Updated Vax Track

Updated Vaccination by Age Range for NJ:
5/13 vs 6/8

At Least 1 Dose
Total Pop: 9.2m 
Total 1st Doses: 5m – 54% of total pop (Up from 49%) – Bloomberg reporting 61.5%

12-15 – 450k population – 100k dosed – 22% 1 Dose (Up from 0%)
16-17 – 240k population – 100k dosed – 42% 1 Dose (Up from 19%)
18-29 – 1.5m population – 650k dosed – 43% 1 Dose (Up from 33%)
30-49 – 2.4m population – 1.45m dosed – 60% 1 Dose (Up from 50%)
50-64 – 2m population – 1.4m dosed – 70% 1 Dose (Up from 65%)
65-79 – 1.1m population – 1.0m dosed – 91% 1 Dose (Flat at 91%) 
80+ – 415k population – 320k dosed – 77% 1 Dose (Down from 87%) – Rounding issues?

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251 Responses to Updated Vax Track

  1. grim says:

    Hesitancy continues to decline at a somewhat regular pace.

    KFF survey has a nice illustration of this:

    https://www.kff.org/coronavirus-covid-19/poll-finding/kff-covid-19-vaccine-monitor-april-2021/

    Probably not fast enough to meet Biden’s July 4th goal though, that seems entirely out of reach at this point.

  2. grim says:

    You embrace remote work platform because you think workers can take advantage of cheaper locations. You then ignore the fact that “cheaper locations” in the world will appeal to business owners who will offshore white collar jobs under the remote platform. If the worker already did it by moving to cheaper locations, what makes you think for a second businesses won’t do the same by taking advantage of cheap foreign markets?

    We hire quite a few disabled people and military spouses (who might frequently relocate) through WFH, it’s been incredibly beneficial for them, offering a quality of life that might have been impossible previously.

  3. aj says:

    cnn.com is down

  4. Juice Box says:

    Fastly cloud service is down, many sites use it.

  5. Phoenix says:

    But NJRER is up. Go Grim.

  6. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Fair enough….everything has their pro’s and con’s.

    I just think Americans being at the top of the food chain are the one’s that are going to lose big time under this platform. Our wages have no where to go but down under this platform. Why they would advocate for it for short term benefits is beyond me. Sure your life might be better for next 5 years, but when the next recession hits, don’t think for a second they won’t start acting on eliminating American jobs in favor of cheaper locations in the world. It’s inevitable.

    Are you going to continue paying 6 figures to someone in America when you have a platform being created that allows you to go to Eastern Europe and pay them 50k? Wait till Africa gets in the game. We are the one’s that are going to have our standard of living destroyed, and then 3b will finally get cheap housing in America because there are no high paying white collar jobs left.

    Just look what happened to the middle class who thought their union jobs were for life. They shipped them all. White collar is next. The writing is on the wall.

    grim says:
    June 8, 2021 at 6:23 am
    You embrace remote work platform because you think workers can take advantage of cheaper locations. You then ignore the fact that “cheaper locations” in the world will appeal to business owners who will offshore white collar jobs under the remote platform. If the worker already did it by moving to cheaper locations, what makes you think for a second businesses won’t do the same by taking advantage of cheap foreign markets?

    We hire quite a few disabled people and military spouses (who might frequently relocate) through WFH, it’s been incredibly beneficial for them, offering a quality of life that might have been impossible previously.

  7. Fast Eddie says:

    RIP Jim Fassel – for us Giants fans. He was a good guy and had the Eagles number. Only 71, sad to read.

  8. The Great Pumpkin says:

    If you add no value other than getting the job done and can live anywhere, you effectively globalized your position to a point where there is no employee or employer loyalty and there will always be someone out there that will be willing to do your job just as well as you can and for less money. Doesn’t sound like a smart move to become a commodity traded at the lowest cost.

  9. 3b says:

    Pumps New day , fresh day, stop it , WFH madness, obsession with my support of it. Putting words in my mouth, name calling. You are destroying this blog. The only thing to do if this continues is to not permit any WFH articles or discussions as they are upsetting to you. Censorship on WFH is that what you want?

  10. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Right now, fortunately, companies like Apple still want employees back in the office. There is a reason why companies want employees back. They are not getting the productivity results. So for now, we are okay, but if this WFH talk keeps going…people better be careful what they ask for.

  11. The Great Pumpkin says:

    I am done talking about WFH…your welcome.

  12. 3b says:

    Pumps: Good. Thank you.

  13. Juice Box says:

    FBI and DOJ and Pravda (NTY) and others reported a claim based upon the DOJ press conference they did something special to get the bitcoin sent from Colonial pipeline. The “hacker” entity “darkside” responsible for the ransomware attack on Colonial pipeline did not in fact have custody over their bitcoin. Instead, they were using a custodian for their wallet with servers in the United States.

    A simple warrant was used to seize the wallet and the encryption key from a US company. There is nothing special about what they did, it’s not new, and the Press as usual has hyped it all up again. Russia, Russia, Russia….

  14. Juice Box says:

    BTW – FBI is hiring for special agents with STEM backgrounds to investigate online cyber crimes etc. Job pays $60k starting.. LoL…..You are going to really need to find some real boy scouts to work for that pay.

  15. 3b says:

    Juice: The left will never criticize China, for multiple reasons. They never criticized Russia/old Soviet Union either always called for engagement. Now it’s just Russia ruled by right wing government so Ok to criticize.

  16. grim says:

    Lol, anybody worth their weight in IT security can demand $300k easy these days.

  17. Juice Box says:

    3B – Biden meets Putin in Geneva next week, lets see how it’s covered.

    If I remember correctly it was reported about a million times in the MSM after Trump met with Putin in Germany that the two of them had confidential conversations and that was simply not acceptable because they could have been talking about all kinds of election interference and their grand conspiracy to steal the election from Hillary bla bla bla. Again without any American Press witnesses at all times it was some kind of travesty against freedom of the press and had to be Putin/Trump collisional conspiracy against the USA to sell Trump branded condos around the world or something.

    Let see how they paint the picture this time.

  18. 3b says:

    Juice: Agreed, hypocrisy of the left again if it plays out that way again. I think Putin is going to wipe the floor with Biden. He knows Biden is week and the country weak and divided.

  19. Juice Box says:

    S the wallstreetbets apes have taken some heavy hitters out to the wood shed again this time with a CLOV short squeeze…..

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/jonathanponciano/2021/06/07/reddit-trading-frenzy-makes-spac-king-chamath-palihapitiya-a-billionaire-again/?sh=1594e19d10f4

  20. Heya i’m for the first time here. I found this board and I find It really
    useful & it helped me out much. I hope to give something
    back and aid others like you helped me.

  21. The Great Pumpkin says:

    It’s time to realize the game has changed and adjust. The stock market has changed due to social media. Information and collaboration never before seen at such a massive scale.

    Juice Box says:
    June 8, 2021 at 9:36 am
    S the wallstreetbets apes have taken some heavy hitters out to the wood shed again this time with a CLOV short squeeze…..

  22. Bystander says:

    Biden is the weak one..sure. The left is not strong. A little walk down recent memory lane where a sitting president threw FBI and our intelligence agencies under bus. But they are the ‘deep state’ so it was ok. Red hat Q idiots will do anything to blow the Orange clown. Just a few responses from right…fyi

    At a news conference after the summit, President Trump was asked if he believed his own intelligence agencies or the Russian president when it came to the allegations of meddling in the elections.

    “President Putin says it’s not Russia. I don’t see any reason why it would be,” he replied.

    In a strongly-worded statement, US House Speaker Paul Ryan said Mr Trump “must appreciate that Russia is not our ally”.

    “There is no moral equivalence between the United States and Russia, which remains hostile to our most basic values and ideals,” he said, adding that there was “no question” Moscow had interfered in the 2016 election.

    Senior Republican Senator John McCain said it was a “disgraceful performance” by a US president.

    “No prior president has ever abased himself more abjectly before a tyrant,” Mr McCain said in a statement.

    Another senior Republican, Senator Lindsey Graham, who is a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, tweeted that it was a “missed opportunity… to firmly hold Russia accountable for 2016 meddling”.

    Sen. Bob Corker, the Tennessee Republican who chairs the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, said: “Putin only understands strength and I did not think this was a good moment for our country.

    “They definitely interfered in our election,” Corker continued. “That’s not debatable.

    I’ve said a number of times and I’ll say it again. The Russians are not our friends and I entirely believe the assessment of our intelligence community,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said in a statement, according to his office.

    Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, normally a staunch Trump supporter, tweeted: “President Trump must clarify his statements in Helsinki on our intelligence system and Putin. It is the most serious mistake of his presidency and must be corrected—-immediately.”

  23. Juice Box says:

    Pumps – There are laws against pump and dump. It used to be done like the movie “boiler room” with cold calls to investors. Difference is those were registered but sketchy brokers, but the Feds could trace them and shut them down.

    Now it’s all internet hype and has been for 25+ years. Before it was Bulletin Boards, AOL Chat rooms, Yahoo Groups and other smaller stock board players. Now it’s Reddit, they have amassed 10 million kids for pump and dump schemes on their forums.

    The law has not caught up but it is still illegal to make false statements about a company to pump a stock price. I have watched several of these stocks see-saw before erasing gains, none are buy and hold. It’s all gambling…know your risk.

    Again the advantage that is won by one of two sides is lost by the other. Stock Market is a zero sum game and the game will be over if there is a loss in investor confidence to take the other side of a it if people feel it’s being manipulated with false information or outright lies.

  24. Phoenix says:

    “it is still illegal to make false statements about a company to pump a stock price.”

    It’s illegal to do lots of things. Getting someone to actually want to prosecute someone that doesn’t make them a hero, etc well that’s another story.

  25. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Juice,

    It’s not even false information. They deliberately target a stock to buy. There is no law against telling people to buy a stock and make it run. It’s a free market. It’s impossible to stop.

    Why do you think Cathie leans so much on social media network she developed? Why do you think she has analysts that don’t have the traditional background. She understands very well how the game is being played. Way ahead of the curve.

  26. Anon says:

    The media seems to be sensationalizing run of the mill phishing/ransomware operations by putting it under the more nefarious sounding (and harder to unpack) label of “cyber attacks”. And then using this as fodder against Russia.

    I can’t tell if this is intentional (i.e. to build up a storyline that deflects attention away from the emerging information questioning Chinas actions in covering up the origins of COVID) or simply out of journalistic ignorance/laziness. But it seems off.

    I really want a White House reporter to question Biden on what actions he feels should be taken if it is determined that China lied about the origins of the virus. The fact that the media isn’t relentlessly pursuing this story is troubling.

  27. The Great Pumpkin says:

    This is what happens with greed. Chasing short term money, not caring about the long term consequences on the economy. Boosting companies like AMC back from the dead.

  28. Phoenix says:

    This is what happens when you have a bunch of low-functioning geriatrics running the country with our secrets on laptops they barely know how to power-up.

  29. GetBackToWorkBunchOfLazyWebSurfersYeahIMeanYouTooPumpkin says:

    Both of you don’t know what you don’t know. I recommend more critical thinking skills even if it proves headache giving and painful as we are in an information over saturated world with a gigantic portion of it being a hall of mirrors.

