed expenses. The economy hasn’t even digested the initial hit but the dislocation will be felt and the longer this goes on the worse the outcome.

  31. The Great Pumpkin says:

    The concept of a “metaverse” is not at all new, nor is it revolutionary.

    Remember Second Life?

    Borrowing the ideas of failed endeavors to reboot them may or may not be a good strategy, but it is certainly not out of the box revolutionary thinking.

    https://twitter.com/mayhem4markets/status/1454443395603124229?s=21

  32. Hold my beer says:

    JCer

    That’s right. Most retailers make 40-70% of their revenue in the 4th quarter. A bad 4th quarter can take out a weak company and start the death spiral for an average company.

  33. Hold my beer says:

    Most retailers are deeply in debt too. I think not hitting revenue targets can trigger negative things like cutting credit line and interest rates getting raised. Which is the opposite of what the retailer needs.

    I am long toilet paper and coconut milk

    I’m going to stock up on toothpaste and deodorant. The supply chain issue is hitting the raw materials for toothpaste too and the big companies are warning about it.

  34. Libturd says:

    Facebook just be trying to disrupt. Helps the stock price.

    Here’s hoping there is no shortage of York peppermint patties in my kid’s boo sacks.

    Happy Halloween buffoons. Save your Chiklets. You might need to sell them next year.

  35. BRT says:

    This was a good read on the logistics of the supply chain crisis.

    https://medium.com/@ryan79z28/im-a-twenty-year-truck-driver-i-will-tell-you-why-america-s-shipping-crisis-will-not-end-bbe0ebac6a91

    I’m A Twenty Year Truck Driver, I Will Tell You Why America’s “Shipping Crisis” Will Not End
    Ryan JOHNSON
    Ryan JOHNSON

