April foreclosures and delinquencies show continued improvement

From HousingWire:

April foreclosure inventory down about 25% from last year

Foreclosure inventory continues to decline, decreasing 23.4% annually in April, while completed foreclosures declined by 15.8% annually, according to the April 2016 National Foreclosure Report released by CoreLogic, a property information, analytics and data-enabled services provider.

Completed foreclosures averaged 37,000 nationally, down from 43,000 in April 2015. This is down 68.9% from its peak of 117,813 in September 2010.

Whereas foreclosure inventory represents the number of homes at some point in the foreclosure process, completed foreclosures are the homes lost to foreclosure.

“The number of homeowners who have negative equity has fallen by two-thirds since its 2010 peak, and the number of borrowers in foreclosure proceedings has also continued to drop,” CoreLogic President and CEO Anand Nallathambi said.

“Despite this progress, about four million homeowners remained underwater at the end of the first quarter, and these borrowers are more vulnerable to foreclosure proceedings if they should fall delinquent,” Nallathambi said.

That said, rising home prices caused 268,000 homeowners to regain equity in the first quarter of 2016, pushing the total number of mortgaged residential properties with equity to 92%, according to data from CoreLogic.

Last month, the number of homes in some stage of foreclosure and the number of seriously delinquent mortgages were at levels not seen since late 2007, according to the March 2016 National Foreclosure Report from CoreLogic.

April continued the trend and hit yet another low not seen since 2007, when foreclosures averaged 21,000.

In April, total homes in the national foreclosure inventory included about 406,000 homes, about 1.1% of homes with a mortgage. This is down from April 2015’s 530,000 homes, or 1.4% of all homes with a mortgage.

This entry was posted in Foreclosures, Housing Recovery, National Real Estate. Bookmark the permalink.

60 Responses to April foreclosures and delinquencies show continued improvement

  1. grim says:

    From CoreLogic:

    New Jersey
    Foreclosure Inventory Rate 3.7%
    YOY Change -27.6%
    Completed Foreclosures 13,522
    Serious Delinquency Rate 6.9%
    YOY Change -21.4%

    New York-Jersey City-White Plains, NY-NJ
    Foreclosure Inventory Rate 3.1%
    YOY Change -23.5%
    Completed Foreclosures 7,108
    Serious Delinquency Rate 5.6%
    YOY Change -19.8%

  2. grim says:

    The following states had a higher total number of foreclosures than NJ in April

    Florida – 66,071
    Michigan – 46,746
    Texas 26,859
    California – 22,889
    Georgia – 22,095
    Ohio – 23,017
    Pennsylvania – 18,616
    North Carolina – 15,639
    Tennessee – 13,870
    New York – 13,715

  3. grim says:

    Pretty sure Disney is going to unleash thermonuclear destruction on the lake.

    Saw alligators from the walkway between Animal Kingdom Lodge and Kidani Village last year. When I was down near Downtown Disney for a conference earlier this year, the walkway from Downtown to the hotel had signs clearly indicating that feeding alligators was strictly prohibited (not a Disney hotel).

    Surprised it was at Grand Floridian – anyone that’s been around there knows it’s a pretty busy area. I would for sure have thought that little beach by Wilderness Lodge would have been the place.

    Going back in December, staying next door at the Polynesian.

  4. Juice Box says:

    I always thought it was a bad idea to have those artificial beaches on the Disney lakes. Sure no swimming sigins everywhere but no alligator warning either.I could have sworm years ago I saw a pair of eyes at the wayerline reflecting in the dark one night.

  5. Juice Box says:

    Ugh, mobile typing…..

  6. Amerigeddon says:

    grim (4)-

    Take an AR-15 with you to Disney. Just because.

  7. Amerigeddon says:

    When did all the edge-of-the-world types move from CA to FL?

  8. GOP's broken (the good one) says:

    we usually book a couple of suites at 4seasons or Waldorf – same price as Floridian etal

  9. chi says:

    To save on taxes………

    Amerigeddon says:
    June 15, 2016 at 7:35 am
    When did all the edge-of-the-world types move from CA to FL?

  10. Comrade Nom Deplume. Citizen, 2nd Class. says:

    [9] twitiot

    “we usually book a couple of suites at 4seasons or Waldorf – same price as Floridian etal”

    Hahahaha, that’s funny. Probably your funniest yet. Four Seasons, good one.