    The GS scale is very broad with a lot of sub-classifications and exceptions. Yes, the base scale limits how much you can get paid to less then POTUS, but there are exceptions like for physicians; a portion is the maximun GS scale and another is special skill set compensation.

    More importantly, the deeper you go into the rabbit hole the more frequent use of one time only project driven corporate entities where people are assigned and employed thru with their special needs and compensation required to get the job done.

    Is well known public knowledge that the black budget is gigantic. And that government agencies of all stripes employee large swath of contractors. And GM has over 9000 corporate entities to operate world wide. And Trump has over 15000 corporate entities worldwide to run his tax cheating, money laundering, and Putin payment system Put 2 and 2 together.

    Juice Box says:
    June 8, 2021 at 8:55 am

    BTW – FBI is hiring for special agents with STEM backgrounds to investigate online cyber crimes etc. Job pays $60k starting.. LoL…..You are going to really need to find some real boy scouts to work for that pay.

    grim says:
    June 8, 2021 at 9:10 am

    Lol, anybody worth their weight in IT security can demand $300k easy these days.

  30. JCer says:

    Bystander Trump is a moron but that doesn’t mean anything about Biden, he is weak and it shows, he isn’t even a leader in his party. Obama was Putin’s b*tch(remember the red line….) so I expect the same from Biden. Trump at least gave lethal aid to Ukraine, Obama basically fellated Putin, the MSM narrative was BS.

  31. Anon says:

    Now apply this logic to remote working arrangements.

    Or are these people only changing the game and collaborating while in in centralized offices?

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    June 8, 2021 at 9:51 am
    It’s time to realize the game has changed and adjust. The stock market has changed due to social media. Information and collaboration never before seen at such a massive scale.

  32. JCer says:

    Pumps that is called pump and dump, still illegal. It is conspiracy to manipulate the price in a security. If a group of people are colluding on when to buy and sell it’s illegal, I’m sure there are plenty of falsehoods being spread in the reddit threads, people usually need some convincing it’s a good time to buy, I’m certain some “early movers” are profiting handily.

  33. Juice Box says:

    Pumps – read the posts they are loaded with false information. Some people posted they invested their life’s savings, their grandmother’s savings etc into this stock. That in itself is most likely false, and that kind of aggressive pumping is illegal.

    “Hey I am going all in aren’t you? What is the matter you aren’t man enough?”
    This is classic pumping of a stock. There are plenty of examples…and probably plenty of manipulated analysis.

    They will catch people the scammers the initial investors involved who “coordinated” in the scam who purchased at a low price will then sell at a high price after they hype it. It might take them a while but they will expose it.

  34. joyce says:

    Yes, unless it’s High Frequency Trading ;-)

    JCer says:
    June 8, 2021 at 10:38 am

    It is conspiracy to manipulate the price in a security.

  35. BidenIsTheGOAT says:

    Bystander

    Russia collusion was a hoax orchestrated by Obama, the dnc and corrupt intel people. It was the first “big lie”.

    Brennan McCabe strozk etc. should have been tried for treason.

  36. The Great Pumpkin says:

    No comment. In respect to 3b.

    Anon says:
    June 8, 2021 at 10:36 am
    Now apply this logic to remote working arrangements.

    Or are these people only changing the game and collaborating while in in centralized offices?

  37. Juice Box says:

    Joyce – Anything is allowed unless it’s expressly forbidden. The SEC has taken action against many companies where payment for order flow brokers rout orders to exchanges, possibly leading to HFT gains and inferior fills. Example would be Robinhood’s fine last year.

  38. The Great Pumpkin says:

    These traders have realized they can do what the big guys do, push the market around with their capital, if they work together. They have realized they are fish if they don’t work together to beat the big boys who have been moving the market to their favor for decades at the expense of the small retailer.

  39. Juice Box says:

    re: GetBackToWork

    Buddy of mine went to work for them back during the Podesta, DNC, Hillary email controversy. He left and came back quickly do to the sheer incompetence he felt existed. Look I am familiar with Booze Allen and the others with their massive contracts and spending, but reality is FBI and government has to go outside their wheelhouse to get what they need, whether it be unlocking a terrorists iPhone for a million dollars or catching criminals with a fake encrypted communications service.

    This ONE however was brilliant BTW. Operation Trojan Shield and the fake FBI app for encrypted communications.

    “Wellington, New Zealand — Authorities in Australia, New Zealand and Europe said Tuesday they’ve dealt a huge blow to organized crime after hundreds of criminals were tricked into using a messaging app that was being secretly run by the FBI. Police said criminal gangs thought the encrypted app called ANOM was safe from snooping when, in fact, authorities for months had been monitoring millions of messages about drug smuggling, money laundering and even planned killings.

    The app was part of a worldwide sting called operation Trojan Shield, which was led by the FBI and involved the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, the European Union police agency Europol and law enforcement agencies in more than a dozen countries.

    “The results are staggering,” FBI Assistant Director Calvin Shivers said Tuesday morning at Europol’s headquarters in The Netherlands.”

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/anom-app-messaging-fbi-trojan-shield/

  40. Juice Box says:

    Pumps – don’t get too sucked in. The markets are much bigger than a few pump and dump schemers can move.

    Right now they are pumping a few dozen stocks. It’s all out in the open to see. I would think once a judge signs off on subpoenas and warrants to gather the data and Reddit complies to collect and provide the data they will find out who is coordinating this possibly illegal activity. It takes time and resources but will happen.

    https://wsbtrackers.com/

  41. Phoenix says:

    “It takes time and resources but will happen.”

    And then a deal is made for profit and it all goes away.

    And no one goes to jail…

  42. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Juice,

    I don’t do it. I don’t short term trade. I’m just explaining what these “new” traders are doing.

  43. Juice Box says:

    Phoenix – Kamala really slipped she is not HAPPY.. ” And I haven’t been to Europe Harris snapped..” I gather she thought Joe was going to send her to Paris?

    You can bet after Obama sent him him down to South American like two dozen times Biden won’t be sending her to Paris or Brussels or anywhere nice to have fancy dinners and ostentatious displays of ceremonial grandeur.

  44. Fast Eddie says:

    Pumpkin,

    No classes today?

  45. Phoenix says:

    Eddie,
    you can contact me @ Czenz27 @yahoo.com if you want.

  46. Juice Box says:

    Pumps they aren’t doing anything new. I explained it all before, internet hype is nothing new just a new crop of get rich quick lemmings.

  47. Phoenix says:

    Juice,
    My guess is Kamala dreams every night that he stops exhaling CO2.

  48. Ez says:

    8:41

    *you’re

  49. The Great Pumpkin says:

    The level of sophistication has never been witnessed before. So much so, it caught the attention of media headlines and made big investors lose a lot of money.

    Juice Box says:
    June 8, 2021 at 11:42 am
    Pumps they aren’t doing anything new. I explained it all before, internet hype is nothing new just a new crop of get rich quick lemmings.

  50. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Thanks, Ez! Such a good guy helping me out.

    Ez says:
    June 8, 2021 at 11:56 am
    8:41

    *you’re

  51. Juice Box says:

    Phoenix – Biden is headed into a trouble next week he cannot send the VP to Europe anyway he had to take a few geritol and get to work.
    Trump left a mess with all of his Russian sanctions, Biden already caved on the pipeline the Germans need because they shut down all of their clean nuclear power,the Russians are threatening to take their oil off the Petroleum-Dollar on the exchanges and the drop out of the International Space station agreement, and the open skies treaty as well as perhaps some nuclear and ballistic missile treaties as well. All this because Trump was tough on Russia. What a mess Joe to the rescue!!!

  52. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Still angry that your wife is getting taken advantage of by Catholic schools? I get it. Those rich parents private school parents wouldn’t have it any other way, just like their businesses.

    Fast Eddie says:
    June 8, 2021 at 11:36 am
    Pumpkin,

    No classes today?

  53. 3b says:

    I have heard Harris speak a few times. Don’t find her impressive at all. At times she appears clueless.

  54. The Great Pumpkin says:

    How does one become VP having never gone to Europe?

  55. Juice Box says:

    Pumps – I just want to know why the WaPo isn’t calling Kamala a Nazi..for telling the Guatemalans they will be turned back if they come to the US Border illegally.

    https://twitter.com/lilmsgs1/status/1402298264368603137/photo/1

  56. The Great Pumpkin says:

    That’s sad. Can I pass you this cup of hypocrisy?

    Maybe it wasn’t trump making this country crazy, it was the media that was hell bent on getting him out

  57. The Great Pumpkin says:

    None of it matters. All the rich people will be on Mars some day. Writing is on the wall.

  58. JCer says:

    Joyce, crimes are based on how much money you have….there are different rules for the rich vs. the rest of us. Just because corporations get away with it doesn’t mean it’s legal!

  59. Juice Box says:

    Pumps: “writing is on what wall” Odds are a human team might visit Mars one day but actually stay?

    The maximum solar irradiance on Mars is about half that of the earth. Mars does not generate a geo-magnetic field on its own like the Earth does via it’s magnetic core, so little protection against solar winds and cosmic rays and no real atmosphere to speak of it’s 1/100 as dense as earth or equal to the air 22 mi above the Earth’s surface or 116,000 ft high. Airplanes unless they were rocket powered could ever operate there.

    The Martian surface is dry and usually subfreezing, probably presenting an insurmountable obstacle for living organisms microscopic, plant or otherwise. There is a nearly a dearth or water liquid or frozen in most areas of Mars. Again freezing most of the time average temperature is -81 degrees F with a huge range -284 F to about 80 F unlike found here on earth.

    Does not sound like a place you can live without a spacesuit or enclosed habitat. What would be the reason to live there other than to be an eccentric but rich hermit living mostly on canned air and food supplies that will run out eventually.

    We were designed to live here, unless we evolve into something else we will stay here forever and ever.

  60. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Imagine getting paid the money you do at Apple, and then complaining and becoming angry when they ask you to come into the office to work. How entitled are these people? Karen anyone?

    The best part. They think they know better than the most innovative company in the world. If apple wants you in the office, it’s probably for a reason. It’s not like Apple hasn’t compromised, but right, apple should listen to you. Wild.

  61. Fast Eddie says:

    Still angry that your wife is getting taken advantage of by Catholic schools? I get it. Those rich parents private school parents wouldn’t have it any other way, just like their businesses.

    Is that how you public sector parasites see it?

  62. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Juice,

    I truly believe science will overcome it. There is no way they would be throwing all this money at space if they thought it was for nothing.

  63. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Fast,

    Yes, she is being taken advantage of. Without you, she would not be able to survive with a so called “professional” job. That’s why most of the private school teachers are rich retirees or housewives. Guys like EZ or me fit the mold too. Guys with wives that get paid.

  64. Phoenix says:

    Imagine getting paid the money you do as a teacher, and then complaining and becoming angry when they ask you to come into the school to work. How entitled are these people? Karen anyone?

  65. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Amen. This is every profession now. The army of Karen’s grow by the day.