    4 days ago·10 min read

    I have a simple question for every ‘expert’ who thinks they understand the root causes of the shipping crisis:
    Why is there only one crane for every 50–100 trucks at every port in America?
    No ‘expert’ will answer this question.
    I’m a Class A truck driver with experience in nearly every aspect of freight. My experience in the trucking industry of 20 years tells me that nothing is going to change in the shipping industry.
    Let’s start with understanding some things about ports. Outside of dedicated port trucking companies, most trucking companies won’t touch shipping containers. There is a reason for that.
    Think of going to the port as going to WalMart on Black Friday, but imagine only ONE cashier for thousands of customers. Think about the lines. Except at a port, there are at least THREE lines to get a container in or out. The first line is the ‘in’ gate, where hundreds of trucks daily have to pass through 5–10 available gates. The second line is waiting to pick up your container. The third line is for waiting to get out. For each of these lines the wait time is a minimum of an hour, and I’ve waited up to 8 hours in the first line just to get into the port. Some ports are worse than others, but excessive wait times are not uncommon. It’s a rare day when a driver gets in and out in under two hours. By ‘rare day’, I mean maybe a handful of times a year. Ports don’t even begin to have enough workers to keep the ports fluid, and it doesn’t matter where you are, coastal or inland port, union or non-union port, it’s the same everywhere.
    Furthermore, I’m fortunate enough to be a Teamster — a union driver — an employee paid by the hour. Most port drivers are ‘independent contractors’, leased onto a carrier who is paying them by the load. Whether their load takes two hours, fourteen hours, or three days to complete, they get paid the same, and they have to pay 90% of their truck operating expenses (the carrier might pay the other 10%, but usually less.) The rates paid to non-union drivers for shipping container transport are usually extremely low. In a majority of cases, these drivers don’t come close to my union wages. They pay for all their own repairs and fuel, and all truck related expenses. I honestly don’t understand how many of them can even afford to show up for work. There’s no guarantee of ANY wage (not even minimum wage), and in many cases, these drivers make far below minimum wage. In some cases they work 70 hour weeks and still end up owing money to their carrier.
    So when the coastal ports started getting clogged up last spring due to the impacts of COVID on business everywhere, drivers started refusing to show up. Congestion got so bad that instead of being able to do three loads a day, they could only do one. They took a 2/3 pay cut and most of these drivers were working 12 hours a day or more. While carriers were charging increased pandemic shipping rates, none of those rate increases went to the driver wages. Many drivers simply quit. However, while the pickup rate for containers severely decreased, they were still being offloaded from the boats. And it’s only gotten worse.
    Earlier this summer, both BNSF and Union Pacific Railways shut down their container yards in the Chicago area for a week for inbound containers. These are some of the busiest ports in the country. They had miles upon miles of stack (container) trains waiting to get in to be unloaded. According to BNSF, containers were sitting in the port 1/3 longer than usual, and they simply ran out of space to put them until some of the ones already on the ground had been picked up. Though they did reopen the area ports, they are still over capacity. Stack trains are still sitting loaded, all over the country, waiting to get into a port to unload. And they have to be unloaded, there is a finite number of railcars. Equipment shortages are a large part of this problem.
    One of these critical shortages is the container chassis.
    A container chassis is the trailer the container sits on. Cranes will load these in port. Chassis are typically container company provided, as trucking companies generally don’t have their own chassis units. They are essential for container trucking. While there are some privately owned chassis, there aren’t enough of those to begin to address the backlog of containers today, and now drivers are sitting around for hours, sometimes days, waiting for chassis.
    The impact of the container crisis now hitting residencies in proximity to trucking companies. Containers are being pulled out of the port and dropped anywhere the drivers can find because the trucking company lots are full. Ports are desperate to get containers out so they can unload the new containers coming in by boat. When this happens there is no plan to deliver this freight yet, they are literally just making room for the next ship at the port. This won’t last long, as this just compounds the shortage of chassis. Ports will eventually find themselves unable to move containers out of the port until sitting containers are delivered, emptied, returned, or taken to a storage lot (either loaded or empty) and taken off the chassis there so the chassis can be put back into use. The priority is not delivery, the priority is just to clear the port enough to unload the next boat.
    What happens when a container does get to a warehouse?
    A large portion of international containers must be hand unloaded because the products are not on pallets. It takes a working crew a considerable amount of time to do this, and warehouse work is usually low wage. A lot of it is actually only temp staffed. Many full time warehouse workers got laid off when the pandemic started, and didn’t come back. So warehouses, like everybody else, are chronically short staffed.
    When the port trucker gets to the warehouse, they have to wait for a door (you’ve probably seen warehouse buildings with a bank of roll-up doors for trucks on one side of the building.) The warehouses are behind schedule, sometimes by weeks. After maybe a 2 hour wait, the driver gets a door and drops the container — but now often has to pick up an empty, and goes back to the port to wait in line all over again to drop off the empty.
    At the warehouse, the delivered freight is unloaded, and it is usually separated and bound to pallets, then shipped out in much smaller quantities to final destination. A container that had a couple dozen pallets of goods on it will go out on multiple trailers to multiple different destinations a few pallets at a time.
    From personal experience, what used to take me 20–30 minutes to pick up at a warehouse can now take three to four hours. This slowdown is warehouse management related: very few warehouses are open 24 hours, and even if they are, many are so short staffed it doesn’t make much difference, they are so far behind schedule. It means that as a freight driver, I cannot pick up as much freight in a day as I used to, and since I can’t get as much freight on my truck, the whole supply chain is backed up. Freight simply isn’t moving.
    It’s important to understand what the cost implications are for consumers with this lack of supply in the supply chain. It’s pure supply and demand economics. Consider volume shipping customers who primarily use ‘general freight’, which is the lowest cost shipping and typically travels in a ‘space available’ fashion. They have usually been able to get their freight moved from origination to delivery within two weeks. Think about how you get your packages from Amazon. Even without paying for Prime, you usually get your stuff in a week. The majority of freight travels at this low cost, ‘no guarantee of delivery date’ way, and for the most part it’s been fine for both shippers and consumers. Those days are coming to an end.
    People who want their deliveries in a reasonable time are going to have to start paying premium rates. There will be levels of priority, and each increase in rate premium essentially jumps that freight ahead of all the freight with lower or no premium rates. Unless the lack of shipping infrastructure is resolved, things will back up in a cascading effect to the point where if your products are going general freight, you might wait a month or two for delivery. It’s already starting. If you use truck shipping in any way, you’ve no doubt started to see the delays. Think about what’s going to happen to holiday season shipping.
    What is going to compel the shippers and carriers to invest in the needed infrastructure? The owners of these companies can theoretically not change anything and their business will still be at full capacity because of the backlog of containers. The backlog of containers doesn’t hurt them. It hurts anyone paying shipping costs — that is, manufacturers selling products and consumers buying products. But it doesn’t hurt the owners of the transportation business — in fact the laws of supply and demand mean that they are actually going to make more money through higher rates, without changing a thing. They don’t have to improve or add infrastructure (because it’s costly), and they don’t have to pay their workers more (warehouse workers, crane operators, truckers).
    The ‘experts’ want to say we can do things like open the ports 24/7, and this problem will be over in a couple weeks. They are blowing smoke, and they know it. Getting a container out of the port, as slow and aggravating as it is, is really the easy part, if you can find a truck and chassis to haul it. But every truck driver in America can’t operate 24/7, even if the government suspends Hours Of Service Regulations (federal regulations determining how many hours a week we can work/drive), we still need to sleep sometime. There are also restrictions on which trucks can go into a port. They have to be approved, have RFID tags, port registered, and the drivers have to have at least a TWIC card (Transportation Worker Identification Credential from the federal Transportation Security Administration). Some ports have additional requirements. As I have already said, most trucking companies won’t touch shipping containers with a 100 foot pole. What we have is a system with a limited amount of trucks and qualified drivers, many of whom are already working 14 hours a day (legally, the maximum they can), and now the supposed fix is to have them work 24 hours a day, every day, and not stop until the backlog is cleared. It’s not going to happen. It is not physically possible. There is no “cavalry” coming. No trucking companies are going to pay to register their trucks to haul containers for something that is supposedly so “short term,” because these same companies can get higher rate loads outside the ports. There is no extra capacity to be had, and it makes NO difference anyway, because If you can’t get a container unloaded at a warehouse, having drivers work 24/7/365 solves nothing.
    What it will truly take to fix this problem is to run EVERYTHING 24/7: ports (both coastal and domestic),trucks, and warehouses. We need tens of thousands more chassis, and a much greater capacity in trucking.
    Before the pandemic, through the pandemic, and really for the whole history of the freight industry at all levels, owners make their money by having low labor costs — that is, low wages and bare minimum staffing. Many supply chain workers are paid minimum wages, no benefits, and there’s a high rate of turnover because the physical conditions can be brutal (there aren’t even bathrooms for truckers waiting hours at ports because the port owners won’t pay for them. The truckers aren’t port employees and port owners are only legally required to pay for bathroom facilities for their employees. This is a nationwide problem). For the whole supply chain to function efficiently every point has to be working at an equal capacity. Any point that fails bottlenecks the whole system. Right now, it’s ALL failing spectacularly TOGETHER, but fixing one piece won’t do anything. It ALL needs to be fixed, and at the same time.
    How do you convince truckers to work when their pay isn’t guaranteed, even to the point where they lose money?
    Nobody is compelling the transportation industries to make the needed changes to their infrastructure. There are no laws compelling them to hire the needed workers, or pay them a living wage, or improve working conditions. And nobody is compelling them to buy more container chassis units, more cranes, or more storage space. This is for an industry that literally every business in the world is reliant on in some way or another.
    My prediction is that nothing is going to change and the shipping crisis is only going to get worse. Nobody in the supply chain wants to pay to solve the problem. They literally just won’t pay to solve the problem. At the point we are at now, things are so backed up that the backups THEMSELVES are causing container companies, ports, warehouses, and trucking companies to charge massive rate increases for doing literally NOTHING. Container companies have already decreased the maximum allowable times before containers have to be back to the port, and if the congestion is so bad that you can’t get the container back into the port when it is due, the container company can charge massive late fees. The ports themselves will start charging massive storage fees for not getting containers out on time — storage charges alone can run into thousands of dollars a day. Warehouses can charge massive premiums for their services, and so can trucking companies. Chronic understaffing has led to this problem, but it is allowing these same companies to charge ten times more for regular services. Since they’re not paying the workers any more than they did last year or five years ago, the whole industry sits back and cashes in on the mess it created. In fact, the more things are backed up, the more every point of the supply chain cashes in. There is literally NO incentive to change, even if it means consumers have to do holiday shopping in July and pay triple for shipping.
    This is the new normal. All brought to you by the ‘experts’ running our supply chains.

  36. Fast Eddie says:

    When will the term, “Trick or Treat” or the whole concept of Halloween be cancelled? There’s so many elements of exclusion and rac1sm that it truly needs to be banished.