    You a funny guy. Now get me my latte.

  11. Ottoman says:

    Bet the alligator was facing Mecca during the attack.

  12. walking bye says:

    France alerted to Syrian fighters expected to land on shores shortly. A small army of extremists has left Syria and is expected in France in the coming days.

  13. D-FENS says:

    Classy

    Ottoman says:
    June 15, 2016 at 8:21 am
    Bet the alligator was facing Mecca during the attack.

  14. GOP's broken (the good one) says:

    send Disneys alligators to French shores to contain the invasion

    walking bye says:
    June 15, 2016 at 8:40 am
    France alerted to Syrian fighters expected to land on shores shortly. A small army of extremists has left Syria and is expected in France in the coming days.

  15. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Man, what kind of idiot lets their 2 year old kid go play in a body of water in Florida? Are you insane?

  16. The Great Pumpkin says:

    16- It’s almost as idiotic as letting terrorists into your country on the basis of equality.

  17. Fast Eddie says:

    Bet the alligator was facing Mecca during the attack.

    LOL! Otto made me laugh!

  18. grim says:

    Clearly we need to reconsider the existing laws regulating alligators, which are clearly not strict enough to prevent senseless murder of Americans.

    Alligators Kill.

    Perhaps it’s time for an open discussion on alligators. Only open dialogue can fix this issue.

  19. Essex says:

    I am confining my search to homes directly beneath high tension power lines.

  20. grim says:

    There is no reasonable purpose for a 7 foot alligator other than to kill things and murder people.

    We need t regulate alligator sizing once and for all.

  21. GOP's broken (the good one) says:

    isn’t that what the Donald said about Muslims

    grim says:
    June 15, 2016 at 9:22 am
    There is no reasonable purpose for a 7 foot alligator other than to kill things and murder people.

    We need t regulate alligator sizing once and for all.

  22. grim says:

    Touche.

    They do make good basketball players though.

  23. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “It goes by many names: the “sharing economy,” the “gig economy,” the “on-demand economy.” Arun Sundararajan, a professor at New York University’s Stern School of Business who has been studying the phenomenon for several years, favors “crowd-based capitalism.” But he compromised for the book he’s just written, titling it “The Sharing Economy: The End of Employment and the Rise of Crowd-Based Capitalism.”

    In the book, Sundararajan argues that online platforms that make it easy for individuals to sell products and services to others are ushering in a new kind of capitalism. I interviewed him over lunch early this month. What follows is an edited and much-abridged account of our conversation. ”

    http://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles/2016-06-15/secrets-of-the-sharing-economy-in-the-age-of-uber

  24. Comrade Nom Deplume. Citizen, 2nd Class. says:

    [25] pumps

    A pointless stat. It’s as large as the US and Europe combined, and is spending on infrastructure it needs but hadn’t built.

  25. Comrade Nom Deplume. Citizen, 2nd Class. says:

    This Vox piece pretty much sums up where the left is:

    “Large-scale conf1sc@tion is not going to happen. That’s no reason to stop advocating it. (I also want to repeal all immigration laws and give everyone a monthly check from the government with no strings attached, and will argue for those ideas even though they’re not politically viable.)”

    Obama, Hillary and the left say “we aren’t coming for your guns”. What they conveniently leave off is “…but we would if we could.”

  26. D-FENS says:

    https://twitter.com/ABCPolitics/status/742809306454589440?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

    ABC News PoliticsVerified account
    ‏@ABCPolitics
    WATCH: @POTUS: “I may be a little grayer than I was eight years ago, but this is what a feminist looks like”

  27. GOP's broken (the good one) says:

    @Clairlemon

    Simply incredible.

    There is a law in the U.S. that bans federal research on gun violence

  28. Xolepa says:

    long time no post, hehe…..

    Concerning that gator in Florida..I stayed in the 90’s at the Polynesian, which is on the same lagoon (if I remember correctly) as the Floridian. Was with all my kids, then aging from 4 to 11. Never was it mentioned once about Wallygator and his bad habits hanging out in Disney.