    Phoenix says:
    June 8, 2021 at 2:19 pm
    Imagine getting paid the money you do as a teacher, and then complaining and becoming angry when they ask you to come into the school to work. How entitled are these people? Karen anyone?

  66. Ez says:

    Actually there are jobs, especially teaching that will be hard-pressed to go remote.
    Otherwise for many corporations the WFH trend is a huge boon. Massive cost savings on expensive real estate overhead.

  67. The Great Pumpkin says:

    The True Costs of Working From Home
    Remote workers spend more on rent and housing costs than those who stay in the office — a gap that might add up to $15 billion or more if commuters don’t return.

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-02-26/why-remote-workers-spend-more-on-housing-and-rent

    The study authors anticipate a more modest shift to remote work post-pandemic, with 10% of previously in-office workers adopting a permanent home-office lifestyle. Such a transition, the study estimates, would translate into $15 billion in additional housing costs annually. That doesn’t count all the non-housing expenses that remote workers might rack up, for new equipment, no-longer-free snacks, desks and ergonomic gaming chairs, which the study did not include in their analysis.

    “Some of the offsetting costs might blunt some of the enthusiasm for remote work, when people see the prices in the suburbs — where they can actually get a house where remote work is feasible — have gone up by 20% year over year,” said Christopher Stanton, a Marvin Bower Associate Professor at Harvard Business School and the co-author of the study.

    The extra housing costs aren’t much of a hardship for the highest earners; as the chart below shows, it’s the remote workers on the lower end of the earning scale who are already spending a bigger share of their income on housing. “Anyone who has transitioned to remote work from a small apartment will tell you is that it’s not very pleasant,” Stanton said.

    Ez says:
    June 8, 2021 at 2:37 pm
    Actually there are jobs, especially teaching that will be hard-pressed to go remote.
    Otherwise for many corporations the WFH trend is a huge boon. Massive cost savings on expensive real estate overhead.

  68. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Though commercial rents are tumbling in many cities, it’s still too early to see how a long-term office abandonment might change this national landscape of compensation and housing cost. Offloading office space is harder for companies stuck in long-term leases, and even firms like Salesforce, which has been bullish on WFH, haven’t yet announced plans to leave their physical real estate behind. And so far, besides offering bonuses to offset home-office upgrades, employers do not appear to have shown much interest in raising salaries to reflect their lower office expenses. (Several tech companies are taking the opposite approach, announcing pay reductions for employees that choose to move to lower-cost cities.)

    One CEO who had decided to give up his company’s office space recently told Stanton that he planned to spend the savings on big staff retreats at lavish resorts.

    “I was like, yeah, OK,” Stanton said. He suggested that maybe morale would be better served by a home office fund.

  69. The Great Pumpkin says:

    It should be mandatory that everyone shows their taxes. What do you have to hide? It would help weed out a lot of tax cheats.

    “IRS Is Investigating Release of Tax Information of Wealthy Americans

    Tax­payer in­for­ma­tion is con­fi­den­tial, and there are po­ten­tial crim­i­nal penal­ties for IRS em­ploy­ees or oth­ers who re­lease such in­for­ma­tion. Mr. Ret­tig told law­mak­ers that there were in­ter­nal and ex­ter­nal in­ves­ti­ga­tions be­gin­ning, with po­ten­tial pros­e­cu­tions to fol­low.”

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/irs-is-investigating-release-of-tax-information-of-wealthy-americans-11623179470?st=hd66jos0rwuhzb5&reflink=article_copyURL_share

  70. Juice box says:

    School called masks now optional…

  71. Fast Eddie says:

    A record number of job openings and few willing to work. Too much government mascarpone being bandied about. The O’Biden supporters need to get off their @ss and get to work.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/markets/nobody-wants-work-job-openings-soar-all-time-high-93-million-record-numbers-quit-their-job

  72. The Great Pumpkin says:

    There’s hard core, and then there’s Elon Musk.

    Musk called an all-hands meeting at his SpaceX spacecraft factory in Boca Chica Beach, Texas — at 1 a.m. on Sunday, Feb. 23, according to a story published Thursday by Ars Technica.

    The billionaire SpaceX and Tesla boss is known for setting outlandish goals (and sometimes missing them). And in the wee hours of the Sunday, he wanted to know from his team why his factory wasn’t running 24-7 to build the Starship rocket system (which will eventually take crew and cargo to Mars).

    Musk’s engineering team explained they needed more people to take shifts. So over the next 48 hours, SpaceX hired 252 workers, doubling the workforce at that factory, Ars Technica reported.

    The vignette is telling about what it is like to work for Musk.

    SpaceX President Gwynne Shotwell joined the rocket company in 2002 as employee No. 7. A decade and a half later, she said she still loved working for Musk. But she also admitted it is intense.

  73. Fast Eddie says:

    And if the psycho f.ucking progressives come after Joe Manchin for thinking logically, he should switch parties and become a Republican. As it is, the left if going to get walloped in the 2022 midterms.

  74. BRT says:

    School called masks now optional…

    Every kid that is vaxed or recovered has been chin diapering it for the past 2 weeks.

  75. BRT says:

    I have heard Harris speak a few times. Don’t find her impressive at all. At times she appears clueless.

    She’s basically the left version of Sarah Palin.

  76. Ez says:

    4:13 Manchin can suck it.

  77. Ez says:

    Living in West Virginia stinks.
    That’s according the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index released late last month that seeks to test “Americans’ perceptions on topics such as physical and emotional health, healthy behaviors, work environment, social and community factors, financial security, and access to necessities such as food, shelter and health care to create a composite well-being rank for each state.” West Virginia ranked dead last in such categories (there are 55 of them) as “life evaluation”, “emotional health”, “physical health” and “healthy behaviors.” Interestingly, it ranked 14th in “work environment.”

    The bottom of the (state) barrel is unchanged from 2012 with West Virginia (50th), Kentucky (49th) and Mississippi (48th) bringing up the rear. The top of the chart has a new number one with North Dakota — and its booming oil economy — jumping all the way from 19th in 2012 to first in 2013. South Dakota moves from 12th to second happiest in 2013. Of the top ten happiest states, only one — Washington — is located on either of the nation’s two coasts. (The middle of the U.S. may be flyover country but people who live there seem to love it.)

  78. SmallGovConservative says:

    Ez says:
    June 8, 2021 at 4:28 pm
    “Manchin can suck it.”

    EZ thinks Manchin is bad for refusing to support the clearly unconstitutional attempt by the radical Dems to federalize (and effectively trash) election laws and rules. Again, if you ever wondered what kind of man wants to be governed by the likes of Pelosi, Harris and AOC, look no further than this guy.

  79. The Great Pumpkin says:

    A quick look through the data shows why it’s so hard to buy a home right now.

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-06-07/five-charts-that-show-how-the-u-s-ran-out-of-homes-for-sale

    Comment from the article worth sharing.

    “The WSJ wrote about the housing shortage in 1995 that was coming in 25 years. Exploding demographics of prime home buyers by age, another 10% of our population coming in as immigrants and the trend toward divorced couples both owning a home and the trend for govt. to add the cost of infrastructure into the fee’s were all pointing toward a drastic housing shortage around 2020. A perfect storm that builders were aware of, but could really do little because of the 2008 collapse in housing values.”

  80. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Got inventory? This is from a friend of mine that quit teaching and went into real estate.

    “HUGE Congratulations 🎉 to my awesome client and dear friend who just sold her lovely home at 186 Bogert Street in Totowa! We strategically priced this spectacular Cape Cod at $409,000. We had over 75 showings, received over 25 offers, and just CLOSED this afternoon. Sale Price: $460,000 !! I am so happy for this amazing Mom & Teacher and I am wishing her nothing but the best in her next chapter of life 💛 Congrats to the first-time buyer, and a special thanks to the buyer’s agent Danielle Mauriello, for her hard work and professionalism 🙌🏻

    It is an incredible time to list and sell your home. There is significant demand for most homes due to a lack of inventory – but that demand can change, and when it does change it will change quickly. The best time to get top dollar for your home may be today, rather than tomorrow. Please call me if you have any questions. I am more than happy to help. 😊”

  81. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Gotta love the realtor talk in the end…lmao.

  82. MissingLBJNowManchinWouldNeedLotsOfKYAndNoNotKentucky says:

    Actually if LBJ was around he would give him the “treatment”.

    Apart from the talking down with words that Putin’s b1tch can’t even comprehend or know they exist. LBJ would find out his financial backers and put a hold on any donation. Manchin would find himself getting the silent treatment from colleagues and anything important happening in West Virginia that needs the federal govt would STOP and people told call your Senator.

    In short if Manchin is a democrat he would act, but he looks like a republican wolf in democratic clothing. Manchin should just come out of the closet, democrats would lose the senate for a year, but is better than a stranger in your home.

    How do you guys think LBJ wall able to pass Civil Rights, Voters Rights, Medicare, Housing Rights, and all the other stuff with the southern dixiecr5ats intransigence. LBJ used to joke that he had and like to use his big johnson.

  83. chicagofinance says:

    How do you explain Abbott districts, and by association, your salary and benefits?

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    June 8, 2021 at 1:58 pm
    Juice,

    I truly believe science will overcome it. There is no way they would be throwing all this money at space if they thought it was for nothing.

  84. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Chi, I’ll play.

    So what’s your answer to solving education in areas of poverty? How do we reduce the cost? I honestly don’t know the answer, and if I did, it would make me 100’s of millions of dollars. Every school would come to me for consulting.

    If you can figure it out, you are on the road to riches.

  85. 3b says:

    So much for Pumps not talking about WFH, he only lasted a few hours. As for the article good God what a stretch on the authors part not surprised Pumps would link it.

  86. 3b says:

    And the best part is Pumps who thinks he knows better then the most innovative people at the most innovative company. Pumps believes he should be part of the discussion at Apple.

  87. The Great Pumpkin says:

    You are the one always demanding data and what not. You then go piss on it. And you call me crazy?! I’m really trying to be nice to you, but you make it so difficult.

    “But a new working paper distributed by the National Bureau of Economic Research looks at another, hidden cost: Employees who find themselves without an office tend to increase their own spending — on more room. Or, more rooms. About 0.3 to 0.4 more rooms, to be exact.”

    3b says:
    June 8, 2021 at 6:04 pm
    So much for Pumps not talking about WFH, he only lasted a few hours. As for the article good God what a stretch on the authors part not surprised Pumps would link it.

  88. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Wtf does acknowledging a well run company have to do with me personally. All I said was that Apple is the best company in the world and it knows best when it comes to innovation. Hence, why they have specific reasons for wanting to have employees in an office.

    You seriously are lost in the woods..

    3b says:
    June 8, 2021 at 6:08 pm
    And the best part is Pumps who thinks he knows better then the most innovative people at the most innovative company. Pumps believes he should be part of the discussion at Apple.

  89. The Great Pumpkin says:

    You are just like the Apple employees….You know better than the people guiding the trillion dollar ship. The hubris…

  90. chicagofinance says:

    92 posts and Pumpkin is 36 of them? WTF?

  91. chicagofinance says:

    School choice. Charter Schools. Disband the NJEA.

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    June 8, 2021 at 5:58 pm
    Chi, I’ll play.