  37. Phoenix says:

    BRT,
    Watched the movie “Convoy” the other night when I couldn’t sleep due to a crazy work day.
    Saw it when I was younger. Remember it being good. But as I watched, it seemed so dumb. So I paused, watched some, paused again. But as time when on, it actually got better- what I realized is the same things were happening to truckers then as they are today.

    Nothing had changed since the seventies. In fact, it’s probably worse now. Still no respect, never going to be for the average worker.

    Seeing Ali McGraw after all of these years was a pleasant surprise.

  38. Phoenix says:

    “Trick or Treat” or the whole concept of Halloween be cancelled?

    When enough women call the police department after seeing Mike Myers in their Ring cameras.

    It will become tiring for the police and the holiday will end.

  39. Phoenix says:

    “All brought to you by the ‘experts’ running our supply chains.”

    You mean corporations.

    Hands off business. The government needs to keep out of business. So it is up to these “corporations” to solve this problem. It’s the American way.

    It’s not “Bidens” or “Trumps” problem. It’s corporate Americas problem.

  40. Old realtor says:

    If it is corporate America’s fault that supply chains are so screwed up, Fast Eddie is just a fear monger in search of a boogeyman and chicagofinance is just homophobic.

    Phoenix says:
    October 31, 2021 at 9:56 am
    “All brought to you by the ‘experts’ running our supply chains.”

    You mean corporations.

    Hands off business. The government needs to keep out of business. So it is up to these “corporations” to solve this problem. It’s the American way.

    It’s not “Bidens” or “Trumps” problem. It’s corporate Americas problem.

  41. Fast Eddie says:

    Yes, it’s corporate America’s fault that supply chains are non-existent because corporate America wants to impede their revenue stream. Let’s ask Pete Buttigieg what he thinks. Oh wait, he’s on paternity leave. If you like your paternity leave, you can keep your paternity leave!

  42. Phoenix says:

    Eddie,
    Each part of the “supply” chain comes with individual motives.

    As stated, some are getting paid, some are getting paid more. They have no incentive to make changes. Others are getting short changed, so just decided not to play.

    This is America. It’s all about leverage.

    You want hands off of businesses, this is what you have. Competition instead of cooperation. All fueled by greed and leverage.

    Embrace it. It’s the Marlboro man inside of America. The Karen of corporations.

  43. Phoenix says:

    Pete Buttequeg can do his job from home while doing child care. He can zoom all day while the kid watches Peppa Pig.

    That is a job for WFH. No reason to be off. It’s not like construction, roofing, or auto repair.

  44. Phoenix says:

    Eddie,
    The police started the race war. It’s time to suck it up. It’s going to run its course just like Covid.

    You push the envelope, this is what you get.

  45. Libturd says:

    Convoy, I saw it in the theater. Had to be about 8 at the time. Was mildly entertaining to an 8 year old. Saw the Deer Hunter aound then too I think. Clash of the Titans too?

  46. joyce says:

    I guess four years ago if people took off their pink hats and just chanted FU Trump, that would have been an extraordinary sign of failed leadership.

  47. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Maybe will listen to lib, lefty, and chi. Im tempted to just suck it up, admit I’m wrong, and transfer strategy to buying a vanguard small cap like vscix to hold during the storm or just hold cash. Then buy up ark once bust cycle ends.

    “Stock Market Crash: Expert Warns Bubble Criteria ‘Have Now Been Met’”

    https://apple.news/A_oEQQC_vQOaHR61gL9ND4Q

  48. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Hardest part of being wealthy…surviving the bust cycle. It’s ruthless.

  49. Ex says:

    Dead & Co. Tonight, final stop on their tour.
    Delivered an epic set of classic songs. Flawless execution.
    Set List: https://www.instagram.com/p/CVuLysjLaju/?utm_medium=copy_link

  50. Clown World says:

    UN being the UN – Get’s made an offer it can’t accept:
    Essentially, Musk indicates he will sell $6BN of Tesla stock and donate to the UN-World Food Programme, so that ‘World Hunger” can be “solved.”

    The catch – The UN must allow Open Source accounting so that the public can see, precisely, to the penny, how this money is allocated/spent.

    Your move United Nations.

    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1454808104256737289?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1454808104256737289%7Ctwgr%5E%7Ctwcon%5Es1_&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.businessinsider.in%2Finternational%2Fnews%2Felon-musk-is-ready-to-spend-6-billion-to-end-world-hunger-asks-un-to-provide-a-plan%2Farticleshow%2F87455987.cms

  51. Fast Eddie says:

    The catch – The UN must allow Open Source accounting so that the public can see, precisely, to the penny, how this money is allocated/spent.

    That’s beautiful and the reason it’ll never happen! Do the same with the multi-trillion dollar gluttony package the O’Biden administration is trying to push through. Every penny allocated should go to roads, bridges, broadband, water and waste water facilities and maintenance. It won’t… just like Obammy’s trillion dollar package went to defunct green corporations for friends and friends of friends.

  52. Bystander says:

    Ex,

    You are a lucky man. Looks like great setlist. Top of my list are shows at H-wood bowl and well as Santa Barbara bowl. One day when visiting my wife’s fam, I hope to slip away for a night. I would also suggest Joe Russo’s Almost Dead but they just played H-wood Palladium a week or so ago. If you did not catch them then probably will be awhile

  53. Bystander says:

    Interesting..I just saw two Indian software developers post on Linkedin that looking to leave Citi due to vaccine mandate. I don’t know if Muslim or Hindu thing but certainly this will be issue for keeping IT talent.

  54. Libturd says:

    “Obammy’s trillion dollar package went to defunct green corporations for friends and friends of friends.”

    This is absolutely true. But so was Trump’s Trillion dollar tax break to the wealthy (future Republican) voters which failed equally as miserably.

    Both parties can’t control their wasteful spending.

  55. BRT says:

    G20 morons put their masks on exiting the car, and rip take them off on their first steps indoors.

    https://twitter.com/gaborgurbacs/status/1454979999606493184

  56. Fast Eddie says:

    But so was Trump’s Trillion dollar tax break to the wealthy (future Republican) voters which failed equally as miserably.

    I got a “one time” bonus and healthier raise because of that ev1l tax break. The bulk of that tax break went to expanded research and infrastructure that expanded the size and capacity of our company so quickly, that we had suitors banging on the door. My company was then sold to a fortune 500 offering us more incentives across the board with expanded rec counts. See how that works? One side makes, the other side takes.

  57. BRT says:

    So, Starbucks in Princeton has a sign on it, for it’s hours due to staffing issues. I’m noticing they are all incredibly understaffed, moreso than ever.