    Fast forward to 2010, found a retirement community in SW Florida to build a home. Had a choice in one community between a ‘lake’ lot or one backing to woods and the 7th hole. Those ‘lakes’ are actually ponds. It was stated that any gator less than 4 feet cannot be touched or moved out from those ponds. Florida law. Thinking of future grandchildren at that time, I chose the lot next to the golf course.

    BTW, that grandchild dream is now reality, being a Grandpappy since late January. Funny thing, the day after becoming a grandpa, the fellows at work called me to a ‘business’ meeting the very next day. They gave me walking papers. I didn’t give a you know what. They paid me a generous severance and still subsidize my Cobra. All the 13 years I was at that place they did not send me once to ANY class. They kept hiring enough Asian Indians to finally get them to a combined level of my expertise (at an average of 11,000 USD). Now the sole legacy left in the HRIT dept IS being sent to class to learn what I was doing. I know in the back of mind that the whole department, including the first few levels of mid-managment are going to be let go within the next few years as the company leverages a ‘cloud’ solution. Think Workday.

    Little did they know, that the past 10 years I have had an automotive service type business with several employees. Kept it secret, for the most part. Went to work at my place f/t and increased sales 40% from the getgo. I arrive around 11:30 and leave 5-6 in the evening. No stress and much happiness. Will be around here for a couple years, sell everything I have and get the hell out of Dodge.

  29. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Agreed, but there is no denying that we need to start reinvesting in infrastructure here in the U.S. The time has come.

    Comrade Nom Deplume. Citizen, 2nd Class. says:
    June 15, 2016 at 11:52 am
    [25] pumps

    A pointless stat. It’s as large as the US and Europe combined, and is spending on infrastructure it needs but hadn’t built.

  30. The Great Pumpkin says:

    26- You would think they would hire some more people instead of giving away all the money to a few. After all, we do need job creation. You have to love human nature. Greed is a sickness.

    “Nearly 170 Port Authority employees — mostly police officers and maintenance supervisors – earned more than $75,000 each in overtime last year, according to the agency’s payroll. The top 25 on the list each earned more than $110,000 in overtime on top of their regular salaries.”

  31. nwnj3 says:

    #31

    Sorry to hear, it’s sad what H1Bs have done to the IT career fields. They’ve transformed everyone to disposable employees.

    It’s no wonder code camps have sprung up, for anyone going for a 4 year degree, programming, etc. are a tough sell. Who in their right mind(and options) would pin their career aspirations on a skill with a shelf life of 2-3 years?

  32. chicagofinance says:

    I don’t know how many of you remember Cindy who used to post here years ago…..clot scared her off…..anyway she seems to have just had a massive heart attack…..I was told she will recover, but it is rather shocking considering her dedication to fitness……

  33. The Great Pumpkin says:

    “Mindset to Avoid Florida Alligator Attacks

    Here is my Number 1 Rule to avoid a gator attack: I do NOT get near freshwater lakes or canals in the state of Florida. Pretty simple, huh? I swim in the Gulf everyday, and I really do not think about a shark attack…but whenever I get near freshwater, my gator antennae goes all the way to the top.

    I assume EVERY freshwater Florida lake and canal is a home for gators. It doesn’t matter if it is in the middle of downtown, or in the outlying suburban areas. Just know two things: Alliators live in freshwater…and they travel.”

    http://www.florida-beach-lifestyle.com/florida-alligator-attacks.html

  34. Xolepa says:

    J3, they were not H1. They are Indians in their own country. This company was a true multinational. They have sales staff in over 60 countries and all continents. Manufacturing facilities all over the world.

  35. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Congrats on becoming a Grandfather.

    Disgusting what they are doing to the workforce. You are lucky you weren’t born 15 years earlier. It’s evil to import foreigners to take “high skilled” jobs. A fuc!ing sin. How do you trust politicians and corporate leaders when they are pulling moves like this in the name of more profit. More profit for a few people at the expense of many, and our society suffers for it. They should really be hanged for treason.

    “BTW, that grandchild dream is now reality, being a Grandpappy since late January. Funny thing, the day after becoming a grandpa, the fellows at work called me to a ‘business’ meeting the very next day. They gave me walking papers. I didn’t give a you know what. They paid me a generous severance and still subsidize my Cobra. All the 13 years I was at that place they did not send me once to ANY class. They kept hiring enough Asian Indians to finally get them to a combined level of my expertise (at an average of 11,000 USD). Now the sole legacy left in the HRIT dept IS being sent to class to learn what I was doing. I know in the back of mind that the whole department, including the first few levels of mid-managment are going to be let go within the next few years as the company leverages a ‘cloud’ solution. Think Workday.”