    So what’s your answer to solving education in areas of poverty? How do we reduce the cost? I honestly don’t know the answer, and if I did, it would make me 100’s of millions of dollars. Every school would come to me for consulting.

    If you can figure it out, you are on the road to riches.

  92. 3b says:

    Pumps: You said you were not going to talk about WFH, and yet you found s back door into talking about it, so it was never your intent not to talk about it. If you had any critical thinking skills you would understand the employees are the ones that make a company innovative. This is a battle between management and employees. The only hubris is the likes of you thinking your opinion matters on this subject. You hate WFH because of your paranoia it will affect your lifestyle. The rest is BS on your part.

  93. leftwing says:

    “92 posts and Pumpkin is 36 of them? WTF?”

    I literally hit the end right before you posted this and went back and did the same thing….his drivel has been a quarter to a third of most recent days….five in a row…..reposting his own posts to comment on them…..

    Insufferable.

    You guys only have yourselves to blame.

  94. Fabius Maximus says:

    Small,

    “what kind of man wants to be governed by the likes of Pelosi, Harris and AOC”

    I don’t get why people like you are afraid of strong women. What’s the relevance beyond the fact they are women? Did you have Mommie Issues?

  95. 3b says:

    Left; You are right Left. And I am the biggest recidivist. I
    Say I won’t respond to him, and Ok for a while, and then he comes out guns blazing and I find myself. I need to redoubled my efforts.

  96. 3b says:

    Fab: I don’t have a problem being governed by strong women, as long as they are competent. I don’t find any of the 3 noted component at least in politics or any of the issues. That in my mind is the difference.

  97. leftwing says:

    Yeah, me too. He’s like a bad accident. You promise yourself you won’t slow down and look but you end up peeking to see just how ugly it really is….

    I’ve started counting again, I made it over a year last time….

    “17 days Pumpkin-free!”

  98. Ez says:

    6:34 CA has school choice. Where do they rank…?
    It won’t help. Trust me. I know. FWIW you know too.
    Your elite education was won at a huge cost and you might
    even wonder sometimes if it was all worth it. The truth is that everyone is not going to make that journey no matter how hard they try or “where” they try.

  99. Ez says:

    We are all wired too differently. Ask anyone who has been in the classroom long enough.
    These groups mesh and stability is one real asset to learning. New people, high turnover, really messes with the kids. But don’t kid yourself, teaching is Herculean sometimes. It needs and gets good people. Are they top thinkers? Some are. Not many.

  100. BRT says:

    I don’t get why people like you are afraid of strong women. What’s the relevance beyond the fact they are women? Did you have Mommie Issues?

    lol, you have a different definition of strong woman than I do. You want a good example of one, Tulsi Gabbard. High IQ, calm and collected, and brave enough to serve in the military.

  101. Fast Eddie says:

    BRT,

    I was also going to mention Tulsi Gabbard. Those other three mentioned above don’t even rank.

  102. JCer says:

    I wouldn’t describe Pelosi or AOC or Harris as “strong women”. No issues with women leaders but these 3 lack wisdom and seem rather uniformed and are basically 3 partisan politician in their roles for reasons other than competence. Harris was selected because she was a woman of color, AOC matched the demographics in a district which is a sure thing for a democrat politician and Pelosi is just so old she’s been there the longest. None of them are any kind of “leader” they are oppertunists. Honestly as bad as Palin was she looks like a prize compared to those three. Unions in general allow bad employees to remain employed to the detriment of the people they serve and their co-workers.

    Chi is dead right on school choice, in a failing district it is the only thing that works. Our friends raising their kids in jersey city go their kids into good charter schools and the schools are good where as the public schools are horrible. The big difference is they weed out the kids that are disruptive and there is accountability because if they aren’t doing a good job the parents pull the kids.

  103. SmallGovConservative says:

    Fabius Maximus says:
    June 8, 2021 at 6:52 pm

    “I don’t get why people like you are afraid of strong women.”

    Haha! Flab referring to Pelosi/Harris/AOC as strong women. You Dem apologists make this too easy. Let me guess, you also consider Hunter Biden a genius because Slow Joe says he’s the smartest person he knows. Thanks for the laugh.

  104. joyce says:

    N.J.’s revenue soars by an incredible $4 billion as key budget talks loom
    https://www.nj.com/politics/2021/06/njs-revenue-soars-by-an-incredible-4-billion-as-key-budget-talks-loom.html

    I love when they quote Sarlo in budget related articles. One of the best textbook examples of a conflict of interest… all good in Jersey though.

  105. chicagofinance says:

    Palin is AOC …. Harris is the most accomplished and intelligent, but her interpersonal skills, temperament, and moral compass are sorely lacking.

    Pelosi is a vacuous limousine liberal, but she is quite hard boiled. You cannot ascend to Speaker without gravitas.

    JCer says:
    June 8, 2021 at 8:46 pm
    I wouldn’t describe Pelosi or AOC or Harris as “strong women”. Honestly as bad as Palin was she looks like a prize compared to those three.

  106. Ez says:

    Pffffffft Tulsi Gabbard. F’in Loons

  107. Chicago says:

    Ex: for you. Only for the backing music throughout. I don’t care about the movie.

  108. Ez says:

    Niiiiiice.

  109. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Exactly what I said this morning.

    “Your Father’s Stock Market Is Never Coming Back
    Younger generations are reshaping the rules and conventions of investing. Older investors can’t afford to dismiss them.”

    https://apple.news/AuMgEsyj_QViCJE5-772JYA

  110. grim says:

    Think Murphy is going to be the first two term democrat in a long time.

  111. Juice Box says:

    More Fed caused dislocation. Worthless deposits earning 0.00 Percent interest expected to grow to a trillion dollars.

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-06-09/the-fed-is-paying-0-00-such-a-deal-depositors-are-flocking?srnd=premium

  112. Chicago says:

    Ex: today this; tomorrow FabMax comes knocking at your door in the Los Angeles version of this. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kristallnacht

    https://nypost.com/2021/06/09/middle-school-teacher-quits-union-over-its-pro-bds-stance/

  113. Chicago says:

    WTF is a schoolteacher doing up at 12:24AM?

    My wife can barely keep it together past 10PM most school nights.

  114. BRT says:

    Chi, I generally go to sleep at 12 am, wake up at 5 am. At this stage, 10pm-12 am is the only time I can actually do school work without distraction from the kids. Although, I hit age 40 this year and my body is screaming at me to go to bed at 11:30 these days. Between tutoring sessions, I park the car in a parking lot and go to sleep for 20 minutes at time.

  115. Bystander says:

    Blumpy ain’t BRT. Between 10PM-12AM, he is jerking it to Wayne Real Estate Monthly.

  116. BRT says:

    I’d suppose I’d have the energy too if I didn’t see a single student in person all year

  117. chicagofinance says:

    Once again the NY Times spins the facts and reports that cicadas are Republicans.
    https://www.npr.org/2021/06/09/1004648785/a-cicada-infested-engine-is-to-blame-for-bidens-press-corps-travel-delays

  118. Ez says:

    When I’m surrounded, I just can’t stop:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_jRuZauBoU

  119. Fast Eddie says:

    I enjoy my current job and doing well but since half my life seems to be on a laptop, I was wondering if anyone knows of any part time evening/weekend jobs that involve working remote? Something as casual as data entry, medical billing, etc.?

  120. 3b says:

    Fast: I assume you are kidding.

  121. Fast Eddie says:

    3b,

    Lol.. actually, I’m mulling it. Why not? I might as well utilize my time and make money. Shit, I was thinking about working in an Amazon warehouse for an evening and a Saturday. Bad idea on my part?

  122. Fast Eddie says:

    Let me add: I’ve been working since I was 15, non-stop, loading trucks, as a gas jockey, restaurant kitchens, heavy construction… I did it all. I have an insatiable work ethic, was never one for leisure. I was never a big vacation guy. My first trip out of the US was only a few years ago, to the Caribbean and had to be circled by friends and family to go. I like working I guess. On the weekends, I’m up at 6 AM and I start cleaning the house. Yeah, sounds dull and not much of a life but this seems to be how I’m wired.

  123. SmallGovConservative says:

    Fast Eddie says:
    June 9, 2021 at 11:01 am
    “…wondering if anyone knows of any part time evening/weekend jobs that involve working remote?”

    Give this a look — freelance software testing… https://www.utest.com/

    In a similar vein, I’m now bombarded with emails asking me to become a DoorDash driver? May be some money to be made there if you’re interested in delivering sacks of White Castle burgers on Saturday nights.

  124. Ez says:

    Time Vs Money

  125. What’s up colleagues, how is everything, and what you want to say regarding this post, in my
    view its genuinely remarkable in support of me.

  126. 3b says:

    Fast: Been working since 14, non-stop so I hear you. I
    Have no interest in adding additional work hours, I have different interests and love to travel. When I do retire would not mind working a few days a week, maybe in Costco or Trader Joe’s.,something non taxing, and the employees all look happy. Most of them get like 20 bucks an hour.

  127. Bystander says:

    Ed,

    Security guard on a floor at a 24 hour big office park, not ground floor reception. We have them at my building (I went there a month ago and still there). It was same kid from a year ago. He has a seat/wooden podium and sits on his phone watching videos all day. It looks like the safest, easiest paying job in world but could get boring if you want to use hands.

  128. 3b says:

    Bystander: I was thinking about that, but with WFH, won’t be as much need for security jobs!

  129. Fast Eddie says:

    I’m probably better off going back to my blue collar roots and doing something on a Saturday and Sunday morning, like a 6 AM to 12 noon gig. But thanks all for the input, gotta look into this one.

  130. MississippiEddieHalfBrother says:

    Eddie, Eddie,

    I got the perfect job for you. A well known person recommended your half brother from your pa’s side, he’s the oldest of the 5 with down’s syndrome, they would not hire him because they said he was too bright.

    Anyway its in Bedmister or Bedmaster or Bend0v3r, NJ. The job is spreading horse sh!t all over the place. It seems the owner has an incredible ability to generate tonnes of horse p00 on demand, and he’s a cheap bastard so they re-use all of the p00 in the golf field.

    Also, on the side you can make some extra dough, as a lot of the people there seem to like our Mississippi ho0ch and m3th.

  131. 3b says:

    Fast: No offense, but you are getting older, don’t you think you might want to do some done things in toy life, instead of working on your weekends??

  132. Fast Eddie says:

    3b,

    I’m still a number of years away from retiring, whatever that really means, so I might as well earn when I can. I think some physical work is better, it gets me away from a laptop. I also thought about a Trader Joes or Costco type gig, too. I’m probably going to be doing some form of work until I can’t work any longer or drop dead. lol.

  133. grim says:

    One of the reasons I built a distillery.

    There is something cathartic about hands-on work.

  134. Fast Eddie says:

    Yup. I’m doing chores on the weekend, I might as well make some money doing something.

  135. Glen says:

    grim at 4:22 – you are exactly right

  136. 3b says:

    Fast: Understand. I thought you were north of 50, which is still a ways to retirement, but not 40. Agree on hands on work! I love it!! Immigrant parents and in-laws, I learned a lot from my Dad and Father in Law. Would like to continue working too, just not the corporate America scene in retirement.