    Mon – Fri, 6 am to noon
    Sat – Sun Closed

    The one at the mall is
    Mon – Sun, 6 am to 3 pm

  58. BidenIsTheGOAT says:

    The mandate has created more blowback than benefit.

    It’s exacerbated worker shortages and has expanded anti vaccine sentiment tremendously. As the news of “fully vaccinated” people contracting covid continues on, support for the mandates will continue to fall.

    The left also conceded the claim to medical autonomy which they had cling to for defense of abortion for decades. Biden got a short term pop from it and that’s all.

  59. BRT says:

    The administration and our pubic figures are a train wreck. If they were up front and honest, they would tell people the side effects and rare instances of danger. Then…they might actually tell them that the J&J vaccine does not carry the same risks. Instead, they just try to ignore everything and get social media to ban anything that says otherwise as disinformation. I saw the Singapore announcement and rollout. First thing they said was “We the politicians will get it first, to show you our confidence, and also demonstrate it’s safety”. That’s not what happened here. In Oct/Nov, the entire left was exhibiting their vaccine skepticism and as soon as the election was over, it flipped the other way.

  60. leftwing says:

    Solid sets. I saw Oteil do Fire. That was nice. Little scare there with BK…?

    Hey, you ever do a PITS?

  61. leftwing says:

    “The catch – The UN must allow Open Source accounting so that the public can see, precisely, to the penny, how this money is allocated/spent.”

    So simple a concept, and so simple to implement. It should be required that any US spending bill passed have that incorporated. Click on the bill, hotlinks directly to exactly where the money goes. That would control government spending better than anything else…

  62. BidenIsTheGOAT says:

    We’re also not all afforded the luxury that Biden has of hiding in His basement for weeks at a time. He wasn’t seen much for a few days after the last shot which is typical.

    If someone catches a nasty side effect from a booster and goes down there are real world consequences for most of us.

  63. leftwing says:

    “Obammy’s trillion dollar package…Trump’s Trillion dollar tax break to the wealthy (future Republican) voters which failed equally as miserably. Both parties can’t control their wasteful spending.”

    Eh…..One was actual spending, taking more money from the American populace.

    One was taking less money from the American populace.

    Lowering taxes is most certainly not the same as spending.

    Big difference.

    Only the twisted mind of the modern liberal conflates people keeping more of their earnings to be same as taking and spending trillions of their money.

  64. Phoenix says:

    Bill Burr on the presidents, and how you handle the economy. It’s only 1.3 minutes long, but it’s priceless.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BkqR-YM-N8I

  65. Libturd says:

    “Lowering taxes is most certainly not the same as spending.”

    Lowering taxes and having to increase the deficit to cover the revenue shortfall is no different than raising taxes to meet dwindling revenue.

    The tax cut might have helped Eddie and tons of rich guys like us, but the bottom and middle got screwed. Last I recalled, over half of the corporate revenue saved by the tax cuts went to buying their own shares which helped who?

    https://www.policygenius.com/taxes/who-benefited-most-from-the-tax-cuts-and-jobs-act/

    Let’s be real. Neither parties sh1t don’t stink.

  66. Libturd says:

    The other thing I’ve noticed recently is that the number of sites offering unbiased journalism is dwindling.

    Just looking for the results of Trump’s Tax policies required me to go about 12 links before I could find one that was not supported by a left or right wing think tank (paid for propaganda).

  67. Phoenix says:

    Lib,
    Everything is in division in America. There is no “team” or us. It’s every man for themselves unfortunately.

    I believe its going to get really ugly in a country that has so many weapons at home. I can tell you that in my line of work I am seeing more violent cases then I have ever before in my entire career.

  68. BRT says:

    Police in general don’t like quotas. But if you ask them, there’s more than enough people breaking the laws to ticket. You see them drive everyday on your commute. And in general, a good rule of thumb is, the higher crime areas have more aggressive driving and less respect for the laws.

    Also, the closer you are to the city (further North), the more aggressive people are as well. I’m more laid back based on my location and age, but I’m consistently amazed at how everyone in Bergen county drives like they are the most important person on the planet.

  69. grim says:

    The stories I’m reading about Facebook and Twitter “test accounts” being pushed escalating polarized content is shocking (while at the same time hardly surprising) – “Carols Journey to QAnon”.

    Suspect nearly every social and media site is doing the exact same thing, even if entirely unintentional. The most engaging content (good or bad) is what gets pushed down people’s throats. The minute anyone says anything remotely political, these engines are going to push them straight to the core of this polarizing content, because it drives engagement.

    I spent a grand total of 15 minutes on tiktok, which appears to be entirely based on this kind of absurd algorithmic targeting. You let one video play for more than a few seconds, and your feed becomes dominated with that kind of content, ignoring EVERYTHING else.

    FB institutionalized this by making it impossible to view your timeline in chronological order as a default, even going so far as to hide the options and make them difficult to get a less biased view.

    Going on FB now, I see very little of the kind of content that I used to. It has nothing to do with being able to see my “Friends” content. Hell, if I come across a friend post, it seems like a rarity.

  70. leftwing says:

    “Lowering taxes and having to increase the deficit to cover the revenue shortfall is no different than raising taxes to meet dwindling revenue.”

    Absolutely not.

    Actually Lib, and you know I love you man so I’m not breaking your balls, but your statement doesn’t even make sense.

    There is no such thing as a ‘revenue shortfall’. Budgeting starts with the top line. An entity – person, household, business, or government – has revenue. It spends under that line. Any other spending above that amount is not a revenue problem or ‘shortfall’. It is a spending problem.

    And ‘raising taxes to meet dwindling reveneue’? LOL, what dwindling revenue!?

    Federal tax collections are distinctly an upward right moving graph…..there is no ‘dwindling revenue’, there is only an inexorable spending problem….

    Federal tax collections were $800B in 1995…they just crossed 3x that amount at $2.4T.

    Tax receipts are THREE times the amount they were 25 years ago and you are trying to say with a straight face there is a ‘revenue shortfall’?

    C’mon man….

    https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/W006RC1Q027SBEA

  71. Bystander says:

    So, left tell us how Trump reduced spending while passing Ryan’s tax cut..all ears.

  72. BRT says:

    grim,

    One thing I appreciate about facebook is the groups for hobbies. I’m in a NJ pizza group and a Fig tree group. These groups explicitly have a no politics policy and we all just enjoy the pictures/videos/discussion that happens. Either way, old message boards are still far superior discussion, which is why I’m here. I still to this day post on forums for my hobbies that I have been for the past 20 years.