  36. Xolepa says:

    I’ve seen the influx of foreign ‘recruited’ talent since the early 80’s. First, it was Englishman, next came Russians and Ukes. Followed by the Asians, this time in mass.

    I’m over it.

  37. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Didn’t see this before my post, but still feel the same way about these scum bags. Multinationals are a parasite on whatever country they invade. They are no different than the “British East India Company” from the past.

    Xolepa says:
    June 15, 2016 at 1:51 pm
    J3, they were not H1. They are Indians in their own country. This company was a true multinational. They have sales staff in over 60 countries and all continents. Manufacturing facilities all over the world.

  38. The Great Pumpkin says:

    41- Read the third paragraph. Our country was founded on trying to limit the power of corporations. Their power was limited in our country until the barons of the guilded ages granted limitless power to these parasites again.

    “Partners or Parasites?

    An important milestone in the history of corporations was passed in 1600, when Queen Elizabeth of England granted a charter to the East India Company. The new company enjoyed the relatively new privilege of limited liability: investors would be liable only for the amount they invested in the company, even if total debts exceeded total investments. Lim­ited liability attracted much greater investment, which was the goal as England strove to create the means to establish colo­nies and extract wealth from the New World.

    Led by the Dutch and Brit­ish East India companies, corporations gained significant power to shape world trade and transport, the governance of colonies, and even the creation of new laws to benefit their interests-one reason Thomas Hobbes likened them to parasitic worms in the bowels of the body politic in his 1651 political treatise Leviathan.

    By 1776, however, one host population was ready to purge its system of parasites. A series of laws, including the Townshend Acts and the Tea Act of 1773-which essentially granted the East India Company a tax-free tea monopoly in the American colonies-helped incite the colonists to revolt against England and form a new republic in which the role of corporations was significantly constrained. In the newly minted United States, state legislatures imposed tight limits on corporations’ purposes, the amount of capital they could procure, even how long they could exist. As corporate law expert Robert Hinkley observes, “These restrictions ensured that there was very little corporate abuse of the public interest in this country from the American Revolution to around the time of the Civil War.”

    But over time this civic leash on the U.S. corporate system began to loosen. The birth of new industries, such as the railroads, demonstrated how important the corporation was in mobilizing the huge amounts of capital and labor such endeavors needed. Corporate influence was further strengthened during the U.S. Civil War, when the Union government leaned heavily on private industry to produce war materiel. Together, these established corporations as an increasingly influential, even essential, part of the economic and political landscape.

    In order to attract these increasingly wealthy corporations (and secure the tax revenues they generated), states made their incorporation laws more lenient. New Jersey was one of the first to act, by removing limits on capi­talization and allowing corporations to own stock in other companies. A race to the bottom ensued, in which other states weak­ened their laws even further. By 1899 Delaware’s General Corporation Law had made it the most attractive state in which to incorporate by removing many of the remaining limitations on corporations, including the clauses that limited the lifespans and purposes of corporations. Other states (and countries) eventually adopted similar laws, solidifying corporate privilege throughout the United States and the world. And while on occasion the American host population once again rebelled against corporate abuses-Theodore Roosevelt and the trustbusters, and Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal, for instance-corporate power is now stronger than ever.”

    http://www.worldwatch.org/node/575

  39. D-FENS says:

    https://twitter.com/Nero/status/743143759936905216

    Wow…check the replies on his tweets. For those that don’t know…Milo is a gay conservative and editor at Breitbart. He’s getting absolutely bombarded by muslims on twitter.

  40. The Great Pumpkin says:

    42- Last paragraph explains how NJ started the race to the bottom with corporations. It spread to the rest of the states in a race to let the corporations do whatever they wanted in the hopes that the lack of laws would attract them. It really is a cruel joke. people want to be taken advantage of I guess.

  41. The Great Pumpkin says:

    42-
    Look in the second paragraph, people love to blame govt for regulation. Guess who enacted all that regulation so that small businesses can’t compete? So when you are pissed at the govt, you are really pissed off at corporations.