  137. Phoenix says:

    I do hands on work all day. Dealing with the personalities is harder than the work by a longshot.

  138. Fast Eddie says:

    3b,

    I am north of 50. Lol

  139. Phoenix says:

    It’s about time Kamala heads down to the border and does some hands-on work instead of squawking like an excoriated chicken.

    And luckily the FDA approved some of that Alzheimer’s medication, load a case on Air Force One and get it infused. America cannot hold out much longer.

    Good job State of NJ Repubs, you just put in a guy that will guarantee Murphy gets another term.

  140. 3b says:

    Fast: Ok, not north of 60 though!!

  141. SmallGovConservative says:

    Phoenix says:
    June 9, 2021 at 7:06 pm
    “Good job State of NJ Repubs, you just put in a guy that will guarantee Murphy gets another term.”

    Ciattarelli may or may not have been the best Rep candidate, but it’s irrelevant. The Dems could run Hunter Biden or Michael Avenatti and they’d win. Have there ever been more lopsided resumes than the 2018 NJ senate race — Hugin for the Reps (Princeton grad, Marine Corps, chairman of Celgene) vs corrupt and useless Menendez? Wasn’t even close as I recall.

  142. grim says:

    NJ don’t get jack…

  143. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Wasn’t going to post because you guys are a bunch of angry wankers, but the good guy I am, I will pass along the most valuable post of the day…3b, read this and understand this.

    “George Friedman, a geopolitical forecaster, summarized the nostalgia a few years ago:

    In the 1950s and 1960s, the median income allowed you to live with a single earner — normally the husband, with the wife typically working as a homemaker — and roughly three children. It permitted the purchase of modest tract housing, one late model car and an older one. It allowed a driving vacation somewhere and, with care, some savings as well. I know this because my family was lower-middle class, and this is how we lived, and I know many others in my generation who had the same background.

    There are two ways to debate a position: Asking whether it’s true and asking whether it’s contextually complete.

    This version of the 1950s lifestyle is true in the sense that the median American family indeed had three kids and a dog named Spot and a breadwinning husband who worked at the factory and so on.

    But the idea that the typical family was better off then than now – that they were more prosperous and more secure, by nearly any metric – is so easy to debunk.

    That doesn’t mean those yearning for the 1950s are necessarily wrong. It just shows that something else changed in the last 70 years that created a gap between what happened and how people feel about what happened.

    And that something else is not complex: America’s wealth grew but its expectations grew more.”

    http://www.collaborativefund.com/blog/goalpost/

  144. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Whether it’s savings or investing, getting the goalpost to stop moving – or at least move slower than your income grows – is the only way to both be happy with what you have and ensure you don’t push beyond the limits of what you can handle.

    It requires two skills.

    One is the constant reminder that wealth is a two-part equation: what you have and what you expect/need. When you realize that each part is equally important, you realize that the overwhelming attention we pay to getting more and the negligible attention we put on managing expectations makes little sense, especially because the expectations side can be so much more in your control.

    The second is realizing that managing expectations doesn’t have to mean being conservative or unambitious. It’s just realizing that an insatiable appetite for more will always push you to the point of disappointment and regret – always, every single time. So having some ability to deny an extra dollar of work, or a potential opportunity, a bigger house or a nicer car, is essential if you want to use money to make a better life.

  145. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Jesse Livermore was one of the richest men in the world in 1929. By 1934 he was bankrupt – again – living off the money his wife saved from a previous marriage. “I am a failure,” he wrote, before shooting himself in a New York hotel.

    Livermore’s story – the greatest investor of all time whose success led to bigger bets that eventually ruined him, a process he repeated three times – is fascinating because he was the best in the world at making money and perhaps the worst at keeping it.

    By his own admission, the problem was rooted in past success increasing his appetite for future success. If he could double his money in a year, why not triple? If he could triple, why not quadruple? And so on until he went broke.

    Livermore wrote shortly before his death:

    I sometimes think that no price is too high for a speculator to pay to learn that which will keep him from getting the swelled head. A great many smashes by brilliant men can be traced directly to the swelled head – an expensive disease everywhere to everybody, but particularly in Wall Street.

  146. BRT says:

    https://twitter.com/iandprior/status/

    This teacher has balls of steel…I would call her a “strong woman”

  147. Phoenix says:

    Cameras prove cops lie, and there are more cameras out in the world today than ever before. While its depth is unknown, the scope of police lying is wide. Officers lie in high-profile cases and little-known cases, and lie by fabrication, omission, and exaggeration.

    Police officers lie when they or one of their colleagues kill. Officer Michael Slager, of North Charleston, South Carolina, claimed he fatally shot Walter Scott because he feared for his life after Scott grabbed his Taser and pointed it at him, but video showed Slager shooting him in the back from 17 feet away, then dropping his Taser by Scott’s body. After Chicago officer Jason Van Dyke shot Laquan McDonald 16 times, five cops claimed that McDonald lunged at Van Dyke with a knife, but the video showed the teenager walking away.

    They lie when they beat up people who were not resisting arrest. Officers Sean Courter and Orlando Trinidad of Bloomfield, New Jersey, claimed that Marcus Jeter hit one officer and tried to grab the other’s gun, but video showed the officers pulling him out of his car and immediately assaulting him. Five Marion, Florida, cops claimed Derrick Price resisted arrest, but video showed that he was on the ground surrendering with his hands up when the officers began punching and kicking him.

    They lie when they think no cameras are watching, like Reading, Pennsylvania, officer Jesus Santiago-DeJesus did when he smashed Marcelina Cintron-Garcia’s cell phone and arrested her on a false charge of assault after she filmed him during a traffic stop. They lie when they should know for certain that cameras are watching, like officers in Seabrook, New Hampshire, in Skokie, Illinois, and in Sweetwater, Florida, did when they slammed and injured suspects getting booked into their police stations, then falsely claimed the suspects had acted aggressively.

    https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/albertsamaha/blue-lies-matter

  148. Juice Box says:

    Heard that hospital CEO in Texas on the news earlier this week. He has a point, if you work with old people or at risk patients in a hospital you don’t want to be a carrier that kills them. Hospitals were the main source of Novid spread in the early days.

    Patient Zero in NJ was at Hackensack Medical in March of 2020. His name is James Cai. I know two people that died because a family member caught Covid in that Hospital early in the pandemic and brought it home with them….

  149. Juice Box says:

    Zuckerberg is working from home and will do so 1/2 the time.

    (CNN Business)Facebook is giving its employees more flexibility to work outside the office — and Mark Zuckerberg is leading by example.

    The Facebook CEO told employees in a memo Wednesday that he plans to work remotely for at least half of the next year, a company spokesperson confirmed to CNN Business. The memo was previously reported by the Wall Street Journal.
    “I’ve found that working remotely has given me more space for long-term thinking and helped me spend more time with my family, which has made me happier and more productive at work,” Zuckerberg wrote, according to the Journal.
    On Wednesday, Facebook (FB) said it would allow employees across all levels of the company to apply for remote work if their role allows them to do so. Employees who want to come back to the office can do so on a flexible basis but will be encouraged to spend at least half their time in the office, and employees can spend up to 20 working days in a year in a remote location.

    He posted some videos too if him using his “more space” for “long-term thinking” Apparently having 1400 acres in Hawaii gives you time to come up with creative ways to kill the competition…

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9668651/Mark-Zuckerberg-posts-bizarre-video-throwing-spears-wearing-ear-protectors.html

  150. 3b says:

    Pumps: I see you came back with your late night dose of diarrhea yesterday. You get mad, and then disappear for a few hours, and then come back late at night. And of course you lecture us again. Rinse and repeat.

  151. 3b says:

    Juice: Now you have done it!!

  152. Juice Box says:

    All I am saying is Zuckerberg is using his remote WFH time or is it work from Hawaii time to innovate and create. Some people think it cannot be done…..but Zuckerberg will kill Tim Cook and Apple one way or the other.

    BTW I will ante up ante up for the Apple conversation. Since the release of the iPhone in 2007 they went from 50 vice presidents to 100 vice presidents. Work force however increased 17,000 to 170,000. Not much has changed for the employees, there still is a large amount of turnover and really very little room or opportunity to move up. This whole idea that those 170,000 employees have to be in cubicle somewhere is not going to work. People will leave in droves. Studies now say people will forgo a $30k raise to not have to commute several hours a day….

  153. BRT says:

    Hospitals, subways, and food stores in March of 2020 were the primary drivers. Schools would have followed had we waited another 2 weeks.

    But the reality is, March 10th onward, the hoarders packing the foodstore with a line of 200 people back to back was probably the worst thing we could have let happen outside of the brilliant idea of sending positive patients to the nursing homes.

  154. 3b says:

    Juice: I understand what you are saying, put it does not fit with someone else’s
    mindset.

  155. Juice Box says:

    Shuttered office buildings everywhere, CEOs are now writing down their real estate losses.

    Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff said Monday that he expects half or more of his company’s employees to continue working from home after the pandemic.

    Despite hefty real estate investments in recent years, including opening the 61-floor Salesforce Tower in San Francisco in 2018, Benioff said he has accepted that there’s no return to the pre-Covid days. In an interview that aired on CNBC’s “Closing Bell,” Benioff said 50% to 60% of staffers will likely work from home, up from about 20% before the pandemic hit.

    “The past is gone,” Benioff said. “We’ve created a whole new world, a new digital future, and you can see it playing out today.”

    “Salesforce, which opened its 61-floor San Francisco tower in 2018, took $216 million in impairments last year tied to real estate that it was no longer occupying.”

  156. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Just like the suburbs were dead…you used to call me an idiot for how long for saying it’s not so…

    I know how this plays out. Give it a couple of years. It’s all good when your competition is remote (forced by pandemic), but when “in person” teams start wiping their a$$ with their remote competition, a lot of CEO’s that think they are cutting edge, are going to start realizing the truth. Too bad that your worker wants to stay home (nice of you to be so flexible), because your competition doesn’t, and you can’t compete with them in the long term. That’s how this plays out.

    So I don’t really care to listen to your position on WFH, because it’s wrong, just like you were with the idea that the burbs are dead. Competition says so.

    All we are doing is creating case studies on why only a select few can work remotely. Not the whole team.

  157. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Salesforce…lmao.

    Their whole growth model is predicated on getting businesses to work remotely.

  158. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Didn’t you tell me north jersey real estate was dead. You were wrong on that too. So save the WFH bs.

  159. The Great Pumpkin says:

    So enjoy the WFH experiment while it lasts, competition will shut it down in time. You just can’t beat an “in person” team with a “remote team.” If I have to tell you why, then you are lost in the woods. Understand, this is all that matters. Competitive edge is everything.

  160. Juice Box says:

    3b – there are now dozens of projects in NYC to convert office buildings to residential. They have already turned dozens of hotels into housing for the indigent. Who believes the tourists will be back soon? Anyone want to rent a room next to Johnny who is shooting up every day…. Over 200 NYC hotels have closed permanently. It is a disaster for commercial space that won’t correct anytime soon.

    Heck even curbed nyc shut down their online magazine.