  73. Libturd says:

    I know you are not a ball buster Lefty. So no need to clarify. Plus my skin is thick as you know.

    Yes, what Bystander said. You are telling me that those tax cuts curtailed government spending in some way? Nah. It just shifted the burden to pay more of the taxes to those with less discretionary dollars. MUCH, MUCH less. How does this differ from the Biden waste it on his contributors plan than the Trump, waste it on his corporate masters plan if neither help anyone in the end. I can’t imagine you can provide me a chart that shows Trump’s dip in FED spending as a result of the tax cuts?

    If Trump cut spending commensurate with the tax cuts, then yes, I would be a supporter. Instead, he just threw another small bone onto a giant pile of bones. Much like Biden is. The only real difference is where they get the money from. Whether it be from increased deficits or more taxes collected, it really doesn’t matter without a cut in spending.

  74. Libturd says:

    What makes this place so much better is that none of us are trying to fool anyone nor is there any real vitriol shown here. People argue their points and move on. No one is interrupting public school board meetings here. :P

  75. Libturd says:

    And yes BRT,

    Without Facebook Groups, I would be physically and mentally poorer. The parent’s of kids with brain cancer group was the ONLY place we could go to find out anything we were about to go through when our son was near death. The hospitals were fantastic at providing health care, obviously. But from a mental health standpoint, I would argue that the fear of litigation actually renders health care workers detrimental to the victim and their family’s mental health.

    Financially, without Facebook, I would not know of nearly as many advantage plays as well as ways to save on purchases.

    But Grim is right. I go onto Facebook once a day at most usually. Just to find out if some friend or relative either achieved something great or died pretty much.

  76. Chicago says:

    STFU. You don’t have the right to post here ever again.

    To the ovens with you, and FlabMax can hit the start button.

    Libturd says:
    November 1, 2021 at 11:23 am
    What makes this place so much better is that none of us are trying to fool anyone nor is there any real vitriol shown here. People argue their points and move on. No one is interrupting public school board meetings here. :P

  77. Libturd says:

    Speaking of ovens. I was reminiscing with my old college buddies over Halloween yesterday. This was 23 years ago. I was dressed as the good minister Louis Farrakhan. My buddy Moses was Doctor Mengele. Another friend of mine had a 2 foot d1ldo and was dressed as C0ck Man. It really is amazing how times have changed.

    Not only did we not offend anyone, but the laughs, especially from the diverse Hoboken bar crowd, were endless.

  78. So many idiots says:

    I don’t bother with Facebook, Twitter, Instagram. I have 4 millennial siblings so keeping up with their nonstop texts are enough for me.

    I use LinkedIn because my contacts make some narrowcasting comments about my industry. There I get on the ground, up to date material I wouldn’t get anywhere else.

    New Jersey house prices up 15% last year, 19% through October this year. Did anybody on njrereport see this coming?

    When is the njrereport app launching?

    While writing this, I received at least 5 texts – on top of dozens this morning – from my Millennial siblings on their kids’ Halloween experiences. Lots of plastic costumes headed into landfills later this week.

  79. Libturd says:

    And that 2-foot dong showed up every where we went for about ten years. You would be at Rutgers tailgate and would go to grab a beer from a cooler, and there it was. You would look for mail in the mailbox, there it was again. It was the dong that kept on giving. I think we named it Long Duck Dong.

  80. crushednjmillenial says:

    The Public Questions for tomorrow . . .

    Anyone have a strong opinion on the two public questions?

    Q #1 = allow wagering on NJ post-season college sports events held in NJ and legal wagering on NJ teams?
    Q #2 = raffle money can benefit organization holding raffle?

    I haven’t gone deeper than reading the questions on my sample ballot. I’d think I’d vote yes on both – I’m pro-legal gambling and I’m liberatarian regarding raffles. Is there some trick imbedded here?

  81. leftwing says:

    “Yes, what Bystander said. You are telling me that those tax cuts curtailed government spending in some way?”

    Never said they did. They didn’t. The point debated was different, essentially that tax cuts and increased spending are somehow equivalent.

    My assertion is that there is not a revenue shortfall but a spending problem. And that allowing people to keep more of what they earn (tax cut) is not only different but diametrically different than the government taking more of one’s earnings (spending).

    There is not a ‘revenue’ problem. We are among the most taxed people on Earth. And on top of that the government is borrowing on 2:1 ratio on what it collects….

    There is a spending problem.

    If Washington (and Trenton, Albany, et. al.) can’t control themselves shut off the spigot. Tax cuts are part of that…if they can’t take it from you they can’t spend it.

    And, the added benefit?

    If they don’t take it from you, guess what? More of your money is in your pocket.

  82. crushednjmillenial says:

    Betting markets have Youngkin leading in VA. Would be a political shocker if it comes to be. Until Oct. 29, the betting markets favored MacAuliffe.

    The “parents at school boards” issue is driving Youngkin strength, of course. I wonder if the empty shelves at the grocery store might be an under-the-radar point also – on Sunday, I went to the grocery store and noticed the most empty shelves since the first few months of covid. In the weeks leading up to this, there has been sporadic, random items missing, but Sunday (yeseterday) was the worst I’ve seen.

  83. crushednjmillenial says:

    BRT article on supply chain logjam . . .

    Assuming all this is true (good article, to my sensibilities), anyone know what it would be bullish for? More late fees for warehousing and container rentals, and less goods available for consumers? Long PLD, CHRW, repair industry; short WMT?

  84. Juice Box says:

    Biden and Butteigieg will save us from the Christmas Grinch…..only 65 more days ago to get hundreds of ships waiting around the country unloaded onto the port docks then stacked in short term storage, then loaded onto trucks, then unloaded onto trains, then unloaded onto trucks again, then unloaded into warehouses for breakdown and palletizing, then loaded on trucks again then stocked on shelves in stores for manhandling by the masses or shipped in a smaller box on a truck or van to your from steps.

    Go long gift cards…

  85. Juice Box says:

    Correction subtract 9 days it’s 54 until the fat man slides down the chimney…better get busy shopping. BUY, BUY, BUY!!!!!

  86. 3b says:

    Juices: Stick up on toothpaste and deodorant too; apparently supply chain issues with the ingredients to make those too as per the WSJ.

  87. 3b says:

    Juice: Give the kids an orange like my parents used to get for Christmas back in the days in the old country.