    “According to a 2004 report released by U.S. Representative George Miller, one 200-employee Wal-Mart store may cost federal taxpayers $420,000 per year because of the need for federal aid (such as housing assistance, tax credits, and health insurance assistance) for Wal-Mart’s low-wage employees. Moreover, many corporations fill their labor needs offshore in order to exploit unorganized workers in low-cost and politically friendly countries. Over 40 million people now work in export-processing or “free trade” zones. These areas, often exempt from national legislation, allow manufacturers to demand long hours, pay lower wages, and ignore health and safety regulations.

    Corporations have achieved considerable freedom to act in ways that harm the host on which they depend. They have done so primarily by means of regulatory capture, the redesign of societal laws by vested interests for their preferential benefit. This is not new; corporations have always sought to influence lawmakers. TNCs’ current levels of power, money, and freedom are unprecedented, however, and regulatory capture has become widespread. The results can be seen in the scores of laws and court rulings that now protect corporations’ right to profit, right to pollute, right to patent intellectual property-at the expense of citizens, farmers, workers, consumers, communities, and indigenous peoples. As U.S. President Rutherford B. Hayes once remarked, “This is a government of the people, by the people, and for the people no longer. It is a government of corporations, by corporations, and for corporations.” That was in 1884; it’s truer now than ever.

    Parasite hosts are generally helpless to alter the destructive behavior of the parasites that have invaded their systems-a limitation that is often fatal. Humans, in contrast, can regain control and shape the role of the corporation to benefit the host rather than destroy it.”

  42. Hillary's Cankles are ground zero for Zika virus says:

    An alligator attack on humans in the US about 4 times per year since 1950 and I think there have only been 17 fatalities. I think one person per year dies from sharks worldwide, though the number of missing limbs is a bit higher. Yet, 51 people in the US die from lightning strikes every year. It’s always amazing to me how people ignore the statistics whenever there is an unusual death. Then again, about 70% of the population plays the lottery at least once per year. Sadly, they are much more likely to die from a lightning strike than to win.

  43. joyce says:

    Officers may have shot Orlando club patrons
    http://www.9news.com/news/nation-now/officers-may-have-shot-orlando-club-patrons/243700653

    Monday, Orlando Police Chief John Mina and other law enforcement officers offered new details about the shooting, including the possibility that some victims may have been killed by officers trying to save them.

  44. Florida is the ultimate trough state. It is where people end up, rather than where they move to. It’s the last stop for the low level criminal/addict types, because having priors in Florida is about the same ratio of the state population as those having attended a protestant church in Alabama. I would love to know the stats on those who have lived in these states in this order (other states in between are fine): CA – NV – FL (never to leave again).

    When did all the edge-of-the-world types move from CA to FL?

  45. OTOH, I have an acquaintance that is probably like a lot of the better people here, just another HENRY from NJ (and DEVOUT Jets Fan). His kids were just out of HS and off to college so he and his wife decided to sell their home in NJ home and move to one of these big planned communities close to the ocean in South Florida. He’s a corporate accountant. Bought a big home, so the kids could come home whenever they wanted, etc. They lasted exactly one year. Sold the Florida home and moved back to NJ, buying another ~$500K home in Hillsborough and is loving it more than he ever did before.

  46. joyce says:

    “The central bank, led by Chair Janet Yellen, decided not to raise interest rates Wednesday at the end of its two-day meeting.”

    economy must be rolling

  47. Essex says:

    50. generous homestead laws. buy Florida real estate, defraud everyone, go bankrupt…keep your house under Florida law.

  48. Stock market crash between now and November favors…Trump or Clinton? My guess is Trump. So no stock market crash this Summer.

  49. I can’t believe this doesn’t have 4 million views yet:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AU5-OoU8H6s

  50. A Home Buyer says:

    (This post is by no means a critique on the police force, and next day quarterbacking is all too easy in tense situations like this where literally… seconds actually do matter. Just an idiot’s view on the details released for far.)

    48- Joyce,
    The story here being told here is missing some details in the timeline. We know around 49 people were fatally wounded, another 53 seriously wounded. This particular rifle has a 30 round capacity, but regardless of the type of firearm used: accuracy levels tend to drop off quickly in dimly light situations, as distance increases, and when adrenaline starts pumping. A highly practiced individual may be able to adjust for this, however the report indicates he only purchased these a week prior. I discount that he was well versed or practiced for these conditions.