    Bloomberg just published a piece about empty hotels and office buildings and property taxes. Nice graphic too.

    https://www.bloomberg.com/graphics/2021-ny-property-tax/

  161. The Great Pumpkin says:

    3b,

    It’s also fitting that you take a dump on what I shared last night. Why? It doesn’t measure up with your nostalgic feeling that the people living in the 1950’s had it better than today. Give it another read, and understand it. Start with this.

    “Warren Buffett once told a group of college students that they all lived better than John D. Rockefeller:

    I mean you’re warm in winter and cool in summer and can watch the World Series on TV. You can do anything in the world. You literally live better than Rockefeller. His unparalleled fortune couldn’t buy what we now take for granted, whether the field is—to name just a few—transportation, entertainment, communication or medical services. Rockefeller certainly had power and fame; he could not, however, live as well as my neighbors now do.”

  162. The Great Pumpkin says:

    If the sky is so dark for commercial real estate in nyc, when is my wife’s company’s stock price going to drop? How come it’s going up? It’s at 52 week high.

    This post was a shot at her company, right?

    Juice Box says:
    June 10, 2021 at 9:05 am
    3b – there are now dozens of projects in NYC to convert office buildings to residential. They have already turned dozens of hotels into housing for the indigent. Who believes the tourists will be back soon? Anyone want to rent a room next to Johnny who is shooting up every day…. Over 200 NYC hotels have closed permanently. It is a disaster for commercial space that won’t correct anytime soon.

  163. 3b says:

    Pumps: When did I ever say people living in the 1950s lived better? I said I’m the 1980s at least you could live on one salary, if one wanted. You want both people working today, in the office of course, to pay for your Wayne house when you sell it. You are off in the summer, all the other holidays and home at 3:00 and you want everyone commuting into the office everyday. So selfish on your part.

  164. leftwing says:

    Juice, not taking the other side of you but adding to your point…

    WFH is going to shake out where it does. Nobody knows.

    My point is the ramification to specific individuals….

    Of course corporates, if they feel they can effect it seamlessly, would opt for remote work. It’s cheaper for them, from real estate to geographic costs.

    Problem for the individuals is that once demonstrated the work can be done remotely why would the corporate stop with accommodating current employees at their domiciles at their salaries?

    MIT or Stanford grad on one of the coasts? Unless you are rock star category there are some very good grads from Illinois or GIT who will willingly take your place at 80% of your salary while residing in Highland Park or Buckhead.

    Oh wait, the person really doesn’t need to be near the office at all? How about that RPI grad willing to work for 2/3 of your salary in Lake George?

    Oh wait, if I can run these people successfully out of various US locations why not Eastern Europe…..

    WFH will ultimately benefit the corporate.

    Or stated differently if your job is so rote, unimaginative, and siloed that you don’t require any IRL contact with co-workers you have just defined the white collar equivalent of dishwasher.

    Notice to employees, including my own newly minted permanent employee son…choose which bucket you fall into carefully. It is a career choice.

  165. Phoenix says:

    “Warren Buffett once told a group of college students that they all lived better than John D. Rockefeller:
    You literally live better than Rockefeller.”

    Need a front end loader to remove this pile of horse crap.

  166. The Great Pumpkin says:

    The 50s or 80s, what difference does it make. You are missing the point of the article.

    3b says:
    June 10, 2021 at 9:54 am
    Pumps: When did I ever say people living in the 1950s lived better? I said I’m the 1980s

  167. Phoenix says:

    Children today are sitting in sweltering heat in their classrooms.

    Does Warren Buffet give a crap? Or Gates, Or Bezos.

    Or the boomers in their town. The same boomers that want the kids to shovel their 200 ft driveway for twenty bucks? Or to send them off at eighteen to fight wars in foreign countries while they sit in the comfort of their homes watching the Super Bowl while pounding beer after beer?

  168. The Great Pumpkin says:

    It’s the truth. We just keep moving the goal posts on our expectations of what we think is the good life.

    Phoenix says:
    June 10, 2021 at 10:04 am
    “Warren Buffett once told a group of college students that they all lived better than John D. Rockefeller:
    You literally live better than Rockefeller.”

    Need a front end loader to remove this pile of horse crap.

  169. The Great Pumpkin says:

    While taking for granted how good life really is.

  170. 3b says:

    Left: You are exactly right, and exactly why NYC area real estate prices are not justified. As for jobs that can or cannot be done WFH, the fact is many of them even the most creative ones can in many cases be done WFH. The technology is just amazing, where it all falls out I don’t know, but it’s not going back to pre- pandemic times. And that it will negatively affect both commercial and residential real estate in
    Many areas, especially the NYC area.

  171. 3b says:

    Pumps: Ah no I am not. You want everyone back in the office for one reason and one reason only.

  172. The Great Pumpkin says:

    3b, give it a rest. Just like you said north jersey real estate was dead for the past 10 years. Just keep doubling down.

  173. 3b says:

    Pumps: Give it a rest, just tell the class why you hate WFH.

  174. Phoenix says:

    Pumps.
    You have a good life. Way better than most. Enjoy it while it lasts. And I’m not talking about 1950 either.

    You have a lifestyle that others dream about.

    Then you go on about hating the homeless. Maybe on your 4 month hiatus instead of hanging out in Wayne you can go visit some and see how they got where they are.

    They might even fix you a nice slice of humble pie. I’d suggest you eat all of it.

  175. joyce says:

    Need help with a down payment? California Democrats want the state to chip in for homebuyers
    https://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/capitol-alert/article250735029.html

  176. Phoenix says:

    Joyce,

    It’s why I cannot embrace a Democrat any more than a Repub.

    “The state would serve as a “silent partner” to first-time owners, in exchange for up to 45% ownership of a house.”

    This is psycho level economics.

  177. Fast Eddie says:

    “The state would serve as a “silent partner” to first-time owners, in exchange for up to 45% ownership of a house.”

    Straight out of an Ayn Rand narrative. The modern democrat is unbalanced beyond belief.

  178. joyce says:

    The George H.W. Bush Foundation for U.S.-China Relations agreed to accept $5 million from a group with ties to the Chinese Communist Party and China’s international propaganda efforts, according to a report Saturday.

    https://www.axios.com/scoop-bush-family-nonprofits-5-million-deal-with-china-influence-group-886e7d7a-36c3-471b-a582-31b0c2e50eeb.html

    https://www.foxnews.com/politics/bush-nonprofit-5-million-china-group-communist-party

  179. Bystander says:

    Left,

    By the cheapeast rats nest in Paterson as primary address. Now, you live in a high cost area and demand higher pay…voila.

  180. Bystander says:

    I don’t even have to read d&pshits article about the 1950s because the basic premise is debt is wealth now. Back then, you lived within means of salary. You could see people with higher salaries as they had nicer cars. Today, every idiot gets a no down payment beamer. I would take that life over this one where people willing to take extreme debt position for show with Federal reserve printing trillions, ensuring that bill never comes due. You’ve also allowed the wealthiest to take it all…but your ride is nice.

  181. leftwing says:

    “…even the most creative [jobs] can in many cases be done WFH. The technology is just amazing…”

    3b, don’t disagree…..but one needs to differentiate between “can” and “should”…

    Industries are different are I don’t purport to speak for any specific industry than my own…but in that context I was involved in hiring and comp at all levels of my career right through to being on the MD Compensation Committee and the MD Promotion Committee…plus I also owned my own ‘hands-on’ type business referenced yesterday…

    In all situations the top performers – think 1+, 1-, and 2+ on a standard corporate 1-5 performance ranking bell curve – brought more to the organization than the sum total of their exemplary work. These intangibles are highly interpersonal and can’t be effectively accomplished on-line through Teams.

    The majority of the benefits flowed to these people – top of the compensation curve, top bonuses, early promotions, exposure to top execs, boondoggles, and just general job latitude. And, btw, on both the banking side and owned business these performers were rarely just ever sitting on their hands while there….

    The others? Employees ranked 5 quit or are fired, 4- we are trying to figure out if you should be exited or if you are worth salvaging into a (subpar) average employee….either way I don’t trust you while sitting in front of me with direct oversight so I’d have to be crazy to trust you remotely…..

    So that leaves employees in the fat part of the bell curve….the average employee…..As an employer why do I have any loyalty to a just average employee who basically states that he doesn’t want to be hands-on helping the underperformers nor does he want exposure to or work with the exemplary performers? Just give me my assignment and let me go to my (home) cubicle and don’t bother me?

    Fcuk that, if that’s the model I can hire twenty of you anywhere around the country (world) at a fraction of your cost and get the same output.

    Thank you for your input on WFH, you have just self-identified for me that you are setting your goal to top out as a C+ student. Here’s your secure credential for WFH and….I immediately turn to HR and say get me someone else and let’s open up geographically.

  182. Phoenix says:

    By the cheapeast rats nest in Paterson as primary address. Now, you live in a high cost area and demand higher pay…voila.

    With the money you save buy a bulletproof vest. Drive a cheap car that doesn’t stand out.

    And don’t even think about marrying, as no woman will want to live there very long.

  183. BRT says:

    lol, so does this “silent partner” pay half your property taxes? Do they chip in on repairs?

  184. Phoenix says:

    Bystander,
    The other thing is that luxury items used to be more expensive, but necessities were comparatively inexpensive.

    Housing, healthcare, etc cost less, televisions, etc, cost more.

    Today a family is one layoff from being put on the street. Sure there is a moratorium but that is only temporary-and that load was put on the landlord instead of the govt.

    America, the three legged stool, is wobbling.

  185. Phoenix says:

    “if that’s the model I can hire twenty of you anywhere around the country (world) at a fraction of your cost and get the same output”

    Why do Americans want to hire foreigners instead of their own people? If this is the case, lets open the borders now cause I know you can get laborers to build me a house for half the cost if I import them vs hiring an American.

    When is flag day again?

  186. Libturd says:

    Got really busy and had to take a few days off here.

    A lot of companies are targeting September for return to work. Most I’ve heard of are evaluating which positions work best from home. Lot’s of talk of hybrid and rotating schedules.

    My company is in no rush. We had our best six quarters by far working remotely. The key to our CEO’s address was that he was evaluating our need for expensive space in the city and realizes the difficulty that NYC workers suffer commuting and wants to balance this out.

    I see the dumb politics hasn’t stopped.

    I’m sure the likes of Pelosi and AOC are really stupid. So stupid that the Republicans are a former shell of what they were two years ago. My favorite quote from the most staunch conservative here “BidenIsTheGOAT says:
    “If you aren’t even interested in investigating then it tells me everything I need to know.” Insurrection investigation? Come on man. It’s way too easy. Though I’ll give you that Kamala is not impressive. Pelosi, who I hate probably as much as the right does, is the Mitch of the Left. Which one is dominating right now?

    Just got back from Restaurant Depot and their meat prices have gone up at least by 50%. I just paid 90 for a 19 pound brisket. Decided to save some money and bought 20 pounds of pork butt and a bunch of pork ribs. Beef is definitely shooting up in price.