  88. Libturd says:

    If Halloween is any indicator, Christmas is going to mad this year. One last hurrah. Then it’s time to pay the maker.

  89. Libturd says:

    Remember getting pennies and apples?

  90. Juice Box says:

    Some of the pandemic stuff that was double or triple in price is now back in stock, price is back down too…

    https://www.walmart.com/ip/Intex-28481E-Simple-Spa-77in-x-26in-Inflatable-Hot-Tub-with-Filter-Pump-Cover/123237014

  91. Juice Box says:

    Halloween was nuts here. Perhaps 150 kids, even the neighbor who lives over the tracks on a dead end that never gets anyone told me he had 25.

  92. Hold my beer says:

    I got my Moderna booster Friday afternoon. Arm felt less sore than previous full doses. After 24 hours felt like I getting a cold and fell asleep a few hours earlier than normal. Felt fine Sunday with arm Only slightly sore.

  93. SmallGovConservative says:

    Juice Box says:
    October 29, 2021 at 1:19 pm
    “I said they [RU football] were 3-4 in the Big 10, the losses
    Are where it counts to advance. Now I will bet $200 against them , well just because…”

    Good call. Hope you’re a better investor that you are a gambler, given the final score was RU 20 Illinois 14.

    Just kidding. RU will be underdogs in remaining games and could certainly lose them all. But on a somewhat more serious note, there are very few things that NJ residents have to be proud of when it comes to our home state. The state university, including it’s athletic teams, should be one of those things — as it is in Michigan, Wisconsin, Texas, etc…In a state marked by corrupt politicians, crumbling infrastructure and sky-high taxes, hopefully RU football can become one of those few sources of pride. Feel free to jump on the bandwagon if/when it happens.

  94. Fast Eddie says:

    I hope Murphy wins here. I want people’s taxes to go up, route 80 and 78 to become toll roads, vaccine and mask mandates everywhere, strangulating climate restrictions on anything that breathes and increased borrowing to fund six-figure, do-nothing pensions and jobs.

  95. No One says:

    Speaking of laws and lawbreakers, I was reminded me of a passage from Atlas Shrugged between science bureaucrat Ferris and businessman Rearden:

    Dr. Ferris smiled. . . . . .”We’ve waited a long time to get something on you. You honest men are such a problem and such a headache. But we knew you’d slip sooner or later – and this is just what we wanted.”

    “You seem to be pleased about it.”

    “Don’t I have good reason to be?”

    “But, after all, I did break one of your laws.”

    “Well, what do you think they’re for?”

    Dr. Ferris did not notice the sudden look on Rearden’s face, the look of a man hit by the first vision of that which he had sought to see. Dr. Ferris was past the stage of seeing; he was intent upon delivering the last blows to an animal caught in a trap.

    “Did you really think that we want those laws to be observed?” said Dr. Ferris. “We want them broken. You’d better get it straight that it’s not a bunch of boy scouts you’re up against – then you’ll know that this is not the age for beautiful gestures. We’re after power and we mean it. You fellows were pikers, but we know the real trick, and you’d better get wise to it. There’s no way to rule innocent men. The only power any government has is the power to crack down on criminals. Well, when there aren’t enough criminals, one makes them. One declares so many things to be a crime that it becomes impossible for men to live without breaking laws. Who wants a nation of law-abiding citizens? What’s there in that for anyone? But just pass the kind of laws that can neither be observed nor enforced nor objectively interpreted – and you create a nation of law-breakers – and then you cash in on guilt. Now, that’s the system, Mr. Rearden, that’s the game, and once you understand it, you’ll be much easier to deal with.”

    Watching Dr. Ferris watch him, Rearden saw the sudden twitch of anxiety, the look that precedes panic, as if a clean card had fallen on the table from a deck Dr. Ferris had never seen before.

  96. Juice Box says:

    As I said my brother is an RU alumni gives me something to give him a hard time about, besides going bald. As far as bandwagon their last bowl game was 8 years ago. Lets see how they do against the Badgers this week.

  97. Fast Eddie says:

    Ahh, Hank Reardan, the man who manufactured green-tinted steel rails that carried the train with Dagny Taggart and himself.

    It’s funny… I read a comment this morning that said something about democrats being in the business of creating turmoil and chaos in order to make money. G0d, it’s so true and their lackeys fall for it in the guise of compassion and caring. Build back better. LMAO!

  98. chicagofinance says:

    I thought Christie was going to become the next Mets President of Baseball Operations?

    Juice Box says:
    November 1, 2021 at 12:31 pm
    Correction subtract 9 days it’s 54 until the fat man slides down the chimney…better get busy shopping. BUY, BUY, BUY!!!!!

  99. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Indirect way of saying that we f/ed up. You pay for what you get. Sure, it’s cheap to use other countries, but the cost will eventually come due, and it did.

    “Farewell Offshoring, Outsourcing. Pandemic Rewrites CEO Playbook.
    Uncertainty in the global supply chain is driving executives to seek operations away from cheaper countries to locales affording greater control”

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/pandemic-rewrites-ceo-rulebookputting-reliability-before-efficiency-11635779679?mod=hp_lead_pos5

  100. Juice Box says:

    Interesting. Startup Unison.com sent a snail mail fake check today offering to buy out my home equity now.

    This is not a HELOC…It’s a SHARED HOME EQUITY CONTRACT…a new twist offered by startups Homefunds, Hometap, Noah, Point, Unison and Unlock. The deal is Shared Home Equity Contracts are NOT debt instruments, therefore they DO NOT appear on your credit report as debt financing. Homeowners receive funds in a lump sum upfront. There is no interest rate attached to the principal amount. Borrowers must pay the full principal amount plus a percentage of their home’s appreciated value at the end of the contract terms are usually 10 or 30 years or depending on the terms.

    My offer letter says 30 years..or when I sell the home.. so more free money for everyone..

    I could take out the equity with no payments, no interest for 30 years and go long heck Bitcoin or if I wanted to be an old fogey boomer the S&P index…

    What could possibly go wrong?

  101. grim says:

    A number of foreign countries permitted outsourcers supporting US clients to be excluded from specific lockdown provisions as essential, providing far more flexibility than within the US. Extensions were permitted that leveraged the client business types to make those decisions. So, for example, if an outsourcer supported a US financial services client, they were broadly grandfathered as essential.