    As the time line goes, around 2AM the shooter appears and begins firing. Assuming he inflicted all or a majority of the casualties at this point, we are looking at multiple magazine changes. No reliable reports on the number of rounds fired, but he is quickly confronted by an off duty officer / security individual and the shooter retreats into a secured location taking hostages.

    The police arrive and treat the situation (rightfully so based on the information they had) as a hostage situation and delay action. Assuming the shooter did inflict the causalities upfront, the delay to gather information and open dialogue with the shooter (while appropriate) may have resulted in the high fatality count of the hostages. The 5.56 rounds are designed to fragment (not penetrate) upon collision and cause internal bleeding. The three hours they lay waiting on the club floor without any type of medical intervention would have most likely killed the severely wounded.

    Where things become grey for me is the breach.

    The decision is finally made to breach the perimeter, extract hostages, and take down the shooter. They prepare a device on the exterior wall to start the breach, which fails. They then use a mechanized ram to break through the wall. These are not things you just have readily available or in any position to be mobilized so the ram must have been a contingency plan in-case the device failed. It would have been mobilized immediately upon its failure otherwise you would have escalated the hostage situation and still not have an entrance into the building.

    The first priority (again, only an idiot’s perspective) would be to capture and defend the newly created portal as this ultimately decides where the hostage situation goes. If the shooter captures the portal, the breach fails and the hostages return to shooter control causing the situation to escalate. Police used use flash bangs so this somewhat matches the idea that they approached with the vehicle as their shield. (Assumptions being they were not remotely in cover using projectile launchers to reach the club).

    Since the shooter managed to get to portal, and exit from it, either the police did not try and secure the opening (if so probably for legitimate procedural reasons) or they failed to hold the portal and the shooter pushed them back. (only an idiots guess), but I would think they would have attempted to defend the portal because otherwise the hostages would not know the explosion and wall crumbling was a safe exit. Someone would need to be there direct and protect the hostages as they made their way to safety.

    The battle with the police could have possibly started inside the club where hostages were exposed between the two opposing forces. We know the shooter managed to exit the club through this portal, most likely with hostages around or near him, it is also likely they were in danger from cross fire as they exited as well.

    If either case did not happen, then police should have no issue saying they did not hit any of the hostages. For instance, if the police did not fire until the shooter exited, and the shooter was in fact by himself at this time, it should be clear the police did not strike anyone but the shooter. But if you look at the wall by the portal, many rounds were fired into opening, meaning the shooter must have secured and confronted police from that position. The report also says the “complex layout” of the club which may indicate the opening made probably exposed a large portion of the interior to cross fire.

    To reiterate, I am not saying the police did anything wrong. Its just in this case the decisions and actions undertaken may have consequences and they may be playing out.

  51. Jesus, Mary, and Joseph. My 8th grader was just telling me how someone broke down into tears because a teacher told him/her (I forget which) that they had to do their homework. I told my daughter, “Wah, wah, wah, I need my safe space!” and she replied, “This would be a good time to exit”, and walked out of the room. WTF?

  52. A Home Buyer says:

    56 – Appended

    As is the danger of extrapolating data before all the facts come in, more facts eventually do come in. This does clear up a lot of what happened, and basically makes me look exactly like what I cautioned I could be (an idiot). Still some unknowns, but the police and other rescue groups apparently handled this very well based on this report.

    http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/breakingnews/pacing-feet-rants-executions-inside-the-orlando-killers-rampage/ar-AAh5vcn?ocid=spartanntp

  53. Fabius Maximus says:

    Very short notice, I can’t make this, but I am sure there are a few here in the area can get an Uber over.

    https://www.eventbrite.com/e/morristown-whiskey-fest-2016-tickets-24407690058

  54. Amerigeddon says:

    England-Wales tomorrow. Bale & Co better do me and my ancestors proud.

    I’d sign off with some Welsh saying, but I can’t speak a word of that fcuking degenerate language. Evidently, Bale and almost everyone on the team can speak it, which is amazing because it sounds like medieval English spoken with a mouth full of rocks.

Comments are closed.