    I have a big poker game on my deck on Saturday evening and we are participating in a meal train for a dad who died in town on Sunday as well as it’s a good neighbor’s birthday. So it looks like I’m gonna smoke 4 racks of ribs, a brisket and two butts. Good times ahead.

    If any of you fools (who are vaccinated) want to play poker Saturday night, let me know and get you the deets. Relaxing, drinking, shooting the sh1t from 5 to 8 and then it’s game on. Too cold to swim though.

  187. 3b says:

    Left: It will all play out as it plays out. It will be the young that reap
    The positives of WFH as well as the negatives. Simply believing that if all returned to pre- pandemic environment as one individual here believes is foolish . Companies were going with geographic agnostic office locations long before the pandemic. Out sourcing , has been going on for years, need accountants Sri Lanka is full of them, and yet Americans still get accounting degrees. I will put in a few more years and I am done. It

  188. leftwing says:

    Phoenix, I’m not suggesting we outsource overseas, I take the opposite stance all the time.

    That statement was in the context of the employee self selecting himself into that box….”I don’t need to be physically present I can do everything you require without being there”.

    If that is your view and you insist on it, why wouldn’t I go wider and cheaper to hire? That outcome is on you, not me.

    Which is why my first comment on this topic – including to my own son – was effectively be careful what you wish for. You may think you’re getting a benny at the expense of corporate, instead you just made a significant career choice by devaluing your worth to only the sum total of your specific output.

  189. No One says:

    The govt is already a silent partner in your home ownership. Take a $400k house paying $10k/yr in property taxes. The NPV (net present value) of 10k rising 2% annually into perpetuity, assuming a 3% discount rate is about $350k. Houses in NJ all carry this subterranean liability, for as I’ve said, nobody truly owns their home in NJ, you’re just renting it from the government.

  190. 3b says:

    Left: It may get to the point where the employee does not get to chose WFH , vs come into the office.

  191. Bystander says:

    “Just got back from Restaurant Depot and their meat prices have gone up at least by 50%.”

    Lib,

    I had a similiar discussion with husband of one youth soccer coaches this weekend. He runs a deli up in New Haven. Opened a month before COVID then had to shut it down. Could not take SBA loan as did not meet timeline of early Feb. He reopened and doing ok because in area of older folks but office lunch has been crushed. He said chicken was like $79 per before (don’t know quantity) and now paying 104 (I think). He said has to raise prices significantly. Buckle up for Fed’s “transitory” inflation

  192. 3b says:

    Bystander: Transitory my arse, new baseline.

  193. tripstar385 says:

    Left said “You may think you’re getting a benny at the expense of corporate, instead you just made a significant career choice by devaluing your worth to only the sum total of your specific output”

    I think that leadership, of any large organization (say 50+ employees) already thinks of ever single employee in this manner. The notable exception is front-office or employees paid solely/primarily on commission. For the “production staff” they know they are viewed this way and have agreed to be compensated via a formula that predictably and accurately accounts for the revenue created by the individual.

    If you do not have a precise and easily attributed revenue stream attached to your work, then you are a cost center. Perhaps smaller family based employers view the value of the individual and will consider non-revenue contributions to employment decisions. But for 90% of the work-force, being judged on the “sum-total” of your output is exactly how your hours/efforts are viewed by executive leadership.

  194. joyce says:

    Phoenix,

    Three legged stools cannot wobble ;-)

    I know the reference, only joking around.

  195. leftwing says:

    No one has defined ‘transitory’ adequately for me….are we going to take back wage increases next year? WTF?

    3b, lol, I think it may shake out eventually where cost center and low value added/average performing producers may well receive a suggestion they WFH and it won’t be a compliment.

    It will indicate exactly where you land on the food chain…..kind of like previously when a big project hit crunch time and you were told “you can head home if you want, we got it”……the corporate kiss of death…….you thought you were an indispensable 1- team player and just got a cold slap across the face that the office views you as a 3+ at best…..better dust off that resume…..

  196. leftwing says:

    “But for 90% of the work-force, being judged on the “sum-total” of your output is exactly how your hours/efforts are viewed by executive leadership.”

    I’d disagree….certainly not for IB revenue business units, the intangibles are incredibly important. Obviously they won’t overcome poor output performance but the number of individuals who could be ranked 1 on an objective output scale is higher than the slots available…plus the largest intangible is leadership….if you are not involved in mentoring, recruiting, instruction (if applicable), etc you will not be at the front of the line for raises, best bonuses, early promotion, and high profile assignments all of which form a self-reinforcing cycle….the more and better exposure you have the faster and higher you move.

    On the other side of the spectrum my small business had some ‘mission critical’ components…if they didn’t work at the exact time we needed them the entire operation was shut down…..Had one role (multiple of those responsibilities) for which we had three employees…..everyone produced the baseline, they would be gone if they didn’t…..one guy was so good he could have anything he wanted, if he were able to be there 100% of time I would never need to show up…..another guy, if he had the opening shift, yeah, I would head down just to make sure everything was alright for the day, leave, and then come back later for the rest of the day….

    Intangibles are the differentiating factor…..
    Both had the same output, there was a huge performance difference between the two for me based on the trust and confidence each one built up….

  197. Libturd says:

    Surprised there’s no chatter on the “United States Innovation and Competition Act,” or USICA funding that was just passed?

    You know, the one where we spend a quarter trillion trying to keep up with China? The n0n-partisan bill even positively approved by Mitch McConnell and Chuck Schumer?

    Wait! The Dems want to invite China over for lunch.

    The idiocy and focus on politics here is pretty stupid at times.

  198. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Holy sh!t!! I’m on cloud nine. Cathie Wood is on the pumpkin train. I can’t believe my eyes. How long was I calling for the roaring 20s 2.0 based on the context of the last paragraph quoted below.

    “Cathie Wood agrees with Fundstrat’s Tom Lee that a demographic boom led by millennials will drive the stock market higher for years to come”

    “Ark Invest’s Cathie Wood’s agrees with Tom Lee and his recent note that a demographic boom driven by millennials will power the stock market higher for years to come.

    Wood made the comments in a webinar on Tuesday, in which she said, “I agree with Tom Lee. We are in a magnificent period for equities. The bull market has broadened out and it has strengthened. And we believe it has duration.

    Wood was referencing a note from Lee that was published las week, in which he detailed the demographic rise of millennials as they enter their prime age in terms of earnings growth. That will help fuel the formation of families and the purchases of homes and vehicles, all of which represent a considerable multiplier for economic growth, according to the note.”

    https://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/stock-market-outlook-demographic-boom-cathie-wood-fundstrat-tom-lee-2021-6-1030505186

  199. chicagofinance says:

    Occam’s Razor
    https://finance.yahoo.com/quote/%5ETNX?p=%5ETNX

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    June 10, 2021 at 9:14 am
    If the sky is so dark for commercial real estate in nyc, when is my wife’s company’s stock price going to drop? How come it’s going up? It’s at 52 week high.

  200. The Great Pumpkin says:

    You better believe I feel good right now!! Boom!! Yippee ki-yay…!!

  201. chicagofinance says:

    BTW the UST 10 is a coiled spring…… we are pushing up at support at 147…. note, I am looking at bond prices not yield, although I quote yield.

    As an aside, this development is absolutely crazy…… WTF is happening?

  202. leftwing says:

    “The idiocy and focus on politics here is pretty stupid at times.”

    Looks like you’re trying to pick a fight and getting no takers… ;)

    Me, I’ll stick to real estate and economics today…..

    chi, yeah, puzzling….lots of foreign money? Fed dropping $120B on other liquid assets squeezing others out? The annular eclipse this morning? who the fcuk knows…..

    I’m eyeballing 1.35, that would be a loud signal to me…..

  203. chicagofinance says:

    I need to calculate the impairment of failing to expediently scroll past all of Pump’s posts….

    Juice Box says:
    June 10, 2021 at 8:43 am
    “Salesforce, which opened its 61-floor San Francisco tower in 2018, took $216 million in impairments last year tied to real estate that it was no longer occupying.”

  204. chicagofinance says:

    It’s breaking through 147….fcuk….. I guess this week’s auction are over and the CPI didn’t scare everyone…..

    leftwing says:
    June 10, 2021 at 2:06 pm
    chi, yeah, puzzling….lots of foreign money? Fed dropping $120B on other liquid assets squeezing others out? The annular eclipse this morning? who the fcuk knows…..

    I’m eyeballing 1.35, that would be a loud signal to me…..

  205. The Great Pumpkin says:

    I was saying this as early as 2011. This makes me even more confident in her analysis. She gets it.

    Keep thinking the pandemic is pushing this hot housing market…lmao. No idea how people think that’s the reason for this runup.

    “We think that this demographic shift also is a boon for housing, of course, and crypto, which is the millennials new asset class,” Wood concluded.

  206. No One says:

    Well if Cathie predicts something, then some people thinks that makes it even better than true. Weird how young people are interested in investing alongside an elderly mystic spouting tall tales, as well as getting into electronic ponzi schemes and online betting.

  207. 3b says:

    Left: Don’t know how it all plays out, save to say, Millennials see the corporate World differently. They will eventually be running these companies as well. As far as being indispensable, I have found over the years that no one is. And the ones who believe they are , are usually first to go.

  208. leftwing says:

    Auction was nutty, think I heard dealers only got filled at 15%…….can that be right….

  209. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Just like the hippies became the most ruthless capitalists on the planet.

    When they see that their business performs better (aka makes more money) with an in person workforce, they will change their tune of wanting to work from home.

    3b says:
    June 10, 2021 at 2:19 pm
    Left: Don’t know how it all plays out, save to say, Millennials see the corporate World differently. They will eventually be running these companies as well. As far as being indispensable, I have found over the years that no one is. And the ones who believe they are , are usually first to go.

  210. leftwing says:

    “Don’t know how it all plays out, save to say…”

    Agree with you there, will be interesting to see…

    “Millennials see the corporate World differently…”

    GenZ too…makes for a real nice little window of an arbitrage opportunity for some 20-something if he can see the hole to run through…..

    If I were in my 20s at GS or another quality company ‘insisting’ on back to work with everyone else pushing back, oh man……I would be the first guy scheduling face to face meetings as far up the food chain as was appropriate with a nicely groomed message along the lines of “I joined for the culture and quality of this organization which has far exceeded my wildest expectations. I want you to know that being physically here is an inextricable part of that experience for me. I am 24/7 in. When do I start and can I pick up any slack from others.”

    LOL, in three years I can assure you I’m a level higher and 2x comped than my contemporaries who got to enjoy lunch at home in their shorts.

    In terms of life tradeoffs, I’ll take the former every time.

  211. leftwing says:

    Chi, really not digging the last two months of sideways headline equity values with all the churning under the surface…..rarely short the market, other than to hedge, but with vol coming in appreciably I’m going to poke around tonight on some short alternatives maybe…….