  102. Fast Eddie says:

    Speaking of football, went to see the Montclair/Rowan game this past Saturday. Mind you, I got there midway through the first quarter so I don’t know if they kneel and if the National Anthem is being played. If I go to another game and they pull that stunt, I’ll just leave. I still haven’t seen one down of the NFL this year. Oh wait, there was a game on in the Grasshopper up in Newfoundland on route 23 after we went apple picking so I couldn’t stare sideways they whole time. Otherwise, I have no idea who’s doing what in that league. I assume they still disrespect America and our Veterans as they cash their bi-weekly $340,000 paychecks? Do they have pasted logos on the field and uniforms touting the ev1ls of America?

  103. chicagofinance says:

    Look….. I don’t want to pick a fight with you, but can you please pay attention to some nuance? Buttigieg preferences are just and adjective, but in this case, it is clearly the reason that he was appointed to his job, so it is an apt description. It represents his only qualification. As you may below note, I referenced W. Bush Era FEMA Chief Michael Brown, an equivalent ineffectual bureaucrat appointed to a high profile government position with no credentials.

    I do find Buttigieg’s behavior far worse, because at least Brown showed up for his crisis.

    I will take it one step further. I actually worked with a person who gave birth on a Friday and was back in the office the following Monday. I thought at the time it was mortifying, but I at least give credit in the sense that our company was in crisis, and the dedication to the job galvanized everyone around her.

    What about this self-absorbed jacka$$? We have a national economic and security crisis here….. he didn’t even disclose publicly what was happening until called on the carpet?

    Yet all you have to say is I am a homophobe? Don’t be blinded by your own prejudice.

    Old realtor says:
    October 31, 2021 at 10:13 am
    If it is corporate America’s fault that supply chains are so screwed up, Fast Eddie is just a fear monger in search of a boogeyman and chicagofinance is just homophobic.

    chicagofinance says:
    October 30, 2021 at 4:31 pm
    “supply chains non-existent” you forgot to add ….. while our politically connected and unqualified LGBTQTIA+ Secretary of Transportation is on paternity leave…….
    “Brownie, you’re doing a heck of a job”

  104. Bystander says:

    I know Ed I was reading Lion, Witch and Wardrobe with my 7 year old son and it really dawned on me that Pelosi was like the White Witch with her ogres, wolves and bull-headed men, halting Christmas and killing the Orange maned lord Aslan at the Stone table of Capitalism. Really I think we should build economic policy based on a fictional book.

    Make America Great Again..Again. Perhaps Again and again..

  105. Juice Box says:

    Christie as Met’s President? I thought Stevie threw him a bone already and put him on the board. If he was as the Stadium all the time they would need to order allot more sausages.. I once saw him tip a sausage tray in a breakfast buffet line and empty it onto his plate.

    Christie has another book coming out in two weeks. He paints himself as some kind of savior…it seems..

    “Republican Rescue: Saving the Party from Truth Deniers, Conspiracy Theorists, and the Dangerous Policies of Joe Biden”

    I don’t think he will be making a comback anytime soon.

  106. Juice Box says:

    Biden is just being nice. It’s his prerogative as well he is President to allow a cabinet secretary to go on paid leave. I doubt the Secretary of Defense would take a leave during a war, he would probably resign and be replaced. Also I think his larping got out of hand as for the for the twitter announcement of the birth the two fathers were laying in a HOSPITAL BED. WTF was that? I never laid in a Hospital bed to hold my kids. First there was no bed you could just jump in. I gather they must have a suites full of beds sitting at Walter Reed for VIPs to take Instagram shots.

    https://tinyurl.com/49v7tvcw

    BTW Their infant son is sick and in the Hospital this weekend. I hope he is feeling better.

  107. No One says:

    Chi is a Depeche Mode-ophile so he cannot be a homophobe.

  108. leftwing says:

    “on Sunday, I went to the grocery store and noticed the most empty shelves since the first few months of covid. In the weeks leading up to this, there has been sporadic, random items missing, but Sunday (yeseterday) was the worst I’ve seen.”

    Was in the land of the free yesterday after some shooting. Stopped into a local retailer to grab a case of shells off the shelf to bring back here and texted a buddy to see if he wanted some. While waiting for his response figured kill some time and pick up some staples (Walmart). Was very surprised how many bare spots and gaps among all the shelves. Haven’t seen that in NJ but my grocers are smaller and more specialized….

  109. The Great Pumpkin says:

    I still can’t believe corporations paid consultants a lot of money from the 1980’s to 2000’s to put us as a country in this kind of position. This is where capitalism is dangerous….businesses free to do as please sold our entire country out for cheap short term profit in a matter of 3 decades. All the hard work of previous generations sold out to Asia in the span of a couple of generations.

    “So, where will they find engineers like me who spent most of their careers working for companies who made everything in the US? In the last 20 years, so much was outsourced to China that younger engineers never had the advantage of learning all the manufacturing processes hands-on right outside the engineering department doors in the factory. I’m within a few years of retirement. When engineers my age are gone, the only people with that experience are in China. Re-learning all the manufacturing processes is going to be a much bigger job than people think. I hope it works.

    It’s a little like a drug addict (US) deciding that they aren’t getting a reliable supply of drugs (low cost products) from their supplier (China) and now wants to make the drugs them themselves.”

  110. leftwing says:

    “…supply chain logjam…Long PLD, CHRW, repair industry; short WMT?”

    Knee jerk reaction…I’m going to look harder at CHRW, liked them after their earnings last week. Only issue is the runup in share price going into earnings. If she could retrace a bit, not necessarily all the way back to 86ish but even to 90 it may really get my attention.

    On retailers, again gut, no research…probably stay away from the big ones that have excellent supply chain management, depth, and resources (like WMT). Also would stay away from those not overly reliant on seasonal goods (again, WMT). Plus WMT has all the financial flexibility in the world and would be the likely beneficiary (again) of smaller guys folding….

    If I were to target retailers I’d look for second tier…they have less resources and infrastructure, and are of less importance to those moving goods (so their shipments get bumped first). Also, stronger seasonality so if they miss the season they are truly fcuked. Macy’s? They just had a good share price runup on some questionable news…plus I was in there recently (SHM) as I needed some new dress pants…zero inventory in men’s shirts and dress pants. Like almost embarrassingly so…..

  111. leftwing says:

    “…so more free money for everyone…I could take out the equity with no payments, no interest for 30 years…What could possibly go wrong?”

    I can’t go into detail on a public forum….this is my lifeblood….Anyway with a friend last week. Good guy, solid guy, experience in PE but not headline worthy….circled solid mid-nine figures in two weeks including two very deep eight figure commitments from top institutions that are household names….one of the institutions essentially said they are in but only for the full amount as they ‘simply have too much money’…..Cash is everywhere.

  112. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “If company leaders can’t improve profits by outsourcing / offshoring, they many be stuck working with their employees. Would that be so tragic?

    Possibly they could “Engage their Employees in Making Money”, as the Forbes article of the same name suggests.

    Research on hundreds of companies, in collaboration with Harvard Business School, shows companies who work with their employees as trusted partners, understanding, driving and participating in the improving economics, have double the profit growth of their peers. Think Southwest Airlines over decades versus the rest of the airline industry.

    This Inc Article, “A Key Strategy to Double Your Profit Growth”, provides details on the research.”

    https://www.inc.com/bill-fotsch/a-key-strategy-to-double-your-profitable-growth.html

  113. Fabius Maximus says:

    The Rand heads discussing the Supply Chain crises is comical.

    I am not sure which is funnier, the cries for big bad government to step in and force the private firms to make changes to ease the congestion, or the fact that the Independent contract truckers (i.e. the exploited workers) have done a John Gault and disappeared.

    I always ask the question “Who shovels Sh1t in the Gulch?”

  114. grim says:

    The interesting bit about independent truckers, is that it was a sign of success for a long hauler to be an independent, with his/her own rig. The independents were always the most profitable of the bunch, and if you were knowledgeable enough to wrench, you essentially controlled your costs well (and didn’t beat on the equipment).

    At some point, the short-haul independents got burned, and California prohibited them at the ports.

    I took possession of some large equipment out of a Quebec distillery about a year ago. The trucker was an independent. He ran a straight shot down from Montreal, and slept in our parking lot (he asked).

    I paid him directly for the transport, it wasn’t cheap, but for 2 long days work, he did very, very well. I feel like I’ve paid big freight companies similar amounts for far shittier service, including FedEx who put forks through the side of a tank, and still attempted to deliver it to me.

  115. leftwing says:

    “…including FedEx who put forks through the side of a tank, and still attempted to deliver it to me.”

    LOL, didn’t fit in an overnight envelope?

    Wasn’t aware Fedex was into the heavy freight.

  116. grim says:

    Yeah, someone was driving a fork lift without long forks attached. Instead of driving around to the side of the tank where they could lift it with short forks, they attempted to just PUSH the skid, by putting the forks up to the bottom of the tank. I think the tank weighs around 3000 pounds empty, probably 3500 rigged and skidded. Why they thought it wouldn’t result in massive damage is beyond me.

    I thought FedEx Freight would do a better job. Nope. That indie trucker kicked ass in comparison.

  117. Bystander says:

    Fab,

    It is beyond laughable. Not one of the Randians would want to live in the world of her creation. It is better off imaginary. The libs would die off but all the cushy military jobs and govt pensions in Alabammy show their value as a producer.

  118. joyce says:

    You’re correct on the first point but not the second (well mostly incorrectly on the second) as has been noted they’ve been barred from working in California.

    Fabius Maximus says:
    November 1, 2021 at 3:36 pm
    The Rand heads discussing the Supply Chain crises is comical.

    I am not sure which is funnier, the cries for big bad government to step in and force the private firms to make changes to ease the congestion, or the fact that the Independent contract truckers (i.e. the exploited workers) have done a John Gault and disappeared.

    I always ask the question “Who shovels Sh1t in the Gulch?”

  119. The Great Pumpkin says:

    It’s all about perspective. The sinking of the Titanic was a miracle to the lobsters in the ship’s kitchen. -Collected

  120. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Think a winning strategy could be just buying these two coins over the next 5 years.

    https://money.usnews.com/investing/cryptocurrency/articles/bitcoin-vs-ethereum-which-is-a-better-buy

  121. Fast Eddie says:

    “The word around Rome is that Biden’s meeting with the Pope was unusually long because Biden had a bit of a ‘bathroom accident’ at the Vatican & it had to be addressed prior to him leaving.”

    O’Biden shit his pants!! LMAO!!!

  122. Fabius Maximus says:

    “they’ve been barred from working in California”
    From Above:
    “Most port drivers are ‘independent contractors’, leased onto a carrier who is paying them by the load. Whether their load takes two hours, fourteen hours, or three days to complete, they get paid the same, and they have to pay 90% of their truck operating expenses (the carrier might pay the other 10%, but usually less.) ”

    So either he’s wrong or you are. I can find no evidence of your assertion.

  123. Fast Eddie says:

    Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo on port backups in California:

    “People say to me, will Christmas gifts be delivered? To which I say, call FedEx.”

    LMAO!!!! Not my yob!

  124. Juice Box says:

    Winning?

    You are betting that nothing will become something. Crypto does not exist in any real sense, it’s a human construct that is neither invincible or finite.

    Right now our politicians are failing us for many reasons, at least the Chinese and others have come to their senses.

    Buy fu*ck*ing farmland like bill gates already..

  125. Grim says:

    Grew up knowing truckers, still do.

    https://www.smart-trucking.com/independent-trucker/

    In all my 40 years of trucking, I found working as an independent trucker under my own authority was certainly the most profitable work that I ever did.

  126. Fabius Maximus says:

    Yes Gary, context is everything.

    “There are backups. And as I said, this isn’t something that can be fixed overnight. But the important thing is, you know, fundamentally, supply chains and logistics are run by the private sector. People say to me, will Christmas gifts be delivered? To which I say, call FedEx. You know that- that isn’t what the government does. “

  127. leftwing says:

    Ex, nice.

    I never intersected with the Dead growing up, various reasons….my oldest introduced me way too late in life. Hope these guys hold it together for a 2022 tour….caught two shows this summer and would do more next year.

  128. Fabius Maximus says:

    Again Grim context. The next line in your quote.

    “The money was really good back then. There were no load brokers involved. No middlemen to take a cut.”

    Here is a good article detailing some other issues.
    https://www.forbes.com/sites/pamdanziger/2021/10/15/unclogging-the-ports-will-not-fix–the-supply-chains-even-bigger-trucking-crisis/

  129. joyce says:

    It’s not his job. You want more government in the economy and in your life?

    Fast Eddie says:
    November 1, 2021 at 9:48 pm
    Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo on port backups in California:

    “People say to me, will Christmas gifts be delivered? To which I say, call FedEx.”

    LMAO!!!! Not my yob!

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