    Feels like a move coming….just don’t know which way lol

  212. JCer says:

    On the topic of the 1950’s. You cannot point to the fact that everyone has nicer things and an iPhone as better quality of life. People had less stuff but in many ways were better off, single income could afford a home, people had job security and more career opportunities, education was far less expensive, retirement wasn’t self funded(pensions!). If you look at it even looking at the inflation number which doesn’t account for the real inflation drivers(effectively inflation is underestimated) and consider single income vs 2 and consider all of the other stuff people today must hold back from their income, retirement, college expense(or student loans), healthcare expense, etc you’ll see that they were actually much more secure back then and didn’t borrow like drunken sailors to fund a lifestyle they could not afford which is exactly what today’s middle class has been doing. Not only that in 1950’s you could get a decent job with no formal education or training.

    Yes today if you have money you can live significantly better than someone from the 50’s but it doesn’t consider the perilous financial situation today’s middle class puts themselves in to live that decent lifestyle nor the fact that the expense load is compulsory not optional, no amount of frugal living is going to make up the difference it simply isn’t possible to live on a single factory workers income, the base expenses have gone up tremendously. I mean we live in NJ home of 15k property taxes on a cape cod for cripes sake.

  213. 3b says:

    Pumps: No they won’t, that’s what you want, and the comparison to 1960s hippies is ironic I would say, but typical for you.

  214. The Great Pumpkin says:

    From Bloomberg

    Yes, Real Estate Prices Are Soaring, and No, It’s Not a Bubble
    ● Stricter lending standards have reduced risk in the market.

    https://apple.news/AJNVv611TSrW6LkQfiX3UIw

  215. The Great Pumpkin says:

    The parallels are hard to ignore: the record prices, the bidding wars, the subdivisions that fill up as soon as they’re built, the resourceful buyer who clinched a deal by dropping off cupcakes that matched the home’s interior paint colors. Today’s real estate market feels a lot like the bubble market circa 2006. “The numbers don’t make sense. How do you make a rational offer on a house when you have irrational people in the game?” asks James Carmer, a software engineer who’s toured more than 100 houses in Austin.

    So are we staring at another housing bubble? One hopes not, because when the last one burst, it triggered a global financial crisis and what at the time was the deepest economic downturn since the Great Depression. For most Americans, a home is their most valuable asset—as well as the collateral for a pile of debt. If housing goes down, so does the economy. “Real estate is suddenly pretty bubbly in almost every interesting market in the world,” said bearish investor Jeremy Grantham at a recent Morningstar Inc. investment conference in Sydney. “Eventually there’ll be a day of reckoning.”
    To figure out whether U.S. housing is due for a correction requires digging into a hundred factors, from the rate of household formation to the output of lumber mills. And it’s unclear in which direction those signals are pointing.

    There’s one very big difference between then and now, though: Mortgage loans are much harder to get. An index of mortgage credit availability reached almost 870 in June 2006. This March it was just 125. Lenders have raised lending standards even beyond the requirements of the Dodd-Frank Act of 2010, which was passed in response to the financial crisis. Loans are smaller in proportion to house values and borrowers’ income. Borrowers’ average credit scores are higher. And you can’t bluff your way into homeownership with a no-doc or low-doc loan—i.e., one that allows you to attest to your creditworthiness without providing full documentation.

  216. SmallGovConservative says:

    leftwing says:
    June 10, 2021 at 12:59 pm
    “No one has defined ‘transitory’ adequately for me….”

    As I think about it, for the inflation that we’re currently experiencing to be transitory, it would need to be due almost entirely to two factors: supply chain disruptions due to the closing of the global economy, and excess consumer demand strictly as a result of the reopening of the economy. I assume that supply chains will smooth out organically over some period of months. But consumer demand has been so massively juiced by govt stimulus, and govt appears so afraid to reduce the stimulus, that I don’t see excess demand (and hence inflation) disappearing any time soon — absent some massive shock to the system (covid re-emergence, war, stock market crash).

  217. BRT says:

    lol, CNN brought back Jeffry Toobin. Why? Can’t you just replace him with someone that doesn’t whack it on zoom meetings? In every other industry, he’d be blacklisted for life.

  218. dentss dunnigan says:

    According to some estimates, unemployment fraud during the pandemic could ‘easily reach $400 billion,’ as states weren’t prepared for the unprecedented wave of unemployment claims

  219. Phoenix says:

    LW,

    I know you take the opposite stance.

    It’s too bad the people in power don’t.

  220. 3b says:

    So lending standards are tougher and that means there is no bubble. Thanks that’s all
    We need to know.

  221. Phoenix says:

    Ars Technica: Biggest health insurer plans to deny ER bills if it doubts you had an emergency.
    https://arstechnica.com/science/2021/06/biggest-health-insurer-plans-to-deny-er-bills-if-it-doubts-you-had-an-emergency/

  222. Ez says:

    2:40 people today have a lot more stuff and much larger homes overall than the fifties.
    There were some really nice homes built in pre and post WW2 America but they are often smaller than families today are expecting. The great suburban migration into the south and southwest have yielded some real material gains for Americans. But yeah there is a price to be paid. It doesn’t appear to be sustainable.

  223. Brt says:

    Something weird is going on in the car market. I saw an ad for the dealer financing new purchases for people earning 10 dollars an hour. Also know of a teacher who was fired because he went looney. Guy got out of the looney bin, goes to Bloomfield, somehow finances 2 BMWs. He has no job.

  224. Brt says:

    Dents, I know of 5 cases of unemployment fraud personally

  225. joyce says:

    grim,
    if possible, release my post from moderation. thank you

  226. joyce says:

    NJ state gov trying to require state mandated funds to cover the cost of medical cannab!s:
    Catastrophic Illness in Children Relief Fund
    Pharmaceutical Assistance to the Aged and Disabled (PAAD) program
    Senior Gold Prescr!ption Discount Program
    Victims of Crime Compensation Office (VCCO)

    At least the article points out that NJ has the highest costs for that product largely due to a slow expansion of the program that has kept competition to a minimum as demand skyrocketed. I wonder if they ever considered, you know, actually expanding the program to increase competition.

  227. No One says:

    BRT, what’s the PC word for looney? “Differently realitied”?

    I remember hearing about a recently IPO’d finance company that claims they can use “AI” to make superior subprime car loans. Sounds like horse manure to me. They have been rapidly growing their loans though. Open Lending Corp.

    But lots have gotten into the subprime car lending party. Mainly because people tend to default on other debts earlier than their car loans.
    https://www.autonews.com/finance-insurance/modeling-alternative-data-ai-help-lenders-pandemic

  228. Brt says:

    I suspect they’d be happy to seize the car back with these sky high used car prices.

  229. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Bingo. That was the point of the article had people actually read it. We keep moving the goal posts on what we deem “satisfactory.” No one is telling you to have all this stuff. If you want a one income household, drastically cut back to the lifestyle deemed “satisfactory” for an 80’s family. You will realize you don’t need much money if you find that lifestyle satisfactory.

    Ez says:
    June 10, 2021 at 5:44 pm
    2:40 people today have a lot more stuff and much larger homes overall than the fifties.
    There were some really nice homes built in pre and post WW2 America but they are often smaller than families today are expecting. The great suburban migration into the south and southwest have yielded some real material gains for Americans. But yeah there is a price to be paid. It doesn’t appear to be sustainable.

  230. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Like Buffett said, you are living better than Rockefeller (minus the fame and fortune) did, but take it for granted. Stuff he would have given all the money for, like a central air system in a heatwave. Fresh meat thanks to refrigerators. Kumamoto oysters available on the regular on the east coast. Life is good.

  231. 3b says:

    Pumps: Now it’s an 80s family. Seriously, you need help, therapy, meds a combination of both, but you seriously need help.

  232. 3b says:

    100 percent cash out refis are out there too.

  233. The Great Pumpkin says:

    3b, take a deep breath, it’s going to be okay. You were wrong before and will be wrong again. It’s your nature. Just accept it.

  234. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Your utopia, where WFH is the norm, and real estate is cheap is nothing more than a dream. Wake up, and smell the coffee.

  235. The Great Pumpkin says:

    Why in the world would real estate ever become cheap in the NYC metro area? It’s inevitable that the human population will fill dense metro areas like this at the expense of rural areas. So give me one good long term reason this area won’t be valued?

  236. The Great Pumpkin says:

    You think Amazon is strategically buying up any large commercial real estate they can in north jersey? Is that because this area is dying and everyone is leaving due to the high cost/high tax location? Why are they investing if this is the case?

  237. 3b says:

    Pump: You are where you are because of your spouse. You hate WFH because it’s a threat to your cushy lifestyle. You care nothing about other people and their quality of life. You need help. And on that note I am back to ignoring you. I know you will do all you can to provoke me, which is your MO. I just have to take the high road and ignore you.

  238. The Great Pumpkin says:

    My wife toured the work being completed by Penn station. Crazy what they are doing. LIRR etc.. She took a tour of the new Facebook campus, and whatever they say in the papers, their investment in nyc says otherwise. That’s all I can say.

  239. Ez says:

    9:11 Facebook CEO plans to wfh for another six months.

  240. Juice box says:

    Pumps – I post rail and bus ridership all the time. News is ridership has not recovered. BILLIONs in bailouts for the MTA directly from the FED and now more $$$ from congress. You can bet next year they will be asking for more.

    WAKE ME UP WHEN THE TOURISTS RETURN TO NYC….

  241. chicagofinance says:

    As a one factor model, yes, but on an absolute basis, the bullet (and by extension the party that posted it) is patently naïve and stupid.

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    June 10, 2021 at 3:26 pm
    From Bloomberg

    Yes, Real Estate Prices Are Soaring, and No, It’s Not a Bubble
    ● Stricter lending standards have reduced risk in the market.

  242. chicagofinance says:

    You reside here.

    The Great Pumpkin says:
    June 10, 2021 at 9:05 pm
    So give me one good long term reason this area won’t be valued?

  243. JCer says:

    Pumps, I really need to stop replying but NYC has lost value in the past. NYC is one of the most important metro areas in the world and it will almost certainly continue to be but that does not mean in absolute terms appreciation in the short term nor does it mean that it’s importance cannot diminish in the future. I think you’ll find a lot of folks posting here have a bigger investment in the region than you do but it doesn’t make them blind to risk and the potential impact of disastrous tax policies. Yes tech companies are interested in moving(we have the largest tech workforce outside of Silicon Valley) in but they are replacing banks who are shedding staff, it remains to be seen if the effects of the changes taking place in the local economy are negative, positive, or neutral.

    I also really doubt these claims that the avg schmuck lives better than Rockerfeller did. Regardless of technological innovations, what really contributes to quality of life? Listen my house was built in the 1920’s short of computers,TV and air-conditioning what do I have that is better than what they had? They had servants, just think of that alone, all of the time consuming stuff we have to do they had someone to do it for them, they didn’t cook, clean, do landscaping, home maintenance, etc. I assure you Rockerfeller had a series of nice homes, ate quality food, traveled and lived quite well. Have you seen places like Hearst Castle? Industrialists at the beginning of the 20th century lived quite a bit better than the average American today even with TV, computers and air conditioning. Does the average American live in a place like this….

    https://hudsonvalley.org/historic-sites/kykuit-the-rockefeller-estate/

    or this
    https://www.townandcountrymag.com/leisure/a22575207/rockefeller-family-private-playhouse/

    and there were many others. Maybe Buffet should stick to what he knows and it’s not the lifestyle of early 20th century robber Barrons.